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Peter Harrington

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A treatise on Harmony: containing The Chief Rules for Composing in Two, Three, and Four Parts. Dedicated to all Lovers of Musick, by an Admirer of this Agreeable Science. The Second Edition, Alter’d, Enlarg’d,and Illustrated with Examples in Notes.

PEPUSCH, Johann Christoph. Landscape octavo (206 x 110 mm) Contemporary diced Russia, flat spine attractively gilt, compartments formed by a gilt dotted lozenge and quatrefoil roll enclosing a sunflower tool, panel of a concentric roundel roll gilt to the sides, gilt edge-roll, and endpapers marbled. Housed in mid-brown morocco-backed blue cloth drop-back box, title gilt to the spine, single gilt rule to the spine edges. A little rubbed, corners just through, front joint starting but entirely sound, corresponding hinge a touch open, but strong, light browning throughout, occasional staining, overall a very nice copy indeed. 4 plates of tables, pp.109-227 musical notation, wood-cut head- and tail-pieces, errata leaf in facsimile on old paper. First edition thus. Pepusch (1666/7-1752) is best known as the "composer" of Gay's The Beggar's Opera (1728); "he was almost certainly in charge of the music for John Gay's The Beggar's Opera, which opened on 29 January 1728. He composed the overture and may have had a hand in arranging the airs; that the musically inept basses in the printed edition are a reflection of his work seems unlikely" (ODNB). He was certainly a composer of some distinction whose large body of theatre, church, vocal and instrumental music met with deserved success. He also developed a considerable reputation as a teacher and theorist with a keen interest in ancient music, he has one of the founders of the Academy of Ancient Music in 1726: "In 1730 A Treatise on Harmony was published anonymously. According to Hawkins [Hawkins, "Life of Dr. Pepusch, the Famous Musical Composer", Universal Magazine of Knowledge and Pleasure (1778)] it was the work of Pepusch's student James Hamilton, Viscount Paisley and later seventh earl of Abercorn, and published without his permission. It probably illustrates elements of Pepusch's teaching, and the revised version which appeared the following year may have been done with Pepusch's assistance" (ODNB), musical examples having been added to illustrate the Pepusch's "chief rules". In 1737 Pepusch was appointed organist at the Charterhouse, moving into an apartment in the grounds, in later life he "retired from composition and devoted himself mainly to the the study and performance of ancient music. [This] his most important theoretical work represents a last ditch attempt to restore solmization as a basis for the instruction of harmonic theory" (New Grove, 2001, 19, p.326). Neat, near contemporary ownership inscription of Jas. Adcock to the first blank, a few pencilled marginalia to the text. Adcock (1778-1860) was a choral singer and director, he joined the choir of St. George's Chapel, Windsor in 1786, also that of Eton College Chapel, being appointed a lay clerk of both institutions. Shortly afterwards he resigned from both and went to Cambridge, where he was admitted to the choirs of Trinity, St. John's and King's Colleges, become master of choristers of the last. He published a number of glees, and is also credited with a volume entitled The Rudiments of Singing, "with about thirty solfeggi to assist persons wishing to sing at sight" (Grove, 1908, I, p.41). Fairly uncommon on the market, this a particularly pretty and well-preserved copy.
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Hedylus.

H.D. [i.e. Hilda Doolittle.] Octavo. Original black cloth-backed orange paper boards, spine lettered in gilt with "Blackwell" imprint at foot, pictorial device stamped in black to front board depicting four pillars supporting a lintel (lettered 'HEDYLUS') surrounding a plinth-supported herm. No dust jacket issued. Bookplate of Dorothy Wood to front free endpaper, with facing typewritten slip laid onto pastedown stating: "In memory of Dorothy Wood, M.A. (Oxon) of Canterbury who died in Konya, Turkey 4th December 1967". Spine very slightly slanted, head bruised, top of book block spotted, in all a near-fine copy. First edition, first impression, UK issue. In all 775 copies were printed, of which 750 were for sale in the UK and US; 520 copies were sent to Houghton Mifflin (who published on 19 October 1928), making this one of the 225 copies sent to Basil Blackwell (published 26 January 1929). H.D. (1886-1961) was "a key figure in the international Imagist movement of the early 20th century and in modernism more broadly: both through her own poetry and through her editing and dissemination of the work of others. As well as her imagistic pieces, she wrote complex longer poems (most published during her lifetime), translation, essays, reviews, outlines for films, and autobiographical novels which are, like most of her work, explorations of the self" (Orlando). H.D. referred to Hedylus, her anti-Oedipal Hellenistic comedy, as a "psychobiography". Considered highly unconventional novel in its use of word-play, symbolic structures, and manipulation of myth, the novel follows the female protagonist Hedyle and her son, Hedylus, on their quest for identity and purpose. Provenance: in its online catalogues the University of Birmingham lists one Dorothy Wood of Konya as the previous owner of a Justinian follis now in the P. D. Whitting collection of Byzantine coins (date of ownership given as 5 July 1965). It is likely that this is the same owner as that of the present copy, which is fitting given the classical focus of H.D.'s writings in general, and of Hedylus in particular. Boughn A10a.ii.
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An Account of the Basalts of Saxony, with observations on the origin of Basalt in general. Translated, with notes, by P. Neill, F.R.S.E. & F.L.S., secretary to the Wernerian Natural History Society.

DAUBUISSON, J. F. Octavo (211 x 127 mm). Contemporary half calf by J. Mathison of Aberdeen (with his ticket), smooth spine divided by paired gilt fillets, black label, blind arrow-head roll to sides and corners, "Spanish" pattern marbled paper sides, red speckled edges. Spine and extremities a little rubbed, a few chips to head of spine, joints cracked but firm, map with professional repair to split fold, scattered foxing, old library label to foot of spine. A very good copy. Engraved folding map of the Saxon Erzgebirge. First edition in English of Daubuisson's Mémoire sur les basaltes de Saxe (Paris: Courcier, 1803). The translator and editor was Patrick Neill (1776-1851), Scottish naturalist and printer. Jean-François Daubuisson (1769–1841), geologist and engineer, published numerous papers on geology, mining and hydraulics, and is best known for his textbooks, Traité de géognosie and Traité d'hydraulique. "He studied geology and mineralogy in Freiburg with Abraham Werner, the key proponent of Neptunism, the theory that all rocks had an aqueous origin. Later in his career Daubuisson was to side with the Plutonists, who argued that basalts formed from molten rock. However, in this paper. he describes his observations of the basalts of Saxony and argues that they, and all basalts, are sedimentary. [and] provides a fascinating insight into this discredited but once influential theory of the Earth" (Cambridge University Press ed. 2014). Provenance: pretty engraved armorial bookplate of W. Burnett of the Burnetts of Aberdeen (crest a dexter hand with a pruning knife pruning a vine tree); later ink signature-stamp and pencilled ownership inscriptions of Dr A. M. Cockburn, who gave his name to the Cockburn Geological Museum, University of Edinburgh, pencilled note on front free endpaper and the inscription "from R. Hart, Sept. 1945"; Hart was elected a member of the Mineralogical Society in the same year as Cockburn (1934).
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Arabian Days. An Autobiography.

PHILBY, Harry St John Bridger. Octavo. Original blue cloth, title gilt to spine, three-quarter profile portrait in gilt to the front board. With the unclipped dust jacket. Light shelf-wear, spine mildly sunned through the jacket, free endpapers browned, text-block toned, a very good copy in a slightly rubbed jacket. Portrait frontispiece and 48 plates. First edition, second impression, two months after the first. Inscribed, quoting the first line of Dante's Divina Commedia, on the front free endpaper, "To Catherine Boyle with the author's homage to one so happily met "nel mezzo dei cammin di nostra vita [in the middle of our life's journey]!", H. St. J. B. Philby, 20/3/50". Excellent copy of "the remarkable story of Philby's transformation from an official of the Indian Civil Service into an anti-imperialist, converted Muslim, confidant and agent of Ibn Saud" (Foreign Affairs, October 1949). Later ownership inscription of Hasan Karmi, Palestinian linguist and broadcaster. Karmi's family fled the 1948 Nakba settling, perhaps counter-intuitively in Golders Green, and joined the BBC's Arabic Service, becoming a "stalwart as a language supervisor, rationalising the babel of often poor or indifferent Arabic he found on his arrival" (ODNB), and serving as a broadcaster for nearly 40 years. He retired and returned to the Middle East in 1989, choosing to concentrate on his various dictionary projects, and over time becoming embittered with events in the region; "He was not a man to tangle with with: disagreement with him tended to convince him one was either thick or anti-Arab. He had trodden an ostensibly apolitical path through a practical and pragmatic life, but his soul burned for Palestine and the indignities visited upon the Arab people" (Guardian obituary, 7 May 2007). Attractive copy with an appealing provenance.
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Images de la Vie des Prisonniers de Guerre. 24 Estampes Coloriées par E. L. Boucher. Texte de Mario Meunier. Préface de Pierre Mac-Orlan.

BOUCHER, Lucien. Quarto. Original cream paper-covered boards with title in red and black and mounted pochoir illustration to the front board, grey marbled endpapers. Housed in a custom cloth solander box. A few splash marks to spine of box, pale toning to periphery of covers, light bump to one corner. An excellent copy. 43 leaves of light card each mounted on calque paper stubs, 21 with full-page hand-coloured wood-engraved illustrations, one with a double-page hand-coloured panorama of the camp, the remaining text leaves with decorative borders all with tonal tints or spot colour. First and only edition, number 72 of 175 copies "sur papier de luxe". An extremely delicately produced piece, with each leaf mounted on a thin paper stub, unsurprisingly just five copies on OCLC - BnF, Universitäts- und Landesbibliothek Münster, Dartmouth College, Yale, and NLA - and no copies traced at auction. A superb eyewitness record, in words and pictures, of incarceration at the prisoner of war camp at Merseburg in Saxony, written, illustrated and published by three inmates. In his preface Mac-Orlan justly privileges Boucher's "beautiful, melancholy and malicious" images, for giving an impression of the camp that is "so striking and so honest as to be almost inexplicable [si saisissante et si loyale qu'elle semble inexplicable]", singling out in particular that of "the closed washroom door, with enamelled iron water jugs smudged with black spots, awaiting, like fox terriers in front of a rat, opening hour [la porte des lavabos fermés, les brocs-à-eau en fer émaillé, maculés de taches noires attendant, tels des fox terriers devant un rat, l'heure de l'ouverture des portes]". Boucher has received very little recognition for the inspired illustration work that he undertook during the 1920s, most of it for his former fellow inmate Seheur, who, during a brief publishing career - brought to a premature end by the French crisis of 1934 - also produced books illustrated by Vlaminck and Utrillo. The third of these "three comrades who represented the French soul and its marvellous gaiety [representent l'âme française et sa merveilleuse gaîté]" during the "darkest calamities" at Merseburg, Mario Meunier, who was responsible for "the essential words, those that had to be said", became after the War one of France's foremost translators and interpreters of ancient Greek culture. A wonderfully humane account of the prisoner of war experience during the First World War, at present sadly virtually unknown, and surely deserving of wider recognition. Harris & Edelstein, En guerre: French Illustrators and World War I, The University of Chicago Library (2014), 23/24.
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Observations on Mount Vesuvius, Mount Etna, and other Volcanos: in a Series of Letters, addressed to the Royal Society. To which are added, Explanatory Notes by the Author, hitherto unpublished. A New Edition.

HAMILTON, Sir William. Octavo (187 x 115 mm). Contemporary tree sheep sometime neatly rebacked with the original red label laid down, border of gilt chevrons to sides. Binding just a little rubbed, slight wear to corners, closed-tear to map professionally repaired. A very good well-margined copy. 6 engraved plates (including thre folding map of the Bay of Naples and surrounding country). First published in 1772 and again in the following year. "While stationed at Naples, Hamilton developed a great interest in volcanoes, earning a contemporary European reputation as 'the modern Pliny' and the 'professor of earthquakes'. 'I am mad on the subject of volcanoes', he wrote to Greville on 3 March 1778. Vesuvius erupted several times during Hamilton's years in Naples, especially in 1767, 1779, and 1794, and on each occasion he made careful observations. Elected a fellow of the Royal Society in 1766, he submitted to the society many observations and drawings of active volcanoes, which were published in the Philosophical Transactions over the period 1767 to 1795. Among his subjects were volcanic eruptions, volcanic soil, and electrical thunderstorms. In 1767 and 1770 he shipped a large number of volcanic rock, ash, and lava specimens from Vesuvius to London; some survive at the Natural History Museum, Kensington" (ODNB). Provenance: attractive engraved armorial bookplate of Parick Heron of Heron (c. 1736-1803), Whig MP, cousin of James Boswell by his second marriage and, like Hamilton, a member of the Society of Antiquaries of Edinburgh; later ink signature-stamp and pencilled ownership inscriptions of Dr A. M. Cockburn, who gave his name to the Cockburn Geological Museum, University of Edinburgh.
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Becket. Original final script for the 1964 film, actor Michael Miller’s working copy. [Title:] SF 83083 Wallis-Paramount-Hazen. Becket. Final Script. May 1, 1963.

FILM.) ANOUILH, Jean & Lucienne Hill. Quarto. Red grained wrappers titled on front cover "Becket", title page present. 155 leaves, last page of text numbered 154. Mechanically reproduced, bound internally with two silver flat crimped brads; business label of the Enid Shaw script bureau (London) to inside back cover. A few nicks to wrappers otherwise an excellent copy. Becket, starring Richard Burton and Peter O'Toole, was based on Jean Anouilh's 1959 play and garnered the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay (Edward Anhalt), three Baftas (Best Colour Photography, Best Set Design in Colour, Best Costume Design), Best Film from the National Board of Review of Motion Pictures and two Golden Globes (Best Drama, Best Actor in a Drama: Peter O'Toole); it received a total of 11 Academy Award nominations. Actor Michael Miller's copy, with three original call sheets for location shooting at Alnwick Castle, stage and studio lot (dated variously between27 July 63 and 9 August 1963); colour souvenir program (24 pp., wire-stitched as issued); original contract with Paramount (13 leaves, carbon typescript on onionskin stock, dated 5/1/63, corner-stitched). Miller (d. 1987), who took the role of one of Henry's barons, was a stalwart of British television, with roles in The Prisoner (1967), Doctor Who (1963) and The Three Musketeers (1966), his screen credits including The Charge of the Light Brigade (1968) and cult horror flick Eye of the Devil (1966), opposite Deborah Kerr, David Niven and newcomer Sharon Tate.
Gun Fodder.

Gun Fodder.

SNOOK, J. F. Octavo. Original salmon pink cloth, spine and front cover lettered in black. With the dust jacket, designed by Dorothy Burroughes. Jacket spine toned, a few nicks, chips and small tears, spine of binding cocked, touch of foxing to edges of book block. An excellent copy, clean, sound and sharp-cornered. First edition, first impression, of this "grim and intensely realistic picture of the war as seen through the eyes of a typical British 'tommy'" (jacket blurb). John Francis Snook (1897-1970) was born in Limehouse and worked in a factory in the East End before enlisting in 1914, aged 17. He served with the Essex Regiment throughout the war, seeing action at Loos, Ypres and the Somme. In 1917 he received the DCM and was promoted to lance-corporal in charge of a Lewis gun section; after Arras and Cambrai he ended the war as a sergeant. The blurb states that after the war Snook became known as an "active political worker and a passionate anti-war propagandist and organiser". In 1927 he published To Hell with War! (as J. Snook) originally put out by The National Committee for the Declaration of Ex-Servicemen Against War (Library Hub cite this under "Snooks"). In his Foreword, Snook acknowledges the assistance of the popular novelist George Goodchild ("for his kindly and valuable advice in preparing this book for the press") and the illustrator Michael Boland ("for his encouragement"); the latter went on to illustrate the first edition of Geoffrey Trease's left-wing reworking of the Robin Hood legend in Bows against the Barons (1934). Copies in the striking dust jacket designed by Dorothy Burroughes - showing the devil prodding automata-like Tommies toward the mouth of an enormous gun - are particularly uncommon. Not in Lengel.
Hand-book of London. Past and Present. A new edition corrected and enlarged.

Hand-book of London. Past and Present. A new edition corrected and enlarged.

CUNNINGHAM, Peter. Octavo (186 x 122 mm). Mid-20th-century red half morocco by Bayntun, spine gilt lettered direct and decoratively tooled in compartments, red cloth sides, marbled endpapers, top edge gilt. A few very small ink splashes to front cover, contents with occasional minor blemish but generally clean. An excellent copy. Extra-illustrated with over 80 inserted plates, one hand-coloured and serving as frontispiece, folding floorplan of the New Houses of Parliament; printed in double columns. Second edition of Cunningham's celebrated guide, originally published in two volumes in 1849, which covers "in small compass an immense amount of original information about places of interest in London, illustrated by quotations from distinguished authors whose lives have been associated with them. All subsequent works on London have been more or less indebted to Cunningham's 'Handbook'" (Dictionary of National Biography, vol. XIII, 1885). In his new Preface Cunningham writes that "the present edition. is more correct and trustworthy than its predecessor, and has more matter in it; while the type, though small, is clear, and the shape, (one volume instead of two) has taken something from the weight and added to its value for purposes of reference". This is an attractively bound extra-illustrated copy, the additional plates, dating from 1809 to the late 1840s, are taken primarily from those made by Thomas Shepherd in the 1820s, whose Metropolitan Improvements (1827) "was principally received as a visual celebration of modern London" (ODNB). Provenance: engraved armorial bookplate of Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester (1900-1974), Governor-General of Australia (1945-1947), and the uncle of Elizabeth II.
Della letteratura de' Turchi.

Della letteratura de’ Turchi.

DONADO, Giovanni Battista. Duodecimo (149 x 83 mm). Later, probably 19th-century vellum over pasteboards, unlettered. Two oval blindstamps on title pressed flat. Minor stains and blemishes, a few edges roughly opened, small paper restoration not affecting text at foot of B6, a very good copy. With 4 folding leaves of woodcut music at end, printed on both sides. First edition of the first published survey of "Turkish literature". Ottoman scholars had recently undertaken a massive project of re-appropriation and synthesis of earlier literatures in lands then under Ottoman rule, including Greco-Latin, Persian, and Arabic materials. The book is a survey of Ottoman studies in the fields of grammar, poetry, logic, mathematics, geometry, optics, music, medicine, herbal alchemy, chemistry, history, politics, geography, and devotion, interspersed with translations prepared by Venetian dragoman Gianrinaldo Carli (who also translated Katib Çelebi into Italian) and other apprentice dragomans. It concludes with an exhortation for additional translations of books from Turkish, Persian, and Arabic. The nominal author, Giovanni Battista Donà, had been the Venetian bailo (resident consul) at Istanbul from 1680 to 1684, but the book is the fruit of an extensive collection and translation project undertaken by a group of young apprentice dragomans working under Donà in the Venetian embassy in Istanbul. The German philosopher Leibniz, passing through Venice in 1690, remarked that the Della letteratura was the only "new" title he had discovered there. The book is rare in commerce. WorldCat gives 21 locations worldwide; only one copy has come to auction in the past forty years: the Atabey copy in 2002. Atabey 359. Not in Blackmer or Weber.
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Almanacco della Real Casa e Corte per l’anno 1825.

ALMANAC; KINGDOM OF THE TWO SICILIES) Octavo (137 x 95 mm). Contemporary red morocco, smooth spine gilt lettered direct and divided by interlocking circle rolls framing metope-and-pentaglyph rolls, foliate centre tools, sides with paired gilt fillets enclosing broad scrolling foliate frame, large gilt centre stamp of the arms of the Two Sicilies, gilt milled edge roll, gilt edges, marbled endpapers. Short closed-tear at stub of folding map. An excellent copy. Engraved portrait frontispiece of Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies by R. Estevan after V. Camuccini, hand-coloured folding map of the kingdom; title page with wood-engraved royal arms. A particularly attractive copy of this scarce regal almanac for the court of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, formed in 1815 by the union of the kingdoms of Sicily and Naples, existing as an entity until Garibaldi's invasion of 1860. This edition was issued in the year of the death of Ferdinand I (1751-1825): "undereducated, boisterous, [he] liked nothing better than to hunt. Sir William Hamilton, while ambassador to the Neapolitan court, retained an attitude of diplomatic regard for the monarch, noting generously, that he was thought 'not to have a great share of sensibility'" (Ouditt, p. 29). Library Hub locates one copy only among British and Irish institutional libraries (Attingham Park, Shrewsbury, Shropshire); OCLC cites the editions of 1823 (location not given) and 1828 (Lucerne only). Sharon Ouditt, Impressions of Southern Italy: British Travel Writing from Henry Swinburne to Norman Douglas, Routledge (2014).