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Peter Harrington

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In Charming Peking: A Diary of Seven Days spent in the old Chinese Capital.

In Charming Peking: A Diary of Seven Days spent in the old Chinese Capital.

DANBY, Hope; HAVERS, Gladys Mary (illus.). First and only edition, joint presentation copy from the author and the illustrator to their sister, inscribed on the first blank "Gwen and Lionel Howell, with love from Dulcie Hope Danby, March 1930. Peking. China". Below is the signature of Gladys Mary Havers. Gwynydd "Gwen" Marguerite Smedley (1879-1966) moved with her family to Shanghai as a child. In 1905, she married Lionel Harrington Howell (1881-1951), a broker and insurance agent for several firms including Butterfield & Swire, who had begun his career before the Boxer Uprising. The couple lived in Beijing in the 1930s, remaining there during the Second World War. They were interned by the city's Japanese occupying administration for two years. The Smedley Howell family papers are housed at the University of Bristol. Hope Danby (1889-1981), born Dulcie Hope Bertie Smedley, was a prolific writer on Chinese history and archaeology. She was a friend of the controversial scholar-collector Edmund Backhouse and wrote his entry for the Dictionary of National Biography. Her sister and collaborator, Gladys Mary (1881-1954), painted watercolours of Japan and Chinese scenes. Square octavo. Original decorative yellow silk over boards, yellow silk backstrip, original gold thread tassles, front cover with title label lettered in black on dark brown and laid down on card as issued, inner covers lined with bright yellow silk. With 12 hand-coloured illustrations tipped in. All but first illustration captioned in pencil in contemporary hand. Binding faded and rubbed, more so to title label, delicate at gutter, illustrations vivid: a very good copy.
  • $1,244
  • $1,244
"Deutsches Requiem"

“Deutsches Requiem”, original manuscript.

BORGES, Jorge Luis. An original manuscript short story, signed twice by Borges - once on the recto of page 4, where he initially ended the narrative, and once on the final page. This manuscript was made in preparation for the story's first appearance in print, in the February 1946 issue of Sur; it is one of the stories included in Borges's key collection El Aleph (1949). "Deutsches Requiem" is the fictional confession of Otto Dietrich zur Linde, a proud and unrepentant Nazi awaiting execution. This manuscript captures Borges in the process of finalizing his story. There are approximately 30 authorial corrections, including five instances of Borges writing multiple options for words and phrases and later returning to delete as appropriate. There are two significant structural changes. On one occasio,n Borges has deleted an entire paragraph - regarding zur Linde's initial "apprenticeship" with the Nazi party - only to rewrite it in its entirety half a page later. Additionally, he originally ended the story shortly after the death of zur Linde's brother, concluding the tale on the verso of p. 4, only to cross out the final sentences and write another two pages. He has reused his original conclusion and expanded it with the following insertion: "Lo importante es que rija la violencia, no las serviles timideces cristianas. Si la victoria y la injusticia y la felicidad no son para Alemania, que sean para otras naciones. Que el cielo exista, aunque nuestro lugar sea el infierno" ("What matters is that violence, not servile Christian acts of timidity, now rules. If victory and injustice and happiness do not belong to Germany, let them belong to other nations. Let heaven exist, though our place be in hell.") Borges wrote "Deutsches Requiem" shortly after the end of the Nuremberg trials. It is considered a notably early literary attempt to wrestle with the horrors of the Holocaust. "Because Borges admired Germany he tried to comprehend the Nazism, an ethics of cruelty, it in its own terms, possibly the most dangerous, yet the most unvarnished and penetrating way of doing it." (Aizenberg, p. 53). There is only one textual difference in the "Deutsches Requiem" published in El Aleph: the addition of a final sentence, "Mi carne puede tener miedo; yo, no." ("My flesh may feel fear; I do not.") Foster A27.1 for El Aleph. Edna Aizenberg, "Deutsches Requiem 2005", Variaciones Borges, no. 20, pp. 33-57. 8 sheets of graph paper (approx. 245 x 167 mm; p. 7, 157 x 166 mm). Written in black ink on one side only, except for p. 4, which has 6 lines of manuscript crossed through on the verso above Borges's signature, and p. 7, with a few pen trials on the verso. Housed in a black quarter morocco solander box by the Chelsea Bindery. Written in Spanish. Leaves browned, else sharp and well-preserved.
  • $124,405
  • $124,405
The Land of Timur: Recollections of Russian Turkestan.

The Land of Timur: Recollections of Russian Turkestan.

POLOVTSOFF, Aleksandr. First edition, first impression, with the scarce jacket. The author was a Russian diplomat, orientalist, and ethnographer who served as the diplomatic adviser to the Russian Governor-General of Turkestan before the First World War. Alexander Alexandrovich Polovtsov (1867-1944) read law at St Petersburg's Imperial Legal College and worked in the Ministry of Internal Affairs and then the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. "He spent several years in Siberia and Turkestan on behalf of the government, where part of his work involved negotiating with recalcitrant Khans and local chieftains. In 1909, at the end of the "Great Game" between Russia and Britain, Polovtsov was appointed Consul General in Bombay, representing the first official Russian presence there since the tensions eased. He was well-connected, well-traveled, and well-liked, with a flair for languages and a passion for art and culture" (Burlington). In 1917, he was appointed the first director of the Pavlovsk Palace Museum, helping to protect Russia's pre-revolution heritage. In 1920, he relocated to Paris and spent the remainder of his life there. The Land of Timur is partly a political lament: "The so-called Communists from Moscow have created in Samarcand an important propaganda-school for spreading revolution in Asia, and the beautiful old mosques are used, I hear, for expounding to gaping audiences the gospel of Marx" (p. vi). Burlington Magazine, "The Russian Revolution and The Burlington Magazine: A letter from Alexander Polovtsov", available online. Octavo. Original blue remainder cloth, spine lettered in blue, map front endpaper, top edge trimmed, others untrimmed. With dust jacket. Tipped-in frontispiece after painting of Registan in Samarkand, 9 similar plates, all by B. Litvinoff. Spine and extremities sunned: jacket with a few old paper and tape repairs on verso, flaps without price as issued, a near-fine copy in very good jacket.
  • $589
book (2)

Paul and Virginia. Translated from the French. by Helen Maria Williams, author of Letters on the French Revolution, Julia: a novel, Poems, etc.

WILLIAMS, Helen Maria (trans.); SAINT-PIERRE, Jacques-Henri Bernardin de. First separate edition in English, translated by the celebrated bluestocking Helen Maria Williams (1759-1827) "amidst the horrors of Robespierre's tyranny", as she explains colourfully in her Preface; it became "the standard English edition well into the nineteenth century" (Deborah Kennedy, Helen Maria Williams and the Age of Revolution, 2002, p. 122). The circumstances under which Williams completed her translation were trying to say the least, "she was subject to frequent house searches, and on several occasions had parts of the translation and other papers seized and taken to 'the Municipality of Paris, in order to be examined as English papers; where they still remain, mingled with revolutionary placards, motions, and harangues; and are not likely to be restored to my possession'" (ibid.). Paul and Virginia was first published in French as part of Bernardin de Saint-Pierre's Études de la nature in 1788 and received its first English translation the same year. "ESTC shows 17 English forms of this work between 1795, when Helen Maria William's Paul and Virginia was published, and 1800" (Garside, Raven and Schöwerling). Though published without an imprint, this edition was almost certainly issued by the radical and printer John Hurford Stone (1763-1818), with whom Williams was involved. Another edition was published in London the same year by G. G. and J. Robinson. Precedence has not been established. "Although excessively sentimental, this little work contains many charming passages, especially the descriptions, in which Rousseau's influence can be seen, of an idyllic life in strange surroundings. It had an immense vogue, was translated into many languages, and still retains its popular fame. Bonaparte considered it the language of the soul, and he pensioned and decorated the author" (The Oxford Companion to French Literature). See Garside, Raven and Schöwerling 1788:71 Octavo in fours (205 x 133 mm). Recent quarter calf and marbled boards to style, spine ruled in gilt, red morocco label. With 6 engraved plates by Clément after drawings by Dutailly. Small rust hole to one leaf touching one letter; a very good copy.
  • $1,964
  • $1,964
The True Deceiver [in Swedish].

The True Deceiver [in Swedish].

JANSSON, Tove. First edition, first printing, of Den ärliga bedragaren, inscribed by the author on the title page, "till Terttu, det var roligt att jobba tillsammans med dig! ("to Terttu, it was fun working together with you!"), Tove, 18.6.91" The recipient was likely Terttu Schroderus-Gustafsson, an artist who lives on the Porvoo archipelago where Jansson spent her summers. Jansson's paintings of the archipelago are being posthumously exhibited alongside Terttu's in Haikko, Porvoo (2024); the inscription possibly refers to a similar exhibition held in 1991. Terttu is the daughter of the painter, boat maker, and sailor Albert "Abbe" Gustafsson, Jansson's lifelong friend and the subject of the short story "Albert" in The Sculptor's Daughter (1968). Gustafsson's parents rented a summer cottage in Pellinki to Tove's parents in the 1920s. In "Albert", the two children go to sea together on a wooden raft - Jansson's character is envious of eight-year-old Albert, who is a year older and already an accomplished sailor. As adults, they sailed on Albert's self-built boat, Albertina, and as Jansson recorded in Notes from an Island (published first in Swedish in 1996, in English in 2021), "It was Albert who built our boat, in 1962, of mahogany, four metres long, clinker-built. It was the prettiest boat anyone had ever seen along that whole part of the coast. She was strong and agile and positively danced on the waves. Her name was Victoria, because both Tooti's father and mine were named Viktor. Later, as the summers passed, Victoria became more and more Tooti's boat because she loved it the most and lavished care and attention on it." The True Deceiver was published simultaneously in Finland by Schildts. It was not published in English until 2009. Octavo. Original blue boards, spine lettered in silver. With dust jacket. Text in Swedish. Spine ends gently bumped; tape repair to verso of unclipped jacket, tiny chips at spine ends and corners, a few nicks, top edge slightly creased, short closed tear at head of faintly soiled rear panel: a near-fine copy in very good jacket.
  • $1,637
  • $1,637
Congrès juif mondial: conférence extraordinaire

Congrès juif mondial: conférence extraordinaire, Atlantic City, N.-J., 26-30 novembre 1944: discours et résolutions.

WORLD JEWISH CONGRESS. First and only edition of this French language account of the WJC wartime conference in Atlantic City, "a turning point in the thinking of Jewish public workers on the Jewish question of. and on the relation of the Jewish people to the non-Jewish world" (Unity in Dispersion, p. 221 ). Uncommon, perhaps 4 locations world-wide - and more substantial than English language accounts. The conference resolutions were "remarkable for their discarding of old notions which since the time of the French Revolution had been very dear to Jews everywhere, and for stressing with the utmost clarity the idea of the oneness of the Jewish people of all countries on earth and in far more respects than it had been assumed in former times" (p.232). Resolutions called on the British government to open up Palestine to "unrestricted Jewish immigration and resettlement", and for the governments of liberated countries to demand that their Jewish citizens held in Germany as slave labourers "be accorded the same treatment as their non-Jewish citizens", and all anti-Jewish legislation be abrogated with the full restoration of the civil and political rights of Jews. The "Statement and Resolution on the Punishment of War Criminals" sought the prosecution for war crimes of German officials who "devised and waged biological warfare and have exterminated whole groups and classes", underlining that the "most monstrous of these crimes has had as its purpose the destruction of an entire people - the Jews of Europe." The "Resolution on Indemnification" demanded the payment of restitution and reparations to the Jewish people, a call backed up by a study quantifying Nazi destruction and looting of Jewish assets at $8 billion, and with specific proposals on how such compensation should be gathered and distributed. However "at the heart of the conference was the demand for a 'Jewish Commonwealth' in Palestine. As Dr. Nahum Goldmann, chair of the WJC's administrative committee, told the delegates, 'No program of Jewish demands has meaning or historic significance if it does not culminate in a demand for a Jewish Commonwealth in Palestine'" (Wallance). Gregory J. Wallance, The World Jewish Congress during World War II, WJC website; World Jewish Congress, Unity in Dispersion: a History of the World Jewish Congress, 1948. Octavo. Wire-stitched in original pale yellow printed wrappers. A little rubbed, about very good.
  • $655
Fistiana; or

Fistiana; or, the Oracle of the Ring. Comprising a Defence of British Boxing; a Brief History of Pugilism, from the earliest ages to the present period; Practical Instructions for Training; together with Chronological Tables of Prize Battles, from 1780 to 1840 inclusive, alphabetically arranged with the issue of each event. Scientific Hints on Sparring.

DOWLING, Vincent George. Scarce first edition of this "classic work on the noble art, including informative sections on fitness training and sparring. It was a book which was regularly updated and went through fourteen editions before [Dowling's] death" (ODNB). This attractive copy was originally purchased at Fores's fashionable Sporting Repository at 41 Piccadilly, and their ticket is on the front pastedown. Some 143 pages are given over to an alphabetical "chronology of the ring", listing fights from 1785 to 1840, and there are further sections on "ages of living pugilists", "Taverns and Public Houses kept by Ex-Pugilists in London and its Vicinity" and "Duties of Seconds and Bottle-Holders". Vincent George Dowling (1785-1852) was a Londoner educated in Ireland who built a reputation as "an energetic and reliable reporter, a reputation enhanced by his eye-witness account of the assassination of Spencer Perceval in the lobby of the House of Commons on 11 May 1812, and later by his being first to arrive in London with the news that Queen Caroline was to return there from France after the accession of George IV in June 1820. His twelve-hour crossing of the channel in an open boat on a stormy night was evidence of a determined and romantic spirit" (ODNB). In August 1824 he was appointed editor of Bell's Life in London, one of Britain's earliest and most successful sporting newspapers. Hartley 539. Octavo. Original greyish brown vertically combed cloth, gilt-lettered spine, sides with ornamental blind cartouches enclosing gilt stamps of sparring pugilists (front) and boxing accoutrements (rear), pale yellow surface-paper endpapers, gilt edges. Line engraved frontispiece by O. Smith after John Frederick Herring, 4 wood-engraved plates illustrating various blows and holds, single wood-engraving in the text at p. viii (showing a beer basket, gloves, and timepiece). Head of spine chipped, front inner hinge cracked but sound, frontispiece and title page lightly toned, contemporary manuscript note at head of p. 85. A very good copy.
  • $1,637
  • $1,637
The Voyage of the 'Fox' in the Arctic Seas. A Narrative of the Discovery of the Fate of Sir John Franklin and his Companions.

The Voyage of the ‘Fox’ in the Arctic Seas. A Narrative of the Discovery of the Fate of Sir John Franklin and his Companions.

McCLINTOCK, Francis Leopold. First edition. Building on the work of other Franklin searches, "McClintock rightly can claim the distinction of discovering the true fate of Franklin" (Books on Ice). This copy was in the collection of the Irish painter Nathaniel Hone. The expedition, led by Francis Leopold McClintock (1819-1907), a native of Dundalk, lasted from July 1857 to September 1859 and discovered the only known paper records of Franklin. This included a composite paper note "describing the besetting of Erebus and Terror on 1846, the death of Franklin on 11 June 1847, the abandonment of the ships on 1849, and the intent of Captain Crozier to set out on 26 April 1846 to Back's Fish River" (Books on Ice). McClintock also bought items from the crushed ships from the local Iniut, including bodies, books, and relics. His findings were of particular importance for romanticizing Franklin. After two years with no news of Franklin's expedition, his wife Lady Jane Franklin (1791-1875) demanded that steps be taken to find the missing ships. "She bombarded the Admiralty with pleas and suggestions for routes. Her persistence and her willingness to court useful friends and spend the money she had inherited from her father won the respect of many at the Admiralty" (ODNB). Between 1850 and 1857, she helped outfit five ships for the search, the last being the Fox, which launched after the official search had been called off and traced the expedition's story to its tragic end. Provenance: Nathaniel Hone (1831-1917), with his ownership inscription on the verso of the front free endpaper, dated January 1860. Hone was "one of the first Irish artists to come into contact with French plein air painting and naturalism while living in Barbizon in the 1850s. Until his death in 1917 he was considered one of the most important living Irish artists" (Kennedy, p. 235); additionally with the architectural bookplate of Richard Wildman on the front pastedown. This is the English preservationist, author, and historian Richard Wildman (1947-2018), president of the Bedford Architectural, Archaeological & Local History Society and the Bedford Art Society. Books on Ice 3.16; Day 4597; Sabin 43043. Róisín Kennedy, Art and the Nation State, 2021. Octavo. Original blue morocco-grain cloth, spine lettered in gilt, ship vignette of the Fox on front cover, frames ruled in blind on covers, brown surface-paper endpapers. Frontispiece of the Fox, 13 plates, folding facsimile manuscript note, 3 folding maps (one in end pocket); 3 pp. publisher's advertisements at end. A touch rubbed or marked, spine slightly toned, spine ends, board edges, and inner hinges with minor judicious repairs, small marginal adhesion from tissue guard to frontispiece, scattered foxing and offsetting. A very good copy.
  • $917
The Discovery of the North-West Passage by H.M.S. "Investigator"

The Discovery of the North-West Passage by H.M.S. “Investigator”, 1850, 1851, 1852, 1853, 1854. Illustrated by Commander S. Gurney Cresswell.

McCLURE, Robert, & Sherard Osborn (ed.). First edition of the narrative by the first captain to successfully traverse the North West Passage. The narrative went through a further three editions between 1857 and 1865, cementing its status as a classic of Arctic literature. Robert McClure's (1807-1873) expedition, sent to rescue Franklin in 1850, quickly encountered the challenges of the Arctic cold, and the Investigator eventually became stuck in ice. Once rescued, however, McClure and his crew completed their journey through the passage during their return to England. On reaching London after the epic four-year, eight-month expedition, McClure and the crew were granted £10,000 by Parliament for navigating the passage, and he was later knighted. Cresswell, who provided the illustrations for this volume, found his way back to England in another ship ahead of McClure's main party, thereby "effectively becoming the first person to make the complete traverse of the Northwest Passage" (Howgego). Sherard Osborn (1822-75), a close friend of McClure and like him a seaman, entered into the question of Franklin's disappearance in 1849. He helped edit McClure's narrative soon after the latter's safe return in 1854. According to Osborn, McClure "was cool and bold in all perils.[and] modest, and would in war have been a great leader" (ODNB). Books on Ice 3.15; Day 3844; Hill 1122; Howgego III, M32. Octavo. Original blue morocco-grain cloth, title to spine in gilt, covers blocked in blind, brown coated endpapers with advertisements printed on pastedowns. Lithograph tissue-guarded frontispiece, 3 similar plates, hand-coloured folding map; 26 pp. publisher's advertisements at end. Contemporary ownership signature of one Harry Ashington on the title page. Professionally refurbished, with particular attention spine head and inner hinges, fore edge of map slightly frayed with a touch of dust soiling, minor occasional mottling or foxing, a few leaves slightly creased. A very good copy.
  • $3,274
  • $3,274
Poems. Now first published edited with notes by Robert Bridges Poet Laureate.

Poems. Now first published edited with notes by Robert Bridges Poet Laureate.

HOPKINS, Gerard Manley. First edition, one of 750 copies only, of which the bibliography states 50 were given away prior to publication (it took until 1928 to sell them all). Hopkins published very few poems in his lifetime and destroyed many of his early writings in a crisis of faith: after being received into the Roman Catholic faith (by Cardinal Newman himself), he made a bonfire of his juvenilia. It was only decades after his death that this "sensitive, handsome, and almost complete small edition" was published (ODNB), collected and largely designed by Hopkins's friend and admirer Robert Bridges. Contemporary reviews were mixed, though some were stridently positive, such as Theodore Maynard: "A shy mid-Victorian priest, writing while Tennyson, Swinburne and Patmore led their various schools, was more modern than the most freakish modern would dare to be. He is the last word in technical development". Sales of the book, however, were slow: it took until 1928 for the stock to be sold, though in 1930 "a second edition was called for by the poetry public who were demanding new, difficult poetic voices. [Hopkins was] advocated especially by I. A. Richards, F. R. Leavis, William Empson, and Michael Roberts, so that his poems appeared in general and modernistic anthologies, followed by university and school syllabuses, Hopkins had suddenly become a popular modern poet" (ODNB). Dunne A38; Hayward 335. Octavo (191 x 126 mm). Finely bound by the Chelsea Bindery in black morocco, spine lettered gilt, two raised bands, twin rule to turn-ins gilt, marbled endpapers, gilt edges. With 2 photogravure portraits and 2 double-page plates. The occasional minor blemish, an excellent copy in a fine binding.
  • $1,964
  • $1,964
Souvenir of the Battle of Stepney. Fought in Sidney Street

Souvenir of the Battle of Stepney. Fought in Sidney Street, January 3rd., 1911.

CHURCHILL, Winston S. A very rare survival: a printed commemorative napkin recording the Siege of Sidney Street, including a picture of Churchill in the middle of the action. The siege was one of the defining events of Churchill's period as Home Secretary. Churchill's appearance at the scene caught the public imagination, but he was criticized for interfering and showboating. Churchill served as Home Secretary from February 1910 to October 1911. In January 1911, Latvian armed anarchists holed themselves up in a building in the East End following a botched robbery. The police requested military assistance, and a six-hour siege and gunfight ensued, eventually leading to the death of one of the anarchists and the burning of the building. The siege caught London's attention and Churchill soon arrived, perhaps spurred by the many photojournalists present - he was filmed by Pathé News. Souvenir napkins were widely produced in the late 19th and early 20th centuries to commemorate famous events. Printed on very thin paper and sold by hawkers on the streets, they rarely survive. Sarah Burgess was one of the leading manufacturers of them. Churchill features on the napkin, looking round the corner of a building while flanked by police officers, an image widely reproduced in newspapers of the time. The napkin shows a general view of the siege, vignettes of important events, and a "Diary of the Battle" giving an hour-by-hour account. Churchill gave advice to the soldiers and police officers, called up an extra platoon, and approved the decision to let the building burn down. Afterwards, many prominent figures condemned him for meddling with the emergency responders and for seeking to self-advertise. He later admitted he had been wrong to go, though "in the long run his willingness to go to the scene of action would serve his country well" (Roberts, p. 149). Andrew Roberts, Churchill, 2019. Thin paper napkin (366 x 372 mm), printed in black within a colour printed floral border. Slight insect damage at head (not affecting border), very light creases, else in excellent condition.
  • $1,964
  • $1,964
Five press photographs of a female detective investigating shoplifting.

Five press photographs of a female detective investigating shoplifting.

AMERICANA; CRIME. An intriguing demonstration of shoplifting techniques by an early woman recruit in the American police forces. In one photograph, the "woman detective show[s] how the bag was carried by the woman she arrested" (caption). The other confiscated apparatus shown includes a fake forearm and a fur muff, which allow the wearer's sleight of hand to take place unnoticed while "engaging the salesgirl in conversation". Kleptomania became a medical term following an outbreak of shoplifting in the late 19th century. "Not explicitly gender specific in the beginning, on both sides of the Atlantic the diagnosis was quickly associated almost exclusively with women" (Segrave, p. 25). A new group of shoplifters was emerging: "the middle class, and its locale was that new commercial institution, the department store" (Abelson, p. 123). Society saw such affluent thieves not as petty criminals but as citizens of good moral standing who needed medical treatment for their compulsions. In 1878, the New York Times interviewed department store executives on the prevalence of women shoplifters; one sympathetic responder noted that "the people arrested here are all women, of course, but then we have hardly any male customers" (Segrave, p. 10). Women were first actively recruited to US police forces in the early 20th century and among their earliest duties was patrolling stores undercover. In her book Women Police (1925), Chloe Owings explains that such officers had the discretion to liaise with shop owners directly instead of bringing criminal charges. These photographs were likely produced to warn stores about the latest shoplifting methods. They offer an ephemeral view of Philadelphia's police department, which in 1913 swore in Mary D. Diehl and L. M. Gillespie as the city's first policewomen vested with full uniform and powers of arrest. However, female officers were not assigned to street patrol in Philadelphia until 1976. The P. J. Press Bureau's output explored contemporary social history and Americana around the beginning of the 20th century. Other examples of their work picture a one-armed golfer, a Wright brothers flight, the boxer Jack Johnson engaged in a street fight, a mixed-gender and cross-dressing baseball game, and an early press photograph of the Harlem Renaissance leader Alain LeRoy Locke. Elaine S. Abelson, "The Invention of Kleptomania", Signs, vol. 15, no. 1, Autumn 1989; Chloe Owings, Women Police: A Study of the Development and Status of the Women Police Movement, 1925, p. 237; Kerry Segrave, Shoplifting: A Social History, 2001. Together 5 silver gelatin photographs (185 x 141 mm to 201 x 152 mm), versos with original typed and mounted captions and with the photographer's stamp of P. J. Press Bureau, 908 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. Light fading in places, not obscuring details, a couple of marginal tears, minimal rubbing and creasing. In very good condition.
  • $982
Corpus doctrinae Christianae. Quae est summa orthodoxi et catholici dogmatis

Corpus doctrinae Christianae. Quae est summa orthodoxi et catholici dogmatis, complectens doctrinam puram & veram Evangelij Iesu Christi secundum divina Prophetarum et Apostolorum scripta, aliquot libri fideli ac pio studio explicata. Nunc edita ad usum Ecclesiae sanctae publicum et privatum. et at refutationem mendaciorum ac calumniarum malevolentiae & obrectationum.

MELANCHTHON, Philip. First edition of Melanchthon's influential Body of Doctrine, a collection of his most important doctrinal and theological writings, which shaped the confession of faith within German Protestantism for generations. The handsome German binding, signed "G.M." in one roll, may be attributed to the workshop of Matthias Gärtner, active in Augsburg from the 1560s to the 1590s. The Corpus was Melanchthon's last book, published around the time of his death. Among the most important texts, it contains Melanchthon's early creeds, his confession of faith for the Lutheran Church (the Confessio Augustana, here both in the invariata and variata versions, published in 1530 and 1540); the Apology for the Confession (1530), and the Loci communes theologici (1521), a textbook for systematic theology. The Corpus doctrinae Philippicum, also called Saxonicum or Misnicum, "became the textbook for theology students at the University of Wittenberg and the standard of doctrine for a host of principalities including Electoral Saxony" (Wengert, p. 398). It was adopted by pastors and teachers in Pomerania, Anhalt, Hesse, Nuremberg, certain Silesian principalities, Schleswig-Holstein, and Denmark. Other territories and cities later developed their own norms following Melanchthon's model; the term "Corpus doctrinae" was adopted by others throughout the 16th and 17th century to generally indicate a collection of confessional or credal writings. The blind-stamped design on this binding reflects the contemporary German taste for finely detailed ornamental rolls arranged to form a sequence of frames. The rolls of palmettes and scenes from the scriptures are identical to those attributed to Gärtner in EBDB (respectively, cit. ref. r004193 and r003480). The roll of heads of the reformers and coats of arms, containing the monogram M.G., is unrecorded in the EBDB database, but very similar to other signed rolls by this binder (e.g. cit. ref. r003532). Rolls of reformers's heads were popular designs at the time and Melanchthon was often portrayed on them; it is likely that one of the miniatures here is meant to depict him as well. USTC 625592; VD16 M 2883. Timothy J. Wengert, Bearing Christ as Melanchthon's Contribution to the Book of Concord, Lutheran Quarterly, vol. 15, 2012. Folio (294 x 193 mm), bound in sixes: A B-D6 E8 F-Z a-z 2A-3N 3O , 510 leaves, pp. [xx], 56, *41-56, 57-982, [2]; complete with final blank 3O8, Q3 misbound after Q4. Contemporary German pigskin over bevelled boards, spine with blind-ruled raised bands, manuscript label in first compartment, covers ruled in blind and decorated with a series of concentric frames, first border and central panel with roll of palmettes, second border with roll of biblical scenes, third border with roll of heads of reformers in roundels and coats of arms, turn-ins ruled in blind, original engraved brass clasps, catchplates and anchorplates. Some light toning, couple of marks, and minor spots of wear to leather, the binding nonetheless presenting attractively, small damp stain on a few initial and final leaves near gutter, intermittent slight browning, else generally bright and clean. An excellent copy.
  • $7,857
  • $7,857
The Present State of Russia

The Present State of Russia, In a Letter to a Friend at London; Written by an Eminent Person residing at the Great Tzars Court at Mosco for the Space of Nine Years. Illustrated with many Copper Plates.

COLLINS, Samuel. First edition of this incisive, eyewitness account of the Russia of Tsar Alexei (1629-1676). Samuel Collins (1619-1670) worked as physician to Alexei, father of Peter the Great, between 1660 and 1667. Among contemporary authors of English accounts of Russia, "perhaps only Samuel Collins had a real grasp of Russian" ("English Views of Russia in the 17th Century", pp. 156-7). In Russia, Collins treated royalty, nobles, and courtiers, while writing papers on phlebotomy, obesity, and valerian. Among his contemporaries, this first-hand experience made him ideally placed to undertake a study of the country. For Matthew Anderson, his work was "perhaps the best account of the country published during the century" ("English Views of Russia in the Age of Peter the Great", p. 201). The Present State of Russia contains Collins's wide-ranging observations on Russian politics, religion, and society. Individual chapters focus on the tsar's monopoly of the trade in furs and caviar ("a great dainty, but will not keep"), the Russians' treatment of women ("very rigid and severe"), and descriptions of Moscow, the steppe, and Siberia ("'tis so excessive cold here"). His discussions of the Russian predilection for celebratory drinking are particularly entertaining: "Their greatest expression of joy upon festivals is drinking, and the greater the day is, the greater are their debauches In the Carneval before Quadragessima or Lent, they give themselves over to all manner of debauchery and luxury, and in the last week they drink as if they were never to drink more Some of these going home drunk, if not attended with a sober companion, fall asleep upon the Snow (a sad cold bed) and there they are frozen to death". The seven plates depict Russian letters, hand gestures, and architecture. The work was published the year after Collins's death. ESTC R17430; Wing C5385. M. S. Anderson, "English Views of Russia in the Age of Peter the Great", American Slavonic and East European Review, vol. 13, no. 2, 1954; M. S. Anderson, "English Views of Russia in the 17th Century", American Slavonic and East European Review, vol. 33, no. 80, 1954. Small octavo (164 x 99 mm), pp. [22], 141, [3], [8]. Contemporary mottled sheep, professionally rebacked, spine ruled, decorated, and with red morocco label lettered in gilt, covers panelled in blind. Engraved portrait frontispiece depicting Tsar Alexis, and 6 engraved plates, woodcut headlines, errata leaf and 4 leaves of bookseller's advertisements at rear. Near-contemporary ink inscription "Dr Collins" on title page, short annotation to p. 55, and unobtrusive pencil annotations to contents. Light bumping and scuffing, minor browning and offsetting to contents, paper repair to lower outer corner of frontispiece, just crossing platemark: a very good copy.
  • $6,875
  • $6,875