Donald A. Heald Rare Books Archives - Rare Book Insider

Donald A. Heald Rare Books

  • Showing all 25 results

book (2)

Florilegium tractans de variis floribus et aliis indicis plantis ad vivum delineatum in duabus partibus et quatuor linguis concinnatum

SWEERT, Emanuel (1552-1612) (14 1/8 x 9 1/8 inches). Engraved allegorical title, engraved portrait of the author, 110 contemporary hand-coloured engraved plates, title heightened in gold. Title mounted. Copper engravings, with expert modern hand-colouring. Contemporary red morocco, the covers panelled in gilt with foliate center- and corner-pieces, spine densely tooled gilt in seven compartments, lettered in one Provenance: Thomas Herbert, eighth Earl of Pembroke (1656-1733), first Lord of the Admiralty, president of the Royal Society, dedicatee of Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding and Thomas Greenhill's Art of Embalming, and a prolific bibliophile A true masterpiece of botanical illustration. Sweert was a Dutch horticulturalist, painter, draughtsman, and engraver who was born in Brussels, Belgium in 1552. He is known for his botanical illustrations and is considered one of the leading botanical artists of the late 16th and early 17th centuries. His most famous publication is the present enchanting work. Within the sumptuous red morocco is a collection of meticulously detailed illustrations, which capture the essence and beauty of each flower with stunning accuracy. Sweert's naturalistic style is a marvel to behold, creating a sense of depth and realism that sets his illustrations apart from others of its time. Arranged alphabetically by Latin name with each illustration accompanied by descriptions of the plant's physical characteristics and uses. Sweert drew from a wide variety of sources, including his own garden, the collections of botanists and naturalists, and the gardens of friends and patrons. Although the work did not contain prices, it also served as a catalogue of plants offered for sale by Sweert at the Frankfurt fair; the plates, depict some 560 plants and flowers. The work is notable for the many fine plates of bulbous varieties, particularly tulips, burgeoning the craze of Tulipomania that then swept Europe. Cf. Hunt 196; cf. Nissen BBI 1920 &1922; cf. Stafleu & Cowan TL2 13.546. cf. An Oak Spring Flora 9.
  • $95,000
  • $95,000
book (2)

Notes on Tulip Species

DYKES, William Rickatson (1877-1925), DYKES, Elsie Katherine (d. 1933) (15 x 10 3/4 inches). First edition. [1]-108. 108 pp. 54 color plates of tulips. Half-title, Title, Contents, Plates, Bibliography, Introduction by A. Daniel Hall, Biographical note on W. R. Dykes by E. K. Dykes, 54 plates with explanatory text, Index. Publisher's green cloth with gilt-lettering on spine, publisher's tan dust jacket printed black in brodart, uncut First edition example in the publisher's rare dust jacket, with 54 color plates of tulips by Elsie Katherine Dykes. William Dykes, a "true student and great lover of plants," as A. Daniel Hall states in the introduction, served as the Secretary of the Royal Horticultural Society and was a noted authority on tulips. The present work was compiled from his notes and beautifully illustrated by his wife, Elsie Katherine Dykes. This work includes detailed descriptions of each species and notes on cultivation. The Dykes' own garden was planted with over 30,000 tulips. "Elsie Katherine Dykes was a grower and hybridizer of irises and tulips, esteemed in that role by her peers in London's horticultural circles in the first quarter of the 20th century. It is her paintings for Notes on Tulip Species, however, that set her apart. When her husband, William Rickatson Dykes, Secretary of the Royal Horticultural Society and known for his work with irises, met his untimely death by accident, Katherine edited his notes for posthumous publication and added 54 stunning paintings of the tulips with which he had been working. OCLC 2640786. Unturned Leaves: Early Women in Botanical Illustration, Cornell University Library.
  • $350
book (2)

To the Inhabitants of the State of Massachusetts-Bay. Friends and Fellow Countrymen! It is with concern and attention that the House of Representatives find that an act, intitled an act for drawing in the bills of credit of the several denominations, &c. passed the last Session, has given uneasiness to any of the good people of this State: A number of towns have presented their petitions stating such grievances, as they apprehend will arise from the execution of that act, and pray relief

MASSACHUSETTS-BAY HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, GILL, John (1732-1785, Printer) (13 3/4 x 8 1/2 inches). [A]2. [1]-4. 4 pp. Folded broadsheet printed on recto and verso on laid paper Revolutionary-era pamphlet on an act raising funds to fight against the British, issued by the Massachusetts House of Representatives. This leaflet issued by the House of Representatives of the State of Massachusetts-Bay, dated December 15, 1777, summarizes objections to an act calling in bills of credit and refutes each point of the act's critics. This act was passed to finance the Continental Army during the American Revolution: "It is well known, that the present necessary and expensive war in which we are involved, for the preservation of every thing valuable, was first enkindled in this State, and in so sudden a manner, that without magazines or finances, we were obliged instantly to raise, pay, and support a large army by our own efforts, before the American Congress could take measures to relieve us; this occasioned the emission of large and repeated quantities of bills of credit; the unsettled state of Government, and the disinclination of many of the inhabitants to call in any of the bills of credit, or prevent the emission of more by taxation, reduced the legislative body to this alternative, either to suffer our liberties to be destroyed for want of defence, or else to continue the emission of paper bills, to the depreciation of what was then current; the same situation of Government, and disinclination for taxation taking place also in other States, occasioned large and repeated emissions of bills of credit from them, which obtained a general circulation among us." On page 4 is text of the order that "Mr. [Robert Treat] Paine, Mr. Greenough, and Mr. Phillips, be a committee to correct the address, one of which to be sent to the selectmen of each town. Attest. Samuel Freeman, clerk." Evans locates copies at only the following institutions: Library of Congress, Boston Public Library, Harvard Law School Library, Massachusetts Historical Society, New York Public Library, and the John Carter Brown Library. Cushing, Massachusetts Laws 1018. ESTC W8602. Evans 15439. Ford, Broadsides 2099. LoC 2020775013. OCLC 62814407.
  • $1,500
  • $1,500
book (2)

The Trial of Col. Aaron Burr, on an Indictment for Treason. Before the Circuit Court of the United States, Held in Richmond, (Virginia), May Term, 1807: Including the Arguments and Decisions on All the Motions Made During the Examination and Trial, and on the Motion for an Attachment against Gen. Wilkinson. Taken in Short-Hand by T. Carpenter. Vols. I-III

BURR, Aaron (1756-1836), CARPENTER, Thomas (fl.1790s-1810s, Court Reporter) (8 1/4 x 5 inches). Vol. I: 147 [2] 4-135 [3]. 284 pp. Title, Deposit Notice, Publisher's Note. Vol II: 465 [1]. 466 pp. Title, Deposit Notice. Vol. III: 418 I [i-l] [4]. 472 pp. Title, Appendix, Index. Previous owner's small stamp on front pastedowns. Contemporary full sheep, expertly rebacked spines in six gilt-ruled compartments with red morocco lettering-pieces in second compartments and volume numbers in fourth First edition of all three volumes of "the rarest and best account of the trial," (Eberstadt) which made US legal history in its interpretations of treason and executive sovereignty. This elusive set, almost always found without the third volume, is Burr's own report and is crucial to understanding early democracy in America. Of especial relevance today as other high-profile American politicans face their own accusations of treason. "The most exciting trial held in this country during the first half of the nineteenth century." (Graff) Aaron Burr Jr. was an American politician, businessman, lawyer, co-founder of the Bank of New York, and Founding Father who served as Vice President during Jefferson's first term, and, more recently, served as the foil in Lin-Manuel Miranda's musical Hamilton. How Burr came to be arrested in Alabama in 1807 is bizarre and byzantine, but in brief: Burr was rejected by his own party, the Democratic-Republicans, for opposing Jefferson in the 1800 presidential election runoff in the House, and then was shunned by the Federalists for killing Alexander Hamilton in a duel. Burr went West to seek better fortunes, which included a rogue military adventure to seize lands belonging to Spain in Louisiana and Mexico, with incentive given to the Western states to join his adventure. However, Burr's longtime friend, General James Wilkinson, decided to abandon this dubious plan and inform the Feds instead. President Jefferson did not look kindly on his former Vice President's conspiracy to entice the Western states to leave the Union and join with him as he colonized new lands with the support of England. Jefferson alerted Congress and ordered Burr's arrest. Firm in his belief that Burr was a traitor, Jefferson had him charged as such. Luckily for Burr, Chief Justice John Marshall was Jefferson's longtime political foe and would preside at Burr's trial because he was also the federal judge for the US Circuit Court in Virginia. Burr was acquitted and fled for Europe. Cohen, Bibliography of Early American Law 14091, 14092. Eberstadt 134-68. Graff 506. Howes B1013. Sabin 9433. Tompkins, Burr 18.
  • $7,500
  • $7,500
book (2)

Platonis: Opera quae extant omnia. Interpretatione, perpetuis eiufde notis illustrata: quibus and methodus and doctrinae summa breviter and persicue indicature. [Plato: All the Works That Exist. From the New Interpretation of Jean de Serres, Perpetually Illustrated by His Notes: A Brief and Perspicuous Summary of His Method and Doctrine in a Brief and Concise Manner]

PLATO (c.428-348 BCE), SERRES, Jean de (1540-1598, Translator) (14 7/8 x 9 1/2 inches). First edition. Vol. I: *-***6 A-Yy6. xxxvi [1]-542. 578 pp. Vol. II: [x]4 AA-OOooo6. viii [1]-992. 1,000 pp. Vol. III: [x]4 AAAA-OOOOO6 PPPPP-ZZZZZ4 a-f4. viii [1]-416 [1]-139. 564 pp. Titles ruled in red with woodcut cartouche of Estienne's printer's device in the first volume with the motto "Ut ego insererer defracti sunt rami [The branches were broken off so that I might be grafted in]." With woodcut head and tail-pieces, culs-de-lampe, and historiated initials throughout. Text in Greek and Latin parallel columns broken into the now-standard Stephanus pagination reference system. Eighteenth-century full calf uniform across set, boards with gilt roll-tooled borders, expertly rebacked spines lettered in gilt with eight raised bands forming five compartments with title in second and volume number in third, gilt dentelles with stone-pattern marbled endpapers, all edges sprinkled green The "celebrated and magnificent" complete 1578 Stephanus edition of Plato in handsome full calf binding. [Dibdin] "This work has been long considered as a very valuable acquisition to the libraries of the learned, and for its magnificence and variety of critical materials must be always held in estimation." [Dibdin] The Opera Omnia of Plato is the foremost work of ancient philosophy, as well as the first edition of the Latin translation by the Protestant Jean de Serres, who Henry IV appointed "Historian of France" in 1596. This was the best edition of Plato until modern times. By Renaissance standards, Plato was a best-selling author; his two main themes, the quest for truth and human improvement, held enormous appeal for readers of the period. This edition was responsible, along with 1572's monumental Thesaurus Graecae Linguae, for securing the scholarly and literary reputation of the French printer and classical scholar Henri Estienne II (1528-1598). Estienne, who was a member of one of Europe's most illustrious families of printers, edited and prepared the entirety of the Greek text for which this edition is especially known. The present example is complete with dedications to Elizabeth I, James VI, and the Canton of Berne, which are often lacking, and of which Dibidn writes, "care must be taken that these three dedicatory epistles are not omitted." "For two centuries Estienne's edition remained the indispensable instrument of Platonic studies: to this day its pagination is universally accepted as the standard system of reference to the text of Plato. For the translation, Estienne discarded the old standard Latin version by Fincino, and commissioned an entirely new one by Jean de Serres. Of all of Estienne's publications, the Plato is perhaps the most lavishly decorated; it is the only publication in which Estienne used his entire series of decorative headpieces, numerous woodcut initials, culs-de-lampe, and a striking elaborate title-device specially designed for this edition and making its only appearance here." [Schreiber] Stephanus pagination, the system of reference first established in the present work, is still the organizing principle used in modern scholarly editions and translations of Plato, making this book a canonical contribution to classical studies. Stephanus pagination first divides the works into reference numbers that are the page numbers of each of the set's three volumes, and each page number is further subdivided into lettered sections which correspond to parallel Greek and Latin translated passages on a given page, most commonly a, b, c, d, and e. This system is used in modern scholarship to cite Plato. For Plato's works, unique coordinates for a passage can be given with three pieces of information: the work's name, the Stephanus page number, and the letter denoting the passage. For example, "Symposium 172a" cites Symposium, Stephanus page 172, passage a. Adams P-1439. Brucker, Hist. Philosoph. Crit., p. 659. Dibdin, An Introduction to the Greek and Latin Classics II, pp. 297-299. Hoffmann III, p
  • $7,500
  • $7,500
book (2)

The Hero of the Monongahela: Historical Sketch. Published for the Dedication of the Monument Erected to the Memory of Major-General Edward Braddock (Collection Monongahela de Beaujeu, No. 3)

BEAUJEU, Monongahela de (1870-1928), HAWES, G. E. (fl. 1890s-1910s, Translator) (9 x 6 1/8 inches). First English edition. [2] [1]-28. 30 pp. Color oval vignette frontispiece portrait of Beaujeu, Title, Dedication to author's wife, Text, Three black and white photo illustrations on two leaves at p.8 and p.20, 2 folding maps of Braddock expedition at rear with keys. Publisher's brown wrappers printed black and stamped with gold and orange, stab-stitched Rare biography of Captain Daniel Liénard de Beaujeu, leader of the victorious French forces at the Battle of Monongahela who repelled Edward Braddock's expedition with George Washington and Daniel Boone, momentarily keeping the Ohio Valley under French control during the French and Indian War, with maps of the battlefield. During the French and Indian War of 1754 to 1763, the British sent an expeditionary force under the command of General Edward Braddock (1695-1755) to seize Fort Duquesne, located at present-day Pittsburgh, from the French. Though he died almost immediately, Captain Beaujeu's (1711-1755) forces caused one of the most severe military defeats for the British Empire in the 1700s, killing Braddock and beating back his troops, which included future American president George Washington and frontiersman Daniel Boone. The victory would have great significance for the French forces, as Beaujeu's biography explains: "But the very considerable advantage that the French received from this victory, beyond the preservation of the Ohio Valley, was the complete severance from the English alliance of the tribes which were before undecided and up to this time had remained neutral. On the news of the destruction of Braddock, they threw themselves on Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Maryland, scattering everywhere desolation and ruin. On their side the Canadian bands and the other auxiliary nations did not remain inactive, and the terror was thrown in the midst of the colonies so that the frontiers were left deserted, and even in the chief centers of population the preachers found themselves obliged to reassure the people, so great was the alarm of the frightened inhabitants." [p.23] Though the French were able to hold onto the territority for sometime, they ceded all of North America east of the Mississippi to the British in the Treaty of Paris (1763), ultimately leading to British rule in Canada. Beaujeu, who had previously fought at Grand Pré (1747), was an officer famous for using Native American battle techniques, such as the use of war paint during ambushes. This short biography of Beaujeu was taken from notes by the Candian historian Paul Stevens (1830-1881), translated into English by Hawes, edited by a descendent of Beaujeu who was named after the battle, and published at the dedicatory ceremony for a monument in General Braddock's honor in 1913. Though he lost dramatically, the nearby town of Braddock, Pennsylvania, is now named for Braddock. OCLC 774438677.
  • $150
book (2)

Novus Orbis Regionum Insularum Veteribus Incognitarum. [A New World of Islands Unknown to the Ancients]

HUTTICH, Johannes (1480-1544), GRYNAEUS, Simon (1493-1541) (12 1/2 x 8 inches). Augmented edition. a-d4 a-z6 A-Z6 Aa-Dd6 [Ee]2. [24] [1]-599 [1]. 624 pp. Lacking the woodcut world map attributed to Hans Holbein the Younger and Sebastian Münster. Woodcut printer's devices on title and verso of last leaf, historiated initials, head and tail pieces, woodcut illustrations on pp. 127-29. Title, Contents, Dedication, Grynaeus's Text, Index, Texts. Contemporary ink manuscript annotations in margins. Contemporary full limp vellum with brown ink manuscript title on spine and remanants of two pairs of leather ties, with pill-shaped watermark on laid paper, a blue cloth clamshell box with gilt-lettered leather titling-piece on spine A fine example of the most influential collection of early sixteenth-century travel literature. Besides the three voyages of Columbus, the present work includes descriptions of those of Petrus Alonzo and Pinzo, three of Vespucci's four voyages, and Peter Martyr's De Insulis Nuper Inventis. According to Borba, the present edition is the first to contain the letter of Maximilian of Transylvania reporting the news of Magellan's voyage (p. 585). This augmented edition holds the second and third letters of Cortes, and selected letters of Juan Zumarraga, the first Archbishop of Mexico. Though the account of Magellan's voyage was originally published in 1522 in a 16-leaf ephemeral edition of a letter addressed to Charles V, its appearance in Grynaeus's collection of voyages marks the first time his landmark discoveries appear in an historical context side-by-side with those of Columbus, Vespucci, and the Portuguese navigators. Adams G1337. Alden 537/14. Borba I. Burmeister 62. Church 123. Harrisse 223. Sabin 34103. European Americana 537/14.
  • $6,250
  • $6,250
book (2)

Connecticut Warbler. From “The Birds of America” (Amsterdam Edition)

AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851) Colour-printed lithograph, on fine hand-made paper. Excellent condition. Image size: 19 x 11 1/2 inches. Sheet size: 26 3/4 x 39 7/8 inches (approx). [Pl. 138]. In October 1971, employing the most faithful printing method available, the best materials and the ablest craftsmen of their age, the Amsterdam firm of Theatrum Orbis Terrarum Ltd., in conjunction with the Johnson Reprint Corporation of New York, set out to produce the finest possible limited edition facsimile of the greatest bird book ever printed: the Havell edition of John James Audubon's well-loved "Birds of America". The Curators of the Teyler's Museum in Haarlem, Holland made their copy of the original work available for use as a model. The Museum, founded in 1778, bought their copy through Audubon's son as part of the original subscription in 1839. After long deliberation, the extremely complex but highly accurate process of colour photo-lithography was chosen as the appropriate printing method. The best exponents of this art were the renowned Dutch printing firm of NV Fotolitho Inrichting Drommel at Zandvoort who were willing to undertake the task of printing each plate in up to eight different colours. The original Havell edition was published on hand-made rag paper and the publishers were determined that the paper of their edition should match the original. Unhappy with the commercially available papers, they turned to the traditional paper manufacturers G. Schut & Zonen (founded in 1625), who, using 100% unbleached cotton rags, were able to produce a wove paper of the highest quality, with each sheet bearing a watermark unique to the edition: G. Schut & Zonen [JR monogram] Audubon [OT monogram]. The publishers and their dedicated team completed their task late in 1972 and the results of these labours were affectionately known as the "Amsterdam Audubon." 250 copies were published and sold by subscription, with the plates available bound or unbound. Given all this careful preparation, it is not surprising that the prints have the look and feel of the original Havell edition. John James Audubon was born in Les Cayes, Haiti on 26 April 1785. From 1788 to 1803 he lived in France until he was sent to the United States to manage an estate that his father had bought in Pennsylvania. He returned to France in 1805, but his fascination with the United States had taken root and he returned again in May 1806. He married Lucy Bakewell in 1808 and together they embarked on a difficult period financially that was only to be resolved, through Audubon's unshakable and justified belief in his own abilities, with the publication of his masterpiece in 1827-1838. "The Birds of America" is the single greatest ornithological work ever produced and is the realization of Audubon's dream of traveling throughout the United States recording, natural size, every native bird then known. The 435 double-elephant folio sized plates, printed by the Havells of London, depict some 1,065 different species, the majority drawn from specimens that Audubon himself had captured. The Havell edition was expensive at the time of publication and this has not changed. A complete copy sold for a staggering $11,400,000 in a sale in London in December 2010. Currently, the increasingly rare individual plates from the Havell edition, when they do appear, generally sell for between $5,000 and $350,000 depending on the image. The quality of the Amsterdam Audubon plates is apparent to any discerning collector and it is becoming ever clearer that they offer the most attractive alternative to the Havell edition plates, given the latter's spiraling prices. Cf. Zimmer, p. 22; cf. Bennett, p. 5; cf. Fries, Appendix A; cf. Wood, p. 208; cf. Nissen IVB 51; cf. Sabin 2364; cf. Ripley 13; cf. Tyler, Audubon's Great National Work, 1993, Appendix I.
  • $100
book (2)

American Snipe. From “The Birds of America” (Amsterdam Edition)

AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851) Colour-printed lithograph, on fine hand-made paper. Excellent condition. Image size: 12 x 18 inches. Sheet size: 26 3/4 x 39 7/8 inches (approx). [Pl. 243]. In October 1971, employing the most faithful printing method available, the best materials and the ablest craftsmen of their age, the Amsterdam firm of Theatrum Orbis Terrarum Ltd., in conjunction with the Johnson Reprint Corporation of New York, set out to produce the finest possible limited edition facsimile of the greatest bird book ever printed: the Havell edition of John James Audubon's well-loved "Birds of America". The Curators of the Teyler's Museum in Haarlem, Holland made their copy of the original work available for use as a model. The Museum, founded in 1778, bought their copy through Audubon's son as part of the original subscription in 1839. After long deliberation, the extremely complex but highly accurate process of colour photo-lithography was chosen as the appropriate printing method. The best exponents of this art were the renowned Dutch printing firm of NV Fotolitho Inrichting Drommel at Zandvoort who were willing to undertake the task of printing each plate in up to eight different colours. The original Havell edition was published on hand-made rag paper and the publishers were determined that the paper of their edition should match the original. Unhappy with the commercially available papers, they turned to the traditional paper manufacturers G. Schut & Zonen (founded in 1625), who, using 100% unbleached cotton rags, were able to produce a wove paper of the highest quality, with each sheet bearing a watermark unique to the edition: G. Schut & Zonen [JR monogram] Audubon [OT monogram]. The publishers and their dedicated team completed their task late in 1972 and the results of these labours were affectionately known as the "Amsterdam Audubon." 250 copies were published and sold by subscription, with the plates available bound or unbound. Given all this careful preparation, it is not surprising that the prints have the look and feel of the original Havell edition. John James Audubon was born in Les Cayes, Haiti on 26 April 1785. From 1788 to 1803 he lived in France until he was sent to the United States to manage an estate that his father had bought in Pennsylvania. He returned to France in 1805, but his fascination with the United States had taken root and he returned again in May 1806. He married Lucy Bakewell in 1808 and together they embarked on a difficult period financially that was only to be resolved, through Audubon's unshakable and justified belief in his own abilities, with the publication of his masterpiece in 1827-1838. "The Birds of America" is the single greatest ornithological work ever produced and is the realization of Audubon's dream of traveling throughout the United States recording, natural size, every native bird then known. The 435 double-elephant folio sized plates, printed by the Havells of London, depict some 1,065 different species, the majority drawn from specimens that Audubon himself had captured. The Havell edition was expensive at the time of publication and this has not changed. A complete copy sold for a staggering $11,400,000 in a sale in London in December 2010. Currently, the increasingly rare individual plates from the Havell edition, when they do appear, generally sell for between $5,000 and $350,000 depending on the image. The quality of the Amsterdam Audubon plates is apparent to any discerning collector and it is becoming ever clearer that they offer the most attractive alternative to the Havell edition plates, given the latter's spiraling prices. Cf. Zimmer, p. 22; cf. Bennett, p. 5; cf. Fries, Appendix A; cf. Wood, p. 208; cf. Nissen IVB 51; cf. Sabin 2364; cf. Ripley 13; cf. Tyler, Audubon's Great National Work, 1993, Appendix I.
  • $150
Bachman's Warbler. From "The Birds of America" (Amsterdam Edition)

Bachman’s Warbler. From “The Birds of America” (Amsterdam Edition)

AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851) Colour-printed lithograph, on fine hand-made paper. Excellent condition. Image size: 19 x 14 1/4 inches. Sheet size: 26 3/4 x 39 7/8 inches (approx). [Pl. 185]. In October 1971, employing the most faithful printing method available, the best materials and the ablest craftsmen of their age, the Amsterdam firm of Theatrum Orbis Terrarum Ltd., in conjunction with the Johnson Reprint Corporation of New York, set out to produce the finest possible limited edition facsimile of the greatest bird book ever printed: the Havell edition of John James Audubon's well-loved "Birds of America". The Curators of the Teyler's Museum in Haarlem, Holland made their copy of the original work available for use as a model. The Museum, founded in 1778, bought their copy through Audubon's son as part of the original subscription in 1839. After long deliberation, the extremely complex but highly accurate process of colour photo-lithography was chosen as the appropriate printing method. The best exponents of this art were the renowned Dutch printing firm of NV Fotolitho Inrichting Drommel at Zandvoort who were willing to undertake the task of printing each plate in up to eight different colours. The original Havell edition was published on hand-made rag paper and the publishers were determined that the paper of their edition should match the original. Unhappy with the commercially available papers, they turned to the traditional paper manufacturers G. Schut & Zonen (founded in 1625), who, using 100% unbleached cotton rags, were able to produce a wove paper of the highest quality, with each sheet bearing a watermark unique to the edition: G. Schut & Zonen [JR monogram] Audubon [OT monogram]. The publishers and their dedicated team completed their task late in 1972 and the results of these labours were affectionately known as the "Amsterdam Audubon." 250 copies were published and sold by subscription, with the plates available bound or unbound. Given all this careful preparation, it is not surprising that the prints have the look and feel of the original Havell edition. John James Audubon was born in Les Cayes, Haiti on 26 April 1785. From 1788 to 1803 he lived in France until he was sent to the United States to manage an estate that his father had bought in Pennsylvania. He returned to France in 1805, but his fascination with the United States had taken root and he returned again in May 1806. He married Lucy Bakewell in 1808 and together they embarked on a difficult period financially that was only to be resolved, through Audubon's unshakable and justified belief in his own abilities, with the publication of his masterpiece in 1827-1838. "The Birds of America" is the single greatest ornithological work ever produced and is the realization of Audubon's dream of traveling throughout the United States recording, natural size, every native bird then known. The 435 double-elephant folio sized plates, printed by the Havells of London, depict some 1,065 different species, the majority drawn from specimens that Audubon himself had captured. The Havell edition was expensive at the time of publication and this has not changed. A complete copy sold for a staggering $11,400,000 in a sale in London in December 2010. Currently, the increasingly rare individual plates from the Havell edition, when they do appear, generally sell for between $5,000 and $350,000 depending on the image. The quality of the Amsterdam Audubon plates is apparent to any discerning collector and it is becoming ever clearer that they offer the most attractive alternative to the Havell edition plates, given the latter's spiraling prices. Cf. Zimmer, p. 22; cf. Bennett, p. 5; cf. Fries, Appendix A; cf. Wood, p. 208; cf. Nissen IVB 51; cf. Sabin 2364; cf. Ripley 13; cf. Tyler, Audubon's Great National Work, 1993, Appendix I.
  • $150
book (2)

Los Proverbios

Complete set of 18 etchings with aquatint and drypoint, 1816-24, on heavy wove paper, richly printed impressions from the First Published Edition of three hundred copies, with the lithographic title page on heavy wove paper, without watermarks. Plate sizes: 9 1/2 x 14 inches. Sheet sizes: 12 x 17 1/2 inches. Quarter morocco over 19th century marble paper boards. Spine lettered gilt First edition, one of 300 copies, of Goya's print series, completed in the years between 1815 and 1824. The original series comprised 22 plates. These copper plates were left with Goya's son Xavier on his departure from Spain in 1824. The plates remained hidden until Xavier's death in 1854. After which time, 18 of the plates passed through two different owners before they came to the Royal Academy of San Fernando in 1862, where they were published in this first, posthumous edition in 1864. Four remaining plates were discovered in Paris in the early 1870s, and were eventually published in the periodical, L'Art, in 1877. Evidence suggests that Goya started work on this series in 1815 and continued until 1819. When he left Spain and the absolutist regime of King Fernando VII for exile in Bordeaux, France, in 1824, he effectively left the proofs of Los Proverbios in wooden boxes in Spain, and never returned to them. Although Goya almost certainly intended to publish the series, it was never published in his lifetime. The first edition, published by the Real Academia de Nobles Artes de San Fernando, Madrid, in 1864 was at the time titled Los Proverbios (Proverbs). It quickly became apparent that the mysterious scenes depicted by Goya were not illustrating proverbs at all, but in 1864 the proofs Goya had produced in his lifetime were not known, nor was his title for them, Los Disparates (Follies). The series was made in a very particular political and personal context for Goya, at a time when he was not in the court's favour anymore, the new King Fernando VII preferring the court painter Vicente López (1772-1850) to him. Goya had confined himself to his house and focused on a world of his own, fully aware of the political situation and events around him but artistically removed from the demands of the court. The works also came at the end of the War of Independence (the Peninsular War, 1808-1814), the horrors of which the artist had unapologetically explored in one of his other great print series, Los Desastres de la Guerra. This context allowed Goya's fierce imagination to develop in Los Proverbios, in a work stunningly modern for its time. Deltiel 202-219; Harris 248-265.
book (2)

Sixteen Illustrations of Ancient Ceremonial Displays

(9 5/8 × 14 1/2 inches). First edition. 16 openings, 32 pp. 18 color-woodblock plates heightened with silver and textured inks including an architectural plan and 9 double-page spreads, all with Japanese title captions. Preliminary and terminal text in calligraphic Japanese with red woodblock stamps. Book reads from right to left: title and contents (1 p.), calligraphy (1 p.), 18 woodblock prints (27 pp.), postscript (3 pp.), colophon (1 p.). Publisher's green foliate-patterned silk fabric-covered boards in concertina-fold form with a printed color calligraphic paper-label on front board, thick wove paper with flecked endpapers Exquisitely printed Meiji-period color woodblock-printed book, or gafu, by the master Neo-Rinpa artist Furuya Korin, in its original orihon, or concertina-fold, format and binding. Furuya's Ancient Ceremonial Displays is a splendidly lavish, complex woodblock-printed book of traditional Japanese Imperial Court interiors from the premodern era. The superbly executed work is an elegant example of the orihon, or Japanese concertina-fold, codex printed on one side of a long piece of thick paper, then folded and placed in silk-wrapped boards. Furuya's publication was produced for members of the Kyoto Art Society in 1903; it captures how elite residences would decorate public rooms for special occasions. Its beautifully clear, intricate images depict all of the accouterments necessary for formal Japanese Court ceremonies and social activities of the ruling-class, such as tea and incense ceremonies, coming-of-age and wedding celebrations, and the samurai armor and clothing used in official events. So, too, do we see bonsai, furnishing, costume, ceramics, flowers, musical instruments, cat statues, folding screens, woodblock prints, fans, and weapons. The early twentieth-century fascination with Japan's past typified by the present work is a response to the opening and unbridled modernization of Japan in the late-1800s and the ensuing loss of a sense of tradition. Furuya, a master Meiji-era devotee of the Rinpa abstract aesthetic, was one of the foremost modern designers in fin-de-siècle Japan. Furuya adopted the name of the Rinpa artist Ogata Korin (1658-1716) as his own, claiming Ogata's legacy, saying he was the "Korin of the modern age," and pushed his style further. Ogata himself was famous for revitalizing the imagery of the classical literary world as imagined by Tawaraya Sotatsu (1570-1643). Rinpa artists used vibrant colors and patterns to design textiles, ceramics, and paintings long before abstraction was embraced in the West. Born in the Shiga Prefecture near Kyoto, Furuya studied under Suzuki Mannen (1868-1893), the Western-style painter Asai Chu (1856-1907), and most importantly, Kamisaka Sekka (1855-1942), who was the leading Rinpa practitioner of his day. Furuya became "instrumental in the development of Japanese modern design in the early twentieth-century" by taking up the mantle of Rinpa and pulling it into the new century. [Dover] He did so in part by being an integral member of the Kyoto Arts and Crafts circle and editing the important journal of Japanese design Shin-Bijutsukai. Beginning in 1905, Furuya also taught at the Kyoto Municipal School of Arts and Crafts; he was appointed to a professorship directly before his death in 1910. Among Furuya's works are other orihon-format albums of geometric patterns and motifs from nature based on flowers and plants (1905), pine trees (1905), and bamboo (1907), all published by Yamada Unsodo. His Korin Patterns (1907), a two-volume sample book for the kimono industry, was described by John T. Carpenter of the Metropolitan Museum of Art as "impressive." Furuya's gafu and e-hon works are held by the British Museum and the Rijksmuseum. The present book is in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. List of Plates: 1. Ritual Utensil Decoration. 2. Bedroom Decoration. 3. Genpuku Ceremony Decoration [Coming-of-Age Ceremony]. 4. Kujo Aristocratic F
book (2)

Tygers at Play

Etching, finished with a graver. State ii/iii, finished proof with the etched inscription: "Painted and Engraved by Geo: Stubbs / Publish'd as the Act directs febry. 25, 1780 by Geo: Stubbs London." An incredibly rare proof impression of George Stubbs' masterpiece. "Tygers at Play" is touching and sublime, and epitomizes Stubbs' genius as an animal painter. This is a stunning proof impression of one of George Stubbs' most famous prints. Stubbs is considered one of the greatest English painters. His ingenious animal and sporting pictures remain unrivalled in their passionate depiction of emotion and their commitment to naturalistic observation. Stubbs' was briefly apprenticed to the painter Hamlet Winstanley, a relationship which quickly ended, leaving the young artist to his own education. In contrast to contemporary academic theory, Stubbs' attached great importance to the belief that art should imitate nature, not the work of other artists. He spent years carefully studying human and equine anatomy so that he could truthfully represent natural form and movement. A result of this study was his famous Anatomy of the Horse, which details, with beautiful engraving, the various elements of a horse's anatomy, from skeletal form to muscular definition. Continuing in search of innovation, Stubbs began experimenting with a myriad of different media, becoming accomplished in both enameling and printmaking. Through arduous application, he became a talented mezzotint engraver and worked with ease in both soft ground and etching techniques. Stubbs was elected Director of the Society of Artists and a Royal Academician, and today his prized paintings are housed in some of the finest museums in the world. This animated image shows two leopards at play in front of the opening of a dark cave. Although the print was entitled Tygers at Play, early writings on natural history show that "tyger" was a generic term, commonly applied to all the larger cats, with the sole exception of the lion. This magnificent print not only demonstrates Stubbs' talents as an engraver but also exemplifies his genius when expressing animal emotion. In contrast to some of his darker images of conflict, Tygers at Play is light and carefree while still remaining true to nature. In mood and effect this image is nothing short of sublime. It blends natural observation with a sense of emotion, creating a visual feast for the viewer. Lennox-Boyd, George Stubbs, 60, ii/iii; Gilbey, Life of George Stubbs, no. 36; Sparrow, British Sporting Artists from Barlow to Herring, 1922, p. 135; Siltzer, The Story of British Sporting Prints, p. 271; Taylor, The Prints of George Stubbs, no. 2 (described LB states II and III); Parris, pp. 7-11 (describes all states); Snelgrove, British Sporting and Animal Prints 1658-1874, no. 27.
book (2)

General Orders Book Referring to African-American Soldiers

(8 x 5 1/2 inches). First edition. 512 pp. General Orders 1-172. Circulars I-16. Over fifty contemporary ink manuscript signatures throughout. Front board ruled in blue ink with contemporary ink manuscript title, stab-stitched, with no spine or back board, leaves uncut American Civil War book of General Orders, capturing the War's day-to-day progress in South Carolina and the incremental integration of Black people into the Union Army. This book of General Orders and Circulars was kept by an officer in the Department of the South headquarted at Folly Island and Hilton Head in South Carolina during the American Civil War. The Department of the South had more opportunities to recruit African Americans than most other Army Departments and this collection of General Orders reflects that. Many of the Courts Martial, the reports of which make up the majority of this group of orders, involve African-American soldiers. Examples include: General Order No. 6 (January 1, 1864): "Ordered: That Major General Gilmore, commanding the Department of the South, be and he is hereby authorized: First: To enlist and organize all the colored troops that can be recruited in his Department, the said enlistments to be in accordance with the rules and regulations of the service and of the War Department, relating to the organization of colored troops. Second: General Gilmore is authorized to appoint a Board for the examination of white persons to officer the regiments and companies so raised by him and to make provisional appointments of the persons passed by said Board." General Order No. 34 (March 8, 1864): "Pursuant to section 24, of the Act approved February 24, 1864, amendatory of the Act of March 3, 1863, Boards of Enrollments in districts in which there are any colored persons held to service, will, without delay, proceed to enroll all such persons as are liable to military duty." General Order No. 44 (March 26, 1864): "In accordance with orders from the War Department, the 1st and 2d Regiments South Carolina, and the 1st Regiment North Carolina Volunteers (Colored), will, hereafter, be known and designated, respectively, as the 33rd, 34th, and 35th Regiments US Colored Troops."
book (2)

[Manuscript log of the U.S.S. Delaware, kept by Robert Storer, during her final cruise home from the Mediterranean]

62 pp. Original brown cloth. Cloth moderately soiled and stained. Light dampstaining to some of the text. An American Navy cruise in the Mediterranean. Manuscript log book of the U.S.S. Delaware, kept by seaman Robert B. Storer, during the ship's final voyage. The U.S.S. Delaware was launched in October 1820. She spent most of her active duty cruising in the Mediterranean, where she served in the interests of American commerce and diplomacy in that area, though she also spent several years stationed in Brazil, patrolling the coasts of Brazil, Uruguay, and Argentina to represent American interests during political unrest in those countries. She began her final voyage to the Mediterranean in February 1843, setting out from Rio de Janeiro. This log covers the last three months of the Delaware's active service, documenting her return voyage from the Mediterranean to Norfolk. She arrived home in March 1844, and was still at the naval yard in 1861, when she was set afire with other U.S. ships in order to keep them from falling into Confederate hands. The log begins with the ship at anchor in Mahon harbor, off Minorca in the Mediterranean. Storer keeps details of provisioning the ship and readying to sail for first 12 days of January. As is standard with ship's logs, he records speeds, winds, and weather conditions, as well as the positioning of the sails. Everyday events such as inspecting the crew or holding "divine service" on Sundays are noted, as well, as are sightings of other ships' sails and exchanging colors with passing vessels. The Delaware sights the coast of Spain and moves into the Atlantic around the third week in January; on February 2, crew member Jacob Lawrence, a marine, dies (though Storer does not say from what), and his funeral service is held the next day, and Lawrence's body is committed to the deep. Also of note, the Delaware investigates a wreck on Feb. 15: "At 7.45 hauled up the courses, hauled down the jib and laid the main and mizen topsails to the mast, and sent a boat to board the wreck. At 8.15 the boat returned from the wreck; discovered her to be the English Hermaphrodite Brig 'Halifax' of 'Halifax,' loaded with lumber, water logged and foremast sawed off, nothing living on board." The rest of the voyage is uneventful and relatively smooth, and the Delaware sights the Cape Henry light house on March 4th. The last few days are recorded as the ship is anchored at Hampton Roads, including a salute to the passing of former Secretary of the Navy, Thomas Gilmer, who died on February 28th.
book (2)

Account of an Expedition from Pittsburgh to the Rocky Mountains, performed in the Years 1819, and ’20 &under the Command of Major Stephen H. Long

3 volumes (text: 2 vols., octavo [8 1/2 x 5 1/4 inches]; atlas: 1 vol., quarto [11 3/4 x 9 3/8 inches]). Atlas: 11 engraved plates and maps (2 double-page maps after S.H. Long by Young & Delleker; 1 double-page plate of geological cross-sections; 8 plates [1 hand-coloured] after S. Seymour [6], T.R. Peale [1] and one unassigned, engraved by C.G. Childs [2], Lawson [1], F. Kearney [2], W. Hay [1], Young & Delleker [1]). Text: expertly bound to style in full tree calf, covers bordered with a gilt double fillet, flat spine in compartments divided by darker tree calf bands and gilt roll tools, lettered in the second and fourth compartments, the others with a repeat decoration in gilt, marbled endpapers. Atlas: bound to style in half tree calf over period marbled paper covered boards, spine uniform to the text A fine copy of the first edition of one of the most important early western expeditions. Edwin James was the botanist, geologist, and surgeon for this important government expedition, initially named the Yellowstone Expedition. Led by Major Stephen Long, the expedition added significantly to the earlier discoveries of Lewis and Clark and Zebulon Pike. In addition to his duties on the expedition, James subsequently served as the editor and compiler of this text, relying "upon his own records, the brief geological notes of Major Long, and the early journals of Thomas Say [who served as the expedition's naturalist]" (Wagner-Camp). Appendices to the text comprise astronomical and meteorological tables and Indian vocabularies. In addition to Long, James and Say, the expedition included Titian Peale as draughtsman and assistant naturalist; and Samuel Seymour as landscape artist. The published plates depict Oto Indians, views of the Plains, and buffalo. Major Long was the principal proponent of government-sponsored exploration of the West following the War of 1812. He travelled farther than Pike or Lewis and Clark, and blazed trails that were subsequently followed by Fremont, Powell, and others. The expedition travelled up the Missouri and then followed the River Platte to its source in the Rocky Mountains before moving south to Upper Arkansas. From there the plan was to find the source of the Red River, but when this was missed the Canadian River was explored instead. Cartographically, the atlas contains the first maps to provide detail of the Central Plains. Upon returning to Washington from the expedition, Long drafted a large manuscript map of the West (now in the National Archives) and the printed maps in James's Account closely follows. The "Western Section" map is particularly interesting as it here that the myth of the Great American Desert was founded by Long: a myth which endured for decades. The designation Great American Desert appears east of the single range of the Rocky Mountains, together with a two-line note: "The Great American Desert is frequented by roving bands of Indians who have no fixed places of residence but roam from place to place in quest of game." Long's map, along with that of Lewis and Clark, "were the progenitors of an entire class of maps of the American Transmississippi West" (Wheat). American Imprints 12942; Graff 2188; Howes J41; Sabin 35682; Streeter sale 3:1783; Wagner-Camp 25:1; Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 353; see Nicholas and Halley, Stephen Long and American Frontier Exploration (1995).
book (2)

Lands of the Moslem: A Narrative of Oriental Travel

(9 1/4 x 6 inches). First edition. [1]-378 [4]. 382 pp. Engraved frontispiece of Mount Zion by Burt, Title with Latin epigraph, Deposit statement, Contents, Text, Appendix, Publisher's advertisements. Four engraved views including Jerusalem by Burt (p.262), the Mount of Olives by J. Bannister after the Rev. G. Fisk (p.273), and the Ruins of Tyre by O. Pelton after J. D. Harding from an original by Cassas (p.329). In-text woodcut illustrations throughout, including a print of hieroglyphic inscriptions (p.158). Contemporary ink manuscript signature in three locations. Publisher's brown embossed and grained cloth with arabesque pattern, gilt-lettering on spine. A travel narrative of Palestine, Egypt, Lebanon, and other parts of the Holy Land by a biblical scholar and future chancellor of New York University. "Everywhere were running streams and fountains, by the side of which grew pomegranates, magnolias, figs, olives, oranges, and apricots, in the greatest luxuriance and profusion." - Crosby, describing the Palestinian city of Nablus (p.295). Lands of the Moslems is a Middle-East travelogue with a scholarly approach, including descriptions of Islamic antiquities and theological reflections on Islam, narrating Rev. Crosby's sixteen-month journey from 1848 to 1849. Chapter titles herein include "The Nile," "Thebes," "Deserts of Suez and Shur," "Judea," "Samaria and Galilee," and other locales expected to interest an American reverend of means in the nineteenth century. It is an important work in Tourism Studies, and it stands with Volney's and Robinson's accounts as essential to understanding the perspective of the West toward the Middle East and Muslims in the mid-1800s. Crosby, a Presbyterian preacher and academic from a prominent family, was educated in New York City before sojourning in the Middle East between 1849 and 1851. Upon returning to the United States, Crosby became a professor of Greek, teaching at New York University and Rutgers University, and served as Chancellor of New York University from 1870 to 1881, then known as the University of the City of New York, and as president of the American Philogical Association in 1871. Besides Lands of the Moslem, the author published several theological works on early Christianity such as Jesus: His Life and Works (1871), and True Temperance Reform (1879), and, interestingly, an American translation of Sophocles's Oedipus Rex. Crosby was influential in New York politics as the first president of the New York Society for the Prevention of Crime, and he pleaded for better management of Indian affairs and international copyright.
book (2)

Les Merveilles des Indes Orientales et Occidentales, ou Nouveau Traitte des Pierres precieuses & Perles

[12], 112pp. Engraved portrait of Anne Marie Louise D'Orleans. Expertly bound to style First edition of this rare work on precious stones and pearls found in the East and West Indies, including a section on pearl fishing in the Persian Gulf. "The first chapter attempts to reconcile differing views of various writers, as cited by Berquen, on the origin of gemstones and precious metals, with following chapters taking up the principal gemstones, and some minor ones, as diamond, sapphire, topaz, ruby, spinel, emerald, amethyst, aquamarine, hyacinth, opal, chrysolite, iris, vermeille, garnets, carnelian, turquoise, quartz varieties, pearl, coral and amber, and lastly, a chapter on gold and silver" (Sinkankas, p. 97f). Dedicated to "La Grande Mademoiselle" Anne Marie Louise d'Orléans, Duchess of Montpensier and niece of Louis XIII, with her finely engraved portrait by L. Boissevin, This early treatise on the subject includes a chapter dedicated exclusively to pearls: "on pesche les perles en divers endroits du monde. Dans le Golfe Persique, principalement aux environs de l'Isle d'Ormus & Bassora: aupres de Baroyn [i.e., Bahrain], Catiffa, Iuffa, Camaron, & autres lieux de ce Golfe" (p. 74). Scarce, especially complete with the portrait. Sinkankas 592; Sabin 4957; Brunet VI, 4780; Graesse I, 348; Ferguson II, 295 (note); JCB(3) III:51-52; Alden and Landis 661.
book (2)

The Gentleman and Cabinet-Maker’s Director. Being a Large Collection of the Most Elegant and Useful Designs of Houshold Furniture in the Gothic, Chinese, and Modern Taste

(17 1/2 x 10 5/8 inches). First edition. [3] a-b2 A-G2 [161]. 182 ff. [4] [i]-x [1]-[28] [322]. 364 pp. Half-title, letterpress title-page printed red and black, engraved dedication to the Earl of Northumberland, Preface, Names of the Subscribers, General Proportions, Rules to Draw Chairs, List of Plates, 161 engraved plates by J. Müller, T. S. Müller, and M. Darly after Chippendale printed on rectos, versos blank. Pencil annotations in a contemporary hand including sketches of furniture, budgets, and an improvised ruler. Original full calf boards worn and refurbished with rudimentary repairs, re-backed spine with six raised bands forming seven compartments, ruled gilt, with gilt-lettered red morocco lettering-piece in second compartment First edition of Chippendale's groundbreaking furniture pattern-book with all 161 exquisite engravings, the most important book of furniture designs in eighteenth-century England. "The Director ushered in a new era in furniture design and forever changed the way furniture designs evolved and were disseminated." [Greene] The Director is a furniture pattern-book that contains 161 engraved plates after designs by Chippendale of furniture in the Gothic, Chinoiserie, English, and French Rococo styles. It was intended to act as a trade catalog for Chippendale's cabinet making firm, which he started in London in 1748. This landmark large folio of Chippendale's had a great impact on American aesthetics, particularly in Philadelphia where several copies were known to have been in the 1760s. "Chippendale's richly carved style had a pervasive influence on local cabinetmaking." [Heilbrunn] His text was extensively relied upon by furniture-makers in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; the present copy bears authentic witness to this use with contemporary annotations from a craftsman at work, as well as fingerspots of varnish on the leaves and a workaday binding. The object's historicity perfectly portrays the trade as it was at the time. Chippendale states in the preface that his intention behind The Gentleman and Cabinet-Maker's Director was to assist the one (the Gentleman) in the choice, and the other in the execution of the designs. The term "Chippendale" is often used to describe English Rococo furniture inspired by The Director's illustrated designs. Published by subscription, the book was an immense success and led to wide dispersal of his work. "His designs were plagiarized from at least the early Victorian period by the publisher John Weale, and more or less free adaptations from The Director have been a staple product of commercial furniture makers since the mid-nineteenth century." [ODNB] The publication's reputation helped Chippendale's firm attract many fashionable clients, including the English actor and playwright David Garrick. Two more editions appeared in Chippendale's lifetime: a virtually identical second edition in 1755, and a revised third edition published in installments from 1759-1762. This complete example of the first edition is as issued, with Page 21 numbered 20. The plates are numbered I-CLX in alternating Roman and Arabic numerals, with two of the plates numbered XXV, the first of which is "Chinese Chairs," the second is "Chinese Sopha," as called for. Avery, Architectural Library, p.160. Berlin Catalogue 1227. Brunet I, 1844. Greene, American Furniture of the 18th Century, p.61. HBS 64829. Heilbrunn, Timeline of Art History, Metropolitian Museum of Art. ODNB. O'Neal 26. Rothschild 614.
book (2)

The Mutineers Turning Lieutenant Bligh and Part of the Officers and Crew Adrift from His Majesty’s Ship the Bounty

Contemporary hand-colored aquatint engraving on cream laid paper. Sheet size: 19 1/2 x 25 5/8 inches. Rare separately-issued print showing Captain Bligh and his loyal men being cast adrift from the Bounty: one of the best known and most desirable of all maritime images, and the only known likeness of the mutineer Fletcher Christian. This famous print shows the moment following the mutiny on the Bounty on April 29, 1789, when Bligh and his loyal crew members are being forced to board the ship's 23-foot launch. Still attached to the Bounty by a line, the mutineers toss four swords to the castaways in the small vessel. The six-line caption below the image relates Bligh's remarkable achievement of safely navigating the open vessel with nineteen men a distance of four thousand miles to safety: "Sustained life under divine providence for 41 days." On the right is a dedication to "the West Indian Planters and Merchants on whose benevolent representation the expedition for transporting the valuable Bread Fruit was undertaken." This print is particularly noteworthy for depicting the only known likeness of the infamous mutineer Fletcher Christian. Christian is shown wearing a hat, standing at the stern of the ship between two breadfruit trees. Dodd, who both painted and engraved this image, was a noted marine painter of the period. It's believed that Dodd consulted Bligh concerning the likenesses of the crew members, including Christian, as well as his general portrayal of the event. Bligh (1754-1817) was a naval officer and colonial governor who joined the Royal Navy at sixteen and was appointed, six years later, to Cook's third voyage as Master of HMS Resolution. His main task on that voyage was to draw charts, and so he honed his exceptional navigational talent. Promoted to Lieutenant, he served in the West Indies before being appointed Commander of HMS Bounty, set to embark to Tahiti to collect Breadfruit plants for British settlements in the Caribbean. After a five-month stay, few crewmembers wanted to leave the Tahitian women with whom they had began relationships, which eventually caused a mutiny on the ship three weeks after departure. According to Bligh, he was abducted from his bed at night, bound, and threatened with death before being put in the ship's launch with his supporters. The voyage that ensued is legendary: with no maps, Bligh successfully navigated three thousand miles to Timor and lost but one man. During the voyage, he even charted part of the coast of Australia. The mutineers, meanwhile, returned to Tahiti before heading to Pitcairn Island where they burned the Bounty at sea. Fourteen mutineers were apprehended in Tahiti, and three were hanged in England after trial. Bligh made a second, successful voyage for Breadfruit between 1791 and 1793. Dodd was a leading painter of maritime subjects who also issued his paintings as engravings. His works are characterized by high drama and include detailed studies of famous ships, naval actions, and battle scenes from the Napoleonic and American Revolutionary wars. His image of the mutiny on the Bounty is the best-known contemporary depiction of the event. Nan Kivell and Spence, p. 32.
book (2)

Ideenmagazin für Liebhaber von Gärten, Englischen Anlagen und für Besitzer von Landgütern um Gärten und ländliche Gegenden, sowohl mit geringem als auch grossem Geldaufwand, nach den originellsten Englischen, Gothischen, Sinesischen Geschmacksmanieren zu verschönern und zu veredeln. [Magazine of Ideas for Lovers of Gardens, English Landscapes and for Owners of Country Estates to Embellish and Refine Gardens and Rural Areas, Both with Little and Large Expenditure of Money, According to the Most Original English, Gothic, Chinese Taste]. Recueil d’Idees Nouvelles pour la Decoration des Jardins. [Collection of New Ideas for Garden Decoration]

(12 1/2 x 9 1/2 inches). First, second, and third editions. Four volumes of 46 cahiers. Ideen Magazin: II-XXIV, XXVI-XXIX, XXXI-XXXXVIII. Neues Ideen-Magazin: I. 423 copper-engraved plates, of which 36 are hand-colored, 1 printed brown and black, 1 folding, and 1 with over-slip. Vol. I, second edition: Cahiers XIII-XXIV. 194 ff. 388 pp. 112 copper-engraved plates, of which 16 are hand-colored and 1 is printed black and brown. Vol. II, first edition. Cahiers XXXVII-XXXXVIII. 138 ff. 276 pp. 104 copper-engraved plates. Vol. III, first, second, and third editions, 1798-1806. Cahiers II-XII and Neues Ideen-Magazin I. 159 ff. 318 pp. 120 copper-engraved plates, of which 17 hand-colored, and 1 folding. Vol. IV: Cahiers XXVI-XXIX XXXI-XXXVI. 109 ff. 218 pp. 87 copper-engraved plates, 3 of which are colored, and one with over-slip. Letterpress titles, some cahiers with part-titles, no title in Vol. IV. Text in German and French. Introduction, index, explanatory texts. Bound to style in half diced russia over orange stone-pattern marbled boards, flat spine richly gilt in six panels with gilt-lettered red morocco titling-piece in second, gilt-lettered black morocco volume piece in fourth, and rest with foliate center tool, green endpapers, leaves on both laid and wove Provenance: Armorial bookplate of Sir John Bridgeman. "The most beautiful German magazine of the 18th century about the layout of gardens, garden houses, their equipment and furnishings, and garden decorations." [Kirchner] Grohmann's Ideenmagazin was published for "admirers of English gardens" and landowners wishing to "ornament" their properties. The present four volumes are a significant selection from this profusely and finely illustrated magazine filled with suggestions for what we now call landscape architecture. The 423 plates are of views of gardens and country houses, follies, tempietti, chinoiseries, facades, decorative grilles and fences, monuments, steles, water features, bridges, pavilions, grottoes, and lanterns "to embellish and refine garden and rural areas according to the original English, Gothic, and Chinese tastes." These designs reflect an eclectic range of sources and styles, Western and Eastern, classical and rustic, with beautifully detailed views of the landscaped gardens and their furnishings, all of which are done in a mode tinged with romanticism. "Grohmann took care to emphasize emotional effect and atmosphere. 'There are moods in the soul,' he wrote, that may be brought into a 'certain indescribable analogy with the surroundings through the choice of style.'" [Hvattum] Due to the comprehensive variety of the buildings depicted as well as the fine execution of the copper engravings, Grohmann's Ideenmagazin acquired a legendary reputation throughout Europe, and boasted of simultaneous publishing in Russia, France, Germany, and Budapest. Its popularity induced numerous derivative followers to begin publishing similar content. Grohmann was a Professor of Philosophy at Leipzig, and a prolific author of works on architecture and the decorative arts. "Grohmann's ambition, as the magazine's subtitle spelled out, was to 'improve and ennoble gardens and landscapes.' The examples were sometimes actual buildings, but just was often they were projects drawn up by architects in Grohmann's circle. Ideenmagazin became something of a hotbed for a new generation of German architects, with Carl Haller von Hallerstein, Gottfried Klinsky, Johann August Heine, and many others using the journal to widen not only garden patrons' choice but also the accepted stylistic repertoire of German architecture." [Havttum] The Ideenmagazin was continued briefly after his death in 1805 by the publisher F. G. Baumgärtner. Complete copies of Ideenmagazin are exceptionally rare and comprise 60 cahiers in 5 volumes with 555 copperplates, 42 being colored, with cahiers 1-48 from Ideenmagazin and and 1-12 from Neues Ideenmagazin. Often individual leaves are missing, having been taken o
book (2)

La Theorie et la Pratique de Jardinage, ou l’On Traite a Fond des Beaux Jardins Apellés Communément les Jardins de Plaisance et de Proprete

(10 x 7 1/2 inches). "Nouvelle Edition Augmentée Considerablement." Vol. I: *-**4 A-Pp4. [i]-xvi [1]-293. 310 pp. Vol. II: 38 engraved plates, 33 are double-plates, 5 are folding. Woodcut head and tail-pieces, historiated initials, and illustrations in-text. Title printed red and black with woodcut printer's device, Dedication with engraved coat-of-arms, Avis, Table of contents, Bookbinder's directions, Parts I-IV, Errata, Table des matieres. Contemporary full calf expertly rebacked to style and ruled gilt, five raised bands forming six compartments on spine, gilt-lettered in second and fourth compartments, bookplate on front pastedowns, within a brown half morocco-backed clamshell box Expanded and corrected edition of the most influential French work on garden design of the first half of the eighteenth century. "The author was at various times Maitre de Comptes for Paris and counsellor to the King of France. A writer, naturalist, and collector, he studied architecture under Alexandre Le Blond, to whom the work has sometimes been incorrectly ascribed, drawing under Bernard Picart and painting under Roger de Piles. Dezallier describes the manner of gardening practiced by Andre Le Notre (1613-1700), who designed or redesigned the gardens of Versailles, Tuileries, and Fountainebleau. The work deals with garden design and such details as the creation of parterres, mazes, garden buildings, ornaments, and fountains. According to Henrey, Le Blond, the noted architect and designer of the Peterhof garden, did the original sketches for about three quarters of the plates, with the remainder done by the author." [Johnston] "It is especially valuable as a record of the manner of gardening as practiced by Le Notre. The original French work appeared anonymously in Paris in 1709, and in the opinion of Gothein: 'Never before did a book lay down the principles of any style so surely and so intelligibly in instructive precepts.' The popularity of the work is attested by the fact that it was published five times in Paris, three times at the Hague, and three times in London." [Henrey] Brunet II, 523. De Ganay 45. Henrey II, pp. 491-493. Hunt 421. Johnston 324.
book (2)

The Complete Farmer: or, a General Dictionary of Husbandry, in All Its Branches; Containing the Various Methods of Cultivating and Improving every Species of Land, According to the Precepts of Both the Old and New Husbandry

(10 3/4 x 8 inches). Second edition, Corrected and Improved. [A]4 B-4R4 4S2 *A-*O4 *P2. [688] [1]-111 [5]. 804 pp. 28 engraved plates, 27 of which are folding. Engraved allegorical frontispiece, title, advertisement, the Complete Farmer, the Gardeners Kalendar, introduction, calendar, index. Printed in double columns. Woodcut calculations and minor ornaments. Contemporary full tan calf, gilt-patterning along board edges, five raised bands forming six compartments on spine with gilt-lettered red morocco titling-piece in second, all edges sprinkled red One of the foremost publications on rural and agrarian matters in the late 18th century, with twenty-seven folding plates and a gardner's supplement. A lovely example of an extensive and influential dictionary of information on agriculture and husbandry from A to Z, written by a member of the Royal Society of Arts under the pseudonym "A Society of Gentlemen." First issued in 1756, the Complete Farmer was published in weekly numbers until 1768. The present work is an example of the 1769 second edition that followed. It contains rich text and elaborate engravings related to cultivating and improving land; breeding, managing, and fattening cattle; curing various diseases; crops, insects, vegetation, water, and much more. Several pages are dedicated to apiary and bees - their anatomy, habits, wax, honey, and preservation. Bound at rear is the supplement "the Gardners Kalendar, Calculated for the Use of Farmers and Country Gentlemen: Containing an Ample Account of the work Necessary to be Done Every Month in the Year; in the Nursery, Kitchen, Fruit, and Flower Gardens. Together with Full Directions for Performing Every necessary Operation, According to the Latest Improvements." It explains which crops grow best in which season through all twelve months of the year. Its ample information is as pertinent to gardening today, especially organic gardening, as it was when it was written. The twenty-seven fold-out engravings each exhibit several associated figures, often with cursive captioning, that are attractive and laden with visual information of a didactic and decorative nature. Aslin 120. British Bee Books 117. ESTC T75354. Higgs 3643. Perkins 379.
book (2)

Residences Memorable De l’incomparable Heros de nôtre Siecle ou Representation exacte des Edifices et Jardins de Son Altesse Serenissime Monseigneur Le Prince Eugene Francois Duc de Savoye et de Piemont.[bound with:] Representation Des Animaux de la Menagerie de S. A. S. Monseigneur le Prince Eugene Francois de Savoye et de Piemont.

(13 3/4 x 20 2/3 inches). First edition. 2 works bound in one volume. 11 engraved calligraphic title pages in French and German (10 in first work, one in second), text in French and German, one engraved dedication leaf at beginning of first work, 102 fine engraved plates after Kleiner, 90 in the first work with 9 folding and 12 in the second work. Nineteenth-century marbled paper boards, rebacked and recornered in calf, flat spine with black Morocco label, marbled endpapers, untrimmed edges First edition with 102 fine plates of a masterpiece of Baroque architecture: the Belvedere Palace and Gardens in Vienna, brought to life by Salomon Kleiner's unequaled engravings. These fine engravings depict a masterpiece of Baroque architecture: the Belvedere Palace and Gardens in Vienna, summer home of Prince Eugene of Savoy. The masterwork of architect Johann Lukas von Hildebrandt, Belvedere is displayed here in all its glory, in artist Salomon Kleiner's detailed engravings of the exterior, the garden, and the many splendid rooms. The second work is a charming view of the Prince's menagerie, filled with exotic animals and plants. Born into a noble French family--and rumored to be the illegitimate son of Louis XIV-- Eugene (1663-1736) was thwarted in his military ambitions by the Sun King's disfavor. Consequently, he moved to Austria and offered his services to the Holy Roman Emperor. He became Field Marshal of the Austrian army and teacher of Frederick the Great. The rewards Eugene received for his military success enabled him to become a patron of Baroque architecture; the Belvedere, planned and constructed by the most distinguished architects, engineers, landscapers, and decorators, was the grandest of his residences, and a worthy rival to his nemesis Louis XIV's Versailles. Kleiner's scenes show the beautiful palace and grounds enlivened by fashionable figures of the sort Prince Eugene entertained at his many hunting parties. This delightful menagerie established in 1717 comes to life in Kleiner's engravings, which depict chatty parrots, stately elk, exotic birds, mischievous apes, and a regal and rather disdainful lion. Berlin Katalog 2117. Brunet III.674. Goldschmidt, XX.8.24. Graesse IV, 28. Jessen 1060. Lewine, p. 263. Lipperheide 686. MMA Bulletin, 1929.XXIV, pp.322-326. Nissen ZBI 2212 (second work only). S.K.B. 2117. Univ. Cat. I.999.
book (2)

An Historical, Geographical, Commercial, and Philosophical View of the American United States, and of the European Settlements in America and the West-Indies

(8 1/4 x 5 inches). Book: (8 1/4 x 5 inches). Large folding maps: (21 x 16 1/2 inches). Complete first edition. 39 of 39 called-for plates. 9 engraved folding maps by Russell including the Washington map, 1 hand-colored engraving of a tobacco plant, four engraved frontispieces of Washington, Penn, Franklin, and Winterbotham by Grainger, 21 engravings of animals, plans, and views, and 5 letterpress tables printed recto verso. Volume I: A4 a4 B-4F4. [i]-viii [10] [1]-591 [1]. 4 plates including two engraved folding maps and engravings of the Falls of St. Anthony and the George Washington frontispiece. Title, Preface, Subscribers' Names, Contents, letterpress tables, text. Volume II: [A]-3R4. [6] [1]-493 [1]. 500 pp. 4 plates including 2 engraved folding maps and 2 engravings including a "View of the Ohiopyle Falls in Pennsylvania" and the engraved frontispiece of William Penn. Title, Contents, text. Volume III: [A] B-3U4 3X3. [6] [1]-525 [1]. 532 pp. 9 plates including 3 engraved folding maps, 5 engravings, 1 of which is hand-colored, and a folding letterpress table. Engraved frontispiece of Benjamin Franklin, Title, Contents, text. Volume IV: [A]4 B-3G4 A-F4 G3 H4 I2. [4] [1]-415 [1] [1]-54 [12]. 486 pp. 21 plates including 2 engraved folding maps, 4 double-sided letterpress tables including 3 folding, and 16 engravings including the frontispiece of Winterbotham and many plates of American wildlife. Title, Contents, Text, Tables, Appendices I-VI, Index, Directions to the Binder. Later speckled black half calf over period marbled paper-covered boards, with five gilt raised bands forming six compartments on spine, gilt-lettered red morocco titling-piece in second compartment and black morocco lettering-piece in third True first London edition with Russell's large folding maps of Washington and Kentucky (printed two years after statehood; portraits of Washington and Franklin); the hand-colored tobacco plant; and over thirty other plates, including many of American wildlife. Winterbotham was a British Baptist minister and author. He was prosecuted for giving two sermons in Plymouth, England, in 1792, in which he espoused his radical and seditious views on religious persecution and the French Revolution. Winterbotham was found guilty, fined one hundred pounds for each sermon, and sentenced to Newgate Prison. He served time there from 1793 to 1797, and wrote the present work of richly-illustrated popular history from his cell. Subjects in the detailed index at the end of Volume IV suggests the breadth of Winterbotham's comprehensive coverage: the discovery and early settlement of the Americas; the American Revolution; each of the states of the Union; the Canadian Provinces and Northwest Territory; the West Indies; and South America. The work also includes considerable information on sugar and tobacco production, with numerous tables related to West Indian imports and the value of British plantation sugar. Gephart writes that Winterbotham's work is "a digest of more than two dozen contemporary sources, including the works of Adams, Franklin, Jefferson, Belknap, Gordon, Ramsay, and Raynal, as well as census data, state constitutions, and religious tracts." Most of the book's handsome plates illustrate American wildlife such as birds, quadrupeds, and reptiles, and were executed unsigned. The well-known hand-colored plate of the tobacco plant is present here in the third volume, as is every other called-for plate and map, including Russell's often-lacking map of Washington, and the frontispieces of Washington, Franklin, and Penn. The list of plates at the rear of Volume IV erroneously calls for a plate of Niagara Falls rather than the plate of the Falls of St. Anthony that is present in all copies. [Howes, Sabin] The present example is with the elusive Russell map of the District of Columbia. Russell's map is an early English printing of the surveyor Andrew Ellicott's plan for the city, based on designs by Pierre Charles l'Enfant. Engrav