Donald A. Heald Rare Books

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Four ships logs relating to his service aboard British battleships and cruisers between the wars

Four ships logs relating to his service aboard British battleships and cruisers between the wars, including time along the coasts of India and China

KETTLE, L. H. Over 700 manuscript pages, with approx. 90 manuscript maps and drawings of ships and ship-related schematics. Contemporary half cream and blue cloth, paper cover labels Well written and illustrated ships logs of a midshipman, including time on the China Station during the Second Sino-Japanese War. The logs begin on May 12, 1924, with midshipman Kettle reporting aboard the H.M.S. Resolution in Scotland. He spends the next year in various training drills, mostly at Invergordon or Rosyth, which he describes in great detail, and includes 22 inserted manuscript drawings of various parts of the ship, as well as several manuscript maps. On July 14, 1925 he transfers to the H.M.S. Effinghausen, then at Portsmouth. On August 25, after a month of drilling and repairs (and with several more sketches of the ship inserted), the cruiser departs Portsmouth toward Gibralter, Malta and the Suez Canal. Passing through Port Said on September 7 and the canal on the following day, the ship reaches Aden harbour on September 13 and Colombo ten days later and Trincomalee soon thereafter. Kettle's entries describe the scenery viewed, ships encountered, issues with the ship, weather, etc. He recounts in great detail lectures on the history of colonialism in the region given by the Commander-in-Chief. Additional sketches, schematic diagrams and graphs are inserted, relating to the ship. The voyage continues through the first half of 1926, with stops in Calcutta, Rangoon, Madras, Bombay, and Mauritius, before crossing to Africa, stopping at Mombasa and Zanzibar. Crossing back towards India, the ship spends the summer and autumn of 1926 along the western shore, continuing military drills, and participating in yacht races, field hockey, cricket matches, etc. Early in 1927, the ship crosses the sea to Rangoon, but returns to Trincomali by March, where Kettle, along with the other midshipman are given new assignments and passage home. The third log begins in January 1931, with Kettle receiving an appointment to the H.M.S. Sussex, which he joins at Malta in February for an 8-month cruise in the Meditteranean, stationed mostly at or in the vicinity of Malta, before returning to Great Britain. In his usual style, Kettle describes war-like exercises in great detail, and gives lots of information on ships encountered, and the day-to-day maintenance of the ship. After a few weeks leave, Kettle sets sail aboard the P&O Mail ship Corfu on a voyage to his new commission, the HMS Cumberland at Shanghai, which he reaches in November. In a December entry, Kettle details the history behind the "confused melee in Manchuria" recounting the events between Japan and China and the Mukden incident. Crossing to Hong Kong, in December Kittle writes further about the political unrest in China: "In China the student problem has become acute especially in Peking where the foreign office was burnt down. General Chang Kai Shek . has resigned and the Canton leaders have been asked to unite both sections into one united republic." By the end of January and continuing through March, Kettle's lengthy entries are filled with news of the conflict in China. Although mostly stationed at Hong Kong, in May 1932, the HMS Cumberland departs for Woosung, and Kittle details the destruction: "what a scene of desolation and destruction the place presents" before continuing to Shanghai, ChinKiang, Nanking, Hankow, Kiukiang, Wei Hai Wei. Kettle give lengthy descriptions of the landscape, people and ships encountered, and exercises, including various competitions among British ships. Included in this section of the log are several manuscript maps by Kettle of the various Chinese regions visited. In September, the ship sails for Dalien (Dairen) and Port Arthur, before continuing to Chefoo: "Instead of improving . the situation at Chefoo has again become worse. General Ham had surrounded the town of Laiyang and Laichow, and offering tribes of ten to fifty dollars has won over a great many troops to his side . The conditions inland are very bad for some 8000 soldiers of both sides are roaming the countryside in bands of about two hundred. In mid-October, the ship reaches Nagasaki for a brief visit, before sailing on for Keelung, en route back to Hong Kong By November, the H.M.S. Cumberland begins its journey home, via Singapore, Colombo and through the Suez, reaching Great Britain the week before Christmas. The final section of the log comprises Kettle's service aboard the H.M.S. Westminster and H.M.S. Hood in British waters between January - November 1933.
Mather's Historical Oil Region Views of Western Pennsylvania [cover title] . Mather's Historical Photographs . [Part I]

Mather’s Historical Oil Region Views of Western Pennsylvania [cover title] . Mather’s Historical Photographs . [Part I]

MATHER, John A. (10 x 13 1/4 inches). Letterpress title, 2 preliminary leaves of text. 12 photographs, printing-out paper prints, each linen backed as issued, with Mather's caption in the negative. Publisher's dark blue cloth, covers bordered in blind, upper covers lettered in gilt. Important photographic record of the early days of the U.S. Petroleum Industry. The work was made and published by the pioneer photographer of the Pennsylvania oil fields, John A. Mather. The first oil well in the United States was drilled by E. L. Drake in Oil Creek, Pennsylvania, near Titusville, in 1859. On the 29th of August oil was struck. John A. Mather, a recent English immigrant and aspiring photographer, heard of Drake's discovery and the ensuing oil rush, and moved to Titusville in October 1860. He set up a gallery, built a floating photo studio and over the next forty years compiled an exhaustive photographic record of the growth of the oil industry. Mather's photographs rarely turn up in the marketplace. The photographs in the present work were printed in 1895 from earlier negatives. Most photographs are identified and dated in the negative. Mather's photographs serve up a visual narrative of this transitional period, documenting the rapid growth of the region from 1864-1880s, when it emerged as the first site of substantial oil wealth in the United States. Mr. Drake is shown along with his first oil well. Mather also depicts the early days of Titusville. The Oil Exchange Hotel is set amidst rolling hills marked with numerous erector-set-like vertical structures. Laborers of all ages, including child "oil dippers," are chronicled along with the burly men who drilled and operated the giant rigs. Two additional parts were subsequently published, though are rarely encountered; all parts are scarce. Giddens, Paul H., Early Days of Oil: A Pictorial History of the Beginnings of the Industry in Pennsylvania (Princeton: 1948).
The Desponding Negro

The Desponding Negro

COLLINS, John; and William REEVE] Engraved sheet music, on two sheets. Very rare early American anti-slavery sheet music. Carr advertised the sale of this work in both Dunlap's American Daily Advertiser and Brown's Federal Gazette as early as August 1793. The poem by John Collins was first set to music by William Reeve the year prior in London, making this printing the likely first American issue. Given the large abolitionist Quaker population, this early American sheet music takes on added significance. Although not noted as an abolitionist, the Birmingham poet Collins wrote this poem in the wake of the debate over William Wilberforce's motion in Parliament to abolish slavery. In the poem, written in the first person from the perspective of the oppressed, the story is told of being kidnaped from Africa onto a slave ship, but during the crossing breaks his chains and runs on deck only to be struck by lightening, upon which due to the loss of his eyesight (and therefore perceived to have no value by the slavers) he is thrown overboard; although rescued, he laments the loss of his "watery grave" and his plight of wandering Britain free but penniless. See Haslinger regarding the use of death as a theme in 18th century antislavery verse (i.e. thereby equating slavery with death, or in this case a fate worse than death), in which she refers to the present poem: "Antislavery verse also uses meter to present enforced survival as a form of unfreedom that etiolates life; here, being fated to live is more unlucky than being fated to die. The emphatic verse of The Desponding Negro communicates the physical and psychological urgency of thespeakers desire to escape captivity (associated not only with enslavement but also with free existence in Britain), while also giving form to economic determinants of the speakers survival." As in all 18th century American sheet music, the present edition is very rare. OCLC records examples at Yale and Brigham Young; an additional example is located in the Library of Congress. Andrea Haslinger, "The Speaking and the Dead: Antislavery Poetry's Fictions of the Person" in The Eighteenth Century (Vol. 60, No. 4) Winter 2019.
The Yosemite Book; A Description of the Yosemite Valley and the Adjacent Region of the Sierra Nevada

The Yosemite Book; A Description of the Yosemite Valley and the Adjacent Region of the Sierra Nevada, and of the Big Trees of California.

WHITNEY, Josiah Dwight 116pp. Twenty-eight mounted albumen photographs, each 6 x 8 inches, and two folding maps. Publisher's half purple morocco and purple cloth covered boards, upper cover stamped in gilt, spine gilt, marbled endpapers, gilt edges Twenty-eight mounted photographs of Yosemite. An important photographically illustrated piece of Western Americana, containing twenty-eight original albumen photographs, the first twenty-four produced by Carleton T. Watkins in 1866 and the final four by W. Harris the following year. The Yosemite Book. was assembled by the office of the California State Geologist, headed by J.D. Whitney. The text was based mainly on the field survey work done by Clarence King in the 1866 season, supplemented with material from other sources. The whole was intended as a lavish guide to Yosemite. Only 250 copies were issued with photographs, as in the present copy. The rest were done on a smaller format to serve more practically as a guide book. The maps are the best of the Yosemite region produced up to that time. Whitney was justifiably proud of the work, which appeared early in 1869, although completed in December 1868. Currey & Kruska conclude that it is "one of the major contributions to Sierra Nevada literature." This work is now scarce. It was notably absent from the DeGolyer Library exhibition devoted to photographically illustrated western books (although it is listed in the appendix). Important and visually impressive. Cowan, p.699; Currey & Kruska, Yosemite Bibliography 60; Farquhar 7a; Graff 4646; Howell 50:929; Howes W389, "aa"; Kurutz, California Books Illustrated with Original Photographs 88; ROCQ 5170;Truthful Lens 896; Zamorano Select 32.
Hon. Mr. Leicester Stanhope

Hon. Mr. Leicester Stanhope

REYNOLDS, Sir Joshua (1723-1792) engraved by Francesco BARTOLOZZI Colour-printed stipple. In excellent condition with the exception of being trimmed on the lower margin with loss to imprint. A charming image of childhood by one of the greatest engravers of his day, after an original by the first president of the Royal Academy. Francesco Bartolozzi is undoubtedly England's most famous eighteenth century stipple engraver. An Italian by birth, Bartolozzi was trained in the Florentine Academy and apprenticed to the Venetian engraver Joseph Wagner. He was an accomplished painter and engraver and he began his career engraving plates after the Italian masters. With an invitation from George III Bartolozzi traveled to England where he undertook the massive task of engraving the drawings of Guercino, Tibaldi and other Italian artists housed in the Royal Collection at Windsor. During this period a new French printmaking technique came to the fore in England, and examples of it delicate results could be seen in every print shop window. According to Clayton, colour printing fuelled the vogue for stipple or dotted manner engraving, which dominated print production in France and England. Bartolozzi earned a reputation for himself by mastering this subtle medium, and his name will forever be linked with the introduction and popularization of stipple engraving in England. Bartolozzi's renown was so great that he earned the privilege of being the first engraver to gain full membership to the Royal Academy. His delicate work lives on as a testimony to his skill and innovation, and he remains one of the most sought after eighteenth century engravers. This charming image of Leicester Stanhope is a wonderful example of Bartolozzi's refined style of engraving. Leicester Fitzgerald Charles Stanhope is depicted here as a young child but he would later inherit the title of the fifth Earl of Harrington. Reynold's portrait was painted when Stanhope was under five and was known by the alternative title 'Sprightliness'. Stanhope went on to a distinguished military career in South America and India. He later supported the movements for the independence of Greece and Poland and the introduction of temperance laws in England. Vesme & Calabi, Francesco Bartolozzi 909; O'Donoghue, Catalogue of Engraved British Portraits. in the British Museum 1; Le Blanc, Manuel de L'Amateur D'Estampes VoI I, p.173, no. 609.
Hoffy's North American Pomologist

Hoffy’s North American Pomologist, containing numerous finely colored drawings, accompanied by letter press descriptions, &c, of fruits of American origin. Edited by William D. Brincklé

HOFFY, Alfred M. (fl. 1837-1864, lithographer and publisher). - William Draper BRINCKLÉ (1798-1862, editor) (10 1/2 x 7 3/4 inches). Lithographic portrait frontispiece of Brincklé by Hoffy, 36 hand-coloured lithographed plates, heightened and finished with gum arabic, all by Hoffy. Publisher's purple cloth, upper cover stamped in gilt A fine copy of this beautifully-illustrated and "very rare" (Bennett) work. "The design of the present work is to direct attention of Horticulturalists. to our native fruits, and to give such a pomological description and colored drawing of them, as that they may be readily identified" (Editor's preface). True to his word, Brincklé gives detailed descriptions of each variety under various sub-headings: size of fruit, flavour, quality, synonyms, form, etc., and then adds a paragraph or so on the historic origins of the variety. Details of 36 varieties are given (16 pears, 7 apples, 4 peaches, 3 raspberries, 2 plums, and 1 each of apricots, grapes, cherry and chestnut) all first described and tested in North America. But the chief glory of this work are the spectacular plates "of a delicate and charming quaintness . [they] are almost good enough to eat" (McGrath). All are 'drawn from nature' and lithographed by Hoffy himself. This is the third work on American fruits to be published by Hoffy with his own hand-coloured lithographs. His earliest and best-known publication is his Orchardist's Companion (Philadelphia: 1841-43). He then collaborated with Brincklé, a Philadelphia doctor and pomological enthusiast, on the ill-fated The American Pomologist (Philadelphia: 1851), the stock of which, according to Hoffy, was "consumed , uninsured, in the conflagration of the Artisan Building, in Ranstead Place" (Introduction to the present work). The present work is therefore Hoffy and Brincklé's second collaboration. The reasons why only the present "Book No.1" appeared are not known, but, at the time, its success seems to have been limited for, as Bennett notes, "it is [now] very rare". Dr. Brincklé's death in December 1862 may also have been a deciding factor. M.A. Amerine & A.E. Borg A bibliography on grapes, wines, other alcoholic beverages 1783; Bennett, p. 117; Bunyard 'Guide to the Literature of Pomology, in the Journal of the Royal Horticulture Society, p. 439; McGrath, p. 56; cf. Oak Spring Pomona 59. "Book no.1" (all published) quarto
The Natural History of Carolina

The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands: containing the figures of birds, beasts, fishes, serpents, insects, and plants; particularly, those not hitherto described, or incorrectly figured by former authors, with their descriptions in English and French

CATESBY, Mark (1683-1749) Titles in French and English and printed in red and black, parallel text printed in double columns in French and English. 1 double-page hand-coloured engraved map, 220 hand-coloured etched plates (218 by and after Catesby, most signed with his monogram, plates 61 and 96 in volume II by Georg Dionysius Ehret). With the 4pp. letterpress Catalogue of the Animals and Plants Represented in Catesby's Natural History, from the third edition, here inserted in the rear of the second volume. (Scattered minor foxing). Contemporary russia, covers bordered in gilt, expertly rebacked to style, expert restoration to the board edges and corners, marbled endpapers Provenance: Manchester Library (armorial bookplate) The second edition of the "most famous colorplate book of American plant and animal life . a fundamental and original work for the study of American species" (Hunt). A beautiful and vastly important work by the founder of American ornithology, this book embodies the most impressive record made during the colonial period of the natural history of an American colony and is the most significant work of American natural history before Audubon. Trained as a botanist, Catesby travelled to Virginia in 1712 and remained there for seven years, sending back to England collections of plants and seeds. With the encouragement of Sir Hans Sloane and others, Catesby returned to America in 1722 to seek materials for his Natural History; he travelled extensively in Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and the Bahamas, sending back further specimens. His preface provides a lengthy account of the development of this work, including his decision to study with Joseph Goupy in order to learn to etch his copper plates himself to ensure accuracy and economy. The end result is encyclopaedic: Catesby provides information not only on the botany and ornithology of the area, but also on its history, climate, geology and anthropology. Catesby writes in the preface of his method of working: "As I was not bred a Painter, I hope some faults in Perspective, and other niceties, may be more readily excused: for I humbly conceive that Plants, and other Things done in a Flat, if an exact manner, may serve the Purpose of Natural History, better in some Measure, than in a mere bold and Painter-like Way. In designing the Plants, I always did them while fresh and just gathered: and the Animals, particularly the Birds, I painted while alive (except a very few) and gave them their Gestures peculiar to every kind of Birds, and where it could be admitted, I have adapted the Birds to those Plants on which they fed, or have any relation to. Fish, which do not retain their colours when out of their Element, I painted at different times, having a succession of them procured while the former lost their colours. Reptiles will live for many months.so that I had no difficulty in painting them while living" (Vol.I, p.vi). The first edition was published in ten parts, with the final part appearing in 1743, plus the twenty plate appendix, which was issued four years later. Work appears to have begun on the present second edition almost immediately, if not simultaneously with the publication of the Appendix in 1747. According to Stafleu & Cowan, the second edition was published between 1748 and 1756. Recent discoveries have suggested that there are multiple issues of the second edition, including early issues that may partly be comprised by sheets from the first edition. The present set includes the first twenty text leaves in their corrected state. Reese, Struggle for North America 16; Cf. Anker 94; cf. Dunthorne 72; cf. Fine Bird Books (1990) p.86; cf. Great Flower Books (1990) p.87; cf Hunt 486 (1st edition); cf. Jackson Bird Etchings p.76; cf. Meisel III, p.341; cf. Nissen BBI 336; cf. Nissen IVB 177; cf. Ripley Yale p.55; Sabin 11508; cf. Stafleu & Cowan TL2 1057; Wood p.281 ('A rare printing'); E.G. Allen 'The History of American Ornithology before Audubon' in Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, new series, vol.41, part 3 (Philadelphia: October 1951); Amy Meyers & Margaret Pritchard Empire's Nature, Mark Catesby's New World Vision (Williamsburg, 1998); Edwin Wolf 2nd, A Flock of Beautiful Birds (Philadelphia, 1977), pp.5-7 (Catesby "was the first to observe and depict North American birds in their natural settings, combining ornithological details with botanic ones"); E. Charles Nelson and David J. Elliott, The Curious Mister Catesby (University of Georgia Press, 2015).
Autograph letter signed

Autograph letter signed, written to George Frederick Kunz regarding his research on the Neutron

CHADWICK, James 1pp. A short letter with an update about Chadwick's research on discovering the neutron. Two months prior to writing this letter, James Chadwick had only just begun experimenting with his research regarding the existence of a possible neutral particle in the nucleus of an atom alongside electrons and protons. In February of 1932, Chadwick published a paper titled "The Possible Existence of a Neutron," where he proposed this possibility. In the early months of his research, he sent the following letter in reply to George Frederick Kunz, the noted mineralogist and mineral collector and vice president of Tiffany & Co. at the time: "Dear Mr. Kunz, I am sorry that at the moment I can supply you with nothing of real interest about the neutron. It is possible, even probable, that I may be able to send you later photographs which show some of the effects of a neutron in passing through matter. Yours sincerely, J. Chadwick" Although the original letter from Kunz is unknown, it is implied that Kunz wrote to Chadwick inquiring for information regarding his early research into this ground-breaking discovery. Two months after sending this letter, in May of 1932, Chadwick published a paper definitively titled "The Existence of a Neutron," announcing that the nucleus of the atom contained an uncharged particle, which he called the neutron, that had previously been undiscovered. For this discovery, Chadwick was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1935, and his discovery radically changed scientists' view of the atom and paved the way for inventions such as the atomic bomb. Letters by Chadwick from this period are rare.
Histoire Naturelle des Oiseaux-Mouches . [with:] Histoire Naturelle des Colibris

Histoire Naturelle des Oiseaux-Mouches . [with:] Histoire Naturelle des Colibris, suivie d’un Supplement a L’Histoire Naturelle des Oiseaux-Mouches

LESSON, René Primevère (1794-1849) (9 x 5 5/8 inches). [Oiseaux-Mouches:] 86 hand coloured engraved plates by Coutant after A. G. Bévalet, J.-G. Prêtre, Mlle. Zoë Dumont, Mme. Lesson and A. C. Vauthier, printed by Rémond (numbered 1-85, plus 48 bis). [Colibris:] 66 hand-coloured engraved plates by Coutant and Teillard after J.-G. Prêtre and A.G. Bévalet, printed by Rémond (Colibris numbered 1-25, plus 12 and 13 bis [misbound into the Oiseaux-Mouches vol.]; Supplement numbered 1-39). Minor dampstaining. Contemporary red and green morocco, bound by Bunetier, covers elaborated bordered in gilt, flat spines gilt, silk endpapers, gilt edges Provenance: armorial bookplate on the front pastedown First editions of Lesson's beautifully illustrated monographs on humming-birds. Described by Wood as fundamental classics, Lesson's monographs were the most comprehensive treatment of the Trocholidae until Gould began his monumental work 20 years later. Lesson's beautifully-illustrated work benefits from showing the subjects in their natural poses and being based on the author's personal observations of the birds in their natural habitat. Lesson was educated at the naval medical school at Rochefort. In 1822 he joined the company of the expeditionary ship 'Coquille', serving as medical officer and naturalist with P. Garnot, under the natural historian J.-S.-C. Dumont d'Urville. The fieldwork that Lesson performed during the two-and-half-year circumnavigation was the foundation of both his fame as a natural historian, and also provided much of the information and experience that he used when writing this and his other companion monographs. When "Cuvier and Latreille reported to the Academy of Sciences on the ['Coquille'] expedition's zoological data and collections [.] Lesson and Garnot were praised for bringing back hitherto unknown species of birds, reptiles, fish, mollusks, and crustaceans. Lesson was also cited for his remarkable colored illustrations of fish and mollusks and for his valuable aid to Dumont d'Urville for the insect collection" (DSB VIII, p.265). Anker 291 and 293; Ayer/Zimmer p. 386; Fine Bird Books (1990) p.117; Nissen IVB 547 and 548; Ronsil 1774; Wood p. 433. Two volumes in four (with the text and plates for each bound separately), 8vo
Verses . Dedicated to her Mother

Verses . Dedicated to her Mother

ROSSETTI, Christina (1830-1894) [4], 66, [2, blank]pp. Original blue patterned cloth wrappers bound in. Full green morocco, bound by Zaehnsdorf, covers with an elaborate floral decoration in gilt with red morocco inlays, spine gilt with raised bands in six compartments, tan morocco endpapers and pastedowns, gilt dentelles, gilt edges. Expert repair to front joint. Full modern morocco box. Provenance: Eliza Harriet Polidori (presentation inscription by the author, dated July 1847); Charles Plumptre Johnson (bookplate); Dr. Samuel L. Siegler (bookplate); Parke Bernet, December 9-10, 1952, lot 596 First Edition of the author's rare first book, comprising poems written when she was between twelve and sixteen years of age, and printed at the private press of her grandfather: inscribed by Christina Rossetti to her aunt. The collection, dedicated to her mother, consists of 42 poems (40 in English and two in Italian), a significant achievement for a sixteen year old and Christina's formal literary début. Printed by her maternal grandfather at his own private press in Park Village East (on the northern corner of Regent's Park), in his preface (entitled 'A Few Words to the Reader'), Gaetano Polidori confirms that Christina's first composition (printed on p.17) was written on her mother's birthday in April 1842. This was originally copied out in a large copperplate hand on pencilled lines that were then erased, and presented to her mother with a posy. 'The Dead City' holds premier place, followed by 'The Water Spirit's Song', the mermaid fantasy of 1844, and several poems celebrating the rose which Christina adopted as her emblem. Pages 55-56 are in the corrected state: dated 1847 at the end; stanza 5, line 1 reads "And now that thou art gone"; stanza 5, line 3 reads "And see the clouds"; stanza 6, line 1 reads "'Yes, oftentimes I sit beneath it now"; stanza 8, lines 1-2 have quotation marks; stanza 8, line 1 ends with a semi-colon. This example with important provenance, inscribed by Rossetti to her aunt Eliza, and from the noted collections of bibliographer Charles Plumptre Johnson and collector Dr. Samuel L. Siegler. Fredeman 44.2; Hayward 267; Ashley IV, p. 99; Tinker 1784; CBEL III, 497; CBEL (3) IV, 659; Marsh pp.32-41, 72-76.
The Tragedie of King Lear . [Bound with:] The Tragedy of Othello . [and with:] The Tragedy of Anthony and Cleopatra

The Tragedie of King Lear . [Bound with:] The Tragedy of Othello . [and with:] The Tragedy of Anthony and Cleopatra

SHAKESPEARE, William (1564-1616) (12 1/8 x 8 1/2 inches). 303-329; 330-359; 360-388pp. Expertly bound to style in panelled calf, covers tooled in blind, upper cover lettered in gilt From Shakespeare's Second Folio. Shakespeare's famed four folios comprise the first four editions of his collected plays, all printed in the 17th century. The Second Folio of 1632, like the First Folio of 1623, contains 36 plays. It is estimated that fewer than 1000 copies of the Second Folio were printed and fewer than 200 copies are in existence today. "King Lear" tells the story of an aging King who plans to divide his kingdom between his three daughters. After asking each to prove their love for him, and receiving a flattering (but insincere) response from two of them, he banishes the third, who truly loved him but failed to prove it. After his two daughters proceed to disrespect him after receiving his wealth and power, he descends into madness. The play is bound with two additional plays: "Othello," centered on the antagonistic relationship between a Moorish general and his officer, Iago, and "Anthony and Cleopatra," centered on the romantic relationship between Cleopatra, the Queen of Egypt, and Marc Antony, one of the Triumvirs of Rome. The Shakespeare Folios have "an aura of book magic about them. For a bibliophile it is a volume devoutly to be wished for and rarely attained; to a library it is a crowning jewel of a collection. Shakespeare, indeed, is a name to conjure with. No lengthy explanations are needed; he is simply the most distinguished author in the English language" (Wolf). STC 22274a. Pforzheimer 906. Greg III, 1113-1116. Jaggard, 496; Wolf, Legacies of Genuis 36.
Viola hirta

Viola hirta

ETTINGSHAUSEN, Constantin Freiherr Von (1826-1897), and POKORNY, Alois (1826-1886) 'Nature printed' in brown ink, with titling and imprint in black, by the Vienna Hof- und Staatsdruckerei. A beautiful example from "most important work produced by nature printing ever published" (Stafleu). To the modern eye this plate has an almost photographic beauty to it, which, in aesthetic terms, foreshadows the work of the great early-20th century photographers such as Man Ray. However, this achievement is almost certainly incidental as von Ettingshausen's intention was to present a detailed anatomical portrait using the highly exacting method of nature printing. John Lindley writes "Attempts were long since made to obtain Botanical portraits by printing from the plants themselves, flattened and otherwise prepared for the purpose. The process of the Imperial Printing Office [Hof- und Staatsdruckerei] at Vienna, to which the name of Nature-Printing has been happily applied. is a great improvement upon the old method, inasmuch as it represents not only general form with absolute accuracy, but also surface, hairs, veins, and other minutiae of superficial structure by which plants are known irrespective of the hidden details of their hidden organization. Moreover, an exact copy in copper of the part to be represented being employed by the printer, instead of so fragile an object as the plant itself, we obtain the means of multiplying copies to the same extent as in copperplate engraving; and hence the method becomes suitable for purposes of publication." (Preface of 'The Ferns of Great Britain and Ireland. Edited by John Lindley. Nature-printed by Henry Bradbury') . The present plate was printed under the supervision of Alois Auer, the inventor of the nature printing process, at the Vienna state press. Von Ettingshausen, an Austrian botanist, palaeontologist and mineralogist, was a keen supporter of nature printing and published a number of other works using the process (the Bradley Bibliography lists 24 titles under his name). Pokorny worked with von Ettingshausen to improve the quality of nature printing and worked as a teacher and lecturer at various establishments in Vienna, lecturing on phytogeography at the university from 1857-1868. Cf. Fischer 69; cf. Hunt Printmaking in the Service of Botany (1986) 60; cf. Nissen BBI 613; cf. Pritzel 2756; cf. Stafleu & Cowan TL2 1723.
Nuphar luteum

Nuphar luteum

ETTINGSHAUSEN, Constantin Freiherr Von (1826-1897), and POKORNY, Alois (1826-1886) 'Nature printed' in brown ink, with titling and imprint in black, by the Vienna Hof- und Staatsdruckerei. A beautiful example from "most important work produced by nature printing ever published" (Stafleu). To the modern eye this plate has an almost photographic beauty to it, which, in aesthetic terms, foreshadows the work of the great early-20th century photographers such as Man Ray. However, this achievement is almost certainly incidental as von Ettingshausen's intention was to present a detailed anatomical portrait using the highly exacting method of nature printing. John Lindley writes "Attempts were long since made to obtain Botanical portraits by printing from the plants themselves, flattened and otherwise prepared for the purpose. The process of the Imperial Printing Office [Hof- und Staatsdruckerei] at Vienna, to which the name of Nature-Printing has been happily applied. is a great improvement upon the old method, inasmuch as it represents not only general form with absolute accuracy, but also surface, hairs, veins, and other minutiae of superficial structure by which plants are known irrespective of the hidden details of their hidden organization. Moreover, an exact copy in copper of the part to be represented being employed by the printer, instead of so fragile an object as the plant itself, we obtain the means of multiplying copies to the same extent as in copperplate engraving; and hence the method becomes suitable for purposes of publication." (Preface of 'The Ferns of Great Britain and Ireland. Edited by John Lindley. Nature-printed by Henry Bradbury') . The present plate was printed under the supervision of Alois Auer, the inventor of the nature printing process, at the Vienna state press. Von Ettingshausen, an Austrian botanist, palaeontologist and mineralogist, was a keen supporter of nature printing and published a number of other works using the process (the Bradley Bibliography lists 24 titles under his name). Pokorny worked with von Ettingshausen to improve the quality of nature printing and worked as a teacher and lecturer at various establishments in Vienna, lecturing on phytogeography at the university from 1857-1868. Cf. Fischer 69; cf. Hunt Printmaking in the Service of Botany (1986) 60; cf. Nissen BBI 613; cf. Pritzel 2756; cf. Stafleu & Cowan TL2 1723.