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Oak Knoll Books

HISTORY OF DESKTOP PUBLISHING

HISTORY OF DESKTOP PUBLISHING

Romano, Frank (with Miranda Mitrano) 10.5 x 8.5 inches. printed paper-covered boards. 400 pages. History of Desktop Publishing is a personal and encyclopedic story of how the personal computer, unique applications, and many colorful people changed the creative and print communities. Author Frank Romano has documented the histories of hot metal and phototypesetting and continues the tale of document production in this book. This installment ends as the Internet becomes a primary focus. It is hard to imagine someone more involved with the universe of desktop publishing from its beginnings than Romano, who takes us on a personal journey from the end of the typewriter era to the age of the Internet, examining the development of personal computers, pagemaking and graphic design programs, postscript, digital fonts, data storage, inkjet printing, GUIs, and the rise of the digital era. For those who grew up during--or built their careers on--these advances, this book provides entertaining perspective and insight on an important period of their lives. For younger readers, it is a fascinating narrative of modern ancient history: how we got from the typewriter to DTP. Fully illustrated, with a Foreword by Gene Gable and a detailed Chronology by Richard Romano. Frank Romano has spent over 60 years in the printing and publishing industries. He was publisher and editor of TypeWorld and Electronic Publishing magazine, and he is the author of many articles and books on printing, publishing, and graphic design, including books on QuarkXPress, Adobe InDesign, PDF workflow, and digital printing. He has lectured extensively and has taught at RIT (where he is Professor Emeritus) and other universities. He is the President of the Museum of Printing in Haverhill, MA.
HISTORY OF DESKTOP PUBLISHING

HISTORY OF DESKTOP PUBLISHING

Romano, Frank (with Miranda Mitrano) 10.5 x 8.5 inches. softcover. 400 pages. History of Desktop Publishing is a personal and encyclopedic story of how the personal computer, unique applications, and many colorful people changed the creative and print communities. Author Frank Romano has documented the histories of hot metal and phototypesetting and continues the tale of document production in this book. This installment ends as the Internet becomes a primary focus. It is hard to imagine someone more involved with the universe of desktop publishing from its beginnings than Romano, who takes us on a personal journey from the end of the typewriter era to the age of the Internet, examining the development of personal computers, pagemaking and graphic design programs, postscript, digital fonts, data storage, inkjet printing, GUIs, and the rise of the digital era. For those who grew up during--or built their careers on--these advances, this book provides entertaining perspective and insight on an important period of their lives. For younger readers, it is a fascinating narrative of modern ancient history: how we got from the typewriter to DTP. Fully illustrated, with a Foreword by Gene Gable and a detailed Chronology by Richard Romano. Frank Romano has spent over 60 years in the printing and publishing industries. He was publisher and editor of TypeWorld and Electronic Publishing magazine, and he is the author of many articles and books on printing, publishing, and graphic design, including books on QuarkXPress, Adobe InDesign, PDF workflow, and digital printing. He has lectured extensively and has taught at RIT (where he is Professor Emeritus) and other universities. He is the President of the Museum of Printing in Haverhill, MA.
PATER NOSTER

PATER NOSTER

d'Arbeloff, Natalie small 4to. cloth binding painted with abstract design, inserted in handpainted oil cloth with red felt, see-through muslin bag. Unpaginated. No. 3 of in an edition of 5 similar but not identical copies. Signed by Natalie dArbeloff, an Artists' book. Printed on Fabriano Satinana paper. Blind engraved text on different sized and color papers. The title-page Pater Noster is the smallest; each page has edges of hand coloring. The book is glued to the back cover which has a painted and decorated wood strip on the side. The title is embroidered in red on a yellow and blue felt strip edged in the same stitching; two presstuds close the book. The inside front cover has a brightly colored collage of paper, felt and painted decorations against a blue cloth background. The book is laid in hand-painted oilcloth with red felt inside on which to place the book. The oilcloth is trimmed with red and yellow cord. This is held closed with red and blue cords. The whole is contained in a see-through muslin bag trimmed with turquoise stitching; metallic muslin top part of bag closes with 2 studs which are hidden between blue and red felt. Handwritten instructions by the artist for opening, reading, displaying and handling the work are included on a piece of handmade paper with the book. The book can be opened to display as a stepped pyramid, as well as opened in an inverted V form for longer display. Astunning artists book, visually dynamic and with a meaningful and important text. Fine. cloth binding painted with abstract design, inserted in handpainted oil cloth with red felt, see-through muslin bag