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Plate] HOO-WAN-NE-KA, A Winnebago Chief. [From HISTORY OF THE INDIAN TRIBES OF NORTH AMERICA]

Native American]; McKenney Thomas L. and James Hall Printed and hand-coloured at J.T. Bowen’s Lithographic Establishment. A beautifully lithographed colour plate reproduced from the original painting by Charles Bird King. Folio, the folio sheet now handsomely mounted and framed, the mounting with a wood trimmed beveled edge on tan cloth-covered board, this in a handsome black and red wooden frame gilt covered, glazed. The complete presentation being 25 x 19.5 inches. A `fine, fresh plate, quite clean with only a few very faint and unobtrusive spots of age, the colour rich and fresh, the presentation and framing all very fine and very handsome. An original handcoloured PLATE FROM 'One of the most costly and important works ever published on the American Indians' -Field. The lithographs from McKenney and Hall’s HISTORY OF THE INDIAN TRIBES OF NORTH AMERICA are not only amongst the greatest hand-coloured American illustrated plates of the 19th century, but are also an American cultural treasure providing an historical record of the portraits of the chiefs, warriors and women of the various tribes. The lithographs are faithfully produced from original oil paintings either by Charles Bird King painted from life in his studio in Washington or reproduced by King from the watercolours of the famous frontier artist James Otto Lewis as well as a few other artists.
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NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS [Hand-colored lithograph plate from] Catlin’s North American Indian Portfolio

Catlin George First edition, the plates hand-coloured and mounted on card. An important hand-coloured lithographic plate after Catlin, by Catlin and McGahey, lithographd by Day and Haghe. Folio, mounted with beveled wood trimmed cloth covered board in a handsome dark wooden frame, glazed. The whole approximately 28 x 22.5 inches. A very fine, fresh and clean lithograph with rich colour, the presentation and framing all fine and very handsome. A WONDERFUL FIRST EDITION HAND-COLOURED ILLUSTRATION FROM THE FIRST FOLIO EDITION OF CATLIN'S GREAT WORK ON THE NORTH AMERICAN INDIAN. 'The artist and author, George Catlin began his long journey in 1830 when he accompanied Governor William Clark on a diplomatic mission up the Mississippi River into Native American territory. St. Louis became Catlin’s base of operations for five trips he took between 1830 and 1836, eventually visiting fifty tribes. Two years later he ascended the Missouri River more than 3000km to Fort Union Trading Post, near what is now the North Dakota-Montana border, where he spent several weeks among indigenous people who were still relatively untouched by European culture. He visited eighteen tribes, including the Pawnee, Omaha, and Ponca in the south and the Mandan, Hidatsa, Cheyenne, Crow, Assiniboine, and Blackfeet to the north. There he produced the most vivid and penetrating portraits of his career. During later trips along the Arkansas, Red, and Mississippi rivers, as well as visits to Florida and the Great Lakes, he produced more than 500 paintings and gathered a substantial collection of artifacts. When Catlin returned east in 1838, he assembled the paintings and numerous artifacts into his Indian Gallery, and began delivering public lectures that drew on his personal recollections of life among the American Indians. Catlin traveled with his Indian Gallery to major cities such as Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, and New York. He hung his paintings "salon style"—side by side and one above another. Visitors identified each painting by the number on the frame, as listed in Catlin's catalogue. In 1841 Catlin published Manners, Customs, and Condition of the North American Indians, in two volumes, with approximately 300 engravings. Three years later he published 25 plates, entitled Catlin’s North American Indian Portfolio, and, in 1848, Eight Years' Travels and Residence in Europe. From 1852 to 1857 he traveled through South and Central America and later returned for further exploration in the Far West. The record of these later years is contained in Last Rambles amongst the Indians of the Rocky Mountains and the Andes (1868) and My Life among the Indians (ed. by N. G. Humphreys, 1909). In 1872, Catlin traveled to Washington, D.C. at the invitation of Joseph Henry, the first secretary of the Smithsonian. Until his death later that year in Jersey City, New Jersey, Catlin worked in a studio in the Smithsonian "Castle". In 1879 Harrison’s widow donated the original Indian Gallery, more than 500 works, along with related artifacts, to the Smithsonian. The nearly complete surviving set of Catlin's first Indian Gallery, painted in the 1830s, is now part of the Smithsonian American Art Museum's collection. The associated Catlin artifacts are in the collections of the Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian. Some 700 sketches are held by the American Museum of Natural History, New York City. Some artifacts from Catlin are in the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology collections. The Huntington Library in San Marino, California also holds 239 of Catlin's illustrations of both North and South American Indians, as well as other illustrative and manuscript material by Catlin.
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Plate] KISH-KE-KOSH. A Fox Brave. [From HISTORY OF THE INDIAN TRIBES OF NORTH AMERICA]

Native American]; McKenney Thomas L. and James Hall Printed and hand-coloured at J.T. Bowen’s Lithographic Establishment. A beautifully lithographed colour plate reproduced from the original painting by Charles Bird King. Folio, the folio sheet now handsomely mounted and framed, the mounting with a wood trimmed beveled edge on a tan cloth-covered board, housed in a handsome black and red wooden frame gilt covered, glazed. The complete presentation being 23 x 18.5 inches. A very fine, fresh and clean plate with rich colour, the presentation and framing all very fine and very handsome. An original handcoloured PLATE FROM 'One of the most costly and important works ever published on the American Indians' -Field. Kish-Ke-Kosh was a Fox brave. The tribe located primarily in the area of present day Wisconsin, Iowa and Illinois. After the signing of a treaty with the United States in 1824, the tribe moved to specific lands in Iowa and Illinois. State park preserves and woods are named even to this day after Kish-Ke-Kosh. The lithographs from McKenney and Hall’s HISTORY OF THE INDIAN TRIBES OF NORTH AMERICA are not only amongst the greatest hand-coloured American illustrated plates of the 19th century, but are also an American cultural treasure providing an historical record of the portraits of the chiefs, warriors and women of the various tribes. The lithographs are faithfully produced from original oil paintings either by Charles Bird King painted from life in his studio in Washington or reproduced by King from the watercolours of the famous frontier artist James Otto Lewis as well as a few other artists.
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PERSONAL MEMOIRS OF U. S. GRANT

Grant U.S 2 volumes. First edition. With 49 maps and illustrations, including the engraved portrait frontispieces. And with the dedication from Grant in holograph facsimile. 8vo, publisher’s original green cloth lettered in gilt and with a gilt medallion on the upper covers, with floral endpapers. 584; 647, index pp. A very handsome set, the green cloth bright with no fading and strong gilt, much nicer than is typically found, internally quite fresh, solid, tight and clean, just a hint of mellowing from time, the prelims with a bit of spotting, as is typical. IMPORTANT FIRST EDITION. An important historical memoir of the Civil War, and the best thing that Grant ever wrote. General Norman Schwartzkopf called this the finest memoir of war experiences that has ever been penned. Copies of these books in acceptable condition are becoming increasingly difficult to obtain, and this is an very bright and clean copy. The earliest days of the Civil War were a hard lesson in hubris for the Union Army. After the appointment of Grant to overall command of the Union forces, the war would quickly turn to their favor. Probably the most important book on the American Civil War, and in many respects a masterpiece of American literature. David Eicher"s useful summary includes this fine judgment: "Grant’s MEMOIRS comprise one of the most valuable writings by a military commander in history . . . The work is genuinely that of the commander. As such, it is valuable in its scope, its plain and clear analysis and language, and its broad conclusions about the conduct of the war. "In the years following the war Grant would move into the political arena, even against his best judgment and would, with great public acclaim be elected President of United States for two full terms.
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TOUR OF THE SEPULCHRES OF ETRURIA, in 1839

Etruria; Italy, Etruscan Antiquities]; Gray Mrs. Hamilton "Second Edition" but in fact a reprint of the first edition published only months prior. With 28 engraved plates, including three folding, two of which are hand-coloured, and a hand-coloured plate as frontispiece. The illustrations include murals and wall decorations, friezes, plans, maps, etc. 8vo, in handsome antique three-quarter tan calf over pebbled tan cloth-covered boards, the spine with gilt ruled raised bands trimmed in blind between compartments decorated with attractive gilt centerpieces, one compartment with red morocco label gilt ruled and lettered, edges and endpapers marbled. xi, 541 pp. The text is very fresh and clean, quite fine, as are the plates, the binding handsome with just a bit of expected age. A HANDSOME WORK ON ETRUSCAN SITES. Elizabeth Caroline Johnstone Gray, and her husband John Hamilton Gray, originally traveled to Italy seeking warmer climes during the damp Derbyshire winters. While there they became entranced by Etruscan antiquities. To further their interest, they attended lectures, met with German archaeologists, visited museums, and toured Etruscan sites all throughout the countryside, and Mrs. Gray authored this detailed account of those visits. She makes no claim to scholarship, though she was clearly a serious amateur. Her descriptions of the things she saw are detailed and vivid, and to visit those tombs she was willing to undertake journeys that must have been far from comfortable.
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YEARLING

Wyeth, illus.] Rawlings Marjorie Kinnan An early edition with Wyeth's illustrations. 12 colourplate illustrations, illustrated coloured endpapers, and line drawing illustrated titlepage by N.C. Wyeth. 8vo, original tan cloth, the upper cover and spine lettered and pictorially illustrated in brown and green, in the original dustjacket which features an additional Wyeth illustration. 400 pp. A bright and clean copy, the book in fine condition, with clean text and fresh and beautifully preserved cloth binding, the jacket has wear though the cover art remains very attractive. A HANDSOME COPY COMBINING WYETH'S WONDERFUL ILLUSTRATIONS WITH RAWLINGS' FAMOUS TALE OF RURAL FLORIDA. THE YEARLING is one of the best selling books of 20th Century Southern literature, and was winner of the Pulitzer Prize in 1939. It is the story of the strength and resiliency of the human spirit in the face of crushing poverty, hunger, and adversity. It has been described as one of the most devastatingly beautiful coming-of-age stories of our time. To provide these illustrations N.C. Wyeth visited with Rawlings at her home in Cross Creek and was able to study both the extreme verdure of the Florida scrub and meet with the very people about whom Rawlings wrote. Wyeth said of the visit, ".the people who live on these endless sandy roads are as interesting and authentic types of American pioneers, hunters and trappers as I ever saw. I've watched `gators' slide into the dark streams, caught a glimpse of a black bear and actually heard the scream of a panther last night. I was standing in one of those 'bays' of live oaks and pines. There was a light wind which moved the great festoons of Spanish moss back and forth spectrally, and through this the moonlight poured. The moving shadows made the ground we were standing on writhe and undulate as though it were actually alive. The distant fearful call of that cat added the last touch of blood-chilling accompaniment to the scene."
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Plate] TAI-O-MAH, A Musquakee Brave [From HISTORY OF THE INDIAN TRIBES OF NORTH AMERICA]

Native American]; McKenney Thomas L. and James Hall Printed and hand-coloured at J.T. Bowen’s Lithographic Establishment. A beautifully lithographed hand-colour plate reproduced from the original painting by Charles Bird King, with caption beneath. Folio, the original folio sheet now handsomely mounted and framed, the mounting with a wood trimmed beveled edge on a tan cloth-covered board, housed in a handsome black and red wooden frame gilt covered, glazed. The complete presentation being 22.5 x 18 inches. A very fine, fresh and clean plate with rich colour, the presentation and framing all very fine and very handsome. An original handcoloured PLATE FROM 'One of the most costly and important works ever published on the American Indians' -Field. Tai-O-Mah was a great Fox warrior and chief. His name also means, a 'crash of thunder'. His tribe lived primarily in what is present-day Wisconsin, Iowa and Illinois. In 1824 he was a signatory to a treaty with the U.S. that ceded land to the new nation. After the treaty's signing, Tai-O-Mah moved with his people to Iowa and developed villages there and in Illinois. He is buried on private land in Kingston and the city of Tama, and Tama County, Iowa are named for him. The lithographs from McKenney and Hall’s HISTORY OF THE INDIAN TRIBES OF NORTH AMERICA are not only amongst the greatest hand-coloured American illustrated plates of the 19th century, but are also an American cultural treasure providing an historical record of the portraits of the chiefs, warriors and women of the various tribes. The lithographs are faithfully produced from original oil paintings either by Charles Bird King painted from life in his studio in Washington or reproduced by King from the watercolours of the famous frontier artist James Otto Lewis as well as a few other artists.
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JUNGLE BOOK

Kipling Rudyard; [Fritz Eichenberg, Illustrator] Illustrated Junior Library edition. With ten fine colourplates and numerous black and white drawings throughout the text by Fritz Eichenberg. Tall 8vo, in the publisher's original decorated cloth binding featuring an all-over pictorial colour illustration by Fritz Eichenberg, wrapping around both covers and the spine, the spine panel features a green label simulating morocco, gilt lettered and decorated, and including the original clear acetate dustjacket with lettering in white and black. [vi], 279pp. A very fine copy, with just the lightest touch of the rubbing at the board edges to which this colour screen-dyed cloth is prone. The clear wrapper in very fine shape, the text clean and fresh. A VERY HANDSOMELY ILLUSTRATED EDITION OF KIPLING'S FAMED JUNGLE BOOK, with illustrations by Fritz Eichenberg. The Jungle Book represents a collection of Kipling’s best loved stories for children. The first stories are built around the premise of a human child lost in the jungles and raised by wild animals. Among the noted characters are Mowgli the child, Shere Khan the tiger and Baloo the bear. The beloved tale of Riki Tiki Tavi is also among these enchanting stories. Grosset and Dunlap's Illustrated Junior Library series provided an unbeatable combination of fine colourplate illustrations, high quality printing and materials, and especially bright and appealing decorated cloth bindings, all at an affordable price.
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Plate] MOA-NA-HON-GA. GREAT WALKER. An Ioway Chief. [From HISTORY OF THE INDIAN TRIBES OF NORTH AMERICA]

Native American]; McKenney Thomas L. and James Hall Printed and hand-coloured at J.T. Bowen’s Lithographic Establishment. A beautifully lithographed colour plate reproduced from the original painting by Charles Bird King. Folio, the folio sheet now handsomely mounted and framed, the mounting with a wood trimmed beveled edge on tan cloth-covered board, this in a handsome black and red wooden frame gilt covered, glazed. The complete presentation being 23.5 x 19 inches. A very fine, fresh and clean plate with rich colour, the presentation and framing all very fine and very handsome. An original handcoloured PLATE FROM 'One of the most costly and important works ever published on the American Indians' -Field. The Iowa or Ioway, known as the Báxo e in their own language, are a Native American Siouan people. Today, they are enrolled in either of two federally recognized tribes, the Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma and the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska. The Iowa, Missouria, and Otoe tribes were all once part of the Ho-Chunk people. They are all Chiwere language-speaking peoples. They left their ancestral homelands in Southern Wisconsin for Eastern Iowa, a state that bears their name. In 1837, the Iowa were moved from Iowa to reservations in Brown County, Kansas, and Richardson County, Nebraska. Bands of Iowa moved to Indian Territory in the late 19th century and settled south of Perkins, Oklahoma to become the Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma. The lithographs from McKenney and Hall’s HISTORY OF THE INDIAN TRIBES OF NORTH AMERICA are not only amongst the greatest hand-coloured American illustrated plates of the 19th century, but are also an American cultural treasure providing an historical record of the portraits of the chiefs, warriors and women of the various tribes. The lithographs are faithfully produced from original oil paintings either by Charles Bird King painted from life in his studio in Washington or reproduced by King from the watercolours of the famous frontier artist James Otto Lewis as well as a few other artists.
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Plate] SHAR-I-TAR-ISH. A Pawnee Chief. [From HISTORY OF THE INDIAN T[PhiladelphiaRIBES OF NORTH AMERICA]

Native American]; McKenney Thomas L. and James Hall Printed and hand-coloured at J.T. Bowen’s Lithographic Establishment. A beautifully lithographed colour plate reproduced from an original oil by Henry Inman based on an original painting by Charles Bird King. Folio, the folio sheet now handsomely mounted and framed, the mounting with a wood trimmed beveled edge on tan cloth-covered board, this in a handsome black and red wooden frame gilt covered, glazed. The complete presentation being 23 x18 inches. A very fine, fresh and clean plate with rich colour, the presentation and framing all very fine and very handsome. An original handcoloured PLATE FROM 'One of the most costly and important works ever published on the American Indians' -Field. A famous Pawnee chief, Shar-I-Tar-Ish led his people during the early part of the 19th century. Historically, the Pawnee lived in Nebraska and Kansas. In the Pawnee language, the Pawnee people refer to themselves as Chatiks si chatiks or "Men of Men".The Pawnee lived in villages of earth lodges with adjacent farmlands near the Loup, Republican, and South Platte rivers where tribal economic activities throughout the year alternated between farming crops and hunting buffalo. In the early 19th century, the Pawnee numbered more than 10,000people and were one of the largest and most powerful tribes in the west. Although dominating the Loup (ickari ) and Platte (kíckatuus) river areas for centuries, they later suffered from increasing encroachment and attrition by their numerically superior, nomadic enemies: the Sioux (or Lakota (páhriksukat / paahíksukat) ("cut throat / cuts the throat"), Cheyenne (sáhe / sáhi), and Arapaho (sári itihka) ("dog eater"); the Pawnee called these collectively as cárarat ("enemy tribe") or cahriksuupiíru ("enemy"). The Pawnee were occasionally at war with the Comanche (raaríhta ) and Kiowa (ká iwa) farther south. They had suffered many losses due to Eurasian infectious diseases brought by the expanding Europeans, and by 1860, the Pawnee population was reduced to 4,000. It further decreased, because of disease, crop failure, and warfare, to approximately 2,400 by 1873, after which time the Pawnee were forced to move to Indian Territory in Oklahoma. Many Pawnee warriors enlisted to serve as Indian scouts in the US Army to track and fight their tribal enemies resisting European-American expansion on the Great Plains. The lithographs from McKenney and Hall’s HISTORY OF THE INDIAN TRIBES OF NORTH AMERICA are not only amongst the greatest hand-coloured American illustrated plates of the 19th century, but are also an American cultural treasure providing an historical record of the portraits of the chiefs, warriors and women of the various tribes. The lithographs are faithfully produced from original oil paintings either by Charles Bird King painted from life in his studio in Washington or reproduced by King from the watercolours of the famous frontier artist James Otto Lewis as well as a few other artists.
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ITALY FROM THE ALPS TO MOUNT ETNA [being comprised of] ‘From the Alps to the Arno’ by Karl Stieler; ‘From the Arno to the Tiber’ by Edward Paulus; ‘From the Tiber to Etna ‘ by Woldemar Kaden

Italy; Italian Views; Italy Illustrated]; Trollope Frances Eleanor, Translator and Trollope, Thomas Adolphus, Editor First edition, in the publisher's rare best binding. With over 100 very fine full page engraved plates and 300 engravings within the text, many of which are quite large, title-page printed in red and black. Folio, publisher's very deluxe binding of full vellum over thick boards, the covers with a handsome frame of double-gilt ruling, the upper cover also with bold gilt lettering, the spine with a gilt lettered green morocco label, just above and below the label, and at the tail of the spine, is fine gilt tooling and multi rules in gilt, the turn-ins and the board edges are elaborately gilt tooled, fine marbled endpapers and a.e.g. xiii, 468pp. A beautiful copy of a most beautiful book, the vellum is solid with no bowing or warping, a bit mellowed as would be typical with vellum and with very light evidence of age, a very impressive copy, small abrasion to the morocco label, the text essentially pristine, but for some very minor spottiness from age to the first few and last few pages only, the biding tight and strong. FIRST EDITION AND BEST ISSUE OF An extremely attractive Italian travel book with beautiful engravings on almost every page. These combined firsthand narratives by three talented authors enter Italy through Mont Cenis, and move on to Trentino, Verona, Venice, Mantua, Milan, the lakes, Genoa, Florence, Siena, and many others before ending at the Island of Etna. The Trollopes, brother and sister-in-law of the more famous novelist, have through editing and translation created a text that is written in a clear and congenial style, with great awareness of literature and the arts as it moves from one historic town to the next. A lovely addition to any Italian collection.
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Plate] NE-O-MON-ME, An Ioway Chief [From HISTORY OF THE INDIAN TRIBES OF NORTH AMERICA]

Native American]; McKenney Thomas L. and James Hall Printed and hand-coloured at J.T. Bowen’s Lithographic Establishment. A beautifully lithographed colour plate reproduced from the original painting by Charles Bird King. Folio, the folio sheet now handsomely mounted and framed, the mounting with a wood trimmed beveled edge on tan cloth-covered board, this in a handsome black and red wooden frame gilt covered, glazed. The complete presentation being 23.5 x 18.5 inches. A very fine, fresh and clean plate with rich colour, the presentation and framing all very fine and very handsome. An original handcoloured PLATE FROM 'One of the most costly and important works ever published on the American Indians' -Field. The Iowa or Ioway, known as the Báxo e in their own language, are a Native American Siouan people. Today, they are enrolled in either of two federally recognized tribes, the Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma and the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska. The Iowa, Missouria, and Otoe tribes were all once part of the Ho-Chunk people. They are all Chiwere language-speaking peoples. They left their ancestral homelands in Southern Wisconsin for Eastern Iowa, a state that bears their name. In 1837, the Iowa were moved from Iowa to reservations in Brown County, Kansas, and Richardson County, Nebraska. Bands of Iowa moved to Indian Territory in the late 19th century and settled south of Perkins, Oklahoma to become the Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma. The lithographs from McKenney and Hall’s HISTORY OF THE INDIAN TRIBES OF NORTH AMERICA are not only amongst the greatest hand-coloured American illustrated plates of the 19th century, but are also an American cultural treasure providing an historical record of the portraits of the chiefs, warriors and women of the various tribes. The lithographs are faithfully produced from original oil paintings either by Charles Bird King painted from life in his studio in Washington or reproduced by King from the watercolours of the famous frontier artist James Otto Lewis as well as a few other artists.