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Franklin Gilliam Rare Books

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General Catalogue No 31. Wholesale Hardware, Sporting Goods Automobile Accessories.

CHARLES LEONARD HARDWARE CO., Thousands of illustrations, some line drawings but most half-tones; [6], XXIX, and 604 pp. plus five leaves containing real paint chips pp. Folio, maroon buckram, titled in black on front cover and name on spin; all edges maroon, as new in original publisher's cardboard shipping box An extraordinarily comprehensive catalogue in untouched condition. No other publication from this firm located, despite the fact that it was in business for 120 years. The building now house condominiums. Originally the building had a large lion on a pedestal on the roof, reflecting the original owners leonine moniker. That is no longer there, but the pedestal remains.Charles Leonard (1826Ð1916) originally from London, went to Petersburg, Virginia in 1830. In 1840 he started learning the gun trade, but eventually went into the hardware business by 1845. His store was located on Old Street. Around the beginning of the Civil War LeonardÕs hardware store was on Sycamore Street. The address for his business at that time was 30 South Sycamore Street.From the Petersburg Progress-Index, Wednesday, January 6, 1965, p. 10 ÒAt the last meeting of the ÔBoard of DirectorsÕ of Charles Leonard Hardware Co. it was decided to dissolve the company and discontinue its operation. Times have changed many times over the 120 years this store has been in business and we have changed with them over these many years. However! Now that the market is flooded with Hardware and Housewares that are seconds, irregulars and inferior imports we no longer wish to continue to compete. This store has never sold anything but first quality, top brand products during all these years and when we close our doors forever it will be with the same reputation of quality that has prevailed during this store's entire history. We say goodbye with deep regret and sincerely hope you will take advantage of the great saving being offered at this long to be remembered Sale. Thank you all for the loyal patronage you have given us over these many years.
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Sorosis [Membership List] 1923Ð1924.

FIRST WOMEN'S PROFESSIONAL CLUB], Not illustrated; 36 pp. pp. 12mo, pale wine colored stiff wrappers; front cover printed and faded with dampstain on lower inner corner. Sorosis was the first professional women's club in the United States. The club was organized in New York City with 12 members in March 1868, by Jane Cunningham Croly. Croly had long wanted to open opportunities for women and for women to play a greater role in molding American society. The specific event sparking the creation of Sorosis occurred in April 1868 when the New York Press Club decided to bar women from its dinner honoring Charles Dickens on his American tour. Although the Press Club agreed at the last minute to open their doors to women if enough expressed a desire to attend the Dickens's soiree, it was too little too late to satisfy Croly and her friends. (Years later, the Press Club formally apologized to Sorosis.) Among its founding members were Josephine Pollard, a children's author, and Fanny Fern Parton, a popular columnist who had also been angered by the New York Press Club's actions. Sorosis was incorporated in January 1869. Alice Cary was the first president. Within one year, Sorosis had 83 members.The organizational meeting at Delmonico's restaurant in New York was itself a challenge to socially acceptable behavior since it was not deemed proper for women to be seen in public places without a male escort. Sorosis is a botanical term used to describe aggregated fruit, Mrs. Croly foundit in a botanical dictionary The general supposition is that Sorosis comes from the Greek word meaning sister. But it has a much more significant and broader meaning than that. It is the botanical name of a class known as aggregated fruits, of which the raspberry is an example- a collection of flowers, which mature into fruits, all joined together in one wholesome body. The club's object was to further the educational and social activities of women, and to bring together for mutual helpfulness, representative women in art, literature, science, and kindred pursuits.
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A Collection of some letters and instruments that have passed during the late contests in France concerning the regale.

BURNET, Gilbert] Not illustrated; [1-2] 3-205, 205-235 (i.e. 239)pp. +[7] pp. of advertisements. Signed Aa8-Pp8-Qq4 with Qq2 mis-signed Q2. pp. 8vo, 18th century marbled boards leather spine and tips,worn; skillfully rebacked with the original spine laid down. Armorial bookplate of Ralph William Grey on the front pastedown. This is the Appendix to Burnet's "The history of the rights of princes in the disposing of ecclesiastical benefices and church-lands."but is often found separately. Text is in French apart from English title page and the translation of two of the letters.During the vacancy of an archbishopric or bishopric the French kings claimed the right 910 to receive all the revenues of the diocese, (2) to appoint to all benefices vacant during the interval, (3) to send royal officers to administer the temporalities of the see. These three rights collectively called the rŽgale, were first formulated in the testament drawn up by Louis IX (1214Ð1270) before his departure on a crusade.In the reign of Louis XIV it was determined to extend the system of the rŽgale to the provinces recently added to France. This gave rise to a vigorous struggle on the part of the bishops in the annexed provinces, and their cause was supported by the pope. To coerce the papacy, Louis obtained from the national synod of the clergy in 1682 a declaration practical independence of the Gallican church. This was approved by the pope and was in force from 1682 to the Civil Constitution of the Clergy (1790) during the French Revolution.This is the Appendix to Burnet's "The history of the rights of princes in the disposing of ecclesiastical benefices and church-lands."but is often found separately. Text is in French apart from English title page and the translation of two of the letters. During the vacancy of an archbishopric or bishopric the French kings claimed the right to receive all the revenues of the diocese, (2) to appoint to all benefices vacant during the interval, (3) to send royal officers to administer the temporalities of the see. These three rights collectively called the rŽgale, were first formulated in the testament drawn up by Louis IX (1214Ð1270) before his departure on a crusade. In the reign of Louis XIV it was determined to extend the system of the rŽgale to the provinces recently added to France. This gave rise to a vigorous struggle on the part of the bishops in the annexed provinces, and their cause was supported by the pope. To coerce the papacy, Louis obtained from the national synod of the clergy in 1682 a declaration practical independence of the Gallican church. This was approved by the pope and was in force from 1682 to the Civil Constitution of the Clergy (1790) during the French Revolution.