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ERIC CHAIM KLINE, BOOKSELLER

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Quaedam praemeditatae [et] consideratae cogitationes super quatuor priora capita Libri Primi Moysis, Genesis nominati (Some Carefully Considered Thoughts on the First Four Chapters of the First Book of Moses, Called Genesis) [A KABBALISTIC INTERPRETATION of the BIBLICAL BOOK OF GENESIS, GHOST-WRITTEN BY LEIBNIZ]

Octavo. [8], 115 [i.e., 127], [1, blank]pp. Title in red and black. Contemporary half-calf over speckled boards, gilt-tooled spine with raised bands, morocco lettering piece; marbled endpapers. Tiny worm-trace at corners of last ten leaves, else a fine, crisp copy. Collation: [asterisk]4, A-G8, H4, I4 (= 68 leaves). First Edition of the author's last work, which was in fact ghostwritten by Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716). The itinerant teacher, alchemist and writer Francisciscus Mercurius Van Helmont (1614-1698) "served as the link between the Kabbalah and the Cambridge Platonists led by Henry More and Ralph Cudworth, who made use of kabbalistic motifs for their own original speculative purposes" (Enc. Jud. 10:646). His deep interest in Jewish mystical doctrines is reflected in van Helmont's collaboration with Christian Knorr von Rosenroth in the publication of the Kabbala Denudata (1677, 1684). "Van Helmont was a close friend of both Leibniz and Locke and may have acted as an intermediary between the two" (Hanegraaff). Leibniz took a much greater interest in the Jewish mystical tradition than had previously been acknowledged by an earlier generation of scholars. As Sheila Spector and Allison Coudert have each discussed in recents works on van Helmont and the Christian engagement with Kabbalah, "Leibniz was interested in van Helmont's kabbalistic philosophy, encouraging him to publish his ideas and even helping him to the point of ghostwriting his last book, Quaedam praemeditate & considerate cogitationes super quatuor priora capita libri primi Moysis (1697), a kabbalistic interpretation of Genesis. Leibniz's epitaph for van Helmont is a striking tribute to their friendship: 'Here lies the other van Helmont, in no way inferior to his father. / He joined together the arts and sciences and / Revived the sacred doctrines of Pythagoras and the Kabbalah. / Like Elaus he was able to make everything he needed with his own hands. / Had he been born in earlier centuries among the Greeks, / He would now be numbered among the stars.' [.] It has been alleged that Leibniz derived the term 'monad' from various philosophers, ranging from Giordano Bruno to Henry More. However, a strong case can be made for van Helmont as his most direct and important source. Leibniz's correspondence with the Lutheran millenarian and advocate of universal salvation Johann Wilhelm Petersen reveals that by the end of his life he accepted the radical, kabbalistic idea of tikkun and believed that every created thing would eventually reach a state of perfection" (Hanegraaff). Provenance: The copy of Walter Traugott Ulrich Pagel (1898-1983), pathologist and historian of medicine and alchemy. The author of a seminal work on Paracelsus, Pagel wrote two works on Joan Baptista van Helmont, the father of Franciscus Mercurius van Helmont. With the manuscript ex-libris slip of Pagel's son B[ernard] E[phraim] J[ulius] Pagel tipped-in at the front endpaper along with a manuscript note indicating that the present work contains alchemical passages, notably on p. 62. References: The Library of John Locke 1416; W. J. Hanegraaff (ed.), Dictionary of Gnosis and Western Esotericism (Leiden: Brill, 2006), p. 467; S. A. Spector, Francis Mercury van Helmont's Sketch of Christian Kabbalism (Leiden: Brill, 2012), p. 12; A. P. Coudert, The Impact of the Kabbalah in the Seventeenth Century, The Life and Thought of Francis Mercury van Helmont (Leiden: Brill, 1999), p. 379; and chap. 13 "Leibniz and the Kabbalah"
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SHAHNAMEH-Shāhnāmeh

SHAHNAMEH. Ferdawsi of Tus, Abu'l-Qasim. Shāhnāmeh. A significant and very large manuscript representing half the original manuscript. With 332 leaves. Size: 19.2 x 29.4 cm; written surface: 13.5 x 22.7 cm; It is written in four columns, on beige paper, in nasta`līq script in black ink, with all headings in red ink on gold decorated background. All pages are ruled in gold, red, and blue. All the dividing columns are in either gold decorated red or gold decorated blue. The manuscript covers the second half of the Shahnameh. There are two illuminated headings and 34 miniatures. The miniatures are stunningly bright and exquisite, and most of them cover almost the entire page. The manuscript is bound in full morocco, with scroll work in gilt on both covers, rebacked and, and one corner repaired. Binding is in very good condition, with marbled French end papers. Also, Minor repairs to a few leaves, but no loss of text. Undated, but the last page contains two identical impressions of seals, each one reads: Sayyid Muhammad Nuh 1293 of the Islamic calendar, corresponding to 1876 AD. Therefore, the manuscript was written and illustrated in the early part of the nineteenth century. Provenance: There is a bookplate laid down on the inner front cover, which reads: E. C. Simpson Ex Libris. Sapere Aude, a Latin saying, meaning: Dare to know. It is known that the collection of Edward Cyril Simpson (1894 - 1979) was sold by Dunbar Sloane Auction House on 22nd of April 2009 in Willington, New Zealand. The most expensive items were bought by the New Zealand Government for their National Library. Also, Simpson had significant interest in Persian miniatures. The sale description of the present manuscript is laid down on the front page opposite the front cover. Ferdawsi, more commonly transliterated as Firdowsi (or Ferdausi) (940-1020) is a highly revered Persian poet. He was the author of the Shahnameh, the national epic of the Persian people and of the Iranian World. Ferdowsi, the son of a wealthy landowner, was born in 940 in a small village named Paj near Tus in Khorasan, Northeast of Iran. His great epic, the Shahnameh ("The Great Book": or "The Book of Kings"} is his magnum opus. He devoted more than 35 years of his life to write it. He, no doubt, read and utilized all the available material regarding thr history, legends, and tales of the Persian people. When he finished the book, Ferdowsi went to Ghazni, the Ghaznavid capital, to present it to the Sultan. One story tells Sultan Mahmud had promised Ferdowsi a dinar for every distich written in the Shahnameh, some 60,000 dinars. But later retracted and presented him with 20,000 dirhams, which is equal 200 dinars. Ferdowsi rejected the gift, or, by some accounts, he gave it to a poor man who sold wine. He returned home saddened and unhappy. He wrote a long and angry poem, more like a curse, and ended with the words: "Heaven's vengeance will not forget. Shrink tyrant from my words of fire, and tremble at a poet's ire." Ferdowsi is said to have died around 1020 in poverty at the age of 85. Ferdowsi was buried at the yard of his own home, where his mausoleum now lies. It was not until Reza Shah Pahlavi's rule, in 1925, that a mausoleum was built for the great poet.
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Sefer Ginat Egoz (A Book of the Walnut Grove) [WITH A RARE APPROBATION OF THE “SHELAH HA-KODESH”]

Three parts, small folio. Collation: [aleph-yud tet]4 [chi]2 (= 78 leaves); numerous errors in foliation, but text continuous and complete. Title in red and black, within woodcut historiated borders. Letterpress ornaments. Hebrew text in two columns. Modern two-tone leatherette. Trimmed tightly at top edge, with intermittent partial loss to headline and foliation number. Text moderately embrowned throughout (a few leaves more heavily so). Intermittent fine worm tracing in the inner text columns, resulting in some (mostly minor) loss in about one-half of the leaves. Fairly good copy. Editio princeps. The first printed edition of this detailed compendium of kabbalistic exegetical techniques involving numerology and word-play, and first extant work by Joseph ben Avraham Gikatilla, a "Spanish kabbalist whose works exerted a profound and permanent influence on kabbalism" (EJ). Born in Medinaceli, Castile, Gikatilla lived for many years in Segovia. "Between 1272 and 1274 he studied under Abraham Abulafia, who praises him as his most successful pupil. His first extant work, Ginnat Egoz (1615), written in 1274, is an introduction to the mystic symbolism of the alphabet, vowel points, and the Divine Names. The title derives from the initial letters of the of the kabbalistic elements gematria ("numerology"), notarikon ("acrostics"), temurah ("permutation"). In common with his mentor, Gikatilla also links this mystic lore with the system practiced by Maimonides. This work makes no suggestion of the theosophical doctrine of Sefirot or "spheres" later adopted by Gikatilla." With respect to Christian students of the Kabbalah, Blau notes: "[t]he works of Gikatilia, Recanati's Bible commentary, and the Book of Formation practically sum up the knowledge of the [Christian] interpreters." Gikatilla's influence is clearly evidenced in the researches of the Roman Catholic cardinal and humanist litterateur, Egidio da Viterbo (1469-1532) A gifted student of Hebrew and Aramaic, Viterbo was a noted devotée of Christian Kabbalah; among the surviving translations he commissioned or did himself is a version of the present work (Brach). Approbations: Isaiah ben Abraham Horwitz of Frankfurt, known as the "Shelah ha-Kadosh," whose approbations were given to very few books; Jacob ben Asher Aaron of Friedburg; Moses ben Menachem Bacharach of Frankfurt. Annotations: Old Hebrew entries at the title (one of which has been inked out). J. L. Blau, The Christian Interpretation of the Cabala in the Renaissance, p.19; G.-P. Brach, "Viterbo, Egidio da," in: Dictionary of Gnosis & Western Esotericism, ed. W. J. Hanegraaff (Brill, 2006), p.1162; Roest (Rosenthaliana) 1:563, with detailed note on the correct date of 1614; Steinschneider 5923.2 (p. 1463): "opus rarum" (a rare work); Vinograd (Hanau) 15; Zedner, p. 329. Title (Hebrew): ×¡×¤× ×’×ת אגז Imprint (Hebrew): ‫ ×"א×ווא : ×"ובא לבית ×"×"פוס . על י×"י . ××œ×™×¢×–× ×‘× ×—×™×™×, אלי×"ו בכ×"× "× ×–×¢×œ×™×§×ž×Ÿ יצ"ו אולמא [Hanva: Huva le-vet ha-defus 'al yede ha-po'alim ha-meshutfim Ele'ezer bar Hayim ve-haverav Eliyahu ben Zelikman Ulmo].
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Critical Account of the Situation and Destruction by the First Eruptions of Mount Vesuvius, of Herculaneum, Pompeii, and Stabia. Illustrated with Notes, Taken from the French Translation

Octavo. [2], vi, 125, [1]pp. Letterpress transcriptions of ancient inscriptions throughout. Contemp. tree calf, morocco lettering piece at spine, gilt dentelles. Light wear at spine cap, hairline crack along upper joint (but holding nicely), clean tear at I4 (no loss of text), else a fine, fresh copy. First English edition. The Sendschreiben von den herculanischen Entdeckungen (1762) is an open letter to Count Heinrich von Brühl of Saxony by the celebrated historian of art Johann Joachim Winckelmann (1717-1768) regarding his tour of the ancient sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii. Winckelmann visited Naples in 1758 and 1762; although he "was subjected to note-taking restrictions and was not given free access to the collections" (Coates & Seydl, 43), his Sendschreiben and subsequent Nachrichten von den neuesten herculanischen Entdeckungen (1764) were substative enough to provide scholars "their first real information about the treasures excavated at Pompeii and Herculaneum" (EB, 13th ed.). Among the many artworks which Winckelmann describes in his letter are the well-known vignettes of dancers and centaurs from the so-called Villa di Cicerone in Pompeii. The translator's preface foreshadows the profound importance of these discoveries: "The present century has had the advantage of discovering the ruins of three ancient towns, covered by the eruptions of Mount Vesuvius, and of having what they contained laid open to the inspection of the curious, who by these means have obtained a vast field for the gratification of curiosity, and of that inextinguishable thirst of knowledge, which is one of the principal characterists of rational beings.". References: ESTC T-131014. Roscoe A-630. Cf. Brunet V, 1464: later French collected ed. of the Lettres (Paris, 1784). For a comprehensive series of recent essays on these discoveries see: V.C. Gardner Coates & J. L. Seydl (eds.), Antiquity Recovered, the Legacy of Pompeii and Herculaneum (Los Angeles: Getty, 2007). For a broader discussion of the relationship between archaeology and nineteenth-century historiography, see: G. Blix, From Paris to Pompeii, French Romanticism and the Cultural Politics of Archaeology (Philadelphia: Univ. of Pennsylvania Press, 2009). Full title and imprint: Critical Account of the Situation and Destruction by the First Eruptions of Mount Vesuvius, of Herculaneum, Pompeii, and Stabia; the late Discovery of their Remains; the Subterraneous Works carried on in them; and the Books, Domestick Utensils, and other remarkable Greek and Roman Antiquities thereby happily recovered; the Form and Connection of the Ancient Characters being faithfully preserved. Illustrated with Notes, taken from the French Translation.
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A Comparative Study of the Ritual of Ordination as Found in Leviticus 8 and Emar 369

Octavo.(10), xiv, 679, (1)pp. Indices and 29 page bibliography. Brown cloth lettered in gilt. Illustrated with 59 text diagrams. An ex-library copy with rubber stamp on title page & bottom of text block, and a library pocket on rear pastedown, otherwise a fine copy. Contents: 1. Introduction -- 2. Ritual in the context of the cultural universe -- some methodological considerations -- A. Methodological frame of reference -- B. Relevance of topic -- C. Aims of research -- D. Religion and culture -- E. Model of interpretation -- (1) Definition and explanation of relevant terminology -- (2) Symbol -- (3) Three different approaches of interpreting symbolism -- Lawson and McCauley's cognitive approach -- Gane's cognitive approach and general system theory -- Gorman's social function approach -- Evaluation and formulation of approach taken in this study -- (4) Symbolic act -- (5) Rite of passage -- (6) Ritual -- (7) Cult -- F. Method of interpretation -- (1) Holistic approach -- (2) Phenomenological approach -- Philosophical phenomenology -- Phenomenology of religion -- an introduction -- Phenomenology of religion -- questions and critique -- Phenomenology of religion as implemented in this study -- (3) Pragmatic considerations -- Description of the textual material -- Categories of analysis -- 3. Introduction to Leviticus 8 -- A. Motivation of choice of concentration -- B. History of investigation -- overview and critique -- (1) Leviticus 8 in current research -- (2) Leviticus 8 and ordination in studies pertaining to priests and Levites -- (3) Leviticus 8 in recent commentaries -- Leviticus 8 in commentaries published prior to 1980 -- Leviticus 8 in commentaries published after 1980 -- Commentaries on Leviticus -- a summary -- (4) H. Utzschneider, Das Heiligtum und das Gesetz -- (5) F. Gorman, The ideology of ritual -- (6) Summary concerning the history of investigation -- C. Exegetical method -- Genre and interpretation -- D. The state of the text -- E. Relationship between Lev. 8 and Ex. 29 -- F. Structure of Lev 8 -- (1) Macro-structure of Lev 8 -- (2) Micro-structure of Lev 8 -- G. Summary. 4. Exegesis of Leviticus 8 -- A. Structure of the ritual -- B. Form, order, and sequence of the ritual -- (1) Form of Leviticus 8 -- (2) Order and sequence of Leviticus 8 -- C. Situation and context -- D. Ritual space -- (1) Explicit spatial references in Lev 8 -- (2) Implicit spatial references in Lev 8 -- E. Ritual time -- F. Involved objects -- (1) Objects related to clothing -- (2) Objects related to Tent of Meeting and altar -- (3) Objects related to sacrificing -- G. Ritual roles of participants -- (1) Involved persons -- Moses -- Whole congregation -- Aaron and his sons -- (2) Involved animals -- H. Prescribed/performed ritual action -- (1) First speech act: YHWH speaks to Moses (Lev. 8:1-4) -- (2) Second speech act: Moses speaks to congregation (Lev. 8:5) -- (3) "Bringing forward" 1: Aaron and his sons (Lev 8:6-12) -- (4) "Brining forward" 2: Aaron's sons (Lev 8:13) -- (5) Excursus: Interpretation of sacrifice -- (6) "Bringing forward" 3: Bull of purification offering (Lev 8:14-17) -- (7) "Bringing forward" 4: Ram of burnt offering (Lev 8:18-21) -- (8) "Bringing forward" 5: Ram of ordination (Lev 8:22-23) -- (9) "Bringing forward" 6: Aaron's sons (Lev 8:24-30) -- (10) Third speech act: Moses speaks to priests (Lev 8:31-36) -- I. Ritual sound and language -- J. Summary and evaluation. 5. Ordination ritual at Emar -- A. The comparative method -- an overview -- (1) Overview regarding the methods employed in comparative studies -- Historical comparison -- Applications of historical comparison -- Typological comparison -- (2) Comparative method -- an evaluation -- (3) Approach implemented in this study -- B. Introduction to the ordination ritual from Emar -- (1) Archaeology of Emar -- (2) Texts from Emar -- (3) Composite text or specific manuscript? -- (4) Translation of text A (Msk 731027 [left side] and Msk 74245 [right side] -- C. Structure of ordination ritual from Emar -- D. Form, order, and sequence -- (1) Form of NIN. DINGIR ordination ritual -- (2) Order and sequence of NIN. DINGIR ordination ritual -- E. Situation and context -- F. Ritual space -- (1) Ritual space in selection ceremony -- (2) Ritual space in consecration by shaving ceremony (gallubu) -- (3) Ritual space in installation ceremony (malluku) -- (4) Ritual space on the final day -- (5) Ritual space in administra5tive section -- (6) Implicit spatial specifications -- (7) Evaluation of ritual space -- G. Ritual time -- H. Involved objects -- (1) Objects associated with clothing -- (2) Objects associated with the temple(s) and related utensils -- (3) Objects associated with sacrifice -- (4) Objects associated with foodstuff -- (5) Miscellaneous objects -- I. Ritual roles of participants -- (1) Involved persons -- NIN. DINGIR of Im -- daughter of any son of Emar -- Diviner -- HAL -- Sons of Emar -- Singers -- Father of the NIN. DINGIR -- Men of the quidasu -- Hussu-men -- Hansa'u-men -- Bel biti -- The guests of honor -- Kawanu and taru -- Brothers of the NIN. DINGIR -- Elders of Emar -- Nugagtu -- Two maids -- Sister of NIN. DINGIR -- (2) Involved animals -- J. Ritual action -- (1) The day of selection (lines 2-6) -- (2) The shaving ceremony (lines 7-28) -- Shaving, procession, offering, and feast (lines 7-19) -- Anointing of NIN. DINGIR and procession (lines 20-21) -- Sanctification ceremony for enthronement day (lines 22-28) -- (3) The day of enthronement and subsequent feasting (lines 29-58) -- Sacrificial procession, offering, and feast (lines 29-39) -- Enthronement and return to house of father (lines 40-48) -- Seven days of feasting at bu NIN. DINGIR (lines 49-58) -- (4) The final day (lines 59-75) -- NIN. DINGIR leaves the house of her father as a bride (lines 59-62) -- The final procession to the temple of IM (lines 63-68a) -- Preparation and mounting of the bed (lines 68b-75) -- (5) Final administrative section (lines 76-9
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Archaeologiae Atticae libri tres. Three books of the Attick antiquities

Small quarto. Collation: *4, A-T4 (= 80 leaves; blank T4) [8], 149, [3, blank]pp. Woodcut head- and tailpieces, lettrines, printed marginalia, frequent quotations in Greek, along with an occasional word in Hebrew; complete with the final blank leaf. Recent blue cloth, gilt title at spine. Margins tight; some light soiling at final leaves. A very good copy with crisp text. First edition of this popular introduction to ancient Greek history by Francis Rous (1615-1643), the son of a Puritan writer and politician, also named Francis. With the "addition of their customs in marriages, burialls, feastings, divinations, &c." Zachary Bogan expanded the primer to seven books in the third edition of 1649; a ninth edition appeared as late as 1685. Madan notes that along with Godwin's Roman Antiquities and Moses and Aaron, the Archaeologiae Atticae comprised an introductory trilogy for students of ancient history; indeed, the latter was eventually incorporated along with Godwin's works on Rome and ancient Israel into a collective edition (London: A. Churchill, 1686). References: ESTC S116252. Madan 1:202. Cf. Wing R2032 (ed. 1645). Full title and imprint: Archaeologiae Atticae libri tres. Three books of the Attick antiquities. Containing the description of the citties glory, government, division of the people, and townes with in Athenian territories, their religion, superstition, sacrifices, account of their yeare, as also a full relation of their iudicatories. Oxford: printed by Leonakd [sic] Lichfield, for Edward Forrest. M.DC.XXXVII.
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De Vita Joannis Francisci Commendoni Cardinalis libri quatuor (On the Life of Cardinal Giovanni Francesco Commendone)

Quarto. Collation: á4 é4 í4 ó4 A-3K4, (= 240 leaves). [32], 384, 387-448, [2]pp; engraved printer's device at title, engraved cartouche and lettrine at dedication, engraved portrait; woodcut head- and tailpieces, lettrines. Text continuous despite gap in pagination. Contemporary vellum boards with exposed thongs, old paper labels with manuscript title and shelf marks at spine; edges tinted red. Discrete library stamp at title; occasional mild embrowning or spotting; corner Nn1 skillfully repaired. A pretty copy, crisp and amply-margined. First edition of this biography of cardinal and papal nuncio, Giovanni Francesco Commendone (1523-1584) which notably includes a detailed account of Commendone's 1553 meeting in the Netherlands with Queen Mary Tudor. A brilliant student whose unusual learning was immediately noticed by Julius III, Commedone would serve under several popes as one the Vatican's most important ambassadors. "After successfully performing various papal missions of minor importance, he accompanied Cardinal Legate Dandino to the Netherlands, whence Pope Julius III sent him in 1553 on an important mission to Queen Mary Tudor, who had just succeeded Edward VI on the English throne. He was to treat with the new queen concerning the restoration of the Catholic Faith in England. Accompanied by Penning, a servant and confidant of Cardinal Reginald Pole, Commendone arrived in London on 8 Aug. 1553. Though Mary Tudor was a loyal Catholic, she was surrounded at court by numerous opponents of papal authority, who made it extremely difficult for Commendone to obtain a secret interview with her" (Cath. Enc.). Commendone would later serve as papal legate when Pius IV determined to reopen the Council of Trent in 1560. He was so highly esteemed by the Sacred College that it was widely believed he would be elected pope when Gregory XIII fell dangerously ill; the latter recovered from his malady, though, and went on to outlive Commendone. The humanist and historian Antonio Maria Graziani (1537-1611) was the protegé of cardinal Commendoni. Upon the death of his mentor Graziani went on to serve as papal secretary to Sixtus V. During the papacy of Clement VIII he was appointed Bishop of Amelia, and served as the Apostolic Nuncio to Venice (1596-98). Graziani was a noted anti-Protestant polemicist; among the manuscripts left behind at his death was the present life of his mentor, written in Latin. A French version, translated by Esprit Fléchier, appeared in 1761. Engraved portrait signed "[François] Campion sculp." References: BM STC French, G684. Cf. Brunet VI, 21671 (French version of 1671). Catholic Encyclopedia (1908) IV: pp.156-7. Not in NUC, nor Osmont (1768). While widely held in European libraries, OCLC locates a single copy in the USA at Georgetown Full title and imprint: Antonii Mariae Gratiani a Burgos sepulchri Episcopi Amerini De Vita Joannis Francisci Commendoni cardinalis libri quatuor. Parisiis, apud Sebastianum Mabre-Cramoisy, regis typographum, viâ Jacobaeâ sub Ciconiis. M.DC.LXIX. Cum privilegio regis.
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Poemata et Elegiae sublata obscenitate (Poems and Elegies, Expletives Deleted)

18mo: 180, 169-192 [i.e. 204; with various errors in pagination]pp. Woodcut Jesuit monogram at title. Contemporary calf, gilt compartments at spine. Old library stamp at margin title, and library label at front pastedown. Covers lightly rubbed. A very good, clean copy. Collation: A12, B6, C12, D6, E12, F6, G12, H6, I12, K6 (= 102 leaves; K4 signed K3). Antwerp edition of this anthology of Latin poetry, bowdlerized for the use of impressionable elementary students at Jesuit schools. Similar compilations appeared in Rome as early as 1587. The introduction contains short biographies of the Roman poets Catullus, Tibullus and Propertius based on the even earlier De poëtis Latinus of Pietro Crinitus (1465-ca. 1504). Quoting Dainville's La naissance de l'humanisme moderne, April Shelford reminds us that "because the classics contained material contrary to their religious and moral agenda, the Jesuits did not permit students to browse freely through the canon. Instead, compilers judiciously culled the edifying from the works of Horace and Catullus, for example, so students first encountered these authors through carefully edited anthologies." A rare elementary school text, apart from two copies of the present edition (Vlaamse Erfgoedbibliotheek; Royal Library of Belgium), we have located only four other copies under this title, all in Europen libraries: Duaci: Bogard, 1615 (Musem Plantin Moretus; Karlsruhe, Badische Landesbibliothek); Paris: J. Libert, 1616 (Bibliothèque du séminaire de St-Sulpice à Paris); Duaci: Bogardi, 1623 (Université de Namur). Provenance: Ex-library copy with a small 19th-century oval stamp at title, and library label at front pastedown of the Capucin Friars in Antwerp. References: STCV 12908168. USTC 1000914. Cf. A. Shelford, Transforming the Republic of Letters (NY: Rochester U. Press, 2007), p.19. Full title and imprint: Catulli, Tibulli, Propertii, Poemata, et elegiae sublata obscenitate. Antuerpiae, apud Arnoldum à Brakel, anno 1648.
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Ta souzomena: Opera quae extant omnia (All the Extant Works)

Four parts in one volume, small octavo. Collation: A8, B4, C-T8, V12, [chi]4, V13-16, (blank V16), X4; Aa-Gg8; a4, Aaa-Ccc8, Ddd4; aa4, Aaa-Ccc8, Ddd4. pp. [2], 11-342, [2, blank], [8, variae lectiones & errata]; 112; [7], [1, blank], 54 (i.e. 55), [1, blank]; [8, title & preface], 56. Separate title for each part. N.B.: Complete, despite irregularities of collation and pagination. However, the title and preface of the fourth part are bound out of order, interspersed with the editor's notes following the main text. Eighteenth-century diced calf (joints and extremities lightly worn, tear at spine cap). Occasional touches of mild soiling. Small marginal punture 2F8, else a very good, crisp copy. First collected edition of the works of Julian, Emperor of Rome (331-363), edited by Pierre Martinez (d. 1594) and Charles de Chantelecer (fl. 1577-1620). Part 1: Misopogon. Epistolae. Part 2: Caesares. Part 3: De Imperatoris praeclaris actionibus. Part 4: Hymnus in Solem regem. First two parts with texts in Greek and Latin on facing pages. The last two works are in Greek only. Dedicatory epistle by P[etrus] Martinius dated 1566. Privilege dated 1580. Provenance: Armorial bookplate of Edward Shipperdson (1770-1855) "Nubem Eripiam," Deputy-Lieutenant and magistrate of County Durham, who presented a notable medieval painting, The Crucifixion, by the Master of the Aachen Alterpiece, to the National Gallery in 1847. References: Adams, J-418; Brunet III, 596; Hoffmann II, 492-93; Graesse III, 496. Full title and imprint: Î™Î¿Ï Î»Î Î±Î½Î¿Ï Î‘Ï Ï„Î¿ÎºÏÎ±Ï„Î¿ÏÎ¿Ïƒ τα σωΠομενα. Opera quae extant omnia. A Petro Martinio Morentino Navarro, [et] Carolo Cantoclaro Consiliario Regio, supplicumque libellorum in Curia magistro, latina facta, emendata & aucta. Ejusdem Martinii praefatio de vita Juliani. Additus praeterea est a Carolo Cantoclaro liber ejusdem Iuliani [Peri basileias] [et] á Theodoro Marcilio [Hymnos eis basilea Helion], ab iisdem recogniti [et] illustrati. Una cum variis lectionibus ex vetustis codicibus manuscriptis. Parisiis, apud Dionysium Duvallium, sub Pegaso, in vico Bellovaco. 1583. Cum privilegio Regis.
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Tou pany kyr: Confutatio imperii Papae in Ecclesiam (A Refutation of Papal Authority in the Church)

Octavo. [16], xv, [1], 439, [1]pp. Woodcut printer's device at title; additional half-title precedes main work; annotations; index, and errata. Contemporary calf, paneled in blind; spine elaborately tooled in gilt, morocco lettering piece; dentelles; edges sprinkled in red. Mild wear at extremities; bookplate and old shelf marks at pastedown and endleaf; else an attractive copy with fine, crisp text. Collation: *8, A-2E8, 2F4 (= 236 leaves). First Latin edition of this controversial work by Nektarios (1602/05-1676/85), the Greek Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem from 1661 to 1669, dedicated to Thomas Tenison, the archbishop of Canterbury, and King William III. Fabricius notes that Nektarios was born in Crete and educated at Athens under Theophilus Corydales. He was a strict partisan of Greek orthodoxy and endorsed the Confession of Mogilas in 1662. "During his patriarchate the Romish emissaries were very active in endeavoring to persuade the Greek Christians of Palestine. to unite with the Church of Rome; among them a Franciscan, named Peter, was especially active in distributing five tracts in defense of the papal authority. These tracts Nectarius answered by the publication of another, entitled [Peri tes arches tou Papa antirresis - On the Beginning of the Pope Antichrist] which is a fair refutation of the five principles laid down in the Roman Catholic tracts" (McClintock & Strong Cyclopedia 6:914). This refutation first appeared at Yassy in 1681 or 1682, and was later translated into the present Latin version by the eminent scholar and Huguenot refugee to England, Pierre Allix (1641-1717). The conclusion of the text notes "Excusus per Metrophanem Hieromonachum Giazi [Yassy], in Moldavia A. MDCLXXII" -- the year of the Synod of Jerusalem, which represented the climax of the Orthodox reaction against the heresies of Cyril Lucaris. Following the main text are two brief discussions of the Jesuits (pp.385-406): De Jesuitis (On the Jesuits); De Jesuita qui in Orientales nugas es mendacia effugiit (On the Jesuits, Who Spewed Falsehoods upon the Easterners). Dedication signed P. Allix. Provenance: Bookplate (de-accession stamp) Cathedral Library Ely, where Allix' son, John Peter (d. 1758) was dean. References: ESTC T115885. Graesse 4: 655. Fabricius, Bibl. Graeca 9 (1814), 310: "lucem videt moldauensibus typis a. 1682." Full title and imprint: Î¤Î¿Ï Ï€Î±Î½Ï ÎºÏ Ï [Tou pany kyr] Nectarii Patriarchae Hierosolymitani Confutation imperii papae in ecclesiam. Londini: extat apud Joannem Taylor, in Caemeterio Paulino sub signo Navis. Anno MDCCII.
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[HMAYIL] (Armenian Manuscript Amulet)

Manuscript on paper scroll (45 ft. 6 in. by 3-1/2 in. = 13 meters 87 cm by 9 cm.). 35 sheets glued together, with occasional later reinforcements at verso. Text in single column: 31 illuminated miniatures; 44 ornamented initials. Opening 8-inch section detached; small tears and wear mostly confined to margins. Overall a well-preserved and complete scroll, with concluding colophon. Written, and later printed amulet scrolls (Õ°Õ Õ¡ÕµÕ«Õ , pronounced hum-eye-eel) were quite popular in Armenian culture throughout the Early Modern era though relatively few examples survive due to their delicate format and constant use. Written in Bardzr Hajq in Upper Armenia and dated May 13th 1129 (=1680) of the Armenian era, the colophon of the present scroll notes: "This book for Protection was copied by the hand of sinful deacon Jakob, who is from the province Vorotna, from the village Aghuerdz. Amen. For the enjoyment of Čianshah, Msrshah and Halapshah, the sons of khoja Paghtasar, who is from the province Arzrum, from the Papert city" (Ghazaryan, trans.). The miniatures are likely the work of the copiest who signed the colophon. According to the specialist Davit Ghazaryan, who has examined the scroll, no other example of Jakob's work is known. The tradition of amulets and talismans imbued with the power to bestow well-being and protect from misfortune is ancient and nearly universal. Egyptian scarabs of stone or glazed clay with inscriptions from the Book of the Dead are reckoned among the earliest examples. Armenian hmayil amulets date back to the 15th century; the earliest (incomplete) example is dated to 1428. While these amulets have their ultimate roots in a pre-Christian religious milieu, by the early 15th century in Armenia, the sorcerers who had been producing talismans for centuries began to be replaced by a new group of scribes (Õ¿Õ«Ö€Õ¡ÖÕ Ö‚, tirats'u) who produced hmayils. "These scribes, often belonging to the minor orders of the Church, possessed ready-made writings based on texts of prayers and spells in circulation, which they copied into the scrolls and then customized with the names of those to whom the protection afforded by the hmayils would apply. [S]ome hmayils contained writings of protection that seem to cross the boundary separating orthodox practice from sorcery. Yet these hmayils, though not sanctioned by the Church, were evidently tolerated: they were produced into the second half of the nineteenth century without any formal condemnation by the Church or other actions taken to suppress their production" (Sarkisian). The tension inherent in this Christianized version of ancient folk magic is reflected in the colophon of one hmayil (no. 424 in the Matenadaran collection): "I wrote this sacred preservation book that is called "Hemayel", which is an irrelevant name. Out of ignorance, they call it "Hemayel", as it is a sorcerer who spells "Hem" and the writing they create is called "Hemayel", meaning written or composed by Hem. My writing is not like that, it is pure and free of any sort of wizardry. It contains wishes and prayers of our saints and blessed priests, the likes of Saint Grigor of Narek as well as Saint Nerses of Kyalets, relying on whom we created this preservation script for persecuting demons and curing all the illnesses" (Ghazaryan). Generally written in one column and often made for travelers, the scrolls comprise an imaginative melange of prayers, supplications, Psalms, Gospel passages, sharakans (hymns), and incantations imbued with elements of folk Christianity. "They were typically only a few inches wide, yet could be over thirty feet in length. When rolled up, hmayils were placed in small cloth cases and carried (or even worn) by Armenians for protection during the Early Modern period" (Sarkisian). While it is not uncommon for hmayils to consist of text alone, as is the case with the earliest complete example from 1478, the present scroll contains thirty-one fine miniatures by a local master. At nearly fourteen meters, this scroll is much longer than most surviving hmayils, about half of which are incomplete, and typically average between five to seven meters. According to Davit Ghazaryan only about thirty hmayils are more than ten meters in length. Illustrated examples commonly depict God the Father, Jesus Christ, the Apostles, Grigor of Narek, Nerses the Gracious, and other saints; two distinct groups comprise images of saints on horse-back, and saints with a traditional protective function, such as Saint Sargis, Saint Georg, and Saint Theodore, in which medicine is offered and demons restrained. "Hmayils are of linguistic interest in that the texts can encompass up to twelve centuries of the written Armenian language, with Scriptural passages written in the pure Classical Armenian (գրաբար, grabar) of the "Golden Age" of the language (fifth century), the prayers of St. Gregory and St. NersÄ"s from the Pre-Middle Armenian period of the language (eighth to twelfth century), and later texts in which the language exhibits aspects of Middle Armenian (twelfth to seventeenth century)" (Sarkisian). Named after the early medieval Armenian linguist, theologian, and statesman who is credited with the creation of the Armenian alphabet, the Mesrop Mashtots Institute of Ancient Manuscripts in Yerevan contains the largest collection of hmayils (559); the two other large collections are found at the Holy Saviour's Monastery of New Julfa (57), and at Etchmiadzin Cathedral (ca. 50). References: D. Ghazaryan, "Hmayils - Armenian Amulets in Scrolls" [in:] Magaghat (online articles), Feb. 20, 2020; M. J. Sarkisian, "An Early-Eighteenth-Century Hmayil" [in:] Sources from the Armenian Christian Tradition, vol. 1 (New York: Krikor and Clara Zohrab Information Center, Diocese of the Armenian Church of America, 2022).
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Le Tonkin: Vues Photographiques (Tokin: Photographic Views) (3 vols.) [CONTAINING 122 ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPHS]

Folios. Red cloth over grey paper portfolios, with black lettering on the front covers. String-tied. 101 loose plates. This remarkable and historically important collection is comprised of 122 original b/w photographs taken between 1883-1886 in the area of Northern Vietnam by French medical doctor, explorer and award-winning photographer Charles-Édouard Hocquard (1853 -1911). Hocquard first volunteered in 1883, as a military medical doctor for the Tonkin Campaign. While there he used his position to extensively photograph the country. These images are significant in that they serve as invaluable visual documentation of and offer insight into the daily lives the people, the culture and landscape in the area of the Red River Delta and its surroundings, in Northern Vietnam (then known as Tonkin), as it was in the second half of the 19th century. Most notably, many of these images were taken during the period of France's "Tonkin Campaign" (1883-1886), and the Sino-French War (1884-1885). The French victory during these conflicts ultimately resulted in the beginning of the French colonial period in Vietnam, and the formation of the unified French Indochina. The wide range of images here include portraits, war images, street scenes, landscapes, architecture, still lifes, artisans and craftsmen, musicians and performers, governmental officials, diplomats, soldiers (French, Vietnamese and Chinese), and a number of gruesome images of beheadings and executions. Cities, towns and areas shown include: Hanoi (w/ the citadel), Son Tay, Ninh Bình, Lang Son, Bac Ninh, Nam Dinh, Phu Xa (Dong Dan), Hong Hoa and Dong Son. Although Hocquard's photographs of Tonkin during this period are known to number at least 250 images (and likely many more), publisher Henry Cremenitz offered a total of 240 images* to the public, starting sometime around 1886-1887. It is likely that these images were purchased at the discretion of the buyer. Those who bought a significant amount could have them housed in a custom portfolio. It is known that 117 of Hocquard's images of Tonkin were exhibited at the 1885 Antwerp International Exposition, and won him the gold medal. Although it is not known which images were shown, it can be assumed that many of the exhibited photographs are present in this collection. Some plates contain a single larger image measuring 9 1/2 x 7", while others contain two smaller plates each measuring 6 1/4 x 4". All images are numbered and include a text caption in French, at the bottom, set within each image. All plates are printed with a decorative Chinese-style border and publisher's credits in red. Portfolios with some scratches and stains as well as light rubbing to extremities. The front covers of all three portfolios have a few period notes in ink at the top. Plates throughout with occasional stains, age toning and/or rubbing and minor chipping to extremities, almost entirely confined to the margins. Most images throughout are still clean and vibrant. Portfolios in good to very good- condition. Plates in good+ to near fine condition overall. * A published catalog of images was issued by publisher Henry Cremenitz, naming all available plates in order. A copy of this list accompanies one of the collections held at the Biblioteque Nationale du France, and has been digitally scanned. It can be viewed on their online database. Large images: 84 Small images: 38 (on 19 plates, 2 per plate) Total plate count: 103 Total image Count: 122 There are only 5 collections of these extremely scarce images held worldwide as recorded on OCLC none of which contain the full 240 images: - 3 collections at the Bibliteque Nationale du France (2 of which are scanned) - A small collection at the Bibliothèque centrale du service de santé des Armées (Central Library of the Army Health Service) - The largest collection is held at the Getty (200 images).
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Metropolis (UFA Magazine) [SPECIAL ISSUE, DUTCH LANGUAGE EDITION]

Small quarto. Unpaginated (32 pages). Issued by UFA to herald the release of Fritz Lang's masterpiece "Metropolis". Original wraps with color lithograph by Werner Graul on the front cover. The iconic lithograph features the head of the film's heroine Maria, strapped into Rotwang's transformation machine. The same image was used to publicize the movie's showing at the UFA Pavillion in 1927. The expressionist film is set in a futuristic urban dystopia and explores the social crisis between blue collar workers and their exploitation by the rich in a corrupt capitalistic society. Includes articles on the making of the epic film and statistical information about its large-scale production. Some two million feet of film were shot and the cast, including extras, numbered around 38,000! Approximately 200,000 costumes were used. Metropolis was filmed in 310 days and 60 nights. Released in 1927, the movie was the most sumptuous production mounted in the silent film era. The special affects were astonishing for filmmaking in its incunabular days. With an essay by Fritz Lang's wife, Thea von Harbou, titled "The Children of Metropolis" and a piece by Lang in which he details his ideas of how the movie should be presented. Profusely illustrated with b/w reproductions of photographs of the actors, film stills, the director, production documents, and many other aspects of the production of the film. Rare special edition of the UFA magazine, with incredible in depth documentation of the making of this groundbreaking masterpiece. Text in Dutch. Very minor rubbing to edges of wraps. Light foxing to covers. Interior with some sporadic minor foxing, in most cases to the edges of pages. Images vibrant throughout. Wrappers in very good-, interior in very good+ condition overall. Protected in mylar.
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A Short View of the History of the English Church from the First Introduction of Christianity to the Present Period Vol. 1st From the Times of the Apostles to the Conquest in the Year 1066 [AND] Vol. 4 [King Henry II (1165) through King John (1216); Account of Learning from 1066-1216] [UNIQUE]

Two volumes (of six), quarto. Vol. 1 (26 by 20 cm) in sewn fascicles (without backing) with contemporary marbled card stock covers; vol. 4 (23 by 18 cm) in quarter calf with marbled boards, gilt numeral at spine. Apparently unpublished manuscript of a detailed history of the Church in England. Provenance and annotations: At the opening leaf of the first volume: "These pages having been inspected by a printer for calculation he has given it in which, that 1104 Pages which this and the second volume contain will compleat 600 in print demi Octavo, the extent of which will be down to the Norman Conquest forming the first Volume in print the expense of which will be compleat in boards 193 [pounds] each vol and to the purchaser if a subscriber 8 [shillings] for that and every succeeding Volume." At the verso of the back cover of the first volume is a list penned in a brownish ink distinct from the other text on the page, which notes six volume numbers and their paginations. The first (554pp.) and the fourth (549pp.) correspond to the two present volumes. Volume four contains the motto of the Dukes of Beaufort, "Mutare vel timere spero" (I scorn to change or to fear), penned in circular design in a neat calligraphic hand matching the title above. Mounted at the rear of the volume are two columns from a journal article which references Richard Colt Hoare's English version of The Itinerary of Archbishop Baldwin through Wales A.D. MCLXXXVIII (1188), first published in 1806.
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Ichnographs From the Sandstone of the Connecticut River [W/ 46 PLATES, INCLUDING 22 ORIGINAL SALT PRINT PHOTOGRAPHS]

Large quarto. 61pp. + 46 plates. Black textured buckram boards, with blind-stamping ruling on the covers and gilt lettering on the front. This fascinating and notable work of natural history and early paleontology, is considered the culmination of decades of study on the subject of prehistoric dinosaur Ichnographs (fossilized footprints), found in the Connecticut River Valley. It is profusely illustrated, containing a total of 83 individual images including photographs and lithographs visually documenting these fossils. It is considered the second American book of a scientific nature to be illustrated with photographs*. Starting in 1802 the Connecticut River Valley increasingly became a hotbed for the discovery of evidence of prehistoric life, and one of the first remarkable areas of its kind in North America. In 1835 a group of fossilized impressions were discovered in prehistoric sandstone uncovered in the town of Greenfield, Massachusetts (along the Connecticut River). They were subsequently investigated by a number of academics, including most notably Amherst College geology professor Edward Hitchcock (1793-1864), and the author of this work, physician and naturalist James Deane (1801-1858), who was a neighbor of the initial discoverer. The two men engaged in a long feud over who should get credit for the initial discovery. Deane studied these footprints for decades, and published numerous papers on the subject starting in 1844. He died before he could complete this work, his ultimate and comprehensive statement on the subject, in 1858, and it was posthumously published three years later, with editing and compiling work by his friend and colleague Thomas T. Bouve (1815-1896) of the Boston Society of Natural History, and contributions from others including Hitchcock. The initial sections of this text contain introductory remarks from American naturalist Augustus A. Gould (1805-1866), biographical notice on the late author by American physician and a prominent Christian abolitionist Henry Ingersoll Bowditch (1808-1892), a list of Deane's published papers, and a note from compiler Thomas T. Bouve. Following these sections is Deane's "memoir" discussing the history of the discovery and academic study of the footprints to date, and then the full descriptive text for the plates. The final section of the 46 numbered plates contains a total of 83 individual images (some plates contain multiple figures) reproducing the ichnographs. Deane "chose the best defined and most characteristic specimens", 61 of which are finely printed brown-hued lithographs (4 are large double-page spreads) printed by T. Sinclair of Philadelphia. The other 22 images are original mounted b/w salt-print photographs. No photographer is credited. Although Hitchcock, Deane and others rightly recognized these as the footprints of large prehistoric animals, most of the texts on the subject during the initial era of study referred to them as belonging to forms of large ancient birds and reptiles. It was not until much later that they were recognized as the tracks of a number of species, including the bipedal therapod dinosaur Eubrontes (Eubrontes giganteus) and the sauropod dinsoaur species Otozoum. Here the term dinosaur appears nowhere in the text. This important work in the early history of modern paleontology in North America was published at a transitional time in the evolution of the field as a distinct science within the realm of natural history. In 1842, pioneering British naturalist Sir Richard Owen first coined the term "dinosaur", and the term was only starting to become commonplace. For context, it was William Parker Foulke's pivotal discovery of the Hadrosaurus, only three years earlier in 1858, which unequivocally set the study of dinosaurs in North America into motion. Also, it was only two years before this publication, in 1859, that Darwin published "The Origin of Species", changing biology and life sciences forever, and becoming the subject of enormous controversy. Binding with very minor rubbing and bumping to corners, and the front hinge of the spine. Light sunning to the spine and the back cover. An ex-library copy with bookplate pasted on the interior front cover, a perforated stamp on the title page and the top margins of pages 20 and 57. Red ink stamps on the verso of every plate in the final section. Light smudges and stains to the endpapers. Starting at the gutters of the interior front cover and title-page have been somewhat reinforced. Book block still overall quite tight. Plates with foxing, mostly confined to the margins, and images still clean and vibrant. Binding and interior in very good- condition overall. * An earlier work on the very same subject, "Remarks on Some Fossil Impressions in the Sandstone Rocks of the Connecticut River" (1854), by John C. Warren, was the first published book to contain a photograph of a fossil, and only the second American book to contain a photograph of any kind. (Warren's earlier publication is briefly mentioned in passing on p.19).
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Crimes Hitleriens: Grand Palais – Exposition (Hitlerian Crimes: Grand Palace – Exhibition)

Quarto. [34 pages] Unpaginated. Red and black photo-illustrated paper wrappers. Original photo-illustrated guide, published in conjunction with the exhibition of the same name, held from June 10th - July 31st 1945, at the Grand Palais in Paris. Cover image with photomontage. Sponsored by the newly established French government and the UN War Crimes Commission, this powerful and massive exhibition opened only one month after the end of the war in Europe, and was the first time that millions of French and later other European citizens encountered the sheer scope and horror of Nazi atrocities committed during the Second World War and the Holocaust. The exhibition catalog is profusely illustrated throughout with finely printed b/w photographic reproductions on every page including numerous types of striking and artistic layouts, as well as photomontage. Images contained here range from illustrated maps, graphic statistical tables and Nazi propaganda advertisements, to atrocity photos, war destruction and facsimile images of original documents, accurately representing the wide breadth and scope of the exhibition. Among the included content are statistics on Jewish deportations from France, images from the Struthof concentration camp and content dealing with the fate of members of the French resistance. The interior front wrapper and initial pages include a list of names of the members of the organizing committee, a map of the exhibition, a striking exhibition graphic title with the SS logo, and powerful introductory text. Part of that text states the exhibition sought to "link the effects with the causes, to show how the crimes themselves are not accidents but the outcome of a carefully studied system". The final powerful image printed on the back wrapper shows a mutilated corpse with arms outstretched in a Christ-like pose. Text throughout in French. Wrappers with minor age toning and rubbing along edges, foxing to the rear cover. Interior with some light foxing to inteiror overs, and a few minor smudges and/or water stains near the edges of a few pages. Title page with a horizontal mark in purple. Interior otherwise clean and vibrant. Wrappers and interior in very good- condition overall. An excellent copy of this scarce and powerful publicattion. Protected in modern mylar.
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Tsedah la-Derekh u-Zevadin la-Orá ¥a

Small quarto. 261, [1]ff. Signatures: 1-65 [alef - sameá ¥-heh]4, [chi]2 (= 262 leaves). Woodcut illustration (leaf 90). Final two leaves are folding broadsheets, with letterpress charts, the first (leaf 261) with the final page of text at the verso. Printer's device (Hercules slaying the Hydra) at title. Modern black polished calf. A few skilfull paper repairs at top margin in early leaves. Clean marginal tear (leaf 181). Light worm tracing (with some text loss) in final ten leaves; along with a small group of 4 to 6 very tiny worm holes in the final 30 leaves. Light (mostly marginal) dampstain at final 30 leaves. Both charts with old corrections and annotations (and some loss of text due to worming), each mounted on fine laid paper. A good copy with generally crisp, clean text, notably complete with the final two folding almanac charts. Second edition of this compendium of Jewish law, composed in honor of Don Samuel Abravanel of Seville. It was intended principally for the use of persons in the upper social classes, many of whom occupied positions in government, and found it inconvenient to observe all the legal and ritual regulations, or lacked the time to refer to the halakhic sources. First published at Ferrara in 1554, and arranged in five articles (Heb. = ma'amarot), "[t]he work has an added importance on account of the introduction, which contains valuable historical material, including important details of the method of study in the yeshivot of France and Germany, as well as contemporary incidents in the history of the Jews in Spain. [Menahem] writes reprovingly of those Jews who, because of the demands of the times, began to disregard the observance of the precepts. Although he shows great erudition in his knowledge of the Talmud and codes and was acquainted with the teachings of the earlier Spanish, French, and German scholars, he relies mainly for his halakhic rulings on those of Asher b. Jehiel" (EJ). This preference likely reflects the influence of Asher's son, Judah, who was one of Menahem's principal teachers at the yeshiva in Toledo. Among the very last Hebrew works published at Sabbioneta, the title highlights the approval of Vespasiono Gonzaga, the reigning prince. Previously, in 1553, "the proprietors of this press attempted the hazardous work of republishing the Talmud, and one Treatise saw the light; but the papal decree of that year made the further publication of the Talmud in Italy an impossibility. The end of this press came in the year 1559 due as De Rossi intimates to anti-Christian statements in some of their publications, which finally brought down upon them the wrath of the church" (Amram). When Vincenzo Conti briefly re-established the press at Sabbioneta, to print the present work and two or three others, he would have been keen to indicate his obedience to the temporal and ecclesiastical authorities. The verso of the last numbered leaf and the following unnumbered leaf (both are broadsheets) comprise a calendar, or almanac, entitled "Beʼur ha-luá ¥ot" for the years 5025-6000. The first part is designated "Ha-Luaá ¥ ha-Rishon" and the second "Ha-Luaá ¥ ha-Sheni." Many copies appear to lack one or both of the broadsheets. Annotations: Old Hebrew entries in two hands at the margins of the title-page; some scattered marginal notes in Hebrew. Title in Hebrew: ‏צ×"×" ל×"× ×š וזוו×"ין ×œ××•× ×—× :‏ ‏ו×"ג×"ל×ו ו×"וספ×ו . ×‘×™××•× ×§×¦×ª מילות ×¢× ×‘×™×•×ª . ולוחות ×"×¢×‘×•× . ו×וסף על ×"לוח סימ×י ×"×"פים מ×"×ž××ž× ×•×ª ו×"כללים ו×"×¤× ×§×™× ‏ References: D. Amram, The Makers of Hebrew Books in Italy, pp. 292-3; Cowley 132; Enc. Jud. 11:1303-04; Goldstein 105; Roest (Rosenthaliana), p. 788 (noting two tables); Steinschneider 6368.2 and 3617 (Luah); Vinograd (Sabbioneta) 55; USTC 1791691; Zedner, p.527.
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M. Kir. Belügyminiszter. 577.600/1944. II. B. M. szám. Mentesitö okiratok megerösitése, illetöleg új mentesitések engedélyezése (Royal Hungarian Ministry of Interior. 577.600/1944. Number II. B. M. Confirmation of the Documents of Exemption, and Granting New Exemptions) [SIGNED BY VAJNA GABOR, WITH ORIGINAL SEAL OF THE ROYAL HUNGARIAN MINISTRY OF INTERIOR]

Quarto. 14, [2]pp. On October 15, 1944, the Fascist and anti-Semite Nyilas (Arrow Cross) took power in Hungary, with the 'Nation Leader' Ferenc Szálasi as Prime Minister, and Gábor Vajna as Interior Minister. One of their first acts was to reconsider the list of the Jewish people who were exempted by the previous governments from the enacted laws against the Jews (Jews married to non-Jews, or on whom higher military distinctions were conferred in the World War). This signed printed document is thus a new revised (and dramatically downsized) list of less than 600 Jews exempted from the Hungarian anti-Jewish laws. Its last page bears the original signature in ink of Interior Minister Gábor Vajna*, and the stamped seal of his ministry. Until the spring of 1944 the position of hundreds of thousands of Hungarian Jews can be described as relatively safe - this despite the fact that the Jewish Laws made their lives difficult. Jewish men were forced to serve as laborers in the armed forces and work camps. Thousands of these men died on the Russian front. More than 18,000 Jews, qualified as aliens were deported to Kamenets-Podolsky in the Ukraine, in the summer of 1941, where they were massacred by the German SS, Hungarian soldiers, and Ukrainian militia. From 1939 to 1944, approximately 15-20,000 Jews from abroad found refuge in Hungary. During 1942 and 1943, a number of Polish and Slovak refugees later attested to the nearly undisturbed life of the Jews in Hungary. In March 1944, Hungary had the largest surviving Jewish community, around 800,000 people including converts. This was then the largest grouping of Jews anywhere in German-controlled Europe. In March 19, 1944, the German army occupied Hungary and Horthy was forced to appoint a pro-German government. There was no resistance. Soon Adolf Eichmann appeared with his small team to organize the deportation of all Hungarian Jews to death camps. The Hungarian genocide began in the spring of 1944. Within less than two months - May 15 and July 10, 1944, 437,402 persons (almost the entire Jewish population of the countryside), were locked up in ghettoes and deported mainly to the Auschwitz extermination camp with the collaboration of part of the Hungarian state apparatus, the gendarmerie and the police. Horthy and the people looked on passively. The Pope addressed a personal plea to Horthy on June 25, 1944, which was followed by the warnings of President Roosevelt on June 26, and that of King Gustav of Sweden on June 30. Horthy prohibited further deportations. On October 15, the fate of the Budapest Jews took a dramatic turn for the worse. After Horthy s unsuccessful attempt to extricate Hungary from the war, the Germans activated the Arrow-Cross Party of Ferenc Szálasi, which immediately initiated an unprecedented reign of anti-Jewish terror. Eichmann, who had been obliged to leave Hungary on August 24 (after succeeding in deporting the inmates of the Kistarcsa and Sárvár camps, against Horthy s orders), returned to Budapest on October 17 to proceed to the deportation of the capital s Jews. As a preliminary step in the deportations, a few days after the Arrow Cross putsch, the Jewish male population aged 16 to 60 was ordered to work on fortifications around the capital. At the end of October and the first half of November, some 50,000 Jews, men and women, were driven toward the Austrian border to work on fortifications. A high percentage of persons on this ˝death march˝ perished on the way due to hardship and brutal treatment. Members of the neutral diplomatic corps in Hungary tried to put pressure on the Szálasi-government. The luckier Jews, in possession of genuine or forged safe-conduct passes, were placed into the so-called international ghetto, while the others were forced into the proper ghetto. From the Arrow-Cross seizure of power until the liberation of the Pest ghetto, about 98,000 of the capital s Jews lost their lives in further marches and in train transports, as well as through Arrow-Cross extermination squads, starvation, disease, and cases of suicide. Some of the victims were shot and thrown into the Danube. Tens of thousands of the persecuted were helped by the capital s citizens and the Christian Churches. Soviet troops liberated the big Budapest ghetto on January 18, 1945. On the Buda side of the town, the encircled Nyilas continued their murders until the Soviets took Buda on February 13. Moderate and sporadic creasing along edges of pages. Upper corner of pages creased. Folding marks at center. Text in Hungarian. Document in overall good+ condition. *Gábor Vajna (1891 - 1946) was a Hungarian politician, who served as Interior Minister between 1944 and 1945. Vajna was a confidant of Prime Minister Ferenc Szálasi, the Hungarian fascist party leader and founder of the extreme right "Party of National Will", which later became the Arrow Cross Party. After the fall of Budapest, he was arrested and tried by the People's Tribunal in Budapest in open sessions and sentenced to death for war crimes and high treason. Vajna was hanged in 1946 in Budapest (on the same day as Ferenc Szálasi).