Captain Ahab's Rare Books

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SAMUEL JOHNSON IS INDIGNANT: STORIES - INSCRIBED TO LUCIA BERLIN

SAMUEL JOHNSON IS INDIGNANT: STORIES – INSCRIBED TO LUCIA BERLIN

Davis, Lydia First Printing. Octavo (21.5cm); dark gray cloth, with titling and author's initials stamped in gilt on spine and front cover; dustjacket; [xii],201,[3]pp. Warmly inscribed on the half-title page to Lucia Berlin: "For Lucia, With love and thanks for being such a good friend and for writing such wonderful stories - each one is an inspiration! From Lydia / 1.5.02." Barest hint of foxing to upper edge of textblock, else Fine. Dustjacket is unclipped (priced $17.00), showing some trivial wear to extremities and light dustiness; Near Fine. Housed in a custom clamshell case. Distinguished copy of Davis's major collection of short stories and "flash fiction," inscribed to short story writer Lucia Berlin (1936-2004). Davis, one of Berlin's great admirers, has written extensively about her influence and writing, most recently in The New Yorker, and in the foreword to a new edition of A Manual For Cleaning Women (FSG, 2015). "I have known Lucia Berlin's work for more than thirty years - ever since I acquired the slim, beige 1981 Turtle Island paperback called "Angels Laundromat." By the time of her third collection, I had come to know her personally, from a distance, though I can't remember how.Is this why it is almost impossible to stop reading a story of Lucia Berlin's once you begin? Is it because things keep happening? Is it also the narrating voice, so engaging, so companionable? Along with the economy, the pacing, the imagery, the clarity? These stories make you forget what you were doing, where you are, even who you are" ("The Story is the Thing: On Lucia Berlin." The New Yorker, August 12, 2015). An inscription full of warmth and deep admiration, connecting two masters of the short form.
HEAVILY-CORRECTED TYPESCRIPT FOR A "NOTES OF A DIRTY OLD MAN" STORY

HEAVILY-CORRECTED TYPESCRIPT FOR A “NOTES OF A DIRTY OLD MAN” STORY

Bukowski, Charles Original carbon typescript on six leaves of white bond (measuring 8.5" x 11"), bearing the author's extensive holograph corrections, revisions, and elisions in green felt-tipped pen; signed "Charles Bukowski" on terminal leaf, dated 3-24-75. Faint paper-clip impression at upper left corners, mild handling, with a few tiny splash marks on title leaf, and a small, faint circular stain at lower margin of terminal leaf. Complete, heavily-corrected draft of this Notes of a Dirty Old Man story, which first appeared in the April 4, 1975 issue of the Los Angeles Free Press (No.559). The story is centered around a barfly named Harry, just getting settled for a day of heavy drinking, who encounters a wealthy woman in her mid-40's; she solicits him, takes him home, and engages in some odd fetishistic activity. A humorous and somewhat charming story, lacking the overtly perverse content of some of the stories submitted to High Times, Oui, and Hustler. While the strength of Bukowski's literary legacy rests squarely on his poetry and prose, no small degree of his notoriety as a hard-living, hard-drinking author was due to his many Notes of a Dirty Old Man columns, printed over many years in papers like Open City and L.A. Free Press. Complete stories seldom come onto the market; this one remained uncollected for 36 years, before finally being reprinted in More Notes of a Dirty Old Man: The Uncollected Columns (City Lights, 2011).
HYMN TO THE REBEL CAFE - INSCRIBED TO ISRAEL YOUNG

HYMN TO THE REBEL CAFE – INSCRIBED TO ISRAEL YOUNG, EXTENSIVELY ANNOTATED

Sanders, Edward First Printing, wrappered issue. Octavo (22.75cm); pictorial wrappers; [10],11-194,[6]pp. Israel Young's copy, inscribed to him by Sanders on the half-title page (p.10): "For Izzie & all the good times / Love, Ed / 1994." Apparently one of Sanders's own copies, with his hand-written name and Woodstock, NY address on s slip of lined notebook paper mounted to rear endpaper, and the following note in Young's hand at upper margin of inner rear wrapper: "Israel G. Young, Stockholm, 14 Sept. 1994 / from Ed Sanders." Extensively annotated by Young, who filled the terminal blanks with a full 3pp holograph missive in his characteristic tight hand. Modest wear to extremities, a few faint splash marks to front wrapper and rear endpaper, with front endpaper partially detached; Very Good. A substantial collection of poems by this venerable counterculture figure and musician, many of which first appeared in the pages of Notus, Long Shot, Sulfur, The World, Heartland, and San Francisco Magazine, et al. A significant copy from the collection of Israel Goodman Young (1928-2019), long-time proprietor of the Folklore Center in Greenwich Village, once a major nexus for literature and the arts. Young's relationship with Sanders spanned five decades on two continents. Sanders writes fondly of him in his memoir Fug You: "Israel Young, who ran the Folklore Center, a cultural center frequented by many folksingers and musicians, became a friend. I used his mimeograph to print an issue of Fuck You. I knew him as a great supporter of the avant-garde." (p.106). Indeed, Sanders would read his poetry at the Folklore Center, and the first Fugs concert was held at their new location, on Sixth Avenue and West Third Street in 1965. Young's interaction with the text here is extensive: on the final three pages, his memories pour out, touching on Sanders's poetry (Rebel Cafe and Cemetery Hill), Janis Joplin, Edgar Lee Masters and the Spoon River Anthology, Camus, Jack Hirschman, the Trieste Cafe, and the state of a project underway thanks for a grant from Jerry Garcia's Rex Foundation. Most significantly, he adds a full holograph stanza to the opening poem, "Hymn to the Rebel Cafe": "And tonight, at Spegelteatern / Ed Sanders and I would agree / that Cafe Cino and Cafe Wha / and the Gaslight were great / Rebel Cafes at that time, and / are long gone but we are / both happy that the Rebel / Cafe is alive here tonight / as well as tomorrow, too / All hail to Spegelteatern."
A COMPLETE SET OF BUKOWSKI'S NEW YEAR'S GREETINGS PUBLISHED BY THE BLACK SPARROW PRESS

A COMPLETE SET OF BUKOWSKI’S NEW YEAR’S GREETINGS PUBLISHED BY THE BLACK SPARROW PRESS

Bukowski, Charles 1. If We Take. Los Angeles: Black Sparrow Press. First Edition. Limited Issue, one of 100 numbered copies signed by the author, this being copy no.80. Slim 12mo. (14cm); letterpress printed sheets, handsewn into decorative card wrappers; [12]pp. Fine in the publisher's original envelope, lightly edgeworn, else Near Fine. Housed in a custom leather slipcase and chemise. Krumhansl 31b.2. The Last Poem & Tough Company. Santa Barbara: Black Sparrow Press, 1976. First Edition. Limited Issue, one of 100 numbered copies signed by Bukowski and co-author Diane Wakoski, this being copy no.62. Octavo (20.5cm); decorative paper-covered boards and orange cloth backstrip; publisher's unprinted white paper jacket; [12]pp. Fine in a Fine dustjacket. Krumhansl 53b.3. Art. Santa Barbara: Black Sparrow Press, [1976]. First Edition. Deluxe Issue, one of 26 lettered copies signed by the author, this being copy 'F'. 16mo (10.75cm); blue-green paper-covered boards, with with hand-lettered label applied to front cover; magenta endpapers; publisher's original slipcase; pp. [4] blank, [16], [4] blank. Fine in a Near Fine slipcase, with some light wear to extremities, and a small, stray ink mark along rear edge. Krumhansl 57d. 4. A Love Poem. Santa Barbara: Black Sparrow Press, 1979. First Edition. Deluxe Issue, one of 26 lettered copies specially bound and signed by the author, this being copy 'D'. Small octavo (21cm); decorative paper-covered boards and silver cloth backstrip; publisher's original unprinted olive green paper dustjacket; [8]pp. Fine in a Fine dustjacket. Krumhansl 67c. 5. The Last Generation. Santa Barbara: Black Sparrow Press, 1982. First Edition. Limited Issue, one of 150 numbered copies specially bound and signed by the author, this being copy no.1. Additionally, Bukowski has added a crude drawing of a pair of breasts and pubic hair on the title page, signed "Buk". Slim octavo (20.5cm); decorative paper-covered boards; publisher's unprinted beige paper dustjacket; [12]pp. Fine in a very Near Fine dustjacket, with some trivial wear and dustiness to extremities. Krumhansl 72b. 6. Sparks. Santa Barbara: Black Sparrow Press, 1983. First Edition. Deluxe Issue, one of 26 lettered copies signed by the author, this being copy 'T'. Slim octavo (21.75cm); decorative paper-covered boards; publisher's unprinted black paper dustjacket; [12]pp. Fine in a Fine dustjacket. Krumhansl 77c. 7. One For The Old Boy. Santa Barbara: Black Sparrow Press, 1984. First Edition. Deluxe Issue, one of 26 lettered copies signed by the author, this being copy 'P'. 12mo (16.5cm); decorative paper-covered boards; publisher's unprinted white paper dustjacket; [12]pp. Fine in a Fine dustjacket. Krumhansl 86c.8. Alone In A Time Of Armies. Santa Barbara: Black Sparrow Press, 1985. First Edition. Limited Issue, one of 200 numbered copies specially-bound and signed by the author, this being copy no.167. Octavo (17cm); decorative paper-covered boards; publisher's original unprinted blue paper dustjacket; [8]pp. Fine in a Fine dustjacket. Krumhansl 94b. 9. Gold In Your Eye. Santa Barbara: Black Sparrow Press, 1986. First Edition. Limited Issue, one of 200 numbered copies signed by the author, this being copy no.145. Octavo (16cm); decorative paper-covered boards; [8]pp. A Fine copy. Krumhansl 98b. 10. Luck. Santa Rosa: Black Sparrow Press, 1987. First Edition, Limited Issue, one of 200 numbered copies specially bound and signed by the author, this being copy no.4. 16mo. (10.75cm); decorative paper-covered boards and black leather backstrip; [16]pp. Trivial wear to extremities, else Near Fine. Krumhansl 102b. 11. The Movie Critics. Santa Rosa: Black Sparrow Press, 1988. First Edition. Deluxe Issue, one of 26 lettered copies specially bound and signed by the author, this being copy 'O'. Octavo (18cm); decorative paper-covered boards; [12]pp. A Fine copy. Krumhansl 106c. 12. If You Let Them Kill You, They Will. Santa Rosa: Black Sparrow Press, 1989. First Edition. Limited Issue, one of 200 numbered copies signed by the author, this being copy no.79. Octavo (18.5cm); illustrated paper and red satin backstrip; publisher's original white unprinted dustjacket; [12]pp. Fine in a Near Fine dustjacket, with some light wear and dustiness to extremities. Krumhansl 111b. 13. We Ain't Got No Money, Honey, But We Got Rain. Santa Rosa: Black Sparrow Press, 1990. First Edition. Limited Issue, one of 200 numbered copies specially bound and signed by the author, this being copy no.32. Small octavo (18.5cm); illustrated paper-covered boards; [16]pp. Gentle sunning to spine, trivial wear to upper right corner of front board, else Near Fine. Krumhansl 113b. 14. In The Morning And At Night And In Between. Santa Rosa: Black Sparrow Press, 1991. First Edition. Deluxe Issue, one of 26 lettered copies signed by the author, this being copy 'K'. Small octavo (18.5cm); lavender paper over black, purple, blue, and gold patterned cloth backstrip; unprinted white paper dustjacket; [12pp]. Two small nicks to cloth on rear joint, else Near Fine in a Near Fine dustjacket, with some sunning to spine and extremities. Krumhansl 120c. 15. Now. Santa Rosa: Black Sparrow Press, 1992. First Edition. Limited Issue, one of 200 numbered copies specially bound and signed by the author, this being copy no.167. Small octavo (18.5cm); illustrated paper-covered boards; [8]pp. Gentle sunning to spine, else very Near Fine. Krumhansl 128b. 16. Those Marvelous Lunches. Santa Rosa: Black Sparrow Press, 1993. First Edition. Limited Issue, one of 200 numbered copies specially bound and signed by the author, this being copy no.171. Small octavo (18.5cm); illustrated paper-covered boards; [12]pp. Hint of sunning to spine, else very Near Fine. Krumhansl 133b. 17. Between the Earthquake, the Volcano and the Leopard. Santa Rosa: Black Sparrow Press, 1994. First Edition. Deluxe Issue, one of 26 lettered copies specially bound in boards, this being copy 'D'. Slim octavo (21cm); decorative paper-cov
SALOME

SALOME

Lamb, Mary & Charles (poem); Johnson, Fridolf (text & binding) Quarto (26.25cm); original calligraphic manuscript (rectos), composed in black, burgundy, gold, gray, and dark green ink on translucent stock, bound into batik paper-covered boards with fuchsia cloth backstrip, and manuscript title label mounted to spine; [9] leaves, [3] blank; with illustrated title leaf, and colophon reading "Written and bound by Fridolf Johnson / April, 1948." Large decorative bookplate on metallic paper mounted to front pastedown (Salome Collection / Ex Libris Fridolf Johnson). Light wear to extremities, spine gently sunned, with a touch of fraying to spine ends; scattered foxing to front pastedown, with some offsetting along hinges from binders glue, otherwise text is clean; Very Good+. A unique manuscript of Mary Lamb's romantic poem "Salome," composed around 1808-09, and first published in her husband Charles Lamb's Works [1818]; while the poem was originally published in her husband's works, and while his name is credited on the title page of this volume, the poem, according to scholar Adriana Craciun, "is indisputably hers" ("The Subject of Violence: Mary Lamb, Femme Fatale." Romanticism and Women Poets: Opening the Doors of Reception, p.65). Fridolf Johnson (1905-1988) was an American author, calligrapher, and illustrator, whose early work as a designer led him increasingly toward an interest in printing and typography. He eventually established the Mermaid Press, and became and active member of the Zamorano Club, Typophiles, and New York Chappel of Private Presses. His archive is held at the University of Delaware. (cf.Biographical Note. Fridolf Johnson Papers, 1950-1985).
HEAVILY-CORRECTED TYPESCRIPT - THE FOREWORD FOR THE 1983 EDITION OF THE RIGHT STUFF

HEAVILY-CORRECTED TYPESCRIPT – THE FOREWORD FOR THE 1983 EDITION OF THE RIGHT STUFF

Wolfe, Tom Draft typescript (4,713 words) on six leaves of white bond, measuring 8.5" x 11". Heavily revised, with the author's holograph notations and corrections throughout in black ink, along with 22 notes by a copyeditor in red pencil. Signed "tw" in type, with "T.W. / August 1983" on terminal leaf. Two old folds smoothed-out, with three leaves scribbed (likely by a child) in pencil, black pen, and red crayon on verso; well-preserved, housed in a custom half-morocco slipcase and chemise. Final typescript of Wolfe's foreword to the 1983 edition of The Right Stuff (first published in 1979), issued to coincide with the theatrical release of Philip Kaufman's film adaptation, starring Ed Harris, Barbara Hershey, Dennis Quaid, and Sam Shepard. In his foreword, Wolfe articulates why he was compelled to embark on the project in the first place: "This book originated with some ordinary curiosity on my part. What is it, I wondered, that makes a man willing to sit up on top of an enormous Roman candle, such as a Redstone, Atlas, Titan, or Saturn rocket, and wait for someone to light the fuse? I decided on the simplest approach possible. I would ask a few astronauts and find out.The Right Stuff became the story of why men were willing---willing?---delighted!---to take on such odds in this, an era literary people had long since characterized as the age of the anti-hero." The book was, and remains, one of the cornerstone works on the subject of spaceflight; a significant working draft of the only new writing Wolfe had done on The Right Stuff since its initial publication in 1979.
THE WORKS OF EDGAR ALLAN POE. NEWLY COLLECTED AND EDITED

THE WORKS OF EDGAR ALLAN POE. NEWLY COLLECTED AND EDITED, WITH A MEMOIR, CRITICAL INTRODUCTIONS, AND NOTES, BY EDMUND CLARENCE STEDMAN AND GEORGE EDWARD WOODBERRY

Poe, Edgar Allan Cloth Issue. Ten octavo volumes (19.5cm); original hunter green cloth, with titling and Art Nouveau decorations stamped in gilt on spines; top edges gilt; xvi,343,[1]; [iv],334,[2]; [viii],325,[3]; [viii],297,[3]; [viii],361,[3]; xxvi,331,[5]; [viii],355,[3]; xii,352,[4]; [viii],317,[3]; xxxvi,313,[5]pp, with engraved frontispiece portraits of Poe and his family, and inserted plates of illustrations by Albert Edward Sterner. Contemporary owners ink signature to front pastedown of each volume (C.G. Babcock, June '96); light overall wear to spine ends and extremities, corners bumped or pushed (though mostly still sharp), with upper gilt edges a bit dulled and dusty, and varying degrees of dulling and rubbing to spine gilt; occasional rubbed spots to covers, with a handful of scuffs and scratches to rear cover of Vol.10; spine a bit rolled on Vol.1, with the hinges cracked but holding; a few preliminary leaves roughly opened in Vol.5; subtle indentations to upper fore-edges on Vols. 5-10; contents clean; Very Good. "The most ambitious publishing project of Stone & Kimball, conceived in enthusiasm and carried out with care, this has remained the standard edition of Poe" (Kramer, History of Stone & Kimball, 35). At the time of publication, it was the first complete and true edition of Poe's works, accompanied by critical introductions and notes; the trade edition was issued simultaneously in cloth and half-levant, with a small run of large paper copies, and a limited issue bound in vellum. BAL 16168.
TYPED LETTER

TYPED LETTER, SIGNED, TO JAMES SALTER (NOVEMBER 29, 1983)

Ford, Richard Typed letter on white bond (measuring ca.8.5" x 11"); 30 lines (287 words), and signed "Cordially, Richard Ford" at lower margin. Two old folds from mailing smoothed-out, modest handling and a few creases, with a few faint foxed spots, three tiny spots of correction fluid, and two holograph corrections in Ford's hand. The Pulitzer Prize-winning author's first letter to Salter, written in response to his appreciation of Ford's Esquire essay "The Three Kings: Hemingway, Faulkner, and Fitzgerald" (December 1, 1983). Ford expresses his appreciation of the letter, mentioning "I didn't think I'd done much for the Faulkner-Hemingway-Fitzgerald canon, and in fact my purest pleasure in writing the essay was to say a kind word about my mother, and to try and make some small narrative good out of what seemed like a hit-or-miss college life." He goes on to acknowledge his love of Sherwood Anderson, a mutual influence: ".hist stories were the first ones I read after I woke up -- about age 25. And I admire many, many of them: "Death in the Woods," "I Want to Know Why." It's rare these days even to hear anyone mention his name, and I appreciate your doing it and reminding me of him and the pleasure I had fro those stories." The two kept up their correspondence over the next three decades, with Ford becoming one of the great advocates of Salter's work. In his introduction to the Penguin Classics edition of Light Years, Ford would declare: "It is an article of faith among readers of fiction that James Salter writes American sentences better than anyone writing today."
SKINNY LEGS AND ALL - TIMOTHY LEARY'S EXTENSIVELY ANNOTATED COPY

SKINNY LEGS AND ALL – TIMOTHY LEARY’S EXTENSIVELY ANNOTATED COPY, INSCRIBED BY TOM ROBBINS

Robbins, Tom First Printing. Octavo (24cm); peach paper-covered boards and purple cloth backstrip, with titles stamped in gilt on spine; dustjacket; [x],422pp. Timothy Leary's copy, inscribed to him and his wife Barbara on the half-title page: "To Tim + Barbara, "Couple of the Century" / with affection & admiration / Tom Robbins [Wood Pulp Forever]. Heavily-read and extensively-annotated by Leary across the front pastedown and endpaper, where he supplies the following thoughts: "Tom does what Joyce, Pynchon and Burroughs do - he glorifies paganism and mercilessly satirizes Christianity, Judaism, Islam [.] I love this book." Spine gently sunned, modest hand-soil and some scattered staining to covers, with a few dog-eared pages, and Leary's pervasive underlining and marginal notations throughout the text; Very Good. In supplied dustjacket, unclipped (priced $19.95), with light shelfwear, creasing to flaps, and some faint soil on upper margin of front panel, most noticeable on verso; Very Good+. Housed in a bespoke slipcase and chemise. Robbins's fifth novel, inscribed to long-time friends and devotees Timothy and Barbara Leary. Robbins modeled one of the characters in Jitterbug Perfume after Leary, and many Robbins fans have noted there seems to be a Leary-esque figure in nearly every one of his books. A well-read copy, showing Leary's extensive interaction with the text, and clear affinity for Robbins as a serious literary figure.
THE ROAD - CORRECTED DRAFT TYPESCRIPT

THE ROAD – CORRECTED DRAFT TYPESCRIPT

McCarthy, Cormac Computer-generated draft typescript, complete on 231 numbered leaves (8.5" x 11"), faxed by McCarthy from his agent Amanda Urban's office to his editor, Gary Fisketjon. This draft bears 15 brief corrections and notations in Fisketjon's hand, along with 69 passages marked in pencil throughout the text by Urban (all in copy); Fisketjon has additionally added "Cormac" (in ink) along upper right margin of preliminary leaf. Light wear and handling, with some creasing and more pronounced handling to preliminary and terminal leaves, and a short, closed tear to left margin of p.1; housed in an acid-free chemise and bespoke clamshell case. Complete draft typescript of McCarthy's tenth novel, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2007, and basis for the 2009 John Hillcoat film starring Viggo Mortenson. This copy originated with Gary Fisketjon, McCarthy's long-time editor at Knopf, who oversaw the publication of The Border Trilogy and No Country For Old Men. Based on the transmission line along the lower margin of p.51, this was faxed by McCarthy from the office of his agent at International Creative Management (ICM) LLE, at 5:16pm on February 2, 2006 - preceding publication day by exactly 8 months. Amanda "Binky" Urban, together with her partner, Esther Newberg, took over the literary division of ICM in 1999, the former acting as Co-Director and McCarthy's agent since assuming her role at the agency. An excellent draft of the novel, this version having already gone through several rounds of revision, though clearly showing interaction with the text, and exchange between two of the most significant individuals in McCarthy's professional life at the time.
ORIGINAL BLOTTED LINE CHERUB DRAWING - "BE MY VALENTIME"

ORIGINAL BLOTTED LINE CHERUB DRAWING – “BE MY VALENTIME”

Warhol, Andy Original illustration, composed in ink on paper, measuring 35cm x 28.5cm (ca.14" x 11.25"); figures hand-colored in pink, and titled by the artist in pencil "be my valen | time." Light toning and foxing, with tape remnants to four edges; archivally hinged, placed into gallery mat. Large, charming drawing by Warhol (1928-1987) depicting a pair of cherubs at play, similar to those found in his mid-1950's series In the Bottom of My Garden. "To make a blotted line drawing, Warhol would draw an image (or, often, trace from a photograph) onto a sheet of blank paper. This sheet of paper would either be folded in half or have another sheet of paper attached to it by a piece of tape that functioned as a hinge. Working slowly, Warhol would ink his drawing in small sections on the first sheet of paper and, while the ink was still wet, fold over the second sheet and blot the drawing. Line by line, Warhol would ink and blot the drawing until the entire image was transferred to the second sheet. The smudges and specs of ink produced by this rudimentary printing process gave the resulting image a spontaneous feel. Warhol would then discard the working ink drawing, and the print would serve as his final "drawing".The blotted line became famous as Warhol's line, and, despite its simplicity, it was difficult to imitate" (Mulroney, Lucy. Andy Warhol: Publisher, pp.15-16). While cherubs were a recurring theme in Warhol's early work, Gary Comenas makes note of this particular kind of drawing on the WarholStars website, as relayed by author and illustrator Robert Galster: "I had admired Andy's book jacket design for Ronald Firbank's Three More Novels, and Gilbert [Ireland] called up the publisher and said, 'Who did that book jacket?' because he wanted to see if he could get a Valentine's Day drawing with these little cupids, and it turned out that the artist was Andy Warhol. Andy lived, it turned out, nearby, and we both met him. Andy charged about 20 dollars for the drawing.I turned up on the top floor of this brownstone, above a restaurant. As I recall, it was funny. It was like a bat cave: funny room just filled with things like boxes and things, and not a stick of furniture. And for a desk, he used a door: a door taken off a wall and on two saw horses. He was also working while we were there, and he was sitting on a typewriter case, which was funny. He was sitting on this typewriter case, which is so high off the ground, and working.And I said something about that I liked the little cupid drawing, and he started drawing me more cupids. Just drawing away, and he gave me three or four drawings then."