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Michael R. Thompson

About Woman

About Woman, Love, and Marriage

Saunders,F[rederick ] Frederick Saunders (1807-1902) was a London-born librarian and writer, who relocated to New York in order to open a branch of his familyÕs bookselling firm. He petitioned Congress for the passage of an act that sought to protect both American and British authors; though it was backed by George Bancroft, Henry Clay, William Cullen Bryant, and Washington Irving, it failed to pass. For a time, he was the editor of The New York Post and was the assistant librarian at the Astor Library, later becoming its head librarian. About Woman, Love, and Marriage is both a work of advice and an interesting piece of Òpro-marriageÓ propaganda, with Saunders noting that ÒThe question of the decline of marriage, -- now so much talked about Ð, is of vital importance, not merely to society at large, but of paramount concern to woman, since it involves the greatest interest of her life.To the unmarried portion of the sex.the subject proposed to be discussed can scarcely fail of awakening interest, since Ð being the great event of womanÕs life Ð it simply urges the adoption of an admitted prerogative and duty.Ó (p. vii-viii). About Woman, Love, and Marriage is divided into four sections: I. Concerning Celibacy, II. The Ruling Passion, III. Wedded Life, and IV. Modern Impediments to Marriage. Octavo. [iii]-319, [1, blank], 3-6 pp. Woodcut headpiece and vignettes, initial letters. PublisherÕs green cloth, ruled and stamped decoratively in blind, gilt spine, light blue endpapers. Binding extremities lightly rubbed. Trivial soiling to cloth, a few very minor stains not affecting text, endpapers lightly foxed, bookplate on front pastedown. A very good, bright copy of a scarce book First edition.
The GrimkŽ Sisters: Sarah and Angelina GrimkŽ. The First American Women Advocates of Abolition and WomanÕs Rights.

The GrimkŽ Sisters: Sarah and Angelina GrimkŽ. The First American Women Advocates of Abolition and WomanÕs Rights.

Birney, Catherine H. Angelina Emily GrimkŽ (1805-79) and Sarah Moore (1792-1873) were South Carolina-born essayists and social reformers, born to a wealthy slaveholder family. Sarah engaged in clandestine reading of works in Latin and law books; Angelina refused Episcopalian confirmation and was ultimately expelled from her congregation. She joined Sarah in Philadelphia, where the latter had become a Quaker minister, advocating for abolition and womenÕs rights. Sarah wrote several works, including Epistle to the Clergy of Southern States (1836), which argued that Christianity and slavery were incompatible, and Letters on the Equality of Sexes and the Condition of Woman (1838), which contests the Biblical justification of womenÕs inequality. Angelina authored a pamphlet (Appeal to Christian Women of the South, 1836) that encouraged woman to become active abolitionists. Both sisters worked for the New York Anti-Slavery Society and were the first American women to publically address mixed audiences. She also wrote An Appeal to the Women of the Nominally Free States (1837), in which she first made the connection between women and slaves. Octavo. [3], [1, blank], 319 pp. PublisherÕs brown cloth, lettered and ruled in gilt on front board, gilt-lettered spine, floral patterned endpapers. Very minor foxing to preliminary and terminal blanks. A near fine copy of a scarce work. First edition. Catherine Birney, a friend of the GrimkŽ sisters and a former student of their boarding school, wrote their biography after living with them and being given access to their diaries and letters. The GrimkŽ Sisters follows the lives of Sarah and Angelina from their childhood up to their deaths and, in eighteen chapters, discusses a plethora of significant topics, including religion, their relationship with Catherine Beecher, their abolitionist views, womenÕs rights, their speaking engagements and lectures before audiences of different ethnicities, etc.
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WomanÕs Work and WomanÕs Culture. A Series of Essays.

Butler, Josephine E. Josephine Elizabeth Butler (1828-1906) was a social reformer and womenÕs activist, primarily remembered for her leadership in the campaign to repeal the Contagious Diseases Acts (1870-86), which sought to regulate the spread of venereal disease by imprisoning prostitutes and subjecting them to medical and police inspection. From 1867 to 1873, she was the President for the North England Council for Promoting the Higher Education of Women. During the course of her life, she authored ninety books and pamphlets Octavo. lxiv, 367 pp PublisherÕs blue cloth double-ruled in blind with blindstamped central panel, gilt spine, gray coated endpapers. Binding extremities lightly rubbed, slight wear to corners. A bit of soiling to cloth, minor toning to spine. Intermittent minor foxing, light red pencil markings to a handful of leaves, never affecting text or legibility, a few small stains. Early twentieth-century ink inscription on half-title, small booksellerÕs ticket on upper front pastedown, and small binderÕs ticket on lower rear pastedown. A very good copy. First edition of a work edited by a Ògreat founding mother of modern feminism,Ó who feminist intellectual, political and union leader, and writer Millicent Fawcett (1847-1949) referred to as Òthe most distinguished English woman of the nineteenth century.Ó The essays in the present work include: ÒThe Final Cause of WomanÓ by activist and anti-vivisectionist Frances Power Cobbe (1822-1904), ÒEducation Considered as a Profession for WomenÓ by Reverend George Butler (the authorÕs husband, 1819-1890), ÒMedicine as a Profession for WomenÓ by Sophia Louisa Jex-Blake (1840-1912), and ÒThe Teaching of ScienceÓ by James Stuart (educational reformer and politician, 1843-1913), and others.
All the Works of Epictetus

All the Works of Epictetus, Which Are Now Extant; Consisting of His Discourses, preserved by Arrian, in Four Books, the Enchiridion, and Fragments. Translated from the Original Greek, by Elizabeth Carter. With an Introduction, and Notes, by the Translator.

Epictetus. Elizabeth Carter (1717-1806) was a noted member of the Blue Stocking Circle. Despite an early learning disability and Òwith a persistence that won the praise of V. Woolf in A Room of OneÕs Own,Ó (as Margaret Drabble reminds us in the Oxford Companion to English Literature) she learned Latin, Greek, and Hebrew in childhood with her brothers, and later studied French, Italian, German, Portuguese, and Arabic. She was a friend of Samuel Johnson, who thought her one of the best Greek scholars he had known, and invited her to contribute to The Rambler. She made a number of translations, of which this is considered her masterpiece. It was undertaken at the request of her friend, Catherine Talbot, who arranged for publication and solicited subscribers, amongst which were a large number of women, and members of the Johnson circle. Quarto. 18], xli, [1], 505, [11] pp. With a scholarly introduction to the Stoic philosophers by the translator, an impressive list of subscribers, and an index and appendix of variant readings. Half nineteenth-century brown morocco over speckled boards. Gilt-ruled spine with lettering for author and title, and from the library that once owned the book, the H.H. Baxter Library in Rutland, Vermont. Edges sprinkled red No other library marks, modern ink signature in preliminaries, light foxing. A very good copy First edition of the first English translation of the complete works of Epictetus. This esteemed work was the standard English version prior to OldfatherÕs translation (1925-8). (See Long, Epictetus: A Stoic and Socratic Guide to Life, Oxford: 2002.) Oldfather 47. Lowndes 745 (Òa most admirable translationÓ). NCBEL II, 1595.
The Art of Being Easy At All Times

The Art of Being Easy At All Times, and In All Places, Written chiefly for the Use of a Lady of Quality. Made English from the French Original by Edward Combe, A.B. of Merton Coll. Oxon.

Deslandes, Andres Fran ois Boureau ]. Andr Fran ois Deslandes (1689-1757) was a French philosopher, Commissioner of the Port of Brest in 1716, a member of the Prussian Academy of Sciences, and a corresponding member of La Rochelle of the Acad mie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres. He was born into a prolific family in Pondich ry; his father was diplomat Andr Boreau-Delandes and his grandfather was Fran ois Martin (1634-1706), the founder and governor of Pondich ry. The Art of Being Easy At All Times is a guide for social conduct, specifically aimed at women. Some of the topics it explores include whether or not studious persons are more subject to ÒuneasinessÓ than others, conversing tactfully with women, women being less subject to uneasiness than men, the exile of Ovid (that is, prizing moments that are spent alone), how to enlighten conversation (Òsweetness,Ó Òlight jestingÓ and a good sense of humor are more important than wit, especially in polite company), the importance of reading in between business and pleasure, etc. Twelvemo. [22], 163, [1, blank], [4, Table of Contents] pp. Engraved initial letters, borders, and vignettes. Modern quarter calf over marbled boards, gilt lettered spine with raised bands in five compartments A bit of darkstaining to gutter margins of first few gatherings and very faint intermittent dampstaining to lower margins, neither affecting legibility. A very good copy First English edition. It was first published in 1715 (LÕart de ne point sÕennuyer) in both Paris and Amsterdam.
Aunt Hitty. Biographical and Reminiscent Narration of ÒAunt HittyÓ and ÒUncle ThomasÓ Haskell.

Aunt Hitty. Biographical and Reminiscent Narration of ÒAunt HittyÓ and ÒUncle ThomasÓ Haskell.

Bray, Maria Herrick. Mehitable Haskell (d. 1878) and spiritualist Thomas Haskell (d. 1873) were members of the Peace Society and the Washingtonian temperance organization. They supported womenÕs suffrage, and believed that women and men should be held to the same moral standard. Mehitable traveled in order to proclaim her ideas in churches, schoolhouses, and halls, becoming known as a notable speaker in an era that predated women preachers and lecturers. She wass influenced by Lydia Maria Child and William Lloyd Garrison, was acquainted with Harriet K. Hunt, BostonÕs first female physician, and was friends with Lucy Stone and Wendell Phillips, who gave the address at her funeral. Octavo. [1, title-page], [1, blank], 29 pp. Frontisportrait. Illustrated gray wrappers. Slight toning and minor creasing to covers. Two small closed tears to wrappers, rubber ink stamp (ÒApr 9 1908Ó) on covers and verso of terminal blank. Blindstamp of the New England Historic Genealogical Society on title-page and p. 25, not affecting legibility. Bookplate of the New England Historic Genealogical Society with contemporary ink inscription pasted in; at rear. A very good copy of a scarce book. First edition of a biographical tribute to womenÕs rights advocates and abolitionist siblings Mehitable and Thomas Haskell, with an emphasis on the formerÕs life. OCLC lists only microforms, electronic copies, and reprints.
Strictures on the Modern System of Female Education. With the View of the Principles and the Conduct Prevalent Among Women of Rank and Fortune.

Strictures on the Modern System of Female Education. With the View of the Principles and the Conduct Prevalent Among Women of Rank and Fortune.

More, Hannah. Hannah More was the most prolific and one of the most famous of the Bluestockings and the author of the poem ÒThe Bas Bleu,Ó (1782), in which she saluted LondonÕs female intelligentia. With her sister she ran a boarding school in Bristol. Under the patronage of David Garrick, she wrote a number of religious dramas, including The Inflexible Captive (1774) and Percy (1777), but after GarrickÕs death in 1779, her interest in the theatre waned, and she wrote a series of prose works relating to the obligations of Christianity, particularly among the moneyed classes. More believed that the education of the upper classes was crucial because of their influence on society. Written in the vivacious style that made her popular, the book emphasizes the acquisition of factual knowledge by young ladies, with warnings against the Òdangers arising from an excessive cultivationÓ of imagination and of the fine arts. The study of history, geography, and Òaccuracy in languageÓ is not only worth while in itself, but of religious and moral benefit, helping to protect young ladies from the Òdissipation an d the modern habits of fashionable life.Ó Two volumes, octavo. xix, [1, blank], 292; viii, [1, blank], 327, [1, publisherÕs ads] pp. Original paper spine over boards, uncut, spines numbered in black Binding extremities a bit rubbed, slight soiling to boards, spines slightly worn. Light foxing, very faint dampstaining to lower and outer margins of a handful of gatherings in Vol. I. and faint staining to pp. 233-240 in Vol. II, not affecting legibility. Contemporary circulating library label on upper front pastedown of Vol. I that reads Òsold by Thomas Dangerfield, No. 26 Berkeley Square, Bookseller and Stationer.Ó A very good copy. Third edition of MoreÕs important work on womenÕs education, one of her best known and most important, published the same year as the first. Strictures proved immensely successful; a second ÒcorrectedÓ edition was soon published and it had reached a seventh edition within the first year. There are currently no copies of the first edition in commerce.
Life of Mary Anne Schimmelpennick. Edited by her relation Christiana C. Hankin.

Life of Mary Anne Schimmelpennick. Edited by her relation Christiana C. Hankin.

Schimmelpenninck, Mary Anne. Mary Anne Schimmelpenninck (1778-1856) was the daughter of the Birmingham Quaker and gunmaker, Samuel Galton, a member of the Lunar Society, at whose house such intellectuals as Joseph Priestley, Samuel Parr, Richard Lovell Edgeworth, and Erasmus Darwin were frequent visitors. In 1805, she wrote a pamphlet on the education of the poor, against her motherÕs advice. A year later, she married a Bristol shipping merchant of Dutch descent, and became active in local charities and educational projects. Her interest in the Port Royal group, which flourished in France at the end of the seventeenth century, was prompted by some books sent to her by Hannah More. Her other works include the artistic treatise The Theory and Classification of Beauty and Deformity (1815). Between 1854-1856, SchimmelpenninckÕs niece Christiana C. Hankin took down from dictation the formerÕs autobiography; the memoir portion of the work, which occupies the second volume, was compiled with the utmost pains in order to Òprocure the materials with a view to continue the detail from the period when the autobiography of her early years concludesÓ (p. vi). SchimmelpenninckÕs personal correspondence was used as a source and provides the reader with both her character and her views on a variety of topics. Two volumes, octavo. ix, [1, blank], 345, [1, colophon]; ix, [1,blank], 275, [1, colophon] pp. Frontisportrait. Pastedowns imprinted with ads. Original brick red cloth, stamped and ruled in blind, gilt lettered spine, brown coated endpapers. Binding extremities very lightly rubbed, spines slightly toned. Very minor foxing to a handful of leaves in both volumes, light creasing to margins, small binderÕs ticket on lower rear pastedown of first volume. A fine set. First edition.
Etiquette of Good Society. Edited and revised by Lady Colin Campbell.

Etiquette of Good Society. Edited and revised by Lady Colin Campbell.

Campbell, Gertrude Elizabeth Mary. ÒThere are many unmentionable habitsÉwhich we should regard with unmitigated horror, but which the people of that day looked upon as ordinary and correct behavior,Ó Campbell writes in her ÒIntroductionÓ to Etiquette of Good Society, which sold over ninety thousand copies by the time of CampbellÕs death in 1911. Born in Ireland, Gertrude Elizabeth Campbell (1857-1911), nŽe Blood, was a journalist who wrote columns and articles on sports, art, fashion, and music. Her writing career blossomed after her divorce from Lord Colin Campbell and enabled her to become a prominent member of British literary circles. Her published works include novels, translations, and collections of essays and advice like the present volume. Octavo. 224 pp., [16] publisherÕs ads. PublisherÕs green boards lettered in white, lower board with printed ÒRowlandÕs ArticlesÓ advertisement. Some underlining in places and spotting to fore-edge, otherwise clean throughout. Short split to lower joint and light rubbing to corners and edges of boards. A good, sound copy with clean pages and only minimal foxing. Early (second?) edition of CampbellÕs volume on a variety of etiquette topics from letter writing, garden parties, and marriages to funerals and mourning. This is a scarce book. OCLC lists 5 copies of the 1893 edition in the United States. 4 copies of the 1885 edition are in libraries (one in Chicago and the rest overseas). OCLC lists no editions between 1885 and 1893. Any contemporary editions are rare in commerce. (Grace Lees-Maffei, Design at Home, p. 16.)
Almanacks.

Almanacks.

Greenaway, Kate. Catherine ÒKateÓ Greenaway (1846-1901) was a painter and illustrator whose artworks appeared in dozens of books over the course of her career, including volumes of poetry and short fiction by Robert Browning and Bret Harte. Her work also appeared in fashion and dŽcor: the department store Liberty of London adapted her designs into a popular line of clothing for children; in addition, many middle-class families who were enamored with GreenawayÕs work decorated their childrenÕs bedrooms with wallpaper printed with her art. GreenawayÕs Almanack series was wildly popular in the United States and much of Europe: the 1883 edition alone sold 90,000 copies. An additional almanac was published in 1897, though no almanac was published in 1896. Fourteen volumes, thirteen twentfourmo, one twelvemo. Color illustrations throughout. PublisherÕs glazed paper boards with illustrations. 1889 volume is bound in publisherÕs brown cloth boards. 1884, 1886, and 1892 volumes are bound in imitation vellum and, along with the 1889 volume, gilt-edged and lettered in gilt on front boards. 1884 volume is a 12mo stitched pamphlet. Slight rubbing at edges and some rubbing on boards of the 1889, 1893, and 1895 volumes. Light foxing, as usual. Some damp staining on back board of 1888 volume. Additionally, some staining on endpapers of 1890 volume, but in general the 1890 and 1891 volumes are remarkably bright and clean. Overall a very good set of sound volumes with clean, bright illustrations throughout. In a custom red full morocco pull-apart case with chemise, stamped in gilt on spine and cover and lettered in gilt on spine, produced in the mid-twentieth century by W. Root & Son Binders, London. A set of fourteen Kate Greenaway almanacs plus a facsimile, probably printed in 1973, of GreenawayÕs 1885 Alphabet. GreenawayÕs Almanacks were published between 1883 and 1897, though no almanac was published in 1896. Spielman and Layard, Kate Greenaway, p. 122.
Poems and Essays by a Lady Lately Deceased.

Poems and Essays by a Lady Lately Deceased.

Bowdler, Jane ]. Jane Bowdler (1743-1784) was an English poet and essayist. The present volume, which collected pieces she wrote in her later years, was compiled posthumously by her sister and published for the benefit of a hospital in BowdlerÕs hometown, near Bath. The work was hugely popular and, over the course of the thirty years after its first printing, was published in seventeen editions at Bath, as well as in several more editions in Dublin, London, and New York. Jane Bowdler was the sister of Henrietta Maria Bowdler (1750-1830) and Thomas Bowdler (1754-1825), who gained so much notoriety for publishing expurgated editions of Shakespeare that ÒbowdlerizeÓ remains a term for censorship to this day. Two volumes, octavo. pp. [i-iii], vi-v, 1, 269, with page number misprinted twice on page 13 and with page 198 misnumbered as 298; [3] pp., pp. [1], 2, 294. Contemporary brown calf, stamped in gilt on spines, with red morocco labels on spines lettered in gilt. Marbled endpapers. Cracking to joint of front cover on first volume, likely repaired. Some rubbing to corners. Slight toning and minimal foxing, pages remain largely clean. Piece missing from the bottom of page 15, not affecting text. Pages 196 and 197 of the first volume and pages 30 and 31 of the second volume bear stains from the attached bookmark ribbon. Paper flaw in top right corner of page 125 in volume two. A good, sound set. First edition.
The Book of Common Prayer and Administration of the Sacraments and Other Rites and Ceremonies of the Church. According to the Use of the Church of England. Together with the Psalter or Psalms of David. Pointed as they are to be Sung or Said in Churches.

The Book of Common Prayer and Administration of the Sacraments and Other Rites and Ceremonies of the Church. According to the Use of the Church of England. Together with the Psalter or Psalms of David. Pointed as they are to be Sung or Said in Churches.

John Sturt (1658-1730) was an engraver who specialized in engraving calligraphy and miniatures. He made his living as a book illustrator and produced plates for books such as Francis BraggeÕs Passion of our Savior (1694) and Charles PerraultÕs Treatise on the Five Orders of Architecture (1708). His best-known works are the engraved versions of Laurence HowellÕs The Orthodox Communicant and the present volume. The notations on the pastedown, which may be written in multiple hands, read as follows: ÒBrabaganÓ; ÒW.J. Moore WindsorÓ; ÒPresented to my brother C.H. Moore in Portland Place. This book was formerly in the possession of A. Marsden under Secretary of State for Ireland Ñ the father of Mrs. C. H. Moore & brother of Wm. Marsden Esq., many years Secretary of the Admiralty [illegible]. W.M.B.Ó; and, at the bottom of the page, ÒIt is said that silver types were used in printing this book edition which hereafterwards [illegible]. W.M.B.Ó Octavo. xxii, 166 pp. Entirely engraved double-column text with dozens of silver plate engravings by John Sturt. Volvelle on page v missing its paper pointer but otherwise in excellent condition. Full red morocco with ornate gilt paneling on covers and spine. All edges gilt. Marbled endpapers. Some rubbing to extremities of boards and some foxing, as usual. Uniformly toned due to paper quality. A few shallow scratches on back cover. Three or four notations in ink, probably from the early 19th century, on front flyleaf describing bookÕs provenance. A very good copy with many remarkably intricate engravings throughout. This copy is described on page 144 of GriffithsÕ The Bibliography of the Book of Common Prayer, several variants with engraved borders. This copy is another variant without engraved borders. According to the Dictionary of Irish Biography, Alexander Marsden (1761-1834) was a barrister, East India Company agent, and government official born in Dublin. W.J. Moore was a book collector whose volumes of Samuel RogersÕ poems were collected by Henry Maxwell, 7th Baron Farnham, according to entries in a posthumous catalogue of MaxwellÕs collection. Griffiths, The Bibliography of the Book of Common Prayer, p. 144.