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The Ritz, Paris. Collection of Original Groundplans for the 1898 Design of the Ritz in Paris

MEWES, Charles MEWES, Charles. The Ritz Hotel, Paris. Collection of Renderings for the 1898 and 1911 Construction of the Ritz Hotel in Paris. 46 mounted sheets, various sizes, Zincographs with watercolour additions. Large folio, modern cloth-backed boards. Paris: [1898-1911]. At the beginning of the 20th century, The Ritz Hotel in Paris was the hangout of many celebrities and literati such as Marcel Proust, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway and Coco Chanel. Located on the Place Vendôme in the heart of the 1st arrondissement, the building is in the classic late 17th century style, designed by the royal architect Jules Hardouin-Mansart. The original plan was to situate government offices in a group of buildings, but due to financial difficulties only the façade was constructed and the land behind it was later sold to aristocrats for private residences. In 1896 Swiss hotelier Cesar Ritz acquired one of the buildings and engaged Charles Mewès, an architect known for his grand buildings in the classical style, to update the original 1705 structure. Ritz's innovative standards of hygiene demanded a bathroom for every suite, the maximum possible amount of sunlight, and the minimum of curtains and other hangings. At the same time he furnished the hotel with all the old-fashioned appeal of an English or French gentleman's house, in order to make clients feel at home. Mewes's transformation of what was then the Hotel de Gramont, into the Ritz, resulted in the first hotel in the world to have a bathroom for each room, thanks to his invention of ventilation courtyards. These two massive volumes show Mewes's plans for the original building and for the later 1911 expansion into an adjoining building. Each of the sheets is signed by all the various people involved in the construction, with most measuring an average of 575 x 1700 mm. This is a unique document detailing the creation of one of the world's legendary buildings. PROVENANCE: From the collection of Thierry Despont, the architect responsible for the most recent renovation of the Ritz.
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I quattro libri dell’ architettura. Four books in one volume.

PALLADIO, Andrea PALLADIO, Andrea. I quattro libri dell' architettura. Four books in one volume. 34 ff., 40 ff., 24 ff., 68 ff., profusely illustrated with 217 woodcuts throughout the four books, of which 156 are full-page (of these 84 are printed as plates, recto and verso of 42 leaves). Folio, 295 x 200 mm., bound in slightly later Italian calf over paper boards. Venice: Domenico de' Franceschi, 1570. First edition of the four books together, a work of superlative importance in the history of architecture. "Palladio's lasting influence on architectural style in many parts of the world was exercised less through his actual buildings than through his textbook. Palladio left no immediate successors, his book exerted a powerful influence on contemporary architecture and classical ideals until the end of the eighteenth century" (Printing and the Mind of Man pp. 55-6). The influence which this work had on eighteenth-century England and America cannot be over-emphasized. "Palladio's Quattro Libri (Venice, 1570) is the influential architectural testament in which he set out his formulae for the orders, for room sizes, for stairs and for the design of detail. In the Fourth book he published restorations of the Roman temples which he had studied most closely and, in the Second and Third books (as no architect had done until then), offered a sort of retrospective exhibition of his own designs for palaces, villas, public buildings and bridges. Concise and clear in its language, effective in its communication of complex information through the coordination of plates and texts, the Quattro Libri represents the most effective illustrated architectural publication up to that time. The intelligence and clarity of the 'interface' which Palladio offers to his readers can be seen if one compares it to Serlio's architectural books which started to appear in 1537. Whereas Serlio does not inscribe dimensions on the plates but laboriously rehearses them in the small print of his text, Palladio frees the text of this encumbrance and places the measurements directly on the plans and elevations. It was therefore not only Palladio's architecture, with its rational basis, its clear grammar, and its bias towards domestic projects, but the effectiveness of his book as a means of communication that led to the immense influence of Palladio on the development of architecture in northern Europe, and later in North America" (Guido Beltramini, Andrea Palladio: The Complete Illustrated Works, p. 9). Outer margin of title and first page reinforced, some insignificant browning and two corners missing small pieces presumably paper flaws. But overall an unusually fine copy of this landmark book. PMM 92. Mortimer, Italian 352. Millard, Italian 65. Berlin Katalog 2592. Besterman 78. Cicognara 594. Fowler 212.
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Ruins of the Palace of the Emperor Diocletian at Spalatro in Dalmatia.

ADAM, Robert ADAM, Robert. Ruins of the Palace of the Emperor Diocletian at Spalatro in Dalmatia. vi, [8], 33, [1] pp., with 61 engraved plates on 54 sheets (some double-page). Folio, 525 x 370 mm., bound in full contemporary calf. [London]: For the author, 1764. First edition. "The book incorporated the first encyclical of Britain's most popular architect of the day, who had now been in practice for several years with an immense patronage. Adam makes it quite plain that the great palace of Diocletian forms the source of his ideas upon domestic building, and he modestly claims that it is the first private dwelling-house of the Romans to have been illustrated and described." Adam's account was based on his five-week visit to Spalatro (in Croatia, now known as Split); the sixty-one superb plates were executed after Clerisseau, Zucchi and others (some of the drawings survive at the Hermitage, St. Petersburg). In his introduction, Adam expresses his conviction that Diocletian had revived a taste in Architecture superior to that of his own times. Adam's "observance on unusual detail throughout is remarkable. Nothing is too minute to escape his notice. A careful reading of the descriptions shows whence Robert Adam derived his theories for the planning of his domestic buildings on a monumental scale, like Syon and Kedleston" (James Lees-Milne, The Age of Adam, pp. 67-69). A fine copy of this landmark book. Millard, British 1. Harris, British Architectural Books 4. Fowler 2. Berlin Katalog 1893. Cicognara 3567. John Fleming, Robert Adam and His Circle (1962), pp. 235-240. Georg Kowalczyk, Denkmäler der Kunst in Dalmatien (1910) reproducing 22 plates.
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Designs for the Pavillon at Brighton

REPTON, Humphry REPTON, Humphry. Designs for the Pavillon at Brighton. Title, Dedication, x, 41pp. With Frontispiece printed in bistre, 1 hand-coloured plan, 7 aquatint plates (one tinted with a sepia wash, six hand-coloured [one with an overpage, one double-page with two overslips, one folding with two overslips, one single-page with two overslips, one single-page with one overslip]), and 6 smaller vignettes). Atlas folio, 553 x 370 mm., bound in publisher's blue boards, in a modern buckram folding box. London: Printed for J.C. Stadler, 1808. First Edition. The Repton technique of before and after overslips of garden views was meant to aid in understanding the significance of the proposed changes he was making to prospective clients. Repton's goal was always an aesthetic one, to transform the landscape into a garden. In Designs for the Pavilion Repton alters the scheme slightly to offer winter and spring perspectives as well as the normal before and after comparisons. This original method of providing visual support for his landscape designs, intended for a single client, became an overwhelming success in propagating Repton's theories of landscape gardening to a wide public as well. This is the most complete contemporary record of Repton's Indian phase, and contains his ravishing and justly famous garden designs for the Brighton Pavilion, one of the most famous and opulent royal extravaganzas in existence. The work includes Repton's "Inquiry into the Changes in Architecture as it relates to Palaces and Houses in England.with some Remarks on the Introduction of Indian Architecture." In the "Prefatory Observations" the author admits that he is recommending novel designs in this volume which he had objected to in his former publications. Repton proceeds then to explicate his specific landscape and gardening principles which complement the new "modern gardening" theories being formulated in England. The hand-coloured aquatints include a general plan of Brighton Pavillon, and two of the largest plates with overslips that Repton ever published. There are fine engraved vignettes illustrating Gothic, Grecian, Indian and "modern" styles of architecture, and a large plate of the "endless variety of columns used in Hindu Architecture." Some wear and soiling to the boards, but still a more than acceptable copy. Abbey, Scenery 57. Tooley, p. 207. Martin-Hardie, pp. 128-9. John Morley, The Making of the Royal Pavilion, Brighton, especially "Humphry Repton's 'Designs for the Pavillon at Brighton" pp. 48-65 and figs. 16-37.
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The Designs of Inigo Jones

KENT, William; INIGO JONES [JONES, Inigo]. KENT, William. The Designs of Inigo Jones, consisting of Plans and Elevations for Publick and Private Buildings. Two volumes in one. I: 14 pp., frontispiece and 73 engravings on 51 plates, of which 7 are double and 5 are folding. II: 8 pp., 63 engravings on 46 plates, of which 17 are double. Folio, 508 x 340 mm, bound in contemporary English red morocco, gilt extra. [London]: Published by William Kent, 1727. First edition. Inigo Jones was one of the most influential figures in the visual arts of 17th-century Britain. As Surveyor of the King's Works under James I and Charles I he was responsible for a vast program of work that embraced architecture, interior decoration, stage design and urban planning. "The Designs of Inigo Jones was a significant feature in [Lord] Burlington's campaign to establish a new standard of taste in England: the first in a series of visual exemplars" (Millard). More than two-thirds of the plates in the first volume are devoted to designs of the palace at Whitehall; the remaining plates include details of doors and windows by Inigo Jones (or John Webb?), "With some Additional Designs" by Burlington and Kent such as elevations and plans for Chiswick House. The second volume comprises designs for "Private Buildings" (mainly by Burlington) including the Queen's House at Greenwich, an unrealized design for a palace on the Thames (at Richmond), and the extraordinary dormitory at Westminster School. Jones' designs for the portico of Old St. Paul's, and seven plates of Palladio's S. Giorgio Maggiore, in Venice, conclude the work. Lacking half-title to Volume I, as seems to be always the case, and some minor browning to a few plates, but nevertheless an excellent copy in contemporary red morocco. Millard, British [Architectural] Books 34. Harris & Savage, British Architectural Books 385.
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A Book of Architecture

GIBBS, James GIBBS, James. A Book of Architecture. 2 ff., xxviii pp., with 150 engraved plates. Folio, 507 x 370 mm., bound in contemporary full calf, red lettering piece. London: The Author, 1728. First edition. This was perhaps the most popular architectural book of the eighteenth century; its impact extended beyond Great Britain and America to the West Indies, South America, India and even South Africa. Furthermore, "this was the first book by a British Architect consisting entirely of his own designs, executed and projected" (Harris). "The sheer number and variety of buildings and ornamental forms provided by Gibbs clearly appealed to amateur architects and craftsmen. The influence of A Book of Architecture was enormous. St. Martin-in-the-Fields served as a model for church building throughout the English-speaking world, and in particular in the American colonies, where architects such as Peter Harrison drew heavily from its example. The extraordinarily diverse and numerous borrowings from Gibbs through the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, including those of Thomas Jefferson for Monticello, are carefully studied by Terry Friedman in James Gibbs, 1984" (Millard). The work reveals Gibbs (1682-1754) in his fullest architectural expression, the designer of churches, country houses, garden buildings and pavilions, the "New Building" of King's College Cambridge, the Senate House, and also of church monuments, urns and pedestals, chimney pieces, doors, windows, and much more. The work is a cornerstone to any significant architectural library. Wear too the corners of the binding and insignificant waterstains to the lower corners of the text pages, but overall an excellent copy, and rarely found thus. Harris 257. Millard 22. Berlin Katalog 2270. Fowler 138.
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The Architecture of Leon Battista Alberti in Ten Books. Of Painting in three books and Of Statuary in one book. Translated into Italian by Cosimo Bartoli. And now first into English, and divided into three volumes by James Leoni, Venetian, Architect;

ALBERTI, Leon Battista ALBERTI, Leon Battista. The architecture of Leon Battista Alberti in ten books. Of painting in three books and of statuary in one book. Translated into Italian by Cosimo Bartoli. And now first into English, and divided into three volumes by James Leoni, Venetian, Architect. 3 volumes. Volume I: 103 ff., 9 engraved plates. Volume II: 130 ff., 58 engraved plates (4 double page). Volume III: 34 ff., 8 engraved plates, WITH 6 ff., 27 engraved plates (11 double-page, 8 folding). Folios, ca. 445 x 285 mm., cloth backed boards. London: James Leoni, 1726. First edition of the first translation into English, including Leoni's supplement Some Designs for Buildings both Publick and Private. The work exerted an enormous influence on English eighteenth-century architecture, as illustrated by the list of subscribers that included the architects John Vanbrugh, Nicholas Hawksmoor, Earl of Burlington and George Dance Senior, together with numerous tradesmen (carpenters, masons, plumbers, carvers, bricklayers, paper merchants) and their titled clients. Volume I lacks the etched frontispiece. Occasional browning, but overall an acceptable copy of a rare and important work. Fowler 11; Harris 12; Berlin Katalog 2554; Millard II, 4; Berlin Katalog 2267; Cicognara 378; RIBA, 48.
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Grand escalier du chateau de Versailles dit escalier des ambassadeurs. ordoné et peint par Charles Le Brun ecuyer premier peintre du Roy, consacré à la memoire de Louis le Grand

LE BRUN, Charles LE BRUN, Charles. Grand escalier du chateau de Versailles dit escalier des ambassadeurs. ordoné et peint par Charles Le Brun ecuyer premier peintre du Roy, consacré à la memoire de Louis le Grand. Title and five leaves of text by L.C. le Fevre entirely engraved, with large vignette by Surugue after Parocel and another smaller vignette by Surugue after Coypel, 24 engraved plates, of which 6 are double-page, by Surugue and Simmoneau after Chevotet. Folio, 528 x 391 mm., full contemporary calf with the Royal arms on both covers. Paris: Louis Surugue, 1725. An entirely engraved pictorial record of the Grand Staircase at the Palace of Versailles. Also known as the Ambassadors Staircase, the Grand escalier was primarily built to impress visiting foreign dignitaries by suggesting, in its dazzling mélange of coloured marbles, gilt bronzes, heroic paintings, and exceptional glass skylight, the wealth and power of the Sun King. The plates show sweeping views of the interior, reproductions of individual paintings and sculptures, and a magnificent image of the skylight and ceiling as seen from below. The space was devised by Baroque architect Louis Le Vau and executed posthumously in 1672-1679 by François d'Orbay and the great French artist Charles Le Brun (1619-90). Because of structural concerns, the staircase was demolished in 1752, making this work the only complete record of this brilliant design (Millard). Millard, French 89.
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Le Premier Livre d”Architecture.

DE L'ORME, Philibert; DELORME; L'ORME, Philibert d DE L'ORME, Philibert. Le Premier Livre d'Architecture. [10], 283, [1] ff., with 205 woodcuts, of which 74 are full-page and 7 are double-page. Folio, 362 x 246 mm., bound in full modern calf. Paris: Frederic Morel, 1567. First edition, first issue. This, the most influential handbook of French Renaissance architecture, was written by the most important architectural theorist of Northern Europe in the sixteenth century. "Of the three leading early French architectural writers, de l'Orme is the most interesting and original (He) has been called the first modern architect, because of his original contributions to construction and his skill as an organizer" (Fowler). De l'Orme executed his more important architectural projects during the reign of Henri II. The above work, which was produced with royal support, was intended to be intelligible both to working architects as well as architectural patrons. "Its purpose was to provide a system of architectural design and construction for French building. In nine books de l'Orme presents an impressive synthesis of architectural theory and practice, incorporating traditional and modern, French and Italian, Gothic and Renaissance approaches to architecture. The spirit of the book and the general organization is Vitruvian. De l'Orme, however, writes in a strongly personal style, criticizing his profession and stressing the need for practical experience. This style, along with its citations of ancient authorities and its critical appraisal of Vitruvius' treatise, is like that of Alberti. De l'Orme's strong advocacy of the architect-scholar suggests the influence of the Accademia delle Vertu" (Millard). Lightly toned, fold in one plate repaired, and two discrete stamps in margins of title-page, but nevertheless a pleasing copy of an important and extremely rare book. Mortimer, French 355. Fowler 99. Berlin Katalog 2362. Millard, French 105 (second issue).
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