Antiquariat Dasa Pahor

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Atlas der Bodenbeschaffenheit des Meeres. 9. Lieferung. Westküste Afrikas zwischen 7° und 34° Nord-Breite. Bearbeitet von der Deutschen Seewarte

Atlas der Bodenbeschaffenheit des Meeres. 9. Lieferung. Westküste Afrikas zwischen 7° und 34° Nord-Breite. Bearbeitet von der Deutschen Seewarte

OBERKOMMANDO DER KRIEGSMARINE. / DEUTSCHE SEEWARTE. Oblong Folio (38.5 x 55 cm / 15 x 21.5 inches): [i, title], [2 pp.], 2 key charts, [2 pp.], 24 polychrome plates featuring 32 charts (some plates with 2 charts per plate); bound in original green half-cloth boards bearing printed titles with original string ties; with stamped production numbers in upper right corner of front cover and contemporary handstamp of the ‘Kriegsmarinewerft Kiel’ to centre of front cover (Good, internally overall clean and bright with lovely colours, just a few small spots, some plates with light wear in upper-right blank margins; covers a little sunned with marginal wear and damage to outer upper corner; old cancelled handstamps of the ‘Marine-Unterwasser-Waffenschule’ to inside of front cover). WORLD WAR II U-BOAT ATLAS MOROCCO / WEST AFRICA INNOVATIVE SPACE VISUALIZATION: Atlas der Bodenbeschaffenheit des Meeres. 9. Lieferung. Westküste Afrikas zwischen 7° und 34° Nord-Breite. Bearbeitet von der Deutschen Seewarte. A very rare, large-format atlas of the sea floor off the western and northwestern coasts of Africa, from Morocco down to Sierra Leone, made by the German Navy during the height of World War II expressly for the use of U-Boats; with 24 plates of highly sophisticated and brightly coloured sea charts predicated upon novel, recent intelligence, it was a vital tool used by German submarines to avoid Allied sonar in a vital maritime corridor – one of the most technically impressive cartographic works made by either side during the entire conflict. This impressive and unusual atlas was made on the orders of the Oberkommando der Kriegsmarine (the High Command of the German Navy) during the height of World War II to assist U-boat captain with navigating off the shores of West and Northwest Africa. The atlas contains 24 plates (featuring 32 charts) of an incredibly innovative design that used bright colour-coding and shading to describe the varied nature of the sea floor off the African coast from Morocco to Sierra Leone. Understanding and the seabed was critical to allowing submerged U-boats to avoid detection from Allied sonar, as they patrolled this strategically critical stretch of coastline, attacking enemy convoys, collecting intelligence and deploying spies. The atlas was compiled and published by the Deutsche Seewarte, the special office based in Hamburg that collected and analysed meteorological and hydrological data for the German Navy. The atlas’s charts are predicated upon fresh intelligence gathered by German U-boats, combined with the best established information. The atlas is the first sophisticated rendering of the sea floor off the coasts of West and northwestern Africa and is one of the most technically advanced works of maritime cartography made during the war. The atlas appeared in 1942, when U-boats were still a lethal threat Allied shipping, and while the Nazis (through their Vichy French collaborators) still controlled much of West and North Africa. The atlas features a series of adjoining charts covering the coasts of West Africa from Rabat, Morocco, down to Sherbo Island, Sierra Leone, running from 34 to 7 Degrees of Latitude North. This great stretch incudes the key ports and headlands of Casablanca, Agadir, Essaouira, Cape Blanco, St. Louis, Dakar, Banjul, Conakry, and Freetown; covering the coasts of the much of Morocco, Spanish Western Sahara, all of the coasts of French Mauritania, Senegal, Gambia, Portuguese Guinea (Guinea-Bissau), French Guinea (Guinea), and most of the littoral of Sierra Leone. These coastlines were strategically important during World War II as they lay along the main Allied shipping lanes running from South Africa (and India) and South America to Britain. The design of the atlases’ charts is novel and ingenious, with the nature of the sea floor colour coded as explained on the ‘Legende’ page (and summarized in the bottom margin of each chart). The first category, ‘Bodenart und Bodenhärte’ [Soil Type and Soil Hardness] features ‘Fels; sehr hart (bzw. Felsiger Boden)’ [Rock; very hard (or rocky ground) - coloured Pink]; ‘Einzelne große Steine’ [Single large stones - with pink crossed Xs]; with the following three categories classified as ‘hart (fest)’ [hard (firmly)]; ‘Sand (von unbestimmer Korngröße)‘ [Sand (of undetermined grain size) - coloured Yellow]; ‘Feiner Sand’ [Fine Sand - coloured Light Orange]; ‘Grober Sand und Kies’ [Coarse sand and gravel - coloured Dark Orange]; and finally, ‘Sandliger Schlick’ (bzw. schlickiger Sand); etwas weich [Sandy silt (or silty sand); somewhat soft - coloured Grey]; ‘Schlick; weich’ [Silt; soft - coloured Green]; and ‘Farbige Flächen mit gewellten Rändern: Begrenzung unsicher’ [Colored areas with wavy edges: boundary uncertain - blank with rippled top edge]. The next category is ‘Steinvorkommen’ [Stone Deposits], which includes ‘Stein auf größerer Fläche bekannt’ [large area with observed Stones - with grey crossed-hashed lines] and ‘Steine möglich’ [Possible Stones - with grey vertical lines].References: OCLC: 256526754 / 311420084; A List of Geographical Atlases in the Library of Congress, vol. 5 (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1958), p. 70. SEE OUR WEB PAGE FOR A LONGER DESCRIPTION.
Palestine Scale 1:500

Palestine Scale 1:500,000 / Convoy Routes – Palestine

SURVEY OF PALESTINE. Colour print (Good, some light toning, wear along original folds, 9.5 cm repaired tear with old tape stain from verso extending into upper part, tape from verso since replaced with acid-free paper patch repair), 60 x 43 cm (23.5 x 17 inches). ISRAEL / PALESTINE / JORDAN / LEBANON: Palestine Scale 1:500,000 / Convoy Routes – Palestine. A rare and classified map of Palestine and adjacent lands made during the final days of World War II to delineate convoy routes used by the British Army; this was risky business as the ‘Irgun’, a Jewish paramilitary group targeted said convoys; printed in Jerusalem by the Survey of Palestine. This rare, classified map depicts the bulk of what was the British mandate of Palestine, as well as adjacent parts of Egypt, Transjordan, Lebanon and Syria. It was made in February 1945, late in World War II by the Survey of Palestine in Jerusalem for the use of the British Army to delineate their regular convoy routes. While Palestine was not a major combat zone during World War II, the situation there was tense. The country’s Jewish and Arab communities were very much (an often violently) at odd, while both sides resented the continued British quasi-colonial presence. To make matters even more interesting, the region was full of German spies and agents provocateurs. However, the main threat to British security in Palestine was the Irgun, a Jewish paramilitary group that violently opposed both the Arab and the British presence in the country, with the objective of creating a Jewish homeland over all of Palestine, a goal to be achieved by any means necessary. The Irgun, formed in 1931, staged numerous attacks against the British military, police and civil authorities during the 1930s, but for most of World War II agreed on a truce, as the British were fighting the Nazis (and so presumably helping the end the Holocaust). However, in September 1944, the Irgun, once again, turned against the British, as, first, the war was coming to an end; and second, the Irgun resented the fact that Britain was restricting the emigration of European Jews to Palestine. From that point onwards, until the British left Palestine in 1948, the Irgun launched increasingly frequent and deadly attacks against the British, including upon their army convoys. This British soldiers traversing Palestine did so only with great care and risk. They would certainly have preferred that the Irgun not get their hands upon an example of this map! The map is printed on a monochrome template first developed by the Survey in 1924, and updated to 1944, but is here overprinted in four colours for its specific purpose, to depict the four main colour-coded systems of army convoys. The ‘Reference’, upper left, notes the signs for 1st Class roads; 2nd Class roads; principal seasonal roads; wadis; and railways; while heights are given in metres. The Green convoy routes run from Aqaba (the head of the Red Sea, located off the map) up through Beersheba an then in two branches north, either through Jerusalem, or near to the coast through Lydda, before continuing towards Syria. The Red route runs from Haifa to Baghdad, principally to protect the ultra-valuable Iraq Petroleum Company pipeline. The Yellow route runs from central Palestine, through Jerusalem and then over to Amman, Transjordan. A note on the map, explaining how to follow the routes on the ground, reads: ‘Convoy routes are indicated on the road by coloured signposts as important or difficult turnings and crossroads by periodic colouring of milestones etc. where necessary’. The present map is rare; we can locate 4 institutional examples, at the British Library; Oxford University; National Library of Scotland and University of Kansas. References: British Library: Cartographic Items Maps MOD PDR Misc 1785; OCLC: 808802981; 497654286; 751539861.
Beygir Terbiyesi ve Binicilik

Beygir Terbiyesi ve Binicilik

James FILLIS (1834–1913), author; Mehmed SADIK, translator 8°, [4] title and index, , 336 pp., 35 full page black and white illustrations, contemporary calf with gilt lettering on the cover and spine, original patterned endpapers (binding lightly scratched, battered on the corners with some loss of leather on the spine, paper with light foxing, small folds and chips on the edges, three sheets loose, otherwise in a good used condition). HORSES, RIDING AND DRESSAGE OTTOMAN CAVALRY: [Beygir Terbiyesi ve Binicilik / Principes de dressage et d'équitation / Principles of Dressage and of Riding]. An Ottoman translation of the French work on riding Principes de dressage et d'équitation, by an esteemed riding master James Fillis (1834-1913) was published in Istanbul in 1902. The book introduces riding skills from the basics to the highly demanding dressage and military skills. The original illustrations were replaced with images of Ottoman riders. In the late Ottoman Empire the sultan tried to modernise the cavalry in order to adjust it to the contemporary military strategies and needs, one of the plans being introducing the European riding methods and training of the horses and riders. The work was printed by one of the largest printing presses in the Ottoman Empire, owned by an Armenian Artin Asaduryan, who arrived to Istanbul in 1880s, where he took over an older press and later renamed it to Artin Asaduryan ve Mahdumlar? Matbaas? The press was printing books, posters, theatre playbills, schoolbooks and newspapers in eight different languages with approximately 36 titles per year.
Carta del Mar Rosso e del Sudan orientale pubblicata per cura della Sezione Cartografia della Società Africana d’Italia.

Carta del Mar Rosso e del Sudan orientale pubblicata per cura della Sezione Cartografia della Società Africana d’Italia.

SOCIETÀ AFRICANA D’ITALIA. Lithograph in colour (Very Good, a few very minor old repairs from verso along original folds), 49 x 34 cm (19.5 x 13.5 inches). RED SEA / ITALIAN COLONIAL VENTURES - ERITREA / ETHIOPIA / DJIBOUTI / SUDAN / YEMEN / SAUDI ARABIA: Carta del Mar Rosso e del Sudan orientale pubblicata per cura della Sezione Cartografia della Società Africana d’Italia. A fine map of the Red Sea depicting Italy’s first major operation to establish an overseas colony, in Eritrea, commissioned by the Società Africana d’Italia, an influential lobbying-research organization, and originally published in an issue of their rare journal.This attractive and informative map was excised from an edition of the rare journal Bolletino della Società Africana d’Italia (March-April, 1885), a specialist magazine on Italian colonization in Africa. It depicts the entire Red Sea / Nile region. It was made in the early part of 1885, just as news had arrived that Italy’s ‘Spedizione militare italiana in Africa’ (January-February 1885) had secured control of the country’s first overseas beachheads in Eritrea, a land that became known as the ‘Colonia Primogenita’ (First-born Colony). All key cities and towns are labelled, as are main roads and caravan routes, railways, and telegraph lines (both overland and submarine), while a chart translates Arabic geographical terms. The map includes three cartographic insets; the ‘Pianta di Cartùm’ acknowledges the recent Siege of Khartoum (March 13, 1884 - January 26, 1885), the climax of the Madhist War (1881-99), whereby a British garrison under General Charles Gordon was overwhelmed and killed by Sudanese rebels.The ‘Carta dell Baia d’Assab e dintorni’ depicts the Assab region of south-eastern Eritrea where the Italians established their first small base in Africa in 1882.The ‘Massaua e contorni’ map depicts the port of Massawa in Eritrea where the recent Italian military expedition established Italy’s first major colonial base in Africa.The present map was commissioned by the Società Africana d’Italia (SAI), an organization founded in 1880 in Naples to promote and study Italian colonial endeavours in Africa. The society was a powerful and influential force in Italian affairs up until World War II. Its archives are today preserved as the SAI Museum in Naples, opened in 2014.All issues of the SAI’s Bolletino are today rare, they were only published in small print runs for a select readership. We have not been able to trace a separate reference to the present map in institutional catalogues or sales records.Historical Background: Italian Reunification and the Quest for Colonial Glory - During and in the wake of the Risorgimento Italy endeavoured to become a great world power, which would only be possible if it acquired overseas colonies, as had Britain and France, etc. Italian explorers, business leaders and politicians initially focussed their attention upon the Horn of Africa, in good part due to its strategic location by the Red Sea, along the world’s greatest shipping route, recently opened upon the completion of the Suez Canal, in 1869. SEE OUR WEB PAGE FOR A LONGER DESCRIPTION
Karten über das Arbeitsfeld der Berliner Mission.

Karten über das Arbeitsfeld der Berliner Mission.

BERLINER MISSIONSGESELLSCHAFT / Alexander MERENSKY / Bernhard STRUCK, et al. 4° Atlas (31.5 x 23.5 cm / 12.5 x 9.25 inches): 12 pp. featuring 16 monochrome maps, plus 1 additional map lightly affixed to the inside of back cover and 1 additional map inserted loose-leaf; in original printed grey card wrappers, stapled; 6 of the maps with contemporary manuscript additions (Very Good, internally clean, some marginal spots to covers, slightly worn at spine). ATLAS – MISSIONS IN AFRICA AND CHINA: Karten über das Arbeitsfeld der Berliner Mission. A very rare atlas made by the Berlin Missionary Society, one of the most important missionary organizations in Africa and China during the 19th and early 20th Centuries, featuring 16 original maps made by missionary cartographers, including important figures such as Alexander Merensky and Bernhard Struck, containing 14 maps of South and East Africa and 2 maps of China; plus, this example extra-illustrated with 2 additional maps; an ephemeral post-WWI work published around 1921 in Berlin. This is a very rare atlas depicting locations in South Africa, East Africa and China, concerning the field operations of the Berliner Missionsgesellschaft (BMG) [Berlin Missionary Society], one of the most important Protestant organizations in these lands. The atlas proper features sixteen maps, of which fourteen concern Africa, and of which several of the maps were drafted by important figures such as Alexander Merensky, a leading cartographer of the Transvaal, and Bernhard Struck, a famous ethnographer and anthropologist. Many of the maps are highly detailed and future information available nowhere else. The present atlas was published for the BMG in the wake of World War I, when the society was still very much active in Africa and China, but had to swim against the currents caused by Germany’s loss during World War I. While the content of the maps are stellar, the atlas is printed in a cheap manner, with simple printing on basic paper, owing to the difficult post-war conditions in Berlin; this gives the work a curious ephemeral feel. While the atlas and its cartography have never been researched, it seems that most of the maps featured in the atlas were originally printed as separately issued maps, to be inserted into missionaries’ diaries. The Extra Additional Map B (described following), inserted in the present example of the atlas, is an original 1910 edition of the same map that was re-issued within the atlas just over a decade later (as Map no. 14 below). The BMG Archive in Berlin features collections of the very rare separately issued versions of the maps that appear with the atlas. It seems that the present atlas was issued as an anthology of the BMG’s regional operational maps, preserving this valuable cartographic record during a difficult time for the society.References: Zentralbibliothek der Landeskirche der Evangelischen Kirche Berlin-Brandenburg-schlesische Oberlausitz (EKBO) und Bibliothek des Berliner Missionswerkes (BMG): M3 2019/123; Kirchliche Hochschule Bethel (Bielefeld, Germany): Fb 321; University of South Africa (Muckenleuk Campus, Pretoria): 266.410233 BERL; J.W. HOFMEYR, History of the Church in Southern Africa: A Select Bibliography of Published Material to 1980, vol. I (Pretoria: University of South Africa, 1986), p. 565. SEE OUR WEB PAGE FOR A LONGER DESCRIPTION
A Guide Book for Safety and Security Measures during Hajj.

A Guide Book for Safety and Security Measures during Hajj.

KINGDOM OF SAUDI ARABIA, MINISTRY OF THE INTERIOR. 12° (15 x 10 cm): 52 pp. on glossy paper, including 5 double-page maps and several photographs and diagrams, bound on original glossy printed covers (Excellent, nearly mint condition). THE HAJJ / MECCA, SAUDI ARABIA: A Guide Book for Safety and Security Measures during Hajj. A fascinating, information-packed booklet produced by the Saudi Interior Ministry in the 1980s to advise Hajj Pilgrims on the customs, transportation and security details for visiting Mecca and its holy sites during the World’s greatest annual pilgrimage; published in Riyadh entirely in the English language – illustrated with 5 maps. The Hajj is the greatest annual pilgrimage in the world. According to the Islamic faith, every Muslim who is able to do so must visit Mecca for the Hajj at least once in their lifetimes. The Hajj occurs each year at varying dates according to the Islamic calendar, and usually falls in the mid-summer. As of late, over 2.5 million people made the pilgrimage annually. Performing the Hajj follows ancient and very specific customs that all pilgrims must observe. Despite the herculean efforts of Saudi officials and Islamic societies, the Hajj can be quite dangerous, as hundreds of thousands of pilgrims pack into confined spaces at the same time. Elaborate safety procedures must be followed. The present booklet was published by the Saudi Interior Ministry for distribution to English-speaking pilgrims, and in clear and concise language it elaborates on the customs that must be observed in Mecca, as well as outlining the security and transport procedures. The text is illustrated with numerous photographs, diagrams and maps. The five maps are especially interesting. First, the map of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia – Guidance Map for Land Pilgrims to Mecca depicts the various overland routes crossing Saudi Arabia used by pilgrims from Kuwait, Yemen, Iraq, the United Arab Emirates and Oman. Second, the Master Plan for the Roads of Makkah and Holy Places details the main transportation routes in the Mecca area and the best means of approaching key sites. Third, the Detailed Map for the Mina Zone showcases the enormous 20 km2 (7.7 sq mi). ‘Tent City’ that is built to house pilgrims during the Hajj. It is located 5km from Mecca, towards Mount Arafat. Fourth, the Detailed Map of the Muzdalifa Zone shows the open space between Mina and Mount Arafat where pilgrims collect the pebbles for the ‘Stoning of the Devil’ ritual. Fifth, the Detailed Map of the Arafat Zone showcases the facilities at the foot of Mount Arafat. While the booklet is undated, the printing style and content of the photographs within suggest that it was issued in the 1980s. This ephemeral work is clearly a rare survivor; we have not been able to trace a reference to it.
Sketch Plan of Secondee

Sketch Plan of Secondee

Anon. Cyanotype (blueprint) map with some details heightened in original coloured crayon (Very Good, old folds and minor creasing, old tack marks to corners), 54 x 54 cm (21.25 x 21.25 inches). GHANA (GOLD COAST) – SEKONDI AFRICAN URBANISM: Sketch Plan of Secondee. The only known example of a fascinating cyanotype (blueprint) plan of Sekondi, capturing the Gold Coast’s (Ghana) main commercial port during the Edwardian boom period of economic and infrastructure development - a value artefact of the the Industrial Revolution and urbanism in Sub-Saharan Africa. This is a fine engineers’ blueprint plan of Sekondi, then the Gold Coast’s busiest commercial port, as well as a major regional centre of administration and a key British military base. The site of the Dutch outpost of Fort Orange (established 1642) and later the British base of Fort Sekondi (1682), the location had long been valued as one of the few natural harbours in West Africa that could shelter capital ships. While Britain had maintained a presence along the Gold Coast for hundreds of years, and had formally established a colony in the littoral region in 1867, it was not until the wake of the Fourth Anglo-Ashanti War (1895-6) that Britain gained proper control over the interior, unlocking the Gold Coast’s immense economic potential. Indeed, unlike many of the other European colonies in Africa, the Gold Coast was profitable, producing gold, fine tropical hardwood timber, cocoa, palm products, as well as other tropical cash crops. The local people were also highly industrious, making the colony worthy of grand investment. The British hold over the Gold Coast was confirmed by their victory during the final Anglo-Ashanti showdown in 1900, which resulted in the entire country becoming a British protectorate in 1902. As a critical element towards bringing the Industrial Revolution to the Gold Coast, in the late 1890s the British began to develop Sekondi as a major industrial transhipment centre. This role was solidified in 1903 upon it becoming the seaward terminus of the Government Railway, which headed northwards, deep into the interior, as far as Kumasi. Within only a few years Sekondi become one the of the World’s largest entrepôts for gold, cocoa and timber. The present map, made around 1905, shows the layout of the city in great detail, outlining all major buildings, labelling roads and rail lines, in addition to indicating land use patterns. It is valuable as stellar example of early industrial urbanism in Sub-Saharan Africa. The map shows the Government Railway sweeping down into the city from the north, to terminate at specially constructed quays on the harbour shore, for the purpose of conveying products directly from train to boat. Outlined in the town’s commercial district are Fort Sekondi; harbour works; post office; law courts; market; bank; prison; cold storage; hotel and the country club. To the southwest of the centre, near the shore, are the residential areas (mainly inhabited by local peoples) of ‘Accra Town’ and ‘Housa Town’. To the north, in the interior are the chapel, army barracks, hospital and the country bungalows of important British officials. Sekondi later benefitted from the construction of Gold Coast’s first deep-water harbour, completed at nearby Takoradi in 1928. Sekondi was later merged with its neighbour to form Sekondi-Takoradi, and today serves as the capital of Ghana’s Western Region with a population of over 500,000. Its port plays a major role in the the economy of Ghana (as well as the landlocked Sahel countries), handling 62% of Ghana’s annual exports and 20% of its imports. SEE OUR WEB PAGE FOR A LONGER DESRIPTION
book (2)

Cilicia

SURVEY OF EGYPT. Photo-metal process, mounted upon original linen (Very Good, some light creasing and a few very tiny stains, tack marks to corners, but overall quite pleasing), 79.5 x 61.5 cm (31.5 x 24 inches). WORLD WAR I – TURKEY – ADANA REGION / BAGHDAD RAILWAY: Cilicia. Extremely rare – the Survey of Egypt’s ‘Provisional’ classified map of the strategically vital Adana area of Cilicia, considered to be Ottoman Anatolia’s ‘soft underbelly’ during World War I, where the Baghdad Railway passed perilously close to the Mediterranean coast; the present edition issued just after the end of the war to aid the Franco-Armenian (and British backed) invasion of Cilicia (1918-21).This very rare ‘Provisional’ map was made immediately following the end of World War I, and depicts the strategically key Adana area of Cilicia, a traditional region of southern Anatolia. Devised from the best sources, the map was drafted and published by the Survey of Egypt in Cairo, with the present edition updated to October 27, 1918, only three days before the signing of the Armistice of Mudros that ended the war in the Middle East.The map, made by the photo-metal process, gives the work a lovely dull silver frosted appearance. Adana, one of Turkey’s most important cities, lies near the foot of the formidable Taurus Mountains and before the fertile plan of the Seyhan River delta. The projection extends as far west as the port of Mersin, and eastwards over to the shores of the Gulf of Iskenderun; while reaching northwards, inland, well into the rugged interior. An advanced topographical map, predicated upon a composite of scientific surveys, it labels all manner of natural manmade features, while the additional reference, in the lower-centre margin, identifies metalled roads – bold red lines; roads passable for all transports in dry weather – dashed red lines; as well as roads fit for guns and limbers (light forces).Importantly, the map depicts a key stretch of the partially completed Baghdad Railway, which during the war was the Ottoman-German transport lifeline from Istanbul to the Middle East. Importantly, by October 1918, the Baghdad Railway was completed through all of Anatolia, save for two gaps; the German engineers could not complete the passages across the Taurus Mountains and the Amanus (Nur) Mountains, the latter being in Hatay. Here the line is shown to be complete from the Adana area eastwards, but is shown to be only partially complete in the Taurus Mountains, to the northwest. Also, the Adana area represented the only place where the Baghdad Railway ran near the coastline, making it vulnerable to attack by Britain’s Royal Navy (the line was only 13 miles for the coast at the nearest point, at ‘Yenije’, near Tarsus).The first edition of the present map was made by the Survey of Egypt in 1915, to aid British espionage missions in the Adana area. British-controlled Cyprus proved an ideal base for monitoring the Ottoman coasts, and throughout the war the Royal Navy sent reconnaissance craft (and allegedly small landing parties of spies) to the coasts of Cilicia. The British were especially interested in the progress and security of the Baghdad Railway, which despite the fact that it remained unfinished, allowed the Ottoman-German side to rush troops from Istanbul to the Mesopotamian front in only 21 days (instead of an odyssey that formerly took three months!). The Royal Navy considered landing a force on the coast in the Adana region to sever the railway, or to mount sabotage missions against the engineering works building the line across the Taurus. While some ‘low grade’ interference may have occurred, the British, who feared spreading themselves too thin, never ended up mounting such an operation. Nevertheless, the early edition of the present . References: British Library: Cartographic Items Maps MOD TSGS 2321; Australian War Memorial (Canberra): G7420 s250. Cf. (Re: 1915 edition:) University of Oxford: OCLC: 903141366. SEE OUR WEB PAGE FOR A LONGER DESCRIPTION
Cihan Iktisat Atlasi

Cihan Iktisat Atlasi

Ömer LÜTFI. 12° (16.5 x 10 cm) atlas: [2 ff., title and introduction], 11 maps printed on card, bound in original decorative card covers, stapled (Very Good, overall clean and bright, internally lovely, just some very light wear and staining to covers). THEMATIC CARTOGRAPHY / EDUCATION HISTORY / RARE TURKISH PROVINCIAL PRINTING: Cihan ?ktisat Atlas? [Universal Economic Atlas]. A rare and highly attractive little Turkish thematic atlas featuring 11 World maps detailing the locations of key agricultural and mineral resources; made by Ömer Lütfi, a secondary school teacher in Adana, in the spirit of President Atatürk’s sweeping educational reforms; published in Mersin, a stellar example of provincial Anatolian printing. This attractive little thematic atlas, with an Art Nouveau cover, was authored by Ömer Lütfi, a secondary school teacher in Adana, in southern Turkey, and was published nearby in Mersin. The atlas features Lütfi’s introduction (dated March 28, 1932), followed by eleven thematic World maps detailed the principal locations of critical agricultural and mineral resources, including: 1. Staple Food Crops; 2. Industrial Crops; 3. Tropical Cash Crops; 4. Tobacco; 5. Linen and Hemp; 6. Silk; 7. Wool and Cotton; 8. Precious Metals; 9. Industrial Minerals; 10. Oil and Coal; and 11. Base Metals. The present atlas perfectly demonstrates the spirit of the Turkey’s Early Republican Era, during the presidency of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk (in office 1923-38). During the late Ottoman era, the education system in Anatolia was patchy at best. Only the privileged few received a proper education and the extreme majority were illiterate. While many fine atlases and geography books were pointed in Istanbul for use in schools and universities, these works were expensive and relatively hard to obtain. Atatürk ushered in revolutionary educational reforms, making primary education free and compulsory, while secondary education was made readily affordable. His decision to change the Turkish alphabet from Arabic to Latin characters in 1929, was not only done as modernizing, or Westernizing, reform, but rather more importantly to aid literacy. While Ottoman Turkish had a sophisticated beauty, Arabic script was ill suited to the Turkish tongue, severely hindering literacy. Republican Turkey also encouraged its citizens to learn more about the world outside of the Middle East-Mediterranean world, to forge economic and social ties with lands far away. Atatürk also encouraged educational books to be published in the Anatolian provinces, authored by teachers who had a first-hand knowledge of the needs of their pupils. The present work is an early Turkish educational book in Latin script, which introduces sophisticated international subjects to secondary school pupils, but in an attractive and effective manner. No doubt, it would have aided the students in Adana Vilayet in their learning in the manner intended by Atatürk. The atlas is rare, especially in such fine condition. We cannot trace any examples in Western institutions.
Directorate General Passenger Transport Service / Baghdad Bus Map

Directorate General Passenger Transport Service / Baghdad Bus Map

DIRECTORATE GENERAL PASSENGER TRANSPORT SERVICE / A. KARIM RIFAAT. Colour print, index of bus routes printed on verso, with contemporary seller’s hand-stamp to verso (Very Good, overall clean and bright, just some mild creasing and light wear at original folds, a few very light stains), 65 x 75.5 cm (25.5 x 30 inches). BAGHDAD, IRAQ: Directorate General Passenger Transport Service / Baghdad Bus Map. This interesting and attractive map showcases all of Baghdad as it appeared around 1960, when the city was experiencing major development buoyed by a protracted oil boom. The map shows a detailed street plan of Baghdad and its fast-growing suburbs, labelling all major streets and key buildings, with some famous sites pictured by charming little vignettes. The maps was made by the city’s public transit authority to delineate bus routes, shown by red lines, while an index of 60 routes appears on the verso.Notably, the map depicts many newly-created suburbs, plus grand constructions such as the Baghdad Central Station (built in 1953) and the University of Baghdad (established 1957). The map was produced in several editions from 1957 until the mid-1960s. Befitting such an ephemeral work, all editions are today scarce. We gather from a line printed on the 1957 edition that the map series was designed by a gentleman by the name of A. Karim Rifaat.During this period, Baghdad was enjoying a wave of almost unprecedented economic prosperity and growth, despite the prevailing environment of extreme political instability (the government was overthrown and its principles executed in revolutions in both 1958 and 1963!). From 1947 to 1960, the city’s population increased from 350,000 to over 1 million, as Iraqis from the country flooded into the Baghdad to fulfil jobs created by the oil boom. New suburbs, highways, bridges, schools and hospitals were being built continuously, while the public transport system was well funded and organized, being one of the best in the Middle East. Iraq’s economy, by GDP per head, then approached the level of that of Portugal, in contrast to the great poverty that today befalls the city.References: OCLC: 866733102.
Bombay / Deccan States. / Poona & Bombay / Bombay City

Bombay / Deccan States. / Poona & Bombay / Bombay City, Bombay Suburban, Kolaba, Poona, Ratnagiri, Satara & Thana Districts, Bhor & Janjira States.

r: SURVEY OF INDIA. Colour print (Very Good, overall clean and bright, just some light creasing) 68 x 61 cm (27 x 24 inches). INDIA – BOMBAY / POONA REGION, MAHARASHTRA: Bombay / Deccan States. / Poona & Bombay / Bombay City, Bombay Suburban, Kolaba, Poona, Ratnagiri, Satara & Thana Districts, Bhor & Janjira States. A very rare scientific survey of the crucial Bombay-Poona (Mumbai-Pune) corridor, issued by the Survey of India in Dehra Dun just after World War II and in the twilight days of the British Raj; showcasing a wealth of information on urban development in one of India’s fastest growing regions at critical historical juncture. This is a very rare and important Survey of India sheet depicting the critical Bombay-Poona (Mumbai-Pune) corridor just after the end of World War II and on the eve of Indian Independence. Bombay Island and much of its fast-growing suburbs appear on the extension in the far upper left, while to the southeast, in the interior, is the key city of Poona, connected to Bombay by the famous Great Indian Peninsular Railway (G.I.P.R, built to Poona in 1858). The coast of the Arabian Sea to the south of Bombay features the former pirate haunts of Alibag, Murad and Srivardhan. Else, the countryside is shown to have a great density of villages, farmland and forests, making a complex patchwork quilt of land use. The ‘provisional’ first edition of the present map was issued by the Survey of India field office in Dehra Dun in 1917. Scientific surveys undertaken from 1921 to 1926 improved and updated the quality of the mapping, leading to the publication of the first formal edition in 1930; this was followed by the second edition of 1941, which was re-issued in 1942 and as the present edition of December 1945.Bombay was since the late 17th century India’s premier port, the so-called ‘Gateway to India’. During World War II, the city was a major entrepôt for troops and supplies to support the British Imperial war effort. As shown on the map, in 1945, the densely urbanized area was largely confined to Bombay Island and in 1945 the metro area had only around 2.5 million residents (today it has a population of well over 20 million!). Poona, a location favoured by the British became a major Raj military and administrative centre in the 19th Century, but by the 1940s it was a leading centre of Indian nationalism. Mahatma Gandhi was imprisoned there from 1942 to 1944. In 1945, Poona had population of around 400,000; today to has approximately 4 million residents!All such Survey of India sheet surveys tend to be rare to very rare. They were generally made in only small print runs and had low survival rates due to heavily field use. We have not been able to trace another example of this map in institutional catalogues.
Map of Southern Gallipoli from a Captured Turkish Map

Map of Southern Gallipoli from a Captured Turkish Map

INTELLIGENCE OFFICE [ARAB BUREAU], CAIRO. Colour lithograph mounted upon original linen, with extensive contemporarily manuscript additions in black pen and pencil executed in on the battlefront by Sapper W.D. Saunders of the Royal Engineers (as signed and dated on verso), with 2 handstamps of the ‘Army Telegraphs’ dated December 31, 1915, plus handstamped short title of ‘S. Gallipoli 1:20,000’ on verso (Good, some signs of battlefield use, including wear along old folds, 2 large stains on left-hand side and small stains elsewhere, a tiny hole in lower-left quadrant), 75.5 x 100 cm (29.5 x 39.5 inches). WWI / GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN / CAPE HELLES SECTOR / ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT / FIELD ANNOTATIONS / LAWRENCE OF ARABIA: Map of Southern Gallipoli from a Captured Turkish Map. - A spectacular artefact of the Gallipoli Campaign, being an extremely rare ultra large map of the Cape Hellas-Krithia battle sector issued by T.E. Lawrence’s (later ‘Lawrence of Arabia’) map department at the Intelligence Office in Cairo, predicated upon a recently "captured" Ottoman map that was the first proper survey of this critical military zone; greatly augmented by extensive and important manuscript additions made on the battlefront in the summer of 1915 by W.D. Saunders, a British combat engineer (signed and dated on the verso), depicting landing sites, trenches and front lines, the locations of headquarters and troop placements, roads and other military infrastructure, as well as key sites mentioned in battle reports - by far and away the most impressive map of Gallipoli we have ever encountered. This is by far and away the finest and most historically important map of the Gallipoli Campaign we have ever encountered. This unique artefact is an extremely rare edition of the first generally accurate survey of the critical Cape Helles-Krithia sector and was drafted in Cairo by the future Lawrence of Arabia’s map room at Intelligence Office (later the famed ‘Arab Bureau’), based upon a "captured" Ottoman map (the story behind the production of the map is truly fascinating, please see below). Published and rushed back to the front, this particular example of the map was extensively used in the field in the Cape Helles-Kritihia sector throughout the summer of 1915. Importantly, the map features extensive and highly important manuscript additions executed by Sapper W.D. Saunders of the Royal Engineers (whose name and personal details are signed on the verso) while he was engaged along the front lines. The manuscript additions feature a vast wealth of information, including landing locations; the positions of trenches and front lines; troops placements and headquarters locations; the placement of heavy artillery; roads, wells and the aerodrome; as well as specific places which figured prominently in battles, such as the frightfully named "Snipers Wood". Few maps of the Gallipoli Campaign feature such comprehensive and valuable information added in real-time by a soldier on the front lines, ensuring that this map is worthy of much further academic study. The present map is very rare. We can trace only 4 institutional examples, held by the British Library; National Archives U.K.; Oxford University - Bodliean Library; and the Australian War Memorial. Moreover, we are not aware of any other examples appearing on the market, at least during the last generation. SEE OUR WEB PAGE FOR A LONGER DESCRIPTION.