last 24 hours
last 7 days
last 30 days
older than 30 days

Antiquariat Dasa Pahor

Italiae Totius Orbis Olim Domatricis Nova et Exactiss Descriptio Iaocobo Castaldo Auctore

Italiae Totius Orbis Olim Domatricis Nova et Exactiss Descriptio Iaocobo Castaldo Auctore

Gerard DE JODE (1509-1591). Copper engraved map sheet with full contemporary colou and gilt highlights, with no text on verso, recently remounted upon a larger sheet of paper with added French lines in gilt and blue (Very Good, excellent original colour, map trimmed to neatline as it was once bound in a contemporary atlas factice, repaired tear in the upper part, left from the cartouche) map proper: 37 x 51,5 cm (41.6 x 20.3 inches). ITALY: Italiae Totius Orbis Olim Domatricis Nova et Exactiss Descriptio Iaocobo Castaldo Auctore. This is a beautiful example of a great classic map of Italy, Dalmatia, Sardenia and Corsica by Gerard de Jode. This example, corresponding the 1578 state, was published separately without text on the back and bound in an atlas factice. It was originally coloured with a magnificent late 16th full hand colour, close to the frescoes of the Gallery of Maps in Vatican, which were made between 1580-1583. Such colouring, which is more typical for the murals, and is seldom seen on works of paper. It is amongst the most decorative 16th century colouring we have encountered. Separately Published Maps by de Jode - This ia a separately issued edition without text on the back, corresponding to the state, published in 1578 atlas Speculum Orbis Terrarum by Gerard de Jode. As most of the 1578 de Jode maps were issued with text on the back in an atlas, examples were also sold by the author separately without the text (Shirley, p. 51, no. 119; KOEMAN, Atlantes Neerlandici, vol. 2, p. 206). De Jode’s grand project to make an elaborate atlas was namely extremely costly, time consuming and unlucrative, and the author would, as it was normal at the time, sell maps separately on demand to pay his daily costs. Only a small number of atlases was actually sold. The survival rate of de Jode’s separately published maps is extremely low due to their large format. They would, like our map, usually survive in privately composed atlases. This map was contemporary coloured and mounted back to back with another map in an atlas factice. All the maps from this atlas fragment were trimmed to the neatline and re-margined in order to obtain equal sizes of sheets in the atlas. Such practice was common in the 16th century composite atlases. The map has recently undergone professional restoration whereby it was removed from its contemporary backing and remounted upon a larger sheet of paper with added decorative French lines in gilt and blue. The map’s stellar period colour and gilt highlights have been fully preserved. Gerard de Jode - The De Jodes were highly skilled and innovative cartographers, although their impressive endeavours never met with financial success. Gerard de Jode, originally from Gelderland, found his calling as an engraver in Antwerp, then a premier global centre of publishing. In 1564, he notably engraved Abraham Ortelius’ cordiform wall map of the World. Shortly thereafter, he set about preparing his own atlas, but was beaten to the punch by Ortelius, who published his Theatrum Orbis Terrarum (1570), considered to be the first fully modern atlas of the entire known world. Evidence suggest that Ortelius, a politically powerful man, ran interference on De Jode’s efforts to complete his atlas. He used his connections to ensure that De Jode’s application for an imperial privilege (the contemporary version of copyright protection) was severely delayed. Gerard De Jode eventually published his atlas in 1578, and while his maps are generally regarded to be of superior artistic merit and based on more progressive geographical sources than those of his rival, Ortelius’ opposition ensured that relatively few copies were issued. Cornelis de Jode decided to continue his father’s work and to prepare a revised and enlarged edition of his atlas. References: KOEMAN, Atlantes Neerlandici, vol. 2 (Amsterdam, 1969), Jod 1 (13) – an example with text verso.
Lutzenbur-gii Montuosissimi ac saltuosissimi ducatus

Lutzenbur-gii Montuosissimi ac saltuosissimi ducatus

Gerard DE JODE (1509-1591). Copper engraved map sheet with full contemporary colour, with no text on verso, recently remounted upon a larger sheet of paper with added French lines in gilt and blue (Very Good, excellent original colour, map trimmed to neatline as it was once bound in a contemporary atlas factice), map proper: 37 x 45,5 cm (14.6 x 17.9 inches). LUXEMBURG / LUXEMBOURG: Lutzenbur-gii Montuosissimi ac saltuosissimi ducatus. A stunning example of a separately issued first map of the duchy of Luxembourg, published by Gerard de Jode, was coloured in the late 16th century in the style of the frescoes of the Gallery of Maps in Vatican. This is a beautiful separately issued example of the earliest map of the duchy of Luxembourg, published by Gerard de Jode. This example, corresponding the 1578 state, was published separately without text on the back and bound in an atlas factice. It was originally coloured with a magnificent late 16th full hand colour, close to the frescoes of the Gallery of Maps in Vatican, which were made between 1580-1583. Such colouring, which is more typical for the murals, and is seldom seen on works of paper. It is amongst the most decorative 16th century colouring we have encountered. Separately Published Maps by de Jode - This is a separately issued edition without text on the back, corresponding to the state, published in 1578 atlas Speculum Orbis Terrarum by Gerard de Jode. As most of the 1578 de Jode maps were issued with text on the back in an atlas, examples were also sold by the author separately without the text (Shirley, p. 51, no. 119; KOEMAN, Atlantes Neerlandici, vol. 2, p. 206). De Jode’s grand project to make an elaborate atlas was namely extremely costly, time consuming and unlucrative, and the author would, as it was normal at the time, sell maps separately on demand to pay his daily costs. Only a small number of atlases was actually sold. The survival rate of de Jode’s separately published maps is extremely low due to their large format. They would, like our map, usually survive in privately composed atlases. This map was contemporary coloured and mounted back to back with another map in an atlas factice. All the maps from this atlas fragment were trimmed to the neatline and re-margined in order to obtain equal sizes of sheets in the atlas. Such practice was common in the 16th century composite atlases. The map has recently undergone professional restoration whereby it was removed from its contemporary backing and remounted upon a larger sheet of paper with added decorative French lines in gilt and blue. The map’s stellar period colour and gilt highlights have been fully preserved. Gerard de Jode - The De Jodes were highly skilled and innovative cartographers, although their impressive endeavours never met with financial success. Gerard de Jode, originally from Gelderland, found his calling as an engraver in Antwerp, then a premier global centre of publishing. In 1564, he notably engraved Abraham Ortelius’ cordiform wall map of the World. Shortly thereafter, he set about preparing his own atlas, but was beaten to the punch by Ortelius, who published his Theatrum Orbis Terrarum (1570), considered to be the first fully modern atlas of the entire known world. Evidence suggest that Ortelius, a politically powerful man, ran interference on De Jode’s efforts to complete his atlas. He used his connections to ensure that De Jode’s application for an imperial privilege (the contemporary version of copyright protection) was severely delayed. Gerard De Jode eventually published his atlas in 1578, and while his maps are generally regarded to be of superior artistic merit and based on more progressive geographical sources than those of his rival, Ortelius’ opposition ensured that relatively few copies were issued. Cornelis de Jode decided to continue his father’s work and to prepare a revised and enlarged edition of his atlas. References: KOEMAN, Atlantes Neerlandici, vol. 2 (Amsterdam, 1969), Jod 1 (57) – an example with text verso.
Narod nas dokaze hrani. Bibliografski pregled slovenskega tiska na Primorskem do konca l. 1918

Narod nas dokaze hrani. Bibliografski pregled slovenskega tiska na Primorskem do konca l. 1918

Pavel PLESNICAR (1880-1947). 8°. 128 pp., original wrappers with printed title (a cancelled library example: old paper lables on the upper corner of the cover, spine and on the back, two small 1950s stamps on the inner side of the wrappers, title page with old nummeration in ink and light red pencil line over the lower part and with a red cancellation stamp verso, wrappers slightly scratched, spine reinforced with paper, inside clean). [Our Nation is Keeping the Evidences. Bibliography of the Slovenian Press in Primorsko until the end of 1918]. SLAVIC PRINTING / BIBLIOGRAPHY / ANTI-FASCISM. A valuable bibliography lists the printed material in Slovenian and Latin languages, with a Slavic content, issued in on the coastal area, called Primorsko (Primorska). Listed are 782 texts, published between 1607 and 1918. The index offers names of authors, translators and editors. The book was published in Ljubljana on the eve of World War II, in 1940. At the time the Slavic language, press and culture in Primorsko, which was annexed to Italy after WWI, was systematically suppressed by the Fascist government. This bibliography tries to represent the printed texts relating to the Slavic culture and language before the region was taken over by the Fascists. Ironically the following year Ljubljana itself well under the Fascist occupation and underwent the same terror. The author Pavel Plesnicar was a teacher and writer of the educational material. References: OCLC 444382949, 250843529, 504242122. Šlebinger, Janko: Plesni?ar, Pavel (1880–1947). Slovenska biografija. Slovenska akademija znanosti in umetnosti, Znanstvenoraziskovalni center SAZU, 2013.
Comitatus Burgundiae

Comitatus Burgundiae

Gerard DE JODE (1509-1591). Copper engraved map sheet with full contemporary colour and silver highlights, with no text on verso, recently remounted upon a larger sheet of paper with added French lines in gilt and blue (Very Good, excellent original colour, map trimmed to neatline as it was once bound in a contemporary atlas factice), map proper: 35,5 x 48,5 cm (13.9 x 19 inches). BURGUNDY - Franche-Comté: Comitatus Burgundiae. A detailed, original coloured separately issued map of Burgundy was made by Gerard de Jode. This example, corresponding the 1578 state, was published separately without text on the back and bound in an atlas factice. It was originally coloured with a magnificent late 16th full hand colour, close to the frescoes of the Gallery of Maps in Vatican, which were made between 1580-1583. Such colouring, which is more typical for the murals, and is seldom seen on works of paper. It is amongst the most decorative 16th century colouring we have encountered. The map was only published in the first edition of the atlas from 1578, which was printed in small numbers, and as a contemporary broadside. The second, more common edition of the atlas included a revised map with different cartouche. Separately Published Maps by de Jode - This is a separately issued edition without text on the back, corresponding to the state, published in 1578 atlas Speculum Orbis Terrarum by Gerard de Jode. As most of the 1578 de Jode maps were issued with text on the back in an atlas, examples were also sold by the author separately without the text (Shirley, p. 51, no. 119; KOEMAN, Atlantes Neerlandici, vol. 2, p. 206). De Jode’s grand project to make an elaborate atlas was namely extremely costly, time consuming and unlucrative, and the author would, as it was normal at the time, sell maps separately on demand to pay his daily costs. Only a small number of atlases was actually sold. The survival rate of de Jode’s separately published maps is extremely low due to their large format. They would, like our map, usually survive in privately composed atlases. This map was contemporary coloured and mounted back to back with another map in an atlas factice. All the maps from this atlas fragment were trimmed to the neatline and re-margined in order to obtain equal sizes of sheets in the atlas. Such practice was common in the 16th century composite atlases. The map has recently undergone professional restoration whereby it was removed from its contemporary backing and remounted upon a larger sheet of paper with added decorative French lines in gilt and blue. The map’s stellar period colour and gilt highlights have been fully preserved. Because the map was only produced around 1578 for the first edition of de Jode’s atlas, it is today extremely rare on the market. References: KOEMAN, Atlantes Neerlandici, vol. 2 (Amsterdam, 1969), Jod 1 (20) – an example with text verso.
Ermenilerin Osmanl? I?mparatorlugu'na katk?s?. The Input of Armenians in the Ottoman Empire

Ermenilerin Osmanl? I?mparatorlugu’na katk?s?. The Input of Armenians in the Ottoman Empire

Hasmik STEPANYAN. 4°. 663 pp. with illustrations, autograph of Karekin II on p. 6., original pasted-down errata on the title page, green cloth binding with gilt lettering on the cover and spine, original illustrated dustjacket (Very Good). A rare Turkish version of an award-winning text on the role of the Armenians in the Ottoman Empire. A richly illustrated book with text in Turkish, and with 663 pages and over 400 colour and black and white illustrations represents the role of Armenians in the court, culture, science, medicine, trade, military, sports and urban planning in the Ottoman Empire until WWI. Presented are portraits, historical photos, literature and newspapers, posters, advertisements etc. The introduction in Armenian and Turkish was written by Catholicos Karekin II, Catholicos of All Armenians, the supreme head of the Armenian Apostolic Church. The text, by a female author Hasmik Stepanyan, which was first issued in Armenian language at the 550th anniversary of Istanbul's Armenian Patriarchate under the title Hayeri nerdrumn O?smanyan kaysrut?yunum, won several awards, including an award by the president. This is a less common Turkish translation, issued by the Yerevan State University three years later, with an introduction by Karekin II, dated in 2013. We could only find one institutional example on Worldcat (University of California, Los Angeles). References: OCLC 1013467238.
KOMOWNAYIC KOMOWNIZM: PATMA-KAGAKAKAN ZEKOWCOWM

KOMOWNAYIC KOMOWNIZM: PATMA-KAGAKAKAN ZEKOWCOWM

Levon HAKOBYAN / HAKOBIAN 4°. [8], 350 pp. (15a-?; originally skipped pp. 24-25; 86a-b; originally skipped p. 85; 102a, 106a-b, 99a, 205a-b; originally skipped p. 201; 231a, 235 a-b; originally skipped pp. 236, 257, 266; 305 a) typescript and hand-written chapter titles in red and green, typed recto only, bound with a string, original red cloth binding. Text with original corrections in pens and pencils of different colour, some sporadic parts of the pages cut out as a part of author’s corrections, especially in the last part, sporadic parts of text mounted over with paper and partly corrected by the author (minor wear and staining to the binding, inner margins of the title page and last page with light scratches and pieces of old paper, inner white margins with old small holes – traces of old binding with a string, overall in a good condition). COMMUNISM / ARMENIA: [From the Commune to the Communism. A Historical-Political Report] An attractive, seemingly unrecorded typewritten thick work on the Communism in Armenia. A thick original typescript on the history and philosophy of Communism, its struggle and its being the right solution for the future, was written in Yerevan in 1957. The title page and titles of chapters are drawn in attractive Armenian calligraphy in red and green ink. The text is accompanied with quotations by Russian philosophers. The author, Levon Hakobyan, was carefully revising the text, adding new annotations and erasing / cutting out parts of the text, which is typed on paper of different quality. We could not find any information on the author nor we could find any records, that the text was ever published. References: Unrecorded.
Geoloska karta srednje in spodnje Istre s sosednjimi otoki

Geoloska karta srednje in spodnje Istre s sosednjimi otoki

Rado STRNAD (1900–?). Whiteprint and hand-colour on thick paper, originally mounted on linen 94 x 106,5 cm (37 x 42 inches) (very good, linen slightly dusty). GEOLOGICAL MAP / CROATIA / YUGOSLAVIA: [Geological Map of Middle and Lower Istria with the Neighbouring Islands]. A large unusual map, reproduced with a photographic procedure as a whiteprint and elaborately coloured per hand, shows the geological stricture of parts of Istria and northern Dalmatian islands, today in Croatia. The map was probably made in 1947 or immediately after, when Yugoslavia was granted this part of Istria in the Paris Peace Treaty on February 10th, 1947 and was rebuilding the railroad system in the area. The map is signed by Rado Strnad (1900–?), a state geologist and geographer, who also names people helping him with the project. Historical Background - Up to the end of World War I, the city of Trieste and the Istrian Peninsula, to its south, were part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. The region was ethnically mixed, with large portions of the population being Italian, Slovenian, Croatian, and Austro-German, amongst other groups. Historically, the venerable port city of Trieste proper, although long a part of the Habsburg Empire, was a majority Italian, with a large Slovenian minority, while the areas surrounding the city were overwhelmingly populated by Slovenians. Further south, in far north-western Istria, the population was mixed, although the Italian-speaking population was often the majority right along the coast, while the Slovenes dominates inland areas (a legacy of the location of the old Habsburg-Venetian border which existed until the Napoleonic Wars). Further south, deeper into Istria, the population was mixed between Croatians and Italians. Traditionally, while things were not perfect, these ethnic groups got along quite well. That all changed following World War I, when the entire region was given to Italy. Benito Mussolini, who became the Italian dictator in 1922, enforced a policy of ‘Italianization’ of Trieste and Istria, brutally suppressing any manifestations of Slovene or Croatian culture. While many of the Italians native to the region did not support this policy, Mussolini brought in tens of thousands of pro-Fascist migrants who did. Almost overnight, Mussolini had ruined a peaceful and enlightened multi-ethnic society. Many Slovenes and Croatians were either forced to suppress their identity or immigrate to the newly created state of Yugoslavia, or overseas. That being said an underground Slovene resistance movement developed in Trieste operating under the motto: ‘Trst je nas!’ [‘Trieste is Ours!’]. Moving forward to 1945, Yugoslavia and her Allies were victorious over Nazi Germany and her client state Italy. Marshall Tito, the Yugoslav leader, had conquered Trieste and Istria and was naturally eager to re-establish the full Slovene and Croatian cultural presence, and to annex the area to Yugoslavia. However, the Allied powers, not wanting to provoke further rancour in Central Europe, called for a more cautious approach. While it was acknowledged that Slovenian and Croatian majority areas should, in theory, be granted to Yugoslavia, the problem remained that placing Trieste, a large majority-Italian city within Yugoslavia could cause big headaches. Making matters even more complex, Trieste was virtually surrounded by majority Slovene areas. The temporary solution was to form the Free Territory of Trieste, created in 1947, it was to consist of the narrow coastal area of Trieste and environs and the north-western part of the Istrian Peninsula (the rest of Istria had already been ceded to Yugoslavia). While the Free State had some of the trappings of an independent country (i.e. its own stamps and passports), in reality, it was merely and ephemeral entity living on borrowed time, nervously overseen by the Allied powers and the United Nations. The map was probably hand made in limited edition for institutional and research purposes only. We could not trace another copy in institutions nor on the market.