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1870 IDAHO TERRITORY APPOINTMENT

1870 IDAHO TERRITORY APPOINTMENT

Western Americana - Idaho] An official 1870 document signed by Idaho Territorial Governor David W. Ballard appointing Henry C. Banks to the office of commissioner of deeds to reside in the City of New York. Banks, an attorney with the law firm Banks & Perry, served as commissioner of deeds for 45 states and territories during this period. The commissioner of deeds is a public officer similar to a notary public who may administer oaths and take acknowledgements or proofs of deeds and other documents. The position was established during the 19th century as deeds concerning property located in a particular state could only be acknowledged before a notary public in that state. However, if the deed was acknowledged outside the state where the subject property was located, the grantor would have to locate a judge of a court of record to acknowledge receipt. These judges were often difficult to find and thus, commissioners of deeds facilitated this process until states began to accept the authority of notaries outside their jurisdiction. Ballard (1824-83) was an Oregon physician who served as governor of the Idaho Territory from 1866 to 1870, appointed by President Andrew Johnson. Unlike many territorial governors, he physically resided in his jurisdiction during his tenure, having moved his practice from Lebanon Oregon to Boise, Idaho. When he arrived, the territory was still reeling from the mismanagement of his predecessor, Caleb Lyon. It was also deeply divided over the controversial decision to move the capital from Lewiston to Boise and nearly broke as former territorial secretary Horace C. Gilson had embezzled most of its funds while serving as acting governor before Ballard took office. A Republican who supported the Union during the Civil War, Ballard often clashed with the overwhelmingly Democratic and pro-Confederate territorial legislature. The document measures 17" x 11" and is folded in half, with gold paper seal affixed. Creased from prior folds, it is also a bit toned with a minor stain not impacting the printing. A holographic inscription in purple ink appears on the verso: "Idaho Territory Commission Received March 1870 start second March 1870 expires March 4 1872."
AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED

AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED, ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPHS, ETC.

Terry, Dame Alice Ellen An autograph letter signed (ALS), two cabinet card photographs, a candid photograph, and the bookplate of Dame Alice Ellen Terry (1847-1928), known professionally as Ellen Terry. For nearly two decades, she was considered the leading Shakespearean comic actress in Britain. The two sepia tone portraits by Window and Grove, photographers to the Royal Family, show Terry in costume, as Queen Henrietta Maria in Charles I (c.1879) and as Camma from Lord Alfred Tennyson's short tragedy The Cup (1881), respectively. Terry played both roles after joining Henry Irving's company at the Lyceum Theatre as its leading lady. The photographs are accompanied by a one-page handwritten letter dated May 19, 1893 to an unknown recipient, referencing the images: "Enclosed are a few wee photographs just to amuse you since you say you are so 'lonely' - I like best, of course, stone pictures of me, which make me appear beautiful! - and loathe stone which show me plain!!" This small collection also includes a candid silver gelatin photograph (6 ½" x 4 ¾") of Terry holding the reigns of a horse and buggy while seated next to an unidentified woman. The image is inscribed: "Tis my state coach - Ellen Terry". A final item in this grouping is Terry's hand-colored bookplate, which measures 2" x 2 ¾". It showcases a wood engraved aerial map of Winchelsea created for Terry in 1898 by her son, Edward Gordon Craig, an actor and printer. The letter is written on watermarked paper, with creasing from prior folds, an expert repair of a small closed tear and light discoloration on the verso from its apparent removal from a scrapbook. The portraits each measure 4 ¼" x 6 ½" and are lightly soiled. The Camma image bears an ink stamp on the verso for the John Hoch Art Store in Boston.
CIVIL WAR

CIVIL WAR, YELLOW FEVER, AND STEAMBOATS TO NEW ORLEANS

Blake, Gratia Turnbull (née Fuller, 1835-1915) An archive of family letters written to Gratia Turnbull Fuller Blake during the mid-19th century covering a wide range of historic topics including the U.S. Civil War, slavery, yellow fever, and a legal dispute over land in New York City. Born in Lawrence, Ohio, Gratia married Cincinnattus Blake (1830-1918), a farmer, Union soldier, and Sheriff of Gallipolis, Ohio, in 1857. Together, they raised six sons. This archive contains a six-page letter Gratia received from her sister-in-law, Mary B Fuller. Mary's husband (Gratia's brother) was Captain Emilius Fuller (1815-63), a Confederate Army officer, commander of the St. Martin Rangers Company Infantry in Louisiana, and captain of a boat called the Queen of the West. He was seriously wounded and taken prisoner when his boat was destroyed in Bayou Teche on April 14, 1863. He was transferred to Johnson's Island, Ohio, where he died on July 25. In her letter dated December 15, 1867, Mary's bitter feelings about slavery and the war are still fresh. "I have the most of my work to do myself. I prefer doing it rather than have a free trifling negress around me. Their impudence I cannot ensure," she wrote from her home in St. Martinsville, Louisiana. "They are free as they may stave with their freedom for all I care. I can have a woman by feeding her of giving her a cabin or a room to sleep in and that would cost me less than when I owned them, for then we had to clothe, feed and take care of them when sick. Many of them are getting their eyes opened and say they have had no good times since the Yankees came among them." Along with their personal losses, Mary's family is concerned about an outbreak of yellow fever. Her son, James, wrote to his Aunt Gratia on October 26, 1867 about "yellow jack" which caused 1/3 of the St. Martinsville population to flee: "133 names are published of the victims and except for one or two - they all died since September 11 and about 2/3 of the names only are given which would swell the mortuary list to about 200." An undated letter from her sister-in-law, Julia (Blake) Eaton (1836-1927), includes a negative report of her visit to Cincinnati: "I saw too much suffering while there to feel very happy. I saw a great many of the poor fellows that were wounded at Pittsburgh carried off the steamboats. Poor fellows. God help them." This collection contains 15 letters written in 1856-58 by Cincinnatis to Gratia before they were married. In October 1856, he wrote about all he is doing to yield a living from his Ohio farmlands in order tomake a home for his future bride: "If I do not buy a house, I shall have to build such as my means will allow. I shall have to earn part of the money if not raise my wagon cover and live under it. If my hut is of cornstalks and brush, I shall be happy if Gratia will share it with me." Another group of nine letters was written by Cincinnatis to Gratia in 1877-78 when he was running a steamboat operation, taking potatoes from his farm in Ohio to market in New Orleans along with other goods such as coal picked up along the way. "No good news to speak of and a great deal of bad news," he wrote on November 10, 1878. "Lost the big boat Trowbridge have only the small boat Blake left us. We can only run a part of a day or night at a time the wind is blowing now . the wind blew so hard that the waves came over the side splashboards . I think this is my last March trip forever and if we get this one down safe, I think it a miracle." The collection includes three other letters written to his "boys" and the family during this period. Another group of letters in this archive are related to the ongoing dispute over property in New York with a branch of Cincinnatus Blake's family known as the "Brower heirs". His sister, Visalia, wrote on March 4, 1867 urging him to join other members of the family to cooperatively hire an attorney to pursue their rights: "We will proceed to enter into a contract with the lawyer whom we have selected as our council by which he will be bound to proceed to collect the necessary evidence to prove our heirship and title to the property in question as take such proceedings as may be necessary to enforce that title against the Trinity Church Corporation." Cincinnatus Blake was apparently distantly related to Anneke (or Annetje) Jans, who purchased a 62-acre piece of land in Manhattan, which her living children sold upon her death in 1671. A great-grandson of Jans, Cornelius Bogardus, later claimed his branch of the family had not legally given up its right to the property since his grandfather, one of Anneke's six children, had been dead at the time of the sale and were owed one-sixth of the sale. After a century of legal dispute, the court rejected the claims. This collection includes a dozen other brief notes and letters from friends during the period. The latest letter in this collection is dated 1884, written to Gratia by her son Charles O. Blake (1860-1924) who asks for money as he is stuck in Fairplay, Colorado, likely trying to cash in on the gold rush: "I am still a prisoner in this dammed town and see no prospect of getting out of it until I borrow money of you." The collection also includes about a dozen mailing envelopes. The materials are housed in mylar sleeves. Most were folded for mailing, with some edgewear and occasional soiling. All are legible and in very good condition. A fascinating archive, rich in content.
DOCUMENT SIGNED BY THE AMERICAN PATRIOT WHO WAS ALSO HERMAN MELVILLE'S GRANDFATHER

DOCUMENT SIGNED BY THE AMERICAN PATRIOT WHO WAS ALSO HERMAN MELVILLE’S GRANDFATHER

Melville, Thomas (1751-1832) An original Massachusetts Charitable Society document dated October 8, 1825 and signed by its then president, Thomas Melville, a Boston merchant and the paternal grandfather of the writer Herman Melville. A member of the Sons of Liberty, he was a participant in the Boston Tea Party and served as a major in the American Revolution. Later, Melville worked as a naval officer and as Surveyor of the Port of Boston at the Boston Custom House on State Street. In part, this document reads: "We the President and a majority of the Massachusetts Charitable Society hereby authorize Thomas Melville, Esquire President thereof to transfer to the Treasury of the United States in trust for said states all the six percent stock of the loan of 1812 standing in the same of said Society on the books of the Bank of the United States at Boston." The document is signed by Melville and six other trustees alongside an attached seal. The Massachusetts Charitable Society, still in existence today, was organized by a group of men in Boston in 1762 as a society for "mutually aiding and assisting each other, their families, widows and orphans who may be reduced by the adverse accidents of life." The Society first met at the Green Dragon Tavern in Boston, later frequenting the "Bunch of Grapes" and other local landmarks, and was the first society of its type to enroll members without regard to religion, trade, or national derivation. On the verso on the document the following is written: "Vote. Mass Charitable Soc. Auth. Melville Trustee to transfer stock Oct. 1825." The document measures 7" x 12" and is a bit toned, with creasing from prior folds and some wear along the right edge.
JAY CHAMBERS BOOKPLATES

JAY CHAMBERS BOOKPLATES

Chambers, Jay A collection of 19 hand-signed bookplates designed by Jay Chambers (1877-1929), a graduate of Philadephia's Drexel Institute of Art, Science and Industry who studied under the famous book illustrator and author Howard Pyle. The large paper proofs in this collection are indicative of Chamber's pictorial style, many with idealized figures in historical dress. Chambers is the father of writer Whittaker Chambers, the former Communist and Russian spy whose testimony helped bring down Alger Hiss. Chambers was a sought-after bookplate illustrator at the turn of the last century. A survey of his work is found in Wilbur Macy Stone's books "Jay Chambers: His Book-Plates, With XXVII Examples and an Essay Concerning Them" (1902). Stone and Chambers were two of the three partners in the Triptych Designers of New York, which produced bookplates, published this work, and other small-press publications. After graduating from Drexel, Chambers moved to New York to take a job as a graphic artist at the New York World, a position he landed due to the influence of his father, James Chambers, a well-known journalist of the era. He met Laha Whittaker at a diner he frequented. They married in 1900, moved to the suburbs, and had two sons. In his memoirs, Chamber's eldest son, Whittaker (born Jay Vivian), recalled a difficult home life due to his father's coldness and absence, behavior biographers later attributed to the fact that his father was bisexual and led a double life. The bookplate proofs in this collection, printed in black, include one done in 1902 for Whittaker using his given name Jay Vivian Chambers. Another example, dated 1900, was executed for Florence Audubon (1853-1949), the granddaughter of John James Audubon, and features a squirrel. The collection also includes the bookplate of Winfred Porter Truesdell, an art book publisher and himself a bookplate collector. Examples of Chambers' bookplate work is collected by a variety of institutions. The proofs in this collection are all are in fine condition.
PHOTOGRAPH ALBUM WITH IMAGES OF THE 1927 SHANGHAI MASSACRE

PHOTOGRAPH ALBUM WITH IMAGES OF THE 1927 SHANGHAI MASSACRE

Vernacular Photography] A photographic album with more than 165 images of people and locations in Asia created by a young Dutch chef serving on a merchant ship in the mid 1920s. Notably, the album includes two photographs taken on the streets of Shanghai at the time of the 1927 massacre. The presumed creator of the album appears in many of the photographs and is identified in several captions as a chef. In one image, he is shown killing a chicken, while other photographs show him working in the kitchen onboard ship. The album contains a wide variety of images from his travels, mainly centered around Bali, ranging from farmers in the rice fields to waterfalls and temples. Notably, there are two photographs with extensive captions in Dutch on the verso concerning the conflict in Shanghai. One shows a bustling street scene, while the second shows armed soldiers hunkered down behind sandbag barricades. The Shanghai Massacre of April 12, 1927 was a violent suppression of organizations affiliated with the Communist Party of China by the military forces of Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek and conservative factions in the Kuomintang Nationalist Party. Hundreds of communists were rounded up, arrested, and tortured; most were executed. The album also contains a variety of curious images, including a Charlie Chaplin impersonator surrounded by a group of children, ice and snow covering the deck of the ship ("winter in Yokohama, Japan"), and a series showing a small water plane that appears to have sunk. Most of the black and white photographs are captioned in white on the gray paper album leaves and have extensive holographic captions written in Dutch on the verso. The photographs vary in size, but are generally 4 1/2" x 5". Several dozen are secured with photo corners, but the vast majority are pasted into the album, with a few laid in loose. The brown paper album is secured with a silk yellow string tie.
AUDIO RECORDING OF BOOK BEAT INTERVIEW

AUDIO RECORDING OF BOOK BEAT INTERVIEW

Nin, Anaïs Chicago: 1972. Period reel-to-reel audio recording, preserved in an Ohio State University box, with manuscript titles on the rear panel. Digitized in early 2020 into wav recordings, which are provided on a USB key. The recording is 28 minutes, 37 seconds in length. Nin (1903-77), the French-born diarist and passionate eroticist, is interviewed by Robert Cromie of the Chicago Tribune for the PBS television program Book Beat. In the course of their wide-ranging conversation, which was recorded shortly after the publication of The Diary of Anais Nin, Volume Four, 1944-1947 (1971), she discusses her literary approach: "it's played all kind of the roles, the Diary, you know, it was the story of growth of a woman, it was also a notebook, and many of the characters in the novels I would start taking from reality, from the Diary, and then of course they go through a transformation which fiction always does and they will become composites. So there will be two people in one portrait and they change, but nevertheless the base of it was in truth, in the truth of the Diary, and you can find similarities." Nin also speaks to her complicated relationships with writer Gore Vidal and filmmaker Maya Deren, among others, and the publication of Under a Glass Bell (1944) by her own printing Press, which she named Gemor Press. When asked about Henry Miller's bohemian lifestyle, she recalls, "he was very generous, with everything, with his ideas with his stories, with his life . he's generous to other writers, too, which is something that we kept from the Paris days, and we never understood when we came to New York, the absence of fraternity. But then of course, the New York scene was different. The French writer never made any money. There was something rather uncommercial about being a writer, and we were always helping each other and inspiring each other and encouraging each other and I miss that. Henry continued to encourage writers and I did, too. Somebody said the history of art is the history of friendship. Should be." She also touches on a number of topical issues, musing on the future of the Diary and sharing her thoughts on feminism: "There's one aspect I'm very much involved in, with the creativity of the woman, the liberation of the woman. There's an aspect which is very militant which I'm not involved with and you know, there are many factions, as you know, it's already divided into many factions. I'm interested in showing the writing of women, their capacities, inspiring them, and the Diaries, of course, have meant a great deal to women because it's unusual to have the story of a woman's growth. We never had a record of that and I was always interested in the growth of plants, I would watch plants grow. I think I love to see the growth of human beings, and I found the only one I could really record scientifically, completely was my own, and I think this became the story of growth for other women: examining the conflicts and the obstacles and watching day by day how you could expand without damaging others, how could you grow without being destructive, and all the problems that a woman has."
PLAN OF THE FIRST BAPTIST MEETING HOUSE

PLAN OF THE FIRST BAPTIST MEETING HOUSE, WORCESTER

Americana - Massachusetts] A single sheet (13" x 14 ½") printed circa 1850 of the pew floor plan for the First Baptist Meeting House in Worcester, Massachusetts. The document is hand annotated with names, indicating the families renting the 100 pews outlined on the plan. This rare document is evidence of a practice that was common until the early 20th century of pew rentals in churches as a principal means of raising income. This was especially common in the United States, where churches lacked government support through mandatory tithing. It would appear from the plan that pew rental prices range from 30 to 300, but it's not clear if that is an annual rate or lifetime charge, nor whether the prices quoted are dollars of cents. The most expensive pews are at the center of the church, four rows back from the pulpit. Among those occupying the most expensive seats is Daniel Goddard, possibly a watchmaker living in Worcester in 1850, according to Ancestry records. Joseph Taft (1828-71) in pew 79 worked in a boot factory and was married at the First Baptist Church in 1848, while Levi Howe (1798-1861), a wheelwright, staked his claim on pew 65. No name is written on the plan for more than a dozen of the available pews. Along with the seating chart, the floor plan indicates the position of pulpit center, the entry space, and aisles. Printed along the bottom of the floor plan are the conditions of sale: "One fourth cash, one fourth in three months; one fourth in 6 months; one fourth in 9 months, secured by mortgage on the pews. Those who have paid in all their Stock, it will be taken in payment for Pews." The plan was printed by Henry J. Howland (1810-97), who was active in Worcester printing during the mid-19th century. The First Baptist Church was founded in 1812 and established the first Sunday School in Worcester. Following a fire, the church reopened in 1939 at its current location on the corner of Park Avenue and Salisbury Street and counts among its neighbors the Worcester Polytechnic Institute and the American Antiquarian Society. The floor plan is toned with some light edgewear and a one-inch closed tear along the lower right edge. The annotations are primarily in ink with a few in pencil; a bit of fading but overall quite legible.
SCENES OF DEPRAVITY IN 1830s NEW ORLEANS

SCENES OF DEPRAVITY IN 1830s NEW ORLEANS

Americana - Louisiana] A group of 13 holographic letters written between 1831 and 1836 from New Orleans by Jeremiah C. Garthwaite, a clothing wholesaler, to his brother, Jacob Thomas Garthwaite of New Jersey. Jeremiah wrote about business conditions, his political opinions, and events of the day, recalling in one letter a public hanging in the city which was then experiencing a huge population boom. Jeremiah (1807-83) was the namesake of his father, a Revolutionary War drummer who settled the family in Newark, New Jersey. Jeremiah moved to New Orleans and was a partner in a wholesale clothing business that was dissolved in 1860. He returned to New Jersey and was credited with helping to build the Episcopal Church. All of the letters in this collection are written to his brother Jacob Thomas Garthwaite (1808-59). In an April 26, 1832 letter, Jeremiah writes about violence ("scenes of depravity") in New Orleans: "Last week two affairs of horror took place in one day at half past 2 o'clock p.m. - with pistols 15 paces distant no lives nor blood lost. Same night two murders and three attempts to break in here. Monday three Spaniards [illegible word] their crimes for murder on the gallows. They were hung on the public square a few blocks below our store. I intended to witness it being engaged for the moment. Reached there early in time to see them hanging lifeless corpses [illegible word] in white [illegible word] extended in rotation of the scaffold. After an interval of an hour cut down and stowed into rough casements of wood and carted off, created no small degree of horrid sensations in my mind." They next day, nine more "Spaniards" were arrested on suspicion of murder and 8 or 10 buildings were burned to the ground, he wrote. Jeremiah often traveled and on one trip, he relayed his impressions of St. Louis to his brother: "Although less population, it presents about the same appearance in size as Newark, is handsomely situated on the bank of the Mississippi River, presents a handsome view as you approach it but when in the town the sight is different in consequence of so many old building together with the bustle in putting up new ones." In a letter dated November 10, 1831, he recalls a near meeting with the notorious Mrs. Eaton, wife of the Secretary of War John Eaton, who was ostracized by members of President Andrew Jackson's cabinet over the circumstances of their marriage. He heard about her from other passengers: "They represented her as being abrupt in her manners so that some of her movements they consider highly degrading to any lady." Jeremiah closely followed politics and shares his opinions in the letters. In his correspondence dated May 7, 1831, he references the "blow up at Washington" calling it "a circumstance unprecedented in the history of our country." He is referring to President Jackson's decision to ask for the resignation of his entire cabinet in order to neutralize his feud with Vice President John Calhoun. Jackson then appointed Edward Livingston as Secretary of State, a move Jeremiah supported: "He is a good man for the office opposed to many of the Gent view as regards the rechartering the U.S. Bank." Jeremiah is critical of U.S. Senator Henry Clay, the nullifiers, and South Carolina, which declared the federal tariffs of 1828 and 1832 unconstitutional and therefore null and void within the sovereign boundaries of the state: "Down with him - he is a traitor to the cause he has proposed to support, he has disgraced the country. South Carolina must submit, if not let every one of them be ranked with Henry Clay a traitor and punished accordingly." Despite his criticism of some politicians, Jeremiah was supportive of those who served their country. In a March 17, 1831 letter, he writes that he attended a meeting at the Exchange for "the venerable" President James Monroe: "A subscription is circulating through this city - 1 dollar only is solicited from each individual. I think 5,000 dollars will be given cheerfully. and will call forth the gratitude of every American for a man who has spent his life in the services of his country - he gave his time, his money, his all to obtain what he has now the privilege of witnessing the liberty of the country. I think the nation is bound both by honor and deity to retain such a man from (word) and sheriffs and bestow on him a competency in his old age." His final two letters to his brother in this collection are not written in New Orleans. One was written in 1835 on a boat traveling to Charleston, and the final letter in 1836 while he was traveling by horseback through cotton country near Vicksburg, Mississippi: "Cotton is very good this year and the crops will amount to more than the average. Sells at good prices and finds a ready sale, which is all the Newark (word) want provided the planters pay their bills to the merchants at the regular time (the first of January) instead of buying more land and niggers, and the merchants pay their bills. Business seems very good on the river towns." Each of letters runs two or three pages and are creased with some splitting along the folds. Losses where postal marks were clipped, as well as some general fading, but otherwise quite legible.
PHOTO ALBUM OF A PROMINENT NEW YORK FAMILY

PHOTO ALBUM OF A PROMINENT NEW YORK FAMILY

Kennedy, Anna McPherson Remarkable photo album dating from the 1920s filled with more than 1,100 photographs of the Kennedy family of Kingston, New York, a prominent family whose famous members included the artist Carlotta Petrina, her father Gilbert F. Kennedy, an international lawyer who represented the U.S. at the embassy in London, and her grandfather David Kennedy, the patriarch of the family and one-time mayor of the city who founded a popular patent medicine company. It appears likely that this album was created by Petrina's aunt, Anna McPherson Kennedy, whose photo and initials A.M.K. appear throughout the album. Anna Kennedy (1882-1945) graduated in 1919 from the Presbyterian Training School for Nurses in New York. Upon her death, her estate went to her sister Adelaide (1885-1969). It appears that neither sister ever married, nor did their brother Charles "David" Kennedy. Anna's father, David Kennedy (1832-1901), was mayor of Kingston and manufactured Dr. David Kennedy's favorite remedy, a patent medicine widely used for kidney and bladder problems from the 1870s into the mid 1920s. He transformed the company into a corporation in 1890, selling two-thirds of his interest for $150,000 and remaining president until being ousted from the company in 1898. The photographs in this album center mainly on Anna's apparent travels in the early to mid-1920s to the western U.S. and throughout Europe. Among the photos in the album is a picture of a man perched at the edge of the Grand Canyon labeled D.K. This is more than likely Anna's brother, Charles "David" Kennedy (1874-1948), an attorney who was elected a county judge in Colorado before ultimately going into the oil business in Oklahoma. The photos of travels in Europe begin in 1922, the same period when Anna's oldest brother, Gilbert F. Kennedy (1871-1971), accepted an appointment to become an assistant to the U.S. attorney general in London. His first wife died in 1918, and, according to newspaper reports, he moved to London and brought an action against two insurance companies in the case of 16 World War I cargo vessels that had been destroyed by a mysterious fire while moored in the Hudson River. After winning the case, he was persuaded to remain in London as counsel to the U.S. embassy and later became a partner in a London law firm until his retirement in 1958. Among the black and white photos are a few candid images of Anna's niece (the daughter of Gilbert), Carlotta Petrina, with her husband John in September 1922 while they were visiting Kingston, New York, the family's home. Born Charlotte F. Kennedy, she changed her name in 1921 when she married fellow artist John Petrina, born Giovanni Antonio Secondo Petrina in Treviso, Italy. He died in 1935 in a car accident. There are also eight photographs with captions noting the arrival of AMK (Anna) and Charlotte (Carlotta) in Venice on June 1, 1923 and Charlotte's apartment on the Grand Canal. Petrina (1901-97) was an American illustrator and printer, who was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1933 for her illustrations to accompany John Milton's Paradise Lost. The Carlotta Petrina Museum and Cultural Center in Brownsville, Texas exhibits her works and other artifacts from her life, as well as hosting classes and performances. The photographic album also includes a series of photographs from the British territory of Gibraltar in 1922, including street scenes and images along its border with Spain. The album is also filled with photographs from Anna's European travels in Naples, Capri, Sorrento, Rome, Sienna, Venice, the Swiss Alps, France, and England. Roughly 30 percent of the images are captioned below, some have captions written on the verso. During her travels, she connects with a wide range of young women. For example, photographs in Venice include Jane and Betty Scriven, sisters from Chicago whose parents were part of society. Their father was the Western General Superintendent of the Pennsylvania Railroad lines. About a quarter of the images in the album are dedicated to Anna's travels in the U.S. in the early 1920s. She spent some time in Southern California. Photographs show her on Catalina Island, at the beach, touring the world-famous Ostrich Farm in South Pasadena, and traveling on the Mount Lowe Railway in Altadena. Another selection of images are of a western town with dirt-packed streets and clapboard buildings. Three cyanotypes are among the photographs. The images are pasted to the album leaves, which are chipped and brittle. Approximately x images were removed, 19 images are laid in loose and a series of seven images from a trip to Pompei are laid in, apparently not originally included in this visual record.
ORATION DELIVERED BEFORE THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE SOCIETY OF CINCINNATI

ORATION DELIVERED BEFORE THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE SOCIETY OF CINCINNATI, ON THE FOURTH OF JULY, MDCCCXI

Biddle, Nicholas, Esq Tipped in on a prefatory blank leaf is a later engraved portrait of Biddle and his signature, apparently clipped from a letter. Nicholas Biddle (1786-1844) was an American financier who as president of the Second Bank of the United States (1823-36) made it the first effective central bank in U.S. history. As historian Jeffrey Sklansky observed, Biddle "cultivated the character of the gentleman of feeling who takes upon himself the suffering of a strife-torn world, manifested in effusive despair and foreboding." True to form, he surveys the desolated kingdoms of wartime Europe and prophesies a similar fate for the American republic in this Fourth of July address, which is notable for calling for the construction of a memorial to George Washington. Later, Biddle was President Andrew Jackson's chief antagonist in the Bank War (1832-36) that resulted in the termination of the Second Bank and its replacement by state banks. 28 p. Octavo. Full brown morocco binding, with decorative gilt stamping, two raised bands, ornamental dentelles, and marbled endpapers. The signed bookplate of American historian George Bancroft (1800-1891) appears on the front pastedown. Additionally, an autograph letter signed (ALS) by Bancroft and a receipt signed by him are laid in. Bancroft was a noted critic of Biddle, who he regarded as part of the "aristocracy" along with the likes of Alexander Hamilton. Typical toning to the contents, with some minor offsetting to p.26-7. The binding is a trifle darkened along the extremities; otherwise very good.