W. C. Baker Rare Books & Ephemera

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NARRATIVE OF THE EXPEDITION DESPATCHED TO MUSAHDU BY THE LIBERIAN GOVERNMENT UNDER BENJAMIN J. K. ANDERSON SENIOR

NARRATIVE OF THE EXPEDITION DESPATCHED TO MUSAHDU BY THE LIBERIAN GOVERNMENT UNDER BENJAMIN J. K. ANDERSON SENIOR, ESQUIRE IN 1874

Anderson, Benjamin J. K.; Frederick Starr (ed.) 43 pp. Original printed wrappers, side-stapled. Contemporary inkstamp on the title page correcting the academic affiliation of the editor. Wrappers chipped at extremities; wrappers and outer leaves lightly dampstained and foxed at fore-edge. Good. The first collected report of Liberian explorer Benjamin Anderson's second expedition to the legendary Mandinka/Mandingo city of Musadu. Born to free Black parents in Baltimore, Benjamin Joseph Knight Anderson (1835-1910) emigrated with his mother to Liberia in 1851, arriving at the age of 17. Once in Monrovia,he enrolled at the Methodist Episcopal Seminary (later named the College of West Africa), enlisted in the Militia of the Republic after graduation, and eventually began a distinguished career in Liberian politics, government, and higher education as a professor of mathematics. In 1868, Anderson led the first Western expedition to the city of Musadu, a storied inland West African capital of commerce and Islamic culture that the Liberian government and other colonial powers had long been interested in establishing ties with. Anderson's report of the journey and meeting with the leaders of Musadu were published in 1870 but came under attack by some non-Liberian writers as a possible fraud. The Liberian government sent Anderson to Musadu a second time in 1874. As the American anthropologlist Frederick Starr notes in his introduction to the present pamphlet, the report of this second journey had been "as good as unpublished" by its being circulated only in the limited distribution of Liberia's The Observer newspaper in the 1870s.A brief but important account by one of the first people of West African descent or nationality to document the West African interior.
TRUCOS FAMOSOS : MAGIA PRESTIDIGITACION E ILUSIONISMO No. 11 : MODERNO LIBRO CATALOGO

TRUCOS FAMOSOS : MAGIA PRESTIDIGITACION E ILUSIONISMO No. 11 : MODERNO LIBRO CATALOGO

Palacio de la Magia Moderna / Estudio de Magia Moderna] [2],165,[1] pp. containing numerous in-text illustrations. In Spanish. Original pictorial wrappers. Advertising card of Alex-Mir, with printed "magical device for making coins" on one side, and folded price list of card tricks and games sold by Alex-Mir (printed both sides) laid in. Wrappers worn at yapped edges of wrappers and mildly foxed, toned throughout. Overall very good. Rare Argentinian magic journal and catalog of "famous tricks." The work is numbered 11 of a series that evidently began in June 1944 as "MAGIA : Revista de Prestidigitacion e Ilusionismo." Both titles were published by Jacques Mayer's Palacio de la Magia Moderna, located at 450 Brasil Street in Buenos Aires. The present volume describes the Palacio as "the only house in South America dedicated exclusively to the importation and manufacture of magical apparatus," and includes prints a certification of approval by the Circulo Magico Argentino and an imprimatur, with a paper stamp bearing an image of the Great Sphinx, of the magician Alex Mir. Mir's Estudio de Magia Moderna appears to have taken over publication of the catalog, pasting its name and address at 746 Rivadavia over the several occurences of the old Palacio address, twice noting that it can no longer be reponsible to orders placed to the former address. While most of the volume is dedicated to its catalog of instructions and apparatus for tricks and illusions, it begins with detailed descriptions and explanations of mentalist effects and grand stage illusions, including "The Horse That Disappears in Full Light and Sight of the Public" and "The Famous Indian Rope Trick." OCLC records no copies of this title or that of its predecessor.
THE ACTIVITIES OF THE HAGANA

THE ACTIVITIES OF THE HAGANA, IRGUN AND STERN BANDS AS RECORDED IN BRITISH COMMAND PAPER No. 6873

Tannous, Izzat (foreword) 16 pp., containing several in-text photographic illustrations. Original blue printed wrappers, saddle-stapled. Ink-stamped date of "JAN 26 1961" on front wrapper. Wrappers moderately scuffed and worn. Very good. First edition of the New York Palestine Arab Refugee Office's republication of the 1946 British Command Paper, STATEMENT OF INFORMATION RELATING TO ACTS OF VIOLENCE, detailing the composition and violent activities of Jewish paramilitary groups operating in Palestine at the time, including those of the Haganah (which would later form the core of the Israeli Defense Forces) and the extremist militias, the Irgun and Stern Group (Lehi). The latter two groups would conduct the Deir Yassin massacre of Arab civilians in April 1948, which played a major role in precipitating the exodus of 700,000 native Palestinians that year. The massacre is mentioned in Izzat Tannous's foreword, which provides a Palestinian perspective on Zionism, the British Mandate, and the establishment of the Israeli state. Tannous (1896-1972), was a Christian Palestinian physician, who had been a leading advocate for Palestinian Arab rights since the mid-1930s. After partition and the declaration of the establishment of the state of Israel, Tannous established the Arab Palestine Office in Beirut in 1949 and the Palestine Arab Refugee Office in 1954. In 1964, he helped found the Palestine Liberation Organization and served as the head of its New York office until 1968.
SONATA FOR ORGAN WITH STATE TRUMPETS : IN MEMORIAM WILFRID MEYNELL ZOGBAUM 1915-1965 [manuscript title]

SONATA FOR ORGAN WITH STATE TRUMPETS : IN MEMORIAM WILFRID MEYNELL ZOGBAUM 1915-1965 [manuscript title]

McLennan, John Stewart Folio (14 x 11 1/4 inches). [1],1-117 pp. Manuscript sheet music, inscribed and signed on the final page by the composer, "End | London 7 April 1968 | Tyringham-Cleveland-London 1966-1968 | John Stewart McLennan." Occasional manuscript corrections in pencil. In cardboard plastic-comb binder, manuscript paper cover label. Covers moderately worn, nearly all of binding comb perished. Contents toned, especially at edges, else fine. Overall very good. Original holograph musical score for the unpublished SONATA FOR ORGAN, by 20th-century American composer John Stewart McLennan, Jr. (1903-1996). McLennan was the son of the Canadian senator of the same name (1853-1939) and the American writer Grace Seeley Henop Tytus McLennan (1875-1928). He was born in Tyringham, Massachusetts, at Ashintully, his maternal family's estate. He acquired that property in 1937 and lived there for the remainder of his life. After the estate's Georgian-style mansion was destroyed by fire in 1952, McLennan moved into the farmhouse, converted the nearby barn into a music studio, and began designing the vast and elegant gardens for which the property is best known today. Ashintully Gardens has been given in multiple stages to the Trustees of Reservations land trust by McLennan and his wife Katharine since 1977. McLennan studied piano and composition at the Peabody Conservatory and, over the course of his long career, composed chamber and orchestral music, pieces for the piano and organ, songs, and choral works. He received the American Academy of Arts and Letters music award in 1985. The present piece was dedicated to American painter and sculptor Wilfred Zogbaum (1915-1965), to whom he had also dedicated his 1980 TRIPTYCH FOR ORGAN.
DÉCRET DE LA CONVENTION NATIONALE

DÉCRET DE LA CONVENTION NATIONALE, DU 18e. JOUR DE PLUVIÔSE, AN SECOND DE LA RÉPUBLIQUE FRANÇAISE, UNE & INDIVISIBLE. QUI NOMME LES MEMBRES DE LA COMMISSION TEMPORAIRE DES ARTS, & DESIGNE LES INVENTAIRES DONT ILS SERONT RESPECTIVEMENT CHARGÉS

French Collections] Small quarto. Bifolium, 4 pp. 3/4-inch of loss at upper corner (with no loss to text). Soft early horizontal fold. Very minor foxing. Very good. The 1794 French Revolutionary decree transferring the former royal collections of scientific, technological, and artistic objects to newly designated state inventories, naming the commissioners of each to form the new "commission temporaire des Arts." Forty-three commissioners and twelve categories of objects are named, offering an informative view of cultural authority and material taxonomy at the height of the Revolution. Almost immediately upon the overthrow of the French monarchy in 1792, members of the National Convention embarked upon the urgent and staggering task of protecting the massive royal collections and reorganizing them according to Republican and Enlightenment ideals. Within months, the famous Jardin du Roi and Cabinet d’Histoire Naturelle were newly established as the Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, and on August 10, 1793, the anniversary of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette’s imprisonment, the Louvre palace opened for the first time as a public museum. The following February (Pluviôse II), the National Convention decreed in this document that a temporary commission of arts be established to "inventory and reunite in suitable depositories the books, instruments, machines and other objects of science and arts proper to the public instruction" and assigned forty-three leading scientists, engineers, artists, and craftsmen to the task. Among the commissioners inventorying the collections of natural history, botany, zoology, and mineralogy are the great naturalist Jean-Baptiste Lamarck and the veteran gardener of the Jardin du Roi, André Thouin. Other particularly notable names listed include the anatomist Honoré Fragonard, the famous watchmaker Antide Janvier (assigned to "instruments of physics, astronomy, and others"), the important Parisian printer Barrois, and the painter and landscape architect Hubert Robert (here, simply "Hubert"), who had narrowly escaped the guillotine a few months earlier. Additional categories of objects to be inventoried include maps, paintings, and sculptures, machines of war, antiquities and medals, maps, chemical laboratories, musical instruments "ancient, foreign, or the most rare in their perfection among the known and modern," and various others. The present copy of the decree is a departmental printing, containing a printed acknowledgment of the decree by the authorities of the department of Loiret in its capital, Orléans, signed 25 days after the decree was issued, on 13 Ventôse of the second year of the Republic (March 3, 1794).OCLC lists three copies. Scarce.
CHINESE COLLECTION

CHINESE COLLECTION, HYDE PARK CORNER [caption title]

Dunn, Nathan] Broadside, approximately 7 x 5 1/8 inches. On yellow paper. Wrinkling throughout, adhesive stains on four corners of verso. Surprisingly fresh for its fragile paper and use. Very good. Rare broadside advertising the Chinese Collection of Nathan Dunn at Hyde Park, evidently printed in the summer of 1844, shortly before Dunn's death.Nathan Dunn (1783-1844) was a well-respected Quaker merchant and philanthropist who had spent a decade trading in Ghanzhou/Canton, China, and opened the massive collection of Chinese art and cultural artifacts he had built there to the Philadelphia public in 1838. In November 1841, Dunn was tried on charges for solicitation of "an unnatural crime" in one of the first sodomy cases recorded in the U.S. He was acquitted, and his accusers were arrested for extortion and perjury, but the trial likely precipitated, or at least hastened, Dunn's move to London the following year. London offered both a fresh start for Dunn's personal life and business and as an important new audience for his museum's dual mission of communicating the richness of Chinese culture and the evils of the British opium trade. The collection was moved into a new, pagoda-like building at Hyde Park Corner and opened in June 1842, two months before the Treaty of Nanking would end the First Opium War and establish Hong Kong as a British colony. Dunn's museum supplied the curious London public its first serious view of Chinese material culture and enjoyed, as the present broadside advertises, "the flattering approval of all classes," including the royal family (Queen Victoria was its first official visitor). After Dunn's death in September 1844, the museum gradually wound down its operations in London, left the Hyde Park pagoda, toured the provinces, and returned briefly to London during the Great Exhibition of 1851 before finally being dispersed at auction. London newspaper advertisments most closely resembling the language of the broadside date to July 6 and 7, 1844, when the museum was actively promoting "several Chinese Figures, illustrative of Chinese Punishments," "two porcelain pagodas from Nankin, of immense size and value," figures of a "War God" and the goddess "Chin-Te," and an "Air Vessel, or Floating Saddle of a Chinese 'Water Brave' with all his Warlike Accoutrements - the only specimen in England," as well as the life-size diorama groups Dunn had exhibited since the collection first opened in Philadelphia, "representing the various grades of society, dressed in the peculiar Costumes of the Celestial Empire."
HOGYAN KELL OLVASNI

HOGYAN KELL OLVASNI, SZAVALNI, CIKKET IRNI, BESZÉDET TARTANI, VITÁT LERENDEZNI, GYÜLÉST VEZETNI

Geréb, József 6 1/2 inches. 63,[1] pp. In Hungarian. Original printed wrappers, saddle-stapled. Contemporary typescript note tipped in providing English explanation of contents. Later inscriptions in Agnes Inglis's hand in front wrapper verso and p. [1] noting pamphlet as gift from the author to the Labadie Collection (see below); small rectangle in red pencil on front cover. Toning from note on p. [1], light soiling to wrappers. Very good. A worker's and labor organizer's manual in Hungarian, published in Cleveland, where the largest Hungarian population outside Hungary has long resided. Inscriptions and a folded typescript note tipped in at the front show this copy of the manual to have been a gift to the Labadie Collection, a major collection at the University of Michigan built principally by the Detroit-based anarchists Joseph Labadie (1850-1933) and Anna Inglis (1870-1952). The note translates the title as, "HOW TO | Read | Recite | Write articles | Make speeches | Organize debates | Conduct meetings," and describes it as a separate printing of the appendix of the 1921 work, FORRADALMÁROK KÖNYVE ("The Book of the Revolutionist"), designated as "an official textbook on revolutionary industrial unionism."Rare. OCLC records no copies.Contemporary typescript note tipped in providing publishing history: "This booklet is a reprint [of the appendix] from the book, 'Forradalmárok Könyve' (The Book of the Revolutionist) by Joseph Gereb, Published by the Central Committee of the Hungarian Section of the I.W.W., Chicago, Ill. May, 1921. / The 'Forradalmárok Könyve' was designated as 'an official textbook on revolutionary industrial unionism.'" Manuscript ownership inscription in Inglis's hand inside upper wrapper and at head of p. [1]: "Labadie Collection G[if]t. Joseph H. Gereb. March 10, 1944." Appears to be unrecorded in OCLC as of February, 2017; not in the NUC; not in MILES.
PHILIPPE FRANCOIS BELLANGER DIT L'AVEUGLE DU BONHEUR

PHILIPPE FRANCOIS BELLANGER DIT L’AVEUGLE DU BONHEUR, AGE DE 55 ANS NATIF DE PARIS [caption title]

Bellanger, Philippe-François] Engraving, 9 x 7 1/8 inches (plate area). In French. Faint early folds, very faint foxing in lower margin. Near fine. Portrait engraving of Philippe-François Bellanger, the "Lucky Blind Man," "drawn from life at the Conciergerie on the day of his ordeal." Bellanger (ca. 1740-1805) was a Parisian pyrothechnician who lost his sight detonating fireworks. He moved to the Quinze-Vingts hospital for the blind and soon became widely known as a bird trainer and vendor of French National Lottery tickets. At Quinze-Vingts, Bellanger became deeply attached to a young widow named Fanchette whom he had hired to care for him. When Fanchette began receiving marriage proposals from a young curiosities seller named Pinson, Bellanger became enraged at both the couple and Pinson's blind aunt, who supported their engagement, and he began plotting their murder. On February 25, 1805, Bellanger visited Fanchette and Pinson's aunt in the latter's room and sent Fanchette to buy brandy. While she was gone, he placed a log he had secretly brought with him in the blind woman's stove and excused himself upon Fanchette's return. When Pinson arrived 15 minutes later, the room had begun to fill with a dark smoke, and the three noticed the log, removed it from the stove, and discovered that it had been hollowed out and filled with filled with gunpowder, a fireworks component, three bullets, iron nuts, and a Quinze-Vingts uniform button.The log and various exclamations Bellanger had made in the weeks leading up to the events provided more than enough evidence to convict him of attempted murder, and he was sentenced to death by guillotine at the Conciergerie on June 28, 1805. Bellanger's portrait was drawn on this date, and versions of the present engraving based on it were quickly distributed throughout France and beyond. The engraving features the central portrait of Bellanger surrounded by six illustrations, including four scenes from his life (among which are the moment he lost his sight and his fashioning of the explosive log device), and explanations below. This example of the engraving contains a plate number, "No. VI," indicating that it was most likely removed from the 1805 fifteenth volume of the German periodical LONDON UND PARIS, the only other appearance of the print bearing that number that we have located.