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W. C. Baker Rare Books & Ephemera

RUBYIAT OF ABU-TAYB-AL-MUTANABI

RUBYIAT OF ABU-TAYB-AL-MUTANABI

Al-Mutanabbi; Amin Beder 79 pp., including in-text photographic portrait of the translator. Publisher's black cloth, stamped in gold. Front free endpaper signed and inscribed by the translator: "Presented To. Lt. Selwa Keamy A.N.N.756481 255 General Hospital A.P.O. 772 c/o Postmaster New York from Amin Beder 12-31-45." Half-inch chip at tail of spine, text block and spine split one inch at tail between pp. 78 and 79, else very good. The first translation into English of the Rubaiyat of the great Arabic-language poet Abu al-Tayyib al-Mutanabbi, with a preface, biography of al-Mutanabbi, and original poems by the translator. Al-Mutanabbi (ca. 915-965) is one of the Arab world's most lauded and influential poets and the namesake of the famous Mutanabbi Street in Baghdad, long the center of bookselling and literary and intellectual life in that city. The translator, Amin Georges Beder (1876-1955), was born in present-day Lebanon and emigrated to New York at the age of 14. Arriving in the U.S. with little English, he studied vigorously and went on to attend St. Lawrence University in Canton, New York, where he graduated in 1899 as class valedictorian with a degree in English. He subsequently founded Amin Beder & Co., a business trading in "Oriental goods" that became a highly successful international firm, eventually specializing in fine women’s clothes and moving with him to Florida in 1929. Beder remained active in Arab culture, Middle Eastern affairs, and the Lebanese diaspora community throughout his life, as is evident in the production of the present book, its preface pointing to American interests in the Arabian peninsula, and its inscription to a Lebanese-American serviceman in a New York hospital on the last day of 1945. Beder's biographical sketch of Al-Mutanabbi traces his colorful life, examines his poetry, and describes him as the "progenitor of Omar Khayyam," who then, as now, was much better known to Western readers. The book concludes with several poems of Beder’s own, including a eulogy to Kahlil Gibran, a 1944 war lament, and a final "Longing for Schweir," his home town.
SIAMESE TWINS THE UNITED BROTHERS

SIAMESE TWINS THE UNITED BROTHERS, CHANG-ENG, VERY RESPECTFULLY ACQUAINT THE LADIES AND GENTLEMEN OF [blank] THAT THEY WILL BE IN THAT PLACE ON [blank] AND WILL RECEIVE VISITORS [caption title]

Bunker, Chang and Eng] [ca. 1839]. Broadside, 12 1/2 x 7 1/2 inches. Woodcut illustration in upper portion, text surrounded by ornamental border. Light, even tanning, a bit lighter at the edges where covered by an earlier frame. Very good. Early and scarce promotional broadside for Chang and Eng, the original "Siamese Twins," featuring a handsome woodcut portrait of the pair in dress and scenery evoking their native home.Chang and Eng were born in Siam (present-day Thailand) in 1811, joined at the sternum. They were "discovered" at a young age by a British merchant who spotted them swimming and, after several years, convinced their mother to allow him to hire them for a five-year tour overseas. The brothers left with the merchant and an American sea captain in 1829, never to see Siam or their mother again.Arriving in the U.S. at the age of 17, Chang and Eng entered into a life-long career of exhibition and performance. Developing stage routines involving song, dance, and acrobatics, the brothers toured in the U.S. with a 1860 residency at P. T. Barnum s American Museum and abroad for decades, becoming an international cultural phenomenon. After considerable early financial success, the pair bought a large property in North Carolina, adopted the surname, "Bunker," married a pair of sisters, and, between the four of them, raised 21 children.The broadside includes an early Victorian appeal to"ladies and gentlemen," as the promoters of the Siamese Twins were eager to assure visitors especially women that their sensibilities would not be shocked by viewing the pair. The illustration of the twins thus serves a double purpose both piquing the curiosity of potential viewers and assuring them of the propriety of the event. It is advertised that "Pamphlets containing an historical account of the twins" would be available for sale at the show, as well as engraved and lithographic likenesses. Admission was fifty cents, and there was "no re-admission to the room." The itemwas likely printed toward the end of the twins 1829-1839 first major set of tours and features one of their last depictions in exotic costume. As the American Antiquarian Society catalog notes, the printer, J. M. Elliott, is listed in New York directories at the address contained in the broadside from 1838 to 1845 and issued lithographs of the twins in 1837 and 1839.
Portrait Photograph of Gerard Malanga with His Father

Portrait Photograph of Gerard Malanga with His Father, Gerardo Malanga]

Malanga, Gerard [1972, printed later]. Image size 10 x 6 3/4 inches, sheet size 14 x 11 inches, mat size 16 x 12 inches. Numbered 1/10 and signed in pencil on the mat by Gerard Malanga. Loosely mounted on new archival back,new archival matting between original mat and print, and clear polyester protective cover. Very minor wear. Near fine. Self-portrait in a mirror of Gerard Malanga with his father, Gerardo Malanga, in Holly Hill, Florida. Poet, photographer, and archivist Gerard Malanga (born 1943) was Warhol's right-hand man during the most important years of the Factory, where he worked from 1963 to 1970. Among his many collaborations with Warhol was the 1966/67 "Screen Tests" project. The project resulted in the 1967 book, SCREEN TESTS / A DIARY, which prints stills from film portraits of 54 poets, artists, musicians, and others, with poems by Malanga on facing pages. Malanga began pursuing portrait photography more actively in 1969 and left the Factory in 1970 to pursue the work further. Over the next several years, Malanga photographed dozens of people, famous and not famous, associated with the New York avant garde and produced a body of portraits noted for their warmth and a clear rapport between photographer and subject. In an essay published in the 2000 retrospective book, GERARD MALANGA : SCREEN TESTS, PORTRAITS, AND NUDES, Ben Maddow writes, "One feels, in spite of one's hard earned skepticism . on first viewing the labors of Gerard Malanga, a sensation of spontaneous pleasure. Each image is an act of friendship, and conciously so." He quotes Malanga from a letter, "Nothing is faked or was done for any other purpose than as archival remembrance. I believe each person, as it were, gave me their picture" (p. 120).
Portrait Photograph of Edwin Denby]

Portrait Photograph of Edwin Denby]

Malanga, Gerard [1970, printed later]. Image size 10 x 6 3/4 inches, sheet size 14 x 11 inches, mat size 16 x 12 inches. Numbered 1/10 and signed in pencil on the mat by Gerard Malanga. Loosely mounted on new archival back,new archival matting between original mat and print, and clear polyester protective cover. Small dents and minor crackling in print, 2 1/2-inch crease and light toning in mat. Very good. Portrait of writer Edwin Denby (1903-1983).Poet, photographer, and archivist Gerard Malanga (born 1943) was Warhol's right-hand man during the most important years of the Factory, where he worked from 1963 to 1970. Among his many collaborations with Warhol was the 1966/67 "Screen Tests" project. The project resulted in the 1967 book, SCREEN TESTS / A DIARY, which prints stills from film portraits of 54 poets, artists, musicians, and others, with poems by Malanga on facing pages. Malanga began pursuing portrait photography more actively in 1969 and left the Factory in 1970 to pursue the work further. Over the next several years, Malanga photographed dozens of people, famous and not famous, associated with the New York avant garde and produced a body of portraits noted for their warmth and a clear rapport between photographer and subject. In an essay published in the 2000 retrospective book, GERARD MALANGA : SCREEN TESTS, PORTRAITS, AND NUDES, Ben Maddow writes, "One feels, in spite of one's hard earned skepticism . on first viewing the labors of Gerard Malanga, a sensation of spontaneous pleasure. Each image is an act of friendship, and conciously so." He quotes Malanga from a letter, "Nothing is faked or was done for any other purpose than as archival remembrance. I believe each person, as it were, gave me their picture" (p. 120).
PASSAGE PANOPTIKUM | ILLUSTRIERTER KATALOG [cover title]

PASSAGE PANOPTIKUM | ILLUSTRIERTER KATALOG [cover title]

Wax Museums] 30,[2] pp., containing 10 full-page photographic illustrations and 5 full-page advertisements. Illustrated wrappers, saddle-stapled. Contemporary pencil marks beside most listed items. On brittle paper, toned; wrappers lightly worn. Very good. Unusual catalog of the Passage Panoptikum (founded 1889), which was, along with Castan's Panoptikum, one of Berlin's two waxworks museums, or "panopticons," of the Wilhelmine period. The German panopticon was a kind of inverse of Jermey Bentham's concept of the same name: instead of Bentham's architectural "all-seeing" eye trained on prisoners, the German idea applied to visitors "seeing all" of the world in a single place. Panopticons were populated chiefly by historical, mythological, and allegorical figures, anatomical specimens and human anomalies, and exotic peoples and beasts molded in wax and often set among lifelike dioramas - sometimes along with paintings, sculptures, and curiosities. The Passage-Panoptikum guide here lists 152 exhibits in rooms including a "Hall of Princes," "Academy of Celebrities," "Fairy Tale Hall," and "Rarities Hall," the last containing such exhibits as Noah's Ark, a taxidermied native Brazilian, a "laughter cabinet," and the Frog King surrounded by his favorite wives. The ten photographic illustrations all show dioramas with human (or half-human) characters, from the 1910 Johnson-Jeffries fight (showing the former victoriously knocking the latter through the ropes) to a mermaid's seduction of a deep sea diver. Five full-page advertisements at the end of the catalog promote additional features of the institution, including cabarets, an anatomical museum ("the only one allowed in Prussia"), and an "Abnormalities Hall" that has shown various live acts including the "Lion Man," the conjoined Blazek sisters (during sister Rosa's pregnancy), and the "Blue Men," among others. OCLC records a small handful of 19th-century catalogs of the Passage Panoptikum, but none from the 20th century. Rare.
HOGYAN KELL OLVASNI

HOGYAN KELL OLVASNI, SZAVALNI, CIKKET IRNI, BESZÉDET TARTANI, VITÁT LERENDEZNI, GYÜLÉST VEZETNI

Geréb, József 6 1/2 inches. 63,[1] pp. In Hungarian. Original printed wrappers, saddle-stapled. Contemporary typescript note tipped in providing English explanation of contents. Later inscriptions in Agnes Inglis's hand in front wrapper verso and p. [1] noting pamphlet as gift from the author to the Labadie Collection (see below); small rectangle in red pencil on front cover. Toning from note on p. [1], light soiling to wrappers. Very good. A worker's and labor organizer's manual in Hungarian, published in Cleveland, where the largest Hungarian population outside Hungary has long resided. Inscriptions and a folded typescript note tipped in at the front show this copy of the manual to have been a gift to the Labadie Collection, a major collection at the University of Michigan built principally by the Detroit-based anarchists Joseph Labadie (1850-1933) and Anna Inglis (1870-1952). The note translates the title as, "HOW TO | Read | Recite | Write articles | Make speeches | Organize debates | Conduct meetings," and describes it as a separate printing of the appendix of the 1921 work, FORRADALMÁROK KÖNYVE ("The Book of the Revolutionist"), designated as "an official textbook on revolutionary industrial unionism."Rare. OCLC records no copies.Contemporary typescript note tipped in providing publishing history: "This booklet is a reprint [of the appendix] from the book, 'Forradalmárok Könyve' (The Book of the Revolutionist) by Joseph Gereb, Published by the Central Committee of the Hungarian Section of the I.W.W., Chicago, Ill. May, 1921. / The 'Forradalmárok Könyve' was designated as 'an official textbook on revolutionary industrial unionism.'" Manuscript ownership inscription in Inglis's hand inside upper wrapper and at head of p. [1]: "Labadie Collection G[if]t. Joseph H. Gereb. March 10, 1944." Appears to be unrecorded in OCLC as of February, 2017; not in the NUC; not in MILES.
TECHNOKRÁCIA VAGY IPARI UNIONIZMUS

TECHNOKRÁCIA VAGY IPARI UNIONIZMUS

Wiener, Andor 16 pp. Pictorial wrappers, saddle-stapled. Later inscriptions in Agnes Inglis's hand (see below) on p. [1] noting pamphlet as gift from John Zara to the Labadie Collection. Lower-outer corner bumped, wrappers lightly worn. Very good. A talk, "Technocracy or Industrial Unionism," delivered on Cleveland's West Side for the local Hungarian arm of the I.W.W. by one of its members. The author, Andor Wiener (printed in the pamphlet in the Hungarian style, with surname first), presents the new Technocracy movement of Howard Scott et al., which advocated the replacement of price system-based forms of economy and government with industrial systems designed and maintained by scientists and engineers. Wiener supports the general theories of the Technocrats and belief that their proposed system could successfully replace capitalism in the industrial world but argues that the ideas will remain merely academic if they infused with Marxist theory and fought for by revolutionary workers. Cleveland hosted the largest Hungarian population outside Hungary (some claimed outside Budapest alone) for the greater part of the 20th century, and this pamphlet was intended to be distributed from Cleveland to the larger Hungarian diaspora in the U.S. An inscriptions shows it to have been a gift to the Labadie Collection, a major collection at the University of Michigan built principally by the Detroit-based anarchists Joseph Labadie (1850-1933) and Anna Inglis (1870-1952).The cover shows workers and businessmen fleeing from a factory being overtaken by a giant robot. OCLC records five copies.
PHILIPPE FRANCOIS BELLANGER DIT L'AVEUGLE DU BONHEUR

PHILIPPE FRANCOIS BELLANGER DIT L’AVEUGLE DU BONHEUR, AGE DE 55 ANS NATIF DE PARIS [caption title]

Bellanger, Philippe-François] Engraving, 9 x 7 1/8 inches (plate area). In French. Faint early folds, very faint foxing in lower margin. Near fine. Portrait engraving of Philippe-François Bellanger, the "Lucky Blind Man," "drawn from life at the Conciergerie on the day of his ordeal." Bellanger (ca. 1740-1805) was a Parisian pyrothechnician who lost his sight detonating fireworks. He moved to the Quinze-Vingts hospital for the blind and soon became widely known as a bird trainer and vendor of French National Lottery tickets. At Quinze-Vingts, Bellanger became deeply attached to a young widow named Fanchette whom he had hired to care for him. When Fanchette began receiving marriage proposals from a young curiosities seller named Pinson, Bellanger became enraged at both the couple and Pinson's blind aunt, who supported their engagement, and he began plotting their murder. On February 25, 1805, Bellanger visited Fanchette and Pinson's aunt in the latter's room and sent Fanchette to buy brandy. While she was gone, he placed a log he had secretly brought with him in the blind woman's stove and excused himself upon Fanchette's return. When Pinson arrived 15 minutes later, the room had begun to fill with a dark smoke, and the three noticed the log, removed it from the stove, and discovered that it had been hollowed out and filled with filled with gunpowder, a fireworks component, three bullets, iron nuts, and a Quinze-Vingts uniform button.The log and various exclamations Bellanger had made in the weeks leading up to the events provided more than enough evidence to convict him of attempted murder, and he was sentenced to death by guillotine at the Conciergerie on June 28, 1805. Bellanger's portrait was drawn on this date, and versions of the present engraving based on it were quickly distributed throughout France and beyond. The engraving features the central portrait of Bellanger surrounded by six illustrations, including four scenes from his life (among which are the moment he lost his sight and his fashioning of the explosive log device), and explanations below. This example of the engraving contains a plate number, "No. VI," indicating that it was most likely removed from the 1805 fifteenth volume of the German periodical LONDON UND PARIS, the only other appearance of the print bearing that number that we have located.
SONATA FOR ORGAN WITH STATE TRUMPETS : IN MEMORIAM WILFRID MEYNELL ZOGBAUM 1915-1965 [manuscript title]

SONATA FOR ORGAN WITH STATE TRUMPETS : IN MEMORIAM WILFRID MEYNELL ZOGBAUM 1915-1965 [manuscript title]

McLennan, John Stewart Folio (14 x 11 1/4 inches). [1],1-117 pp. Manuscript sheet music, inscribed and signed on the final page by the composer, "End | London 7 April 1968 | Tyringham-Cleveland-London 1966-1968 | John Stewart McLennan." Occasional manuscript corrections in pencil. In cardboard plastic-comb binder, manuscript paper cover label. Covers moderately worn, nearly all of binding comb perished. Contents toned, especially at edges, else fine. Overall very good. Original holograph musical score for the unpublished SONATA FOR ORGAN, by 20th-century American composer John Stewart McLennan, Jr. (1903-1996). McLennan was the son of the Canadian senator of the same name (1853-1939) and the American writer Grace Seeley Henop Tytus McLennan (1875-1928). He was born in Tyringham, Massachusetts, at Ashintully, his maternal family's estate. He acquired that property in 1937 and lived there for the remainder of his life. After the estate's Georgian-style mansion was destroyed by fire in 1952, McLennan moved into the farmhouse, converted the nearby barn into a music studio, and began designing the vast and elegant gardens for which the property is best known today. Ashintully Gardens has been given in multiple stages to the Trustees of Reservations land trust by McLennan and his wife Katharine since 1977.McLennan studied piano and composition at the Peabody Conservatory and, over the course of his long career, composed chamber and orchestral music, pieces for the piano and organ, songs, and choral works. He received the American Academy of Arts and Letters music award in 1985. The present piece was dedicated to American painter and sculptor Wilfred Zogbaum (1915-1965), to whom he had also dedicated his 1980 TRIPTYCH FOR ORGAN.
DÉCRET DE LA CONVENTION NATIONALE

DÉCRET DE LA CONVENTION NATIONALE, DU 18e. JOUR DE PLUVIÔSE, AN SECOND DE LA RÉPUBLIQUE FRANÇAISE, UNE & INDIVISIBLE. QUI NOMME LES MEMBRES DE LA COMMISSION TEMPORAIRE DES ARTS, & DESIGNE LES INVENTAIRES DONT ILS SERONT RESPECTIVEMENT CHARGÉS

French Collections] Small quarto. Bifolium, 4 pp. 3/4-inch of loss at upper corner (with no loss to text). Soft early horizontal fold. Very minor foxing. Very good. The 1794 French Revolutionary decree transferring the former royal collections of scientific, technological, and artistic objects to newly designated state inventories, naming the commissioners of each to form the new "commission temporaire des Arts." Forty-three commissioners and twelve categories of objects are named, offering a highly informative view of cultural authority and material taxonomy at the height of the Revolution. Almost immediately upon the overthrow of the French monarchy in 1792, members of the National Convention embarked upon the urgent and staggering task of protecting the massive royal collections and reorganizing them according to Republican and Enlightenment ideals. Within months, the famous Jardin du Roi and Cabinet d’Histoire Naturelle were newly established as the Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, and on August 10, 1793, the anniversary of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette’s imprisonment, the Louvre palace opened for the first time as a public museum. The following February (Pluviôse II), the National Convention decreed in this document that a temporary commission of arts be established to "inventory and reunite in suitable depositories the books, instruments, machines and other objects of science and arts proper to the public instruction" and assigned forty-three leading scientists, engineers, artists, and craftsmen to the task. Among the commissioners inventorying the collections of natural history, botany, zoology, and mineralogy are the great naturalist Jean-Baptiste Lamarck and the veteran gardener of the Jardin du Roi, André Thouin. Other particularly notable names listed include the anatomist Honoré Fragonard, the famous watchmaker Antide Janvier (assigned to "instruments of physics, astronomy, and others"), the important Parisian printer Barrois, and the painter and landscape architect Hubert Robert (here, simply "Hubert"), who had narrowly escaped the guillotine a few months earlier. Additional categories of objects to be inventoried include maps, paintings, and sculptures, machines of war, antiquities and medals, maps, chemical laboratories, musical instruments "ancient, foreign, or the most rare in their perfection among the known and modern," and various others. The present copy of the decree is a departmental printing, containing a printed acknowledgment of the decree by the authorities of the department of Loiret in its capital, Orléans, signed 25 days after the decree was issued, on 13 Ventôse of the second year of the Republic (March 3, 1794).OCLC lists three copies. Scarce.
Portrait Photograph of Robert Creeley and His Dog

Portrait Photograph of Robert Creeley and His Dog, Spot]

Malanga, Gerard 1972. Image size 6 1/4 x 9 inches, sheet size 11x 14 inches, mat size 12 x 14 3/4 inches. Signed and dated "'72" by Gerard Malanga. Loosely mounted on new archival back with clear polyester protective cover. Light soiling and scuffing in mat. Minor soiling in margins of print. Image fine. Portrait of poet Robert White Creeley (1926-2005) with his dog, Spot, in Bolinas, California. Poet, photographer, and archivist Gerard Malanga (born 1943) was Warhol's right-hand man during the most important years of the Factory, where he worked from 1963 to 1970. Among his many collaborations with Warhol was the 1966/67 "Screen Tests" project. The project resulted in the 1967 book, SCREEN TESTS / A DIARY, which prints stills from film portraits of 54 poets, artists, musicians, and others, with poems by Malanga on facing pages. Malanga began pursuing portrait photography more actively in 1969 and left the Factory in 1970 to pursue the work further. Over the next several years, Malanga photographed dozens of people, famous and not famous, associated with the New York avant garde and produced a body of portraits noted for their warmth and a clear rapport between photographer and subject. In an essay published in the 2000 retrospective book, GERARD MALANGA : SCREEN TESTS, PORTRAITS, AND NUDES, Ben Maddow writes, "One feels, in spite of one's hard earned skepticism . on first viewing the labors of Gerard Malanga, a sensation of spontaneous pleasure. Each image is an act of friendship, and conciously so." He quotes Malanga from a letter, "Nothing is faked or was done for any other purpose than as archival remembrance. I believe each person, as it were, gave me their picture" (p. 120).
Portrait Photograph of Rene Ricard]

Portrait Photograph of Rene Ricard]

Malanga, Gerard [ca. early 1970s, printed later]. Image size 10 x 6 3/4 inches, sheet size 14 x 11 inches, mat size 16 x 12 inches. Numbered 1/10 and signed in pencil on the mat by Gerard Malanga. Loosely mounted on new archival back,new archival matting between original mat and print, and clear polyester protective cover. Light soiling and scuffing in mat. Print fine. Portrait of actor, writer, and painter Rene Ricard (1946-2014).Poet, photographer, and archivist Gerard Malanga (born 1943) was Warhol's right-hand man during the most important years of the Factory, where he worked from 1963 to 1970. Among his many collaborations with Warhol was the 1966/67 "Screen Tests" project. The project resulted in the 1967 book, SCREEN TESTS / A DIARY, which prints stills from film portraits of 54 poets, artists, musicians, and others, with poems by Malanga on facing pages. Malanga began pursuing portrait photography more actively in 1969 and left the Factory in 1970 to pursue the work further. Over the next several years, Malanga photographed dozens of people, famous and not famous, associated with the New York avant garde and produced a body of portraits noted for their warmth and a clear rapport between photographer and subject. In an essay published in the 2000 retrospective book, GERARD MALANGA : SCREEN TESTS, PORTRAITS, AND NUDES, Ben Maddow writes, "One feels, in spite of one's hard earned skepticism . on first viewing the labors of Gerard Malanga, a sensation of spontaneous pleasure. Each image is an act of friendship, and conciously so." He quotes Malanga from a letter, "Nothing is faked or was done for any other purpose than as archival remembrance. I believe each person, as it were, gave me their picture" (p. 120).
Portrait Photograph of Robert Duncan]

Portrait Photograph of Robert Duncan]

Malanga, Gerard 1972. Image size 6 1/4 x 9 inches, sheet size 11x 14 inches, mat size 12 x 14 3/4 inches. Signed and dated "'72" by Gerard Malanga. Loosely mounted on new archival back with clear polyester protective cover. Light soiling and scuffing in mat. Minor soiling in margins of print. Image near fine. Portrait of poet Robert Edward Duncan (1919-1988).Poet, photographer, and archivist Gerard Malanga (born 1943) was Warhol's right-hand man during the most important years of the Factory, where he worked from 1963 to 1970. Among his many collaborations with Warhol was the 1966/67 "Screen Tests" project. The project resulted in the 1967 book, SCREEN TESTS / A DIARY, which prints stills from film portraits of 54 poets, artists, musicians, and others, with poems by Malanga on facing pages. Malanga began pursuing portrait photography more actively in 1969 and left the Factory in 1970 to pursue the work further. Over the next several years, Malanga photographed dozens of people, famous and not famous, associated with the New York avant garde and produced a body of portraits noted for their warmth and a clear rapport between photographer and subject. In an essay published in the 2000 retrospective book, GERARD MALANGA : SCREEN TESTS, PORTRAITS, AND NUDES, Ben Maddow writes, "One feels, in spite of one's hard earned skepticism . on first viewing the labors of Gerard Malanga, a sensation of spontaneous pleasure. Each image is an act of friendship, and conciously so." He quotes Malanga from a letter, "Nothing is faked or was done for any other purpose than as archival remembrance. I believe each person, as it were, gave me their picture" (p. 120).
Portrait Photograph of Angus Maclise]

Portrait Photograph of Angus Maclise]

Malanga, Gerard [ca. early 1970s, printed later]. Image size 10 x 6 3/4 inches, sheet size 14 x 11 inches, mat size 16 x 12 inches. Numbered 1/10 and signed in pencil on the mat by Gerard Malanga. Loosely mounted on new archival back,new archival matting between original mat and print, and clear polyester protective cover. 2 1/2-inch crease and light toning in mat. Print near fine. Portrait of Angus Maclise (1938-1979), percussionist, publisher, occultist, and poet. Poet, photographer, and archivist Gerard Malanga (born 1943) was Warhol's right-hand man during the most important years of the Factory, where he worked from 1963 to 1970. Among his many collaborations with Warhol was the 1966/67 "Screen Tests" project. The project resulted in the 1967 book, SCREEN TESTS / A DIARY, which prints stills from film portraits of 54 poets, artists, musicians, and others, with poems by Malanga on facing pages. Malanga began pursuing portrait photography more actively in 1969 and left the Factory in 1970 to pursue the work further. Over the next several years, Malanga photographed dozens of people, famous and not famous, associated with the New York avant garde and produced a body of portraits noted for their warmth and a clear rapport between photographer and subject. In an essay published in the 2000 retrospective book, GERARD MALANGA : SCREEN TESTS, PORTRAITS, AND NUDES, Ben Maddow writes, "One feels, in spite of one's hard earned skepticism . on first viewing the labors of Gerard Malanga, a sensation of spontaneous pleasure. Each image is an act of friendship, and conciously so." He quotes Malanga from a letter, "Nothing is faked or was done for any other purpose than as archival remembrance. I believe each person, as it were, gave me their picture" (p. 120).
Portrait Photograph of Herbert Huncke]

Portrait Photograph of Herbert Huncke]

Malanga, Gerard [ca. early 1970s, printed later]. Image size 10 x 6 3/4 inches, sheet size 14 x 11 inches, mat size 16 x 12 inches. Numbered 1/10 and signed in pencil on the mat by Gerard Malanga. Loosely mounted on new archival back,new archival matting between original mat and print, and clear polyester protective cover. 2 1/2-inch crease and light soiling in mat. Print fine. Portrait of Herbert Edwin Huncke (1915-1996), the drifter, grifter, and writer whose use of the word, "beat," is said to have inspired Jack Kerouac's adoption of the term for the Beat Generation.Poet, photographer, and archivist Gerard Malanga (born 1943) was Warhol's right-hand man during the most important years of the Factory, where he worked from 1963 to 1970. Among his many collaborations with Warhol was the 1966/67 "Screen Tests" project. The project resulted in the 1967 book, SCREEN TESTS / A DIARY, which prints stills from film portraits of 54 poets, artists, musicians, and others, with poems by Malanga on facing pages. Malanga began pursuing portrait photography more actively in 1969 and left the Factory in 1970 to pursue the work further. Over the next several years, Malanga photographed dozens of people, famous and not famous, associated with the New York avant garde and produced a body of portraits noted for their warmth and a clear rapport between photographer and subject. In an essay published in the 2000 retrospective book, GERARD MALANGA : SCREEN TESTS, PORTRAITS, AND NUDES, Ben Maddow writes, "One feels, in spite of one's hard earned skepticism . on first viewing the labors of Gerard Malanga, a sensation of spontaneous pleasure. Each image is an act of friendship, and conciously so." He quotes Malanga from a letter, "Nothing is faked or was done for any other purpose than as archival remembrance. I believe each person, as it were, gave me their picture" (p. 120).