last 24 hours
last 7 days
last 30 days
older than 30 days

Shapero Rare Books

method-draw-image (23)

The costume of the Russian empire. Illustrated by a series of seventy-three engravings. With descriptions in English and French.

ALEXANDER, William]. 4to, [18] pp. including French and English title pages, dedications, prefaces and tables of contents, with 73 hand-coloured aquatint plates engraved by J. Dadley after Georgi, each with accompanying text in English and French. Dark green crushed morrocco, covers with borders in gilt and blind, spine richly gilt in six compartments, with broad gilt dividers morrocco lettering-piece to second, all egdes gilt. Attractive copy depicting traditional russian dress in bright original hand-colour. This title was the fourth in a series of costume books issued by William Miller, which included Turkey and China. It depicts peoples from the whole spectrum of 19th century Russian society, including peasants, gentry, merchants, magicians, priests and shamen in their traditional dress. The text was written by William Alexander after the main texts available at the time on Russia including Pallas, Chappe d'Auteroche, Krashenenikov, and Sauer. The plates are after engravings by Johann Gottlieb Georgi's Beschreibung aller Nationen des russischen Reichs (1776-80). Georgi was one of the savants drawn to Catherine the Great's Russian Enlightenment, and undertook the first scientific ethnographic study of Greater Russia under the patronage of the Empress, enquiring into cultures on the fringes including the Finns, Tatars, Samoyeds, Manchurians, Mongols and Cossacks. Abbey Travel 244; Colas 703; Lipperheide 1342.
method-draw-image (23)

Sula.

MORRISON, Toni. First edition; 8vo (22 x 15 cm); publisher's orange cloth with gilt titles to upper board and spine, with the dust jacket, not price clipped, an excellent copy. excellent copy of the first edition of the Nobel prize winning author's second novel Set in the early 1900s in a small Ohio town, the novel recounts the story of two African-American friends Sula and Nel from childhood through to adulthood. A landmark novel in terms of black feminist literature, Morrison not only addresses contemporary realities of provincial communities but affirmed her status as one of the leading American novelists of the twentieth century. Toni Morrison (1931- 2019) rose to fame with her critically acclaimed novel Song of Solomon, which was published in 1977 and won her the National Book Critics Circle Award. She received the Pullitzer prize nine years later for Beloved but it wasn't until 1993 that she was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, the first black woman to do so. An avid fan of the author, Oprah Winfrey spent ten years co-producing and eventually starring in the 1998 screen adaptation of the Beloved trilogy. She later featured Morrison's novels in her book club section of the Oprah Winfrey Show which had on average 13 million viewers and resulted in the author's book sales increasing dramatically. In her final years Morrison publicly voiced her disdain for the rise of Donald Trump who she described as 'endorsed by the Ku Klux Klan'.
method-draw-image (23)

The Bluest Eye.

MORRISON, Toni. First edition; 8vo (21.5 x 14.5 cm); publisher's quarter blue cloth, grey boards, title in silver to spine, corners very slightly bumped, with the dust jacket, price clippes, slightly sunned, two minor tears otherwise a good copy. Toni Morrison's first novel and a landmark in African-American literature 'The Bluest Eye is an inquiry into the reasons why beauty gets wasted in this country. The beauty in this case is black. Miss Morrison's prose is so precise, so faithful to speech and so charged with pain and wonder that the novel becomes poetry. I have said poetry but The Bluest Eye is also history, sociology, folklore, nightmare and music.' - John Leonard (The New York Times). Toni Morrison (1931- 2019) rose to fame with her critically acclaimed novel Song of Solomon, which was published in 1977 and won her the National Book Critics Circle Award. She received the Pullitzer prize nine years later for Beloved but it wasn't until 1993 that she was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, the first black woman to do so. An avid fan of the author, Oprah Winfrey spent ten years co-producing and eventually starring in the 1998 screen adaptation of the Beloved trilogy. She later featured Morrison's novels in her book club section of the Oprah Winfrey Show which had on average 13 million viewers and resulted in the author's book sales increasing dramatically. In her final years Morrison publicly voiced her disdain for the rise of Donald Trump who she described as 'endorsed by the Ku Klux Klan'.
Pride and Prejudice: A novel.

Pride and Prejudice: A novel.

AUSTEN, Jane]. First Bentley edition, the fourth published edition; small 8vo; engraved frontispiece, engraved half-title with vignette, peripheral light spotting to edges of first two and last two leaves, otherwise near-fine; late nineteenth century full calf, double fillet panel, maroon and chestnut letting pieces to spine, other panel gilt tooled, cockerel endpapers and matching edges, 'Downs' bookplate to upper board, some wear commensurate with age, chip to upper left of spine, hinges split but strong, upper joint starting but also firm; a lovely, unrestored copy. Following the publication of the third edition in 1817, no further editions were published until 1833, when Bentley published the novels as part of his Standard Novels, of Novels by Miss Jane Austen, in five single volumes until 1879 when a sixth volume was added, 'reprinting the Memoir' of 1871; these were the first single volume editions published and this title is therefore the first Bentley edition and the fourth published edition. Austen was not yet 20 when she drafted the novel, under the title First Impressions, between October 1796 and August 1797 at Steventon. It was declined by return of post by the publisher Cadell, and subsequently underwent major revisions. The title also had to be changed to Pride & Prejudice, as the Minerva Press published a novel entitled First Impressions by Margaret Holford in 1800. Finally, in late 1812, the novel was accepted by Egerton and published in early 1813 in boards in an edition of probably 1,500 copies (Keynes). The book sold well and was obviously much talked about, not least because of the unknown identity of the author. Anne Isabella Milbanke (the future Lady Byron) called it 'a very superior work' and 'the most probable fiction I have ever read'. Madame de Staël borrowed a copy during her stay in London in 1813. The dramatist Richard Sheridan described it as 'the cleverest thing he [had] ever read' - whereas, according to Jane's Brother Henry, an unidentified 'gentleman' supposedly remarked that '[he] should like to know who is the author, for it is much too clever to have been written by a woman'. Chapman: Jane Austen: A Critical Bibliography p5.