last 24 hours
last 7 days
last 30 days
older than 30 days

University Archives

General Washington to Jonathan Trumbull Explaining His Request for Half-Pay for Life for Revolutionary Officers. Direct from Trumbull Family.

General Washington to Jonathan Trumbull Explaining His Request for Half-Pay for Life for Revolutionary Officers. Direct from Trumbull Family.

Washington George General Washington to Jonathan Trumbull Explaining His Request for Half-Pay for Life for Revolutionary Officers. Direct from Trumbull Family.    GEORGE WASHINGTON, Letter Signed, to Jonathan Trumbull, June 11, 1783, Headquarters, New York. 1 p., 8" x 12.5". Toning and edge tears; some small paper loss affecting first line of letter.   Complete Transcript                                                                         Head Quarters, 11th June 1783 Sir             I have the Honor to enclose to your Excellency the Collection of papers which was promised in my Letter of last Week.                                                                         I have the honor to be                                                                         With great Regard & Esteem                                                                         Sir Your Excellency's / Most Obedient &                                                                         humble Servant                                                                         Go Washington His Excellency / Governor Trumbull   [Docketing on verso:] 11th June 1783 / His Excelcy General Washington with Collection of papers de half pay / recd 23rd June   Historical Background On August 26, 1776, the Continental Congress passed a resolution, the first national pension legislation, that provided half pay for officers and men disabled during their service for the United States. On May 15, 1778, another resolution provided half pay for seven years after the end of the war to all officers who remained in the service for the duration of the war. On October 21, 1780, Congress amended the resolution to offer half pay for life to officers after the war.   Early in 1782, army pay stopped because of a lack of funds, but Congress assured the army that officers and men would be paid when the war finally ended. In the spring of 1783, with rumors of a preliminary peace agreement arriving from Paris, some of the officers in the Continental Army at Newburgh called a meeting to address the situation, vaguely threatening to use force if they were not paid or if the half-pay provision was altered. On March 15, 1783, disgruntled field officers met at the camp at Newburgh to formulate an ultimatum to Congress, when General Washington suddenly appeared and asked to speak to the assembled officers. His short but passionate speech, known as the Newburgh Address, urged them to be patient and warned against civil discord. With Washington's address, the "Newburgh Conspiracy" collapsed, and the officers reaffirmed their loyalty to Congress. One week later, the alarmed Confederation Congress changed the half-pay-for-life provision to five years at full pay.   After the announcement of an end of hostilities in mid-April, much of the Continental Army was furloughed. Congress gave each soldier three months' pay, but because they had no money, financier Robert Morris issued $800,000 in personal notes to the soldiers.   On June 8, 1783, General George Washington wrote a circular to the chief executives of the American states, and through them to the American people. "The great object, for which I had the honor to hold an Appointment in the service of my Country being accomplished," he began, "I am now preparing to resign it into the hands of Congress, and to return to that domestic retirement; which it is well known I left with the greatest reluctance...." He congratulated them on the "glorious events which Heaven has been pleased to produce in our favor" and offered "my final blessing to that Country, in whose service I have spent the prime of my life, for whose sake I have consumed so many anxious days and watchful nights, and whose happiness, being extremely dear to me, will always constitute no inconsiderable part of my own." It was just one of several farewells Washington wrote, culminating in his Farewell Address of 1796, as he closed his second term as President of the United States.   In this 1783 circular, Washington warned that the next few years would decide whether the Revolution had been ultimately "a blessing or a curse, not to the present Age alone, for with our fate will the destiny of unborn Millions be involved." He felt that four things were essential to the existence and well-being of the United States: (1) an "indissoluble Union of the States"; (2) a "sacred regard to public Justice"; (3) the "adoption of a proper Peace Establishment"; and (4) a "pacific and friendly disposition among the people of the United States," willing to "make those mutual concessions which are requisite to the general prosperity" and in some cases to "sacrifice their individual advantages to the interest of the community."   Washington also discussed the debts the new nation owed to the Army: "For my own part, conscious of having acted, while a servant of the public, in the manner I conceived best suited to promote the real interests of my Country, having in consequence of my fixed belief, in some measure, pledged myself to the Army that their Country would finally do them compleat and ample Justice and not wishing to conceal any instance of my official conduct from the eyes of the World, I have thought proper to transmit to your Excellency the inclosed collection of papers relative to the half-pay & commutation granted by Congress to the Officers of the Army. From these communications my decided sentiment will be clearly comprehended, together with the conclusive reasons which induced me, at an early period, to recommend the adoption of this measure in the most earnest and serious manner." He dismissed the idea "that the half pay and Commutation are to be regarded merely in the odious Light of a pension, it ought to be exploded forever—that provision should be viewed as it really was, a reasonable compensation offerd by Congress at a Time when they had nothing else to give to the Officers of the Army for services then to be performed. It was the only means to prevent a total dereliction of the Service—it was a part of their hire, I may be allowed to say, it was the price of their blood and of your Independancy—it is therefore more than a common debt, it is a debt of honor—it can never be considered as a pension or gratuity nor be cancelled untill it is fairly discharged."   To those who objected to the distinction between officers and soldiers, Washington responded that "it is sufficient that the uniform experience of every Nation of the World combined with our own, proves the utility and propriety of the discrimination—Rewards in proportion to the Aids the Public derives from them, are unquestionably due to all its Servants—In some Lines, the Soldiers have perhaps generally had as ample a compensation for their Services, by the large bounties which have been paid them...." If states wanted to do more to reward their soldiers' service, Washington suggested "an exemption from Taxes for a limitted time."   Apparently, Washington sent out the circular letter first, and this letter accompanied the "collection of papers relative to the half-pay & commutation granted by Congress to the Officers of the Army" that Washington had promised in his circular letter.   The collection of papers included the first seven paragraphs of Washington's letter of January 29, 1778, to a Congressional committee, in which he argued that "I consider a proper and satisfactory provision for officers, in a manner, as the basis of every other regulation and arrangement necessary to be made; since without officers no army can exist, and unless some measures be devised to place those of ours in a more desireable situation, few of them would be able, if willing, to continue in it." Congress needed to reward officers who were serving their country but were financially "losers by their patriotism," and Washington concluded that "Nothing, in my opinion, would serve more powerfully to reanimate their languishing zeal, and interest them thoroughly in the service, than a half-pay establishment." The collection also included relevant acts of the Continental and Confederation Congresses; other correspondence between Washington and Congress; and a report of the Newburgh meeting of officers, including Washington's Newburgh Address.   Later in 1783, Barzillai Hudson and George Goodwin, publishers of The Connecticut Courant and Weekly Intelligencer in Hartford, published both Washington's address and the collection of papers "to give the people of America an opportunity of becoming acquainted with the state of facts, respecting the half pay and commutation, granted by Congress to the officers of the army; together with the reason, the necessity and policy which induced the measure." Hudson and Goodwin almost certainly produced the 48-page pamphlet from the enclosures sent with this letter to Governor Trumbull.   Jonathan Trumbull (1710-1785) was born in Connecticut and graduated from Harvard College in 1727. He studied theology and received an A.M. in 1730 but became a merchant with his father in 1731. He served as a delegate to the General Assembly from 1733 to 1740, and as colonel of a Connecticut regiment during the French and Indian War. Trumbull served as deputy-governor of the Colony of Connecticut from 1766 to 1769, and as Governor of the Connecticut Colony from 1769 to 1776 and Governor of the State of Connecticut from 1776 to 1784. He was the only colonial governor to join the Revolutionary cause. George Washington declared Trumbull to be "the first of the patriots."     This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.   WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE.  
G. Washington’s Troops “have crossed the Delaware” Fantastic ALS

G. Washington’s Troops “have crossed the Delaware” Fantastic ALS

Washington George G. Washington's Troops "have crossed the Delaware" Fantastic ALS   An incredible, war date, reference evocative to an to the earlier event which George Washington is more known for than anything else "…the Pennsylvania Troops have crossed the Delaware,".. This time, in a twist of war, the General worries that some of the very troops who were with him in 1776 would spread their mutinous feelings to the New Jersey Troops.   Important and rare war date Autograph Letter Signed, "Go: Washington," as Commander in Chief of the Continental Army, 1 page, 7.75" x 12.5", Ringwood, [New Jersey], January 28, 1781 "To The Officer Commanding the Jersey Troops at Pompton.-" concerning the disposition of the Pennsylvania Line which had recently mutinied and the possibility that elements of the New Jersey line had done the same, ordering the officer to protect the Continental Stores at Morristown. Docketed on verso in an unknown hand. Archivally laid in borders, mild staining to center of page. Clear, strong ink with a large, bold signature by Washington. Superb near fine condition.   On January 1, 1781, following a boisterous New Year's Day celebration, elements of the Pennsylvania Line encamped for the winter near Morristown, New Jersey, mutinied over lack of pay and disagreements over terms of enlistment. When officers led the orderly regiments of the Line to quell the disturbance, it only took a few warning shots for the rest to fall in line with the mutineers. General Anthony Wayne, commanding the Pennsylvania Line, tried to convince them to return to order peacefully to little avail, and as the soldiers marched south toward Philadelphia to air their grievances with the Pennsylvania assembly, he followed them while dispatching letters to Washington and the government in Pennsylvania. The central disagreement lay in the interpretation of the term of service, which was often stated simply as: "for three years or the duration of the war," with no reference to which was to take precedence. Naturally officers assumed the soldiers were committed for the duration of the conflict, while the soldiers were of the understanding that their terms had expired at the end of three years. Additionally, men who had enlisted in 1776 and 1777 had taken $20 enlistment bounties, were disgruntled over the fact that those enlisting later were offered much larger sums.   Pennsylvania Governor Joseph Reed traveled to Princeton to meet with the mutiny's leaders on January 7 and negotiations went fairly quickly. On the same day, an agent of Sir Henry Clinton offered the men all of their back pay if they would agree to abandon the rebel cause. The leaders refused the offer and placed the agent under guard. In the end, Pennsylvania agreed to allow those who had enlisted for the $20 bounties to be discharged and reenlist at the higher rates. Between January 12 and the 29, approximately half of the regiment was discharged, while the remainder were furloughed until March 15 when they reassembled to join operations against the British in Virginia.   However, the amicable resolution to the Pennsylvania a Line mutiny also inspired members of the New Jersey line to follow suit. On January 20, about 300 members of the New Jersey Line at Pompton mutinied. This time Washington, wishing to restore structure and command, ordered General Robert Howe to lead a detachment to compel their unconditional submission, which he quickly accomplished. Howe made an example of the two sergeants who led the revolt by executing them on the spot before a firing squad.   Now that both mutinies had been quelled, Washington looked to protect the Continental Stores at Morristown that were now essentially unguarded after the Pennsylvania mutineers had marched south. He writes to the commander of the New Jersey troops who had just revolted the week before:   "If the Posts at Smiths Clove and Dobbs Ferry have been deranged by the late disorders in the Jersey line they are again to be re-established agreeably to former Orders. And as the Pennsylvania Troops have crossed the Delaware, you are, till some other arrangement is made of the Stores at Morristown to detach about 50 men properly Officered to be relieved once a fortnight to that place. The Objects of the Officer Commanding there are to cover the public Stores which are at Morris to Aid the Q[uarte]r Mast[er] at that Post in forwarding the Provisions and other Stores to their respective places of destination and, where necessary to afford escorts.– The Letters herewith inclosed you will please to forward immediately; the one for the Commissary of Prisoners requires dispatch.–"   This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.   WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!
Martin Van Buren and Andrew Jackson Signed Letter

Martin Van Buren and Andrew Jackson Signed Letter

Van Buren Martin Martin Van Buren and Andrew Jackson Signed Letter   Autograph letter signed on bi-fold stationery stock. Penned on recto of first page, and signed "M. Van Buren". 7.75" x 12.75", no date but circa 1833.  Initialed and docketed by Jackson on the reverse "A.J." In very good to fine condition, with a missing lower right corner and seal-related loss to integral address leaf.   Letter to "The President," Andrew  Jackson, initialed and docketed by Jackson on the reverse. Van  Buren's letter, in part: "My friend Mr. Hoffman will call upon you at ten in the morning to ask some assistance from you in the prosecution of Mr. Decatur's bill in the manner & for the reasons he will point out. It is to come up again on Friday & he wishes very much to be saved from the necessity of attacking the state­ment of Commodore Stewart which he thinks can & ought to be effected by the Commodore." On the reverse of the second inte­gral leaf, Jackson writes: "Major Lewis will please send this & let me see him early—Capt Stuart must be seen on tomorrow after Mr. Hoffman has the interview with me. A. J."   Before he became Jackson's vice president in 1833, Van Buren used his influence as a New York senator to architect the coalition of mid-Atlantic and Southern politicians that supported Jackson's presidential candidacy of 1828. Upon his election Jackson appointed Van Buren as his secretary of state, with the latter continuing to cement himself as the president's most loyal and trusted advisor. When Calhoun resigned from his office to fill a North Carolinian senate seat in late 1832, Jackson named Van Buren as his vice president the day after. Commodore Charles Stewart commanded a number of Naval ships during the war of 1812, including that of the USS Chesapeake and Constitution; interestingly, Stewart befriended future naval heroes Stephen Decatur and Richard Somers while attending Philadelphia's Episcopal Academy as a youth. A content-rich letter featuring the outstanding combination of two presidents.   This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.   WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!
Harry Truman Autographed Signed Letter to First Lady

Harry Truman Autographed Signed Letter to First Lady, Bess! Unique

Truman Harry Harry Truman Autographed Signed Letter to First Lady, Bess!   Harry Truman single page autograph letter signed as President, 5" x 8". Penned on lightly lined paper to First Lady Bess Truman with a note at the head (in the President's hand), and signed by Harry Truman as "Harry". Fine condition.   A scarce Harry Truman handwritten letter to his wife, First Lady Bess Truman, shown in full below:   "Weather is not so good. Have had a very pleasant and restful time. Wish you and Margie were along.   Let me know if you make the St. Louis connection. I believe you should bring your mother back to the White House. I am afraid that trip to Denver will be too hard on her.   My best to everybody. Harry"    With an autograph note by Truman to the upper margin of: "Send to White House and have them phone to Mrs. Harry Truman 219 North Delaware St. Independence, Mo."   The greatest probability is that this letter was written either c. July, 1947 or c. September, 1948 - the two dates prior to 1950 during which Bess' mother traveled to Denver to visit her son, Fred Wallace.   Handwritten letters by Truman as President are scarce. This one written to Bess is especially rare and desirable.   This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.   WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!
John M. Schofield ALS as 21-Year-Old Recent West Point Graduate!

John M. Schofield ALS as 21-Year-Old Recent West Point Graduate!

Schofield John John M. Schofield ALS as 21-year-old Recent West Point Graduate   1p ALS inscribed overall and signed by future Civil War commander John M. Schofield (1831-1906) as "John M. Schofield, Bvt. 2d Lieut., 2d Artillery, U.S. Army" at bottom right. Written in Freeport, Illinois on July 23, 1853. The blue-lined pale blue paper is in near fine condition, with expected folds. Measures 7.75" x 9.75".   Recent West Point graduate John M. Schofield wrote Colonel Samuel Cooper (1798-1876) accepting his appointment of Brevet Second Lieutenant in the Second Regiment of Artillery in the United States Army:   "Sir:   I have the honor to communicate to the War department my acceptance…   I herewith enclose my oath of allegiance.   My age is 21 years + 10 months. My residence when appointed was Freeport Stevenson Co. Ill. I was born in State of New York.   I am, Sir: Very Respectfully Your Most Obt Sevt John M. Schofield Bvt. 2d Lieut. 2d Artillery U.S. Army."   Schofield later recalled in his memoirs, Forty-Six Years in the Army (New York: The Century Co., 1897), that recent West Point graduates had a bad reputation: "An old army colonel many years ago described a West Point graduate, when he first reported for duty after graduating leave, as a very young officer with a full supply of self-esteem, a four-story leather trunk filled with good clothes, and an empty pocket. To that must be added, in my case, a debt equal to the full value of the trunk and clothes and a hundred dollars borrowed money." (16)   It had looked grim for Schofield just months earlier, when he was dismissed from West Point for misconduct. Schofield had received his West Point appointment in 1849. During his last year of study, Schofield served as an arithmetic instructor at the Academy. He was giving special attention to remedial students when other pupils misbehaved; he mysteriously described their actions as "deviltry." Schofield was reprimanded for his lack of control of the classroom and summarily expelled. Only after the intervention of Illinois Senator Stephen A. Douglas was Schofield allowed to return. Schofield eventually graduated 7th in his class in 1853.   John M. Schofield became a career soldier and forged a solid military record during the Civil War. Schofield first fought Confederate guerillas in Missouri, and then participated in eastern campaigns. While Major General, Scofield commanded the Army of the Ohio, a support army of Sherman's. Schofield's forces participated at the Battle of Franklin, the Battle of Wilmington, and the Battle of Wyse Fork among others. Later, Schofield served as the 28th U.S. Secretary of War under the Grant and Johnson administrations. Schofield's promotion to the rank of Lieutenant General in 1895 acknowledged his lifetime contribution to the U.S. Army.   This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.   WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE.
Roosevelt Signed 3x Voting Ballot

Roosevelt Signed 3x Voting Ballot, Including his Ironic ‘Nay’ Vote for the Extension of the Governor’s Term

Roosevelt Franklin   Roosevelt Signed 3x Voting Ballot, Including his Ironic 'Nay' Vote for the Extension of the Governor's Term   Just before being elected Governor of New York, Franklin D. Roosevelt completes an absentee ballot for the elections of Duchess County, New York, writing in his wife, Eleanor Roosevelt, as School Director, and voting against the extension of the governor's term   Franklin D Roosevelt, Official Absentee Voter Registration Document, completed and Signed Three Times in full signature "Franklin D. Roosevelt" along with the Completed Accompanying Ballots filled out in his hand, for the General Election of November 8, 1927 for Dutchess County, New York. The balloting document consists of three pieces as shown below:   The mailing envelope: FDR has boldly signed and dated the outside of the envelope (containing the ballot) in black ink three times. Twice to the recto, and once on the verso. Within the envelope there are two official Absentee Voter Ballots: one being "Questions Submitted County of Duchess November 8, 1927"; the other "General Officers County of Duchess Second Assembly District November 8, 1927". Post marked "October 1927, Warm Springs, GA", the location of Roosevelt's therapeutic resort. Torn open along left side, not affecting signature.   The "Questions Submitted" ballot contains nine proposed amendments, each with a "Yes" and "No" box that the voter is to cross mark accordingly (Roosevelt has marked his choices with an "X" in pencil). The proposed amendments include: Executive Budget, City Debt Limit, Grade Crossing Elimination, Salaries, Head of Executive Department, Highway in Forest Preserve, Condemnation by Counties, and Annexation of Territory by Cities. Perhaps best of all, though, is Roosevelt's ironic vote AGAINST the extension of the NY Governor's term, an office he would seek the very next year (if he hadn't been planning his campaign already). Of course, Roosevelt became the most notorious long-term occupier of office when he was elected to a record FOUR terms as President, prompting the passage of the 22nd Amendment in 1951 which limited the term of office to two. Toning to verso, with separation along top fold line.   The "General Officers" ballot contains the printed names of candidates for eight specific offices: Associate Judge Court of Appeals, Justice of the Supreme Court, Member of the Assembly, Sheriff, County Clerk, County Treasurer, Superintendent of the Poor, and Coroner. Roosevelt placed a cross mark in pencil next to his candidates - all Democrats, of course! The remainder of the ballot is reserved for Town Offices that do not contain printed names of the particular candidates, leaving the voter to complete the form with the names of the candidates and town name. Beside each of the offices, Roosevelt has written in pencil his town "Hyde Park" along with his chosen candidates. Most notable here is his choice for School Director, "Eleanor Roosevelt", written in graphite. Near fine condition.   A fascinating ensemble, giving a rare glimpse of Roosevelt's politics before he became Governor of New York.   This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.   WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!
Franklin Roosevelt Writes to Help His Mistress's Daughter

Franklin Roosevelt Writes to Help His Mistress’s Daughter, Stunning Presentation

Roosevelt Franklin Franklin Roosevelt Writes to Help His Mistress's Daughter, Stunning Presentation   Single page autograph letter signed on White House letterhead, 6.5" x 8.75". Boldly signed by Franklin D. Roosevelt as "FDR". Presented matted and framed with a color enhanced and highlighted black and white portrait of Roosevelt to a completed size of 25" x 14". Frame lightly scratched along right side, the letter is in fine condition. Accompanied by the original White House transmittal envelope addressed in Roosevelt's hand, affixed to the verso of the frame in a plastic sleeve.   A fantastic autographed letter from President Roosevelt on White House stationery to "Norman", (Norman Davis), President of the Council on Foreign Relations regarding a job for Barbara Rutherford, the daughter of Roosevelt's long-standing mistress, Lucy Mercer Rutherford. Shown in full below:   "Dear Norman, Barbara + her family think that she should rejoin them for the next few months - and I think that is best - It was good of you to give her this chance for training and she and I was very grateful - If this war does break out she will be working at it somewhere! As ever F.D.R."   Extremely rare letter by Roosevelt referencing a relationship between himself and Lucy Rutherford, even rarer still that it dates to at least the late 1930's when Roosevelt and Rutherford's relationship was supposedly dormant.   Lucy Mercer was born to wealthy parents who lost most of their fortune and separated in the years following her birth. Mercer then worked briefly in a dress store before taking a position as the social secretary of Eleanor Roosevelt, Franklin's wife, in 1914. Mercer and Franklin are believed to have begun an affair in mid-1916, when she was 25 and he was 34, and prior to his paralytic illness. The relationship was discovered by Eleanor in September 1918, when she found a packet of their letters when unpacking his luggage upon his return from an inspection trip to the war zone in Europe while Assistant Secretary of the Navy near the end of the First World War in September 1918. Though Eleanor offered Franklin a divorce and Franklin considered accepting, political, financial, and familial pressures, including his mother threatening to cut off his inheritance, caused him to remain in the marriage. Franklin terminated the affair and promised not to see Mercer again. Mercer soon married wealthy socialite Winthrop Rutherfurd, a widower then in his fifties, but despite her marriage and Franklin's promise, the two remained in surreptitious, albeit infrequent contact in the three decades that followed and in fact, she was present with Roosevelt at the time of his death.   This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.   WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!
Ronald Reagan ALS Re: Black Panthers

Ronald Reagan ALS Re: Black Panthers, MLK Assassination, Governor Recall, & 1968 Republican National Convention – Outstanding Content!

Reagan Ronald Ronald Reagan ALS Regarding Black Panthers, MLK Assassination, Governor Recall, & 1968 Republican National Convention - Outstanding Content!   1p autograph letter inscribed overall by future 40th U.S. President Ronald Reagan (1911-2004), then Governor of California, and signed by him as "Ron" at lower right. The letter is undated, but has been docketed by the recipient as "7-25-68" in the upper right hand corner. On cream stationery. The recipient's blue marker slash does not affect the legibility of the text. A minor closed tear located along the right edge, else near fine. 6" x 9".   This letter to an unknown friend named "Chuck" contains sensational content relating to the political and cultural climate of 1968, when Governor Reagan faced animosity from multiple fronts. In the letter, Reagan mentions that he was a target of the Black Panthers, as well as of a recall movement tasked with forcing a special election prior to the 1968 Republican National Convention.   "Dear Chuck,   You were more than kind to write as you did + both Nancy + I are grateful.   There have been some threats, and apparently I'm one the Black Panthers have named as front of the [illegible] if Huey Newton should be convicted; also in retaliation for the King murder.   The recall movement is really a political gimmich [sic] + I'm doubtful it will get anywhere at all. Some who've deflected have been quoted in the press as saying there was no real effort to bring about a recall, but merely to create an embarrassment prior to the Convention.   Again thanks + thanks so much for the letters in my behalf.   Sincerely   Ron".   The Black Panthers was a leftwing organization that had been established just a few years earlier in 1966 by cofounders Huey P. Newton (1942-1989) and Bobby Seale. Newton was an activist graduate student who wanted improved social conditions for black Americans, changes achievable through violent means if necessary. On October 28, 1967, Newton had been arrested for fatally shooting Oakland police officer John Frey, and he was later charged with voluntary manslaughter. Reagan anticipated hostility from the organization if Newton was convicted--which in fact he was--in September 1968. Newton was sentenced to a 2-15 year prison sentence but was released in 1970.   Reagan also speculated in the letter that he would be targeted "in retaliation for the King murder." Baptist minister and Civil Rights champion Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929-1968) had been slain in Memphis, Tennessee just three months earlier, on April 4, 1968.   The recall movement to replace Reagan as Governor of California was organized as early as the fall of 1967. The movement was spearhead by disaffected educators, labor organizers, and the elderly who not only wanted to remove Reagan from Sacramento but also destroy his chances of a presidential nomination. Reagan's predictions proved correct, however; he was not recalled. Reagan attended the Republican National Convention in Miami, Florida in early August 1968, finishing in third place for his party's nomination behind Richard Nixon and Nelson Rockefeller. Reagan served as Governor of California between 1967-1975.   The "threats" against Reagan eventually manifested some thirteen years later. President Reagan was wounded in an assassination attempt by John Hinckley, Jr. only a little after two months into his first presidential term, in March 1981.   This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.   WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!
Post-Armistice Maps Used By Gen

Post-Armistice Maps Used By Gen, John J. Pershing

Pershing John Post-Armistice Maps Used By Gen, John J. Pershing Historic group of maps used by A.E.F. Gen. John J. Pershing following the Nov. 11, 1918 armistice to disarm the German army and occupy the Rhineland per the terms of the Armistice. These maps originate directly from the estate of Gen. Robert C. Richardson who served on Pershing's staff, planned St. Mihiel and Meause-Argonne, and served in the occupation. Robert C. Richardson, Jr. (1882-1954) American Army General, Commanding General of he Hawaiian Department, Military Governor of Hawaii and commanded all Army personnel in the Pacific Ocean Areas and Mid-Pacific. During World War I, Richardson as Liaison Officer for G.H.Q Allied Headquarters and with American Armies, Corps, and Divisions during the combat operations of 1918. Richardson was one of the cheif planners of eht Saint-Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne offensives, reporting directly to Pershing. Included is a French map, 34" x 30", stamped "SECRET...MAP ROOM G.H.Q...", January 19, 1919, shows various sectors of the front and Coblenz and which U.S. Army Corps would occupy each section; French printed map, 31" x 35", hand-colored zones showing advances from July 18 to November 11, 1918; French map, 70" x 47", showing the zones of occupation of the allied nations; German map, 51" x 31", 3rd American Army Plan of Occupation of American Forces in Germany; French mmap, 50" x 31", shows advancing of Americans on Coblenz from November 11 to December 11, 1918; French map, 42" x 22" stamped "SECRET...MAP ROOM G.H.Q..." shows bridgehead and American sector in Coblenz; French map, 46" x 34", stamped "SECRET...MAP ROOM G.H.Q...", December 17, 1918, shows postions and areas of resistance; a similar map, December 16, 1918; a 36" x 30" map of the positions of Italian armies, a 16" x 11" hand-colored map showing advances during the 2nd Battle of eht Marne; and two impressive 35" x 43" printed maps "Order of Battle on Western Front", as of Armistice Day, 1918. All are in very good condition. Purchased years ago at a WWII auction.   This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.   WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!
Shimon Peres Thanks Philip Habib

Shimon Peres Thanks Philip Habib, Middle Eastern Envoy, for “much desired peace” – Historic!

Peres Shimon Shimon Peres Thanks Philip Habib, Middle Eastern Envoy, for "much desired peace" - Historic!   1p typed letter signed by Shimon Peres (1923-2016), then Israeli Labor Party Chairman and in between terms as Israeli Prime Minister, as "Shimon Peres" at center. Written in Tel Aviv, Israel on September 5, 1982. On white stationery with "Shimon Peres / Chairman / Israel Labour [sic] Party" letterhead. Several typographical errors have been modified with correction fluid. Expected light paper folds, else near fine. 8.375" x 10.875". Accompanied by the original transmittal envelope addressed in part to "His Excellency Mr. Philip Habib".   In August 1982, American career diplomat Philip Habib (1920-1992) had successfully negotiated the peaceful relocation of Palestinian Liberation Organization combatants and civilian refugees from southern Lebanon, thus diffusing much of the tension precipitating the 1982 Lebanon War. In June 1982, Israeli forces had invaded Lebanon, where the PLO had been launching attacks which killed civilians on both sides of the border. Israeli politician Shimon Peres wrote to Habib a month after the PLO withdrawal, in part:   "Upon the conclusion of your present mission in the Middle East, I would like to express to you my sentiments of profound appreciation.   You have come to our region in the midst of a very complex situation and you are leaving it having advanced all those involved forward on the road to the much desired peace. You have been able to accomplish this step primarily because of your wisdom, your right appreciation of the situation, your patience and unlimited capability.   You have indeed achieved a great feat on the personal level as well as for your country, for the Middle East and for peace-loving people throughout the world.   In the pages of the history of the Middle East, replete with wars, your mission will have a very important impact…"   President Reagan had called Philip Habib out of retirement in 1981 to undertake what Peres termed his "present mission…in the midst of a very complex situation." In his role as Special Ambassador of the United States, Habib had brokered a nine-month-long ceasefire, from July 1981 to June 1982, in Lebanon. He was also instrumental in coordinating the withdrawal of the PLO in Lebanon to North Africa, the Middle East, and the Mediterranean, effectively ending the Israeli siege of Beirut. Habib's efforts resulted in his 1982 nomination for the Nobel Peace Prize.   Shimon Peres would be nominated for his own Nobel Peace Prize in 1994, in acknowledgement for his work in negotiating the Oslo Accords with Yitzhak Rabin and Yasser Arafat. Peres once said in 1997, "Peace is very much like love. It is a romantic process—you have to be living it, you have to invest in it, you have to trust it. As you cannot impose love, so you cannot impose peace." A member of the Israeli Labor Party between 1968-2005, Peres served as acting Prime Minister of Israel in 1977 and 1995, and he was later elected to the office in 1984. Peres served as President of Israel between 2007-2014.   Philip Habib joined the U.S. Foreign Service in 1949, eventually serving in South Korea, South Vietnam, the Philippines, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Canada, and New Zealand. Habib's diplomatic experience in the Middle East was also considerable. As Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs, Habib had worked with Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin and Egyptian President Anwar Sadat in 1977, and his negotiations paved the way for Jimmy Carter's Camp David Accords. The New York Times eulogized Habib as "the outstanding professional diplomat of his generation in the United States."   This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.   WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!
Two scarce limited edition photos of Lee Harvey Oswald

Two scarce limited edition photos of Lee Harvey Oswald

Oswald Lee Set of scarce limited edition photos of Lee Harvey Oswald, including one showing him ominously holding a rifle Two glossy silver gelatin black and white limited edition prints of Lee Harvey Oswald (1939 - 1963) from a limited run of 50. This set is numbered 13 of 50. University Archives owns the negatives and has issued a limited print run of 50 sets; no further prints will be made. Page sizes with border is 8" x 10" each. Fine condition. Provenance: Robert Oswald. A stunning set of ironic photos showing the incredible dichotomy that was Oswald's life. The first photo, taken in 1958 by Robert Oswald, shows Lee Harvey Oswald smiling as a marine on leave from USMC, rifle in hand, standing very much alone and detached in barren surroundings. Yet also with a smile which appears almost inappropriate for the setting. The second photo, taken just a few years later, shows Oswald holding his baby, June Oswald, born in 1963. This time the photo is in front of a classic suburban home. Again smiling, the photo is reminiscent of an orchestrated image depicting Oswald as a salt-of-the-earth and loving father. Of interest is that Oswald wore a distinctive plaid shirt like this one time and time again, including while stationed in Russia after he defected. The limited edition photographic images show a happy man in two very diverse settings, but we all know how that story ended. A scarce and unusual set of limited edition photos. Perfect for a collector of Oswald or Kennedy memorabilia. The two silver gelatin 8" x 10" prints made from unique negatives purchased directly from Lee Harvey Oswald's brother, Robert, in 2015. Limited Edition of 50; no others will be printed by us. ***The last photo in the images (not present with this set) was taken while he was living in Minsk. Note the same or similar shirt. This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses. WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!
1640 New York / New Amsterdam Scarce Manuscripts Signed

1640 New York / New Amsterdam Scarce Manuscripts Signed

New York 1640 New York / New Amsterdam Manuscripts Signed   Two separate and unique manuscript documents signed, one page each, penned on recto and verso of the same leaf, 9.75" x 8.25". Dated March 22, 1640. Fort Amsterdam. Light handling marks, expected folds. Strong contrasting ink and sigantures.   Two extremely early New York documents autographed by four of the first Dutch settlers of New Netherlands. The documents, which are back to back on the same sheet of paper, are signed by "Hamanus A. Booghardii", "Wybrant Pietersen", "Ulrich Lupoltt" (two times) and "Cornelis van Tienhoven" (two times). The first document is a Power of Attorney, issued in the court of Cornelius van Tienhoven. It acknowledges that Harman Mijndertsz van Bogaert (aka Herman van Bogart) appointed Care! Looten to travel to Amsterdam to collect money owed to Bogaert from the West India Company. Looten could withhold his expenses. The document is written in Dutch, and translates as: "Before me, Cornelis van Tienhoven, secretary of New Netherland, in the presence of the undersigned witnesses, appeared Harman Myndertsen van de Bogaert, surgeon, who appoints and empowers, as he does hereby, Mr. Care! Looten, 337 merchant residing in the city of Amsterdam, to collect in his, the principal's, name from the honorable directors of the West India Company chamber of Amsterdam, all such wages and board money as the principal has earned from the 21st of March 1630, when he sailed from the Texel on the ship De Eendracht, Jan Brouwer, skipper, arriving on the 24th of May following here in New Netherland, to the first of February Ao . 1633, as appears by the Book of Monthly Wages, which was sent over and which shows a debit account only without any credit for wages or board money; the principal holding valid whatever shall be transacted herein by the above named Carel Looten, who is empowered to give receipt and to act further as necessity may require. Done this 22nd of March 1640, in Fort Amsterdam in New Netherland. Hamanus A. Booghardii Wybrant Pietersen Ulrich Lupoltt Acknowledged before me, Cornelis van Tienhoven, secretary".   The other side is a certification of correctness and authority granted on behalf of Governor Dr. Willem Kieft, and is signed by Lupoltt and Tienhoven. It reads "I, the undersigned, Ulrich Lupoldt, commissary of merchandise for the West India Company in New Netherland, hereby acknowledge that for the account of the aforesaid Company I have received to my full satisfaction from Wybrant Pietersen, late commissary, the sum of twelve thousand, nine hundred and forty-five guilders, three stivers, six farthings, being the [value of the] balance of merchandise delivered to me by said Wybrandt Pietersen, of which I promise to render a full and true account to the Hon. Director Willem Kiel t, or the Company's agent, except that the Company's account is to be reduced by so much as the weights and measures may be found to be less than the entries call for. Done this 27th of March Ao . 1640, in Fort Amsterdam in New Netherland Ulrich Lupoltt Acknowledged before me, Cornelis van Tienhoven, secretary". Pre-1670 American letters are exceptionally rare. Signed documents, from the future American colonies (such as New Netherlands and New Sweden), of such an early date are virtually unknown. The American Book Prices Current shows one entry for "Fort Amsterdam", and it was sold at Sotheby's in 1977. Likewise, ABPC shows a few entries for "New Amsterdam", and the earliest of those documents was 1654. These documents were signed just fifteen years after New Amsterdam was established. The ink is dark, and there are a few folds and some light staining. A true American rarity.   NEW AMSTERDAM. New Amsterdam, the forerunner of New York City, was founded in 1624 largely by the Dutch, though it was ethnically diverse (Peter Minuit was German). In May 1624, the ship Nieu Nederlandt, chartered by the West India Company, arrived near Manhattan Island. The vessel had thirty families. A few families were left near New Haven, other people settled near the mouth of the Delaware River, some were left on Governor's Island, and the remaining families sailed up the Hudson River to form Fort Orange (now Albany). Later in 1624 and 1625, six additional ships left Holland with colonists, livestock and supplies.   FORT AMSTERDAM. The fort was a stockade built by the Dutch on the southern tip of Manhattan around 1625. It was likely built by slaves and it was to protect the Hudson River from British and French infiltrations.    It was torn down in 1790 after the American Revolution.   THE WEST INDIA COMPANY (WIC). In 1621, the West India Company was granted a charter for a trade monopoly in the Caribbean, and it operated between West Africa (where it engaged in the slave trade) and the Americas. The company became very important in the Dutch settlement of the Americas. The company established many trade posts and colonies in the 1620s and 1630s. In 1629, the company began selling patroonships in New Netherlands.   CORNELIUS VAN TIENHOVEN (1601-1656). Van Tienhoven was the secretary of New Netherlands from 1638 until shortly before his death, and was a very influential man. He served under both Kielt and Peter Stuyvesant. When he caused trouble in New Netherlands, the Dutch West Indies Company ordered him back to Holland. His hat and cane were found in the Hudson River, but no body was recovered; it is unknown if he was murdered or committed suicide.   HARMEN MEYNDERTSZ VAN DEN BOGAERT (1612-1647). Bogaert arrived in Manhattan in 1630, and was a respected surgeon, the commissary of stores for Fort Orange, and an explorer of the Iroquois hinterlands. He kept a valuable journal describing his travels through upstate New York. In 1634, Bogaert was named the ambassador to the Mohawks, and he attempted to restore the fur trade. In 1647, he, while in Albany, was caught with a young male slave, which was a capital offense. He fled to the Mohawks, and was cornered by the Dutch. He set fire to the Mohawk's longhouse full of supplies and was caught. He escaped jail, but fell through an icy river and drowned.   WIJBRANT PIETERSZ / VVYBRANDT PIETERSEN (1600-1655). In 1638, Pietersz was appointed to supervise the quality of tobacco being harvested in New Amsterdam.   CAREL LOOTEN. Looten was an Amsterdam financier.   GOVERNOR DR. WILLEM KIEFT (1597-1647). Willem Kieft was the fifth director of New Netherland. He took up the position in 1638 and held it until 1647.   This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.   WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!
The "Senator Ross" One of the First Armed Ships to Patrol the Mississippi

The “Senator Ross” One of the First Armed Ships to Patrol the Mississippi, Outfitting Orders

Naval History Manuscript document signed, "Isaac Craig / DQmg" [Deputy Quartermaster general], 1p, laid paper, 8" x 12.75", Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, March 30, 1799. An order to Assistant Quartermaster James G. Heron at Fort Fayette to "issue for the use for the Galley Senator Ross the following articles." The order specifies, "Fifty six pounds of Oakam / Fifty Gallons of Tar / Six Gallon of Fish Oil / Forty five pounds of Rosin / Twenty eight pounds of White lead / Twenty eight pounds Red Lead / Fourteen pounds Black paint or Oil of of Lampblack / One quart of Spirits Turpentine / One pound of Litharge / Two pounds Chalk / Two lbs Boat nails / Two lbs 10d. nails / Eleven lbs Spikes / Seventy eight lbs 21/4 inch rope / Eighty nine lb, 1 inch rope / One Camp kettle / One Scrubbing brush / two sweeping brooms". Also specified are the "American colours" which included, "One Ensign / One Jack / One Pendant." Docketed on the verso, "Sundrys for Galley / March 30th 1799 / Rec[eive]d the within / Clinton Butler." Folds lightly toned on the verso, else fine condition. Professionally encapsulated for preservation, with a brief description of the galley taped to the plastic, not on the original document. Somewhere on the banks of the Allegheny, at Pittsburgh, likely on or near Fort Fayette, two armed galleys, the President Adams and the Senator Ross, were built under the supervision of Major Isaac Craig in 1798. They were to be used on the lower Mississippi River in the event of war with France and Spain. According the Naval Historical Center website, the "Senator Ross was a galley built at Pittsburgh, Pa., in 1798 by John Taylor  to protect commerce on the Mississippi. No records of her service have been found." However, according to the Papers of the War Department, correspondence between Isaac Craig, James McHenry and Alexander Hamilton, the Senator Ross launched with pride, with Major Craig confident that the galley "will far exceed the Spanish naval capability currently on the Mississippi. He asks for instructions as soon as possible, and details plans for hiring a crew." Alexander Hamilton recommends the Senator Ross be directed to the "lower posts of the Mississippi and manned by officers and men detached from the line who have the necessary marine knowledge." Apparently, the Senator Ross was directed by Colonel John Francis Hamtramck to go to Fort Massac, to assist with the protection of the fort. Hamilton then writes to James McHenry stating that although he still believes the Senator Ross should be sent "to the lower posts on the Mississippi River, he concedes that McHenry's decision for the boat to remain at Fort Massac has merit." According to the Memorandum Book commencing May 19, 1794, in the Craig Papers (Carnegie Library, Pittsburgh) , both the John Adams and the Senator Ross were "forty-five feet in length and thirteen in beam. They had two masts and were equipped with sails and rigging brought from the East. There were thirty oars of differing lengths and the row-benches were constructed so that they could be folded away." Neville B. Craigg in, The History of Pitisburgh (Pittsburgh, 1851), states that her [ Senator Ross] armament consisted of a 24-pounder and several swivels." What became of the galley Senator Ross is worthy of additional research. This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses. WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!
Charles Lindbergh & Roy Chapman Andrews

Charles Lindbergh & Roy Chapman Andrews, From One Dare Devil to Another, Fantastic Association Signed Photo

Lindbergh Charles Charles Lindbergh & Roy Chapman Andrews, From One Adventurer to Another, Fantastic Association Signed Photo Large sepia toned matte photo of Charles Lindbergh, who signed and inscribed the photo along the lower mat "For D. Roy Chapman Andrews / from Charles A. Lindbergh / 1939". 10.25" x 12.5" (inclusive of the mat). The mat is tipped to a another board using blue tape along the top edge. Near fine with toning to the mat. Accompanied by a 4" x 2.5' sheet with Roy Chapman Andrew's signature "Roy Chapman Andrews". Signature has several locations of smudging to the ink. A fantastic signed photo, gifted from one adventurer to another. Charles A. Lindbergh (1902-1974) ruled the skies, daring and challenging human abilities and technology to make the first nonstop cross Atlantic flight. Nicknamed "The Lone Eagle", he believed he could fly across the Atlantic provided he was in the right plane, and in 1927, proceeded to design the plane himself. After obtaining financing, and a flight test across the US, he took the leap across the ocean, traveling more than 33 hours and 3,600 miles in the plane he named, "The Spirit of St. Louis". Roy Chapman Andrews (1884-1960) lead expeditions through politically disturbed counties to the Gobi desert and Mongolia in his quest for dinosaurs. It was his determination that brought forth a better understanding of the Cretaceous period. Andrews discoveries provided the evidence of how dinosaurs reproduce with the first ever discovery of dinosaur eggs, in addition to his discovery that small mammals actually roamed the earth alongside dinosaurs. However the risks and near death experiences he had to endure to obtain this information is what lead him to be model from which the character, Indiana Jones was created. He noted: "In [my first] fifteen years [of field work] I can remember just ten times when I had really narrow escapes from death. Two were from drowning in typhoons, one was when our boat was charged by a wounded whale, once my wife and I were nearly eaten by wild dogs, once we were in great danger from fanatical lama priests, two were close calls when I fell over cliffs, once was nearly caught by a huge python, and twice I might have been killed by bandits." A wonderful association between these two men who no doubt held mutual admiration for each other's achievements. One, a dare devil in the skies, the other a dare devil on land, each with the purpose of discovery and overcoming challenges. This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses. WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!
Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln, Loser of Southern Indiana Township’s 1864 Presidential Election Results

[Lincoln Abraham] Abraham Lincoln, Loser of Southern Indiana Township's 1864 Presidential Election Results   Two documents relating to the November 8, 1864 presidential election, including a poll book and tally paper, from Bradford, Indiana. The election documents were filed in the clerk's office on November 10, 1864. The partly printed and partly handwritten documents are in very good to near fine condition. With expected paper folds and isolated weathering and/or stains.   The lot includes:   1. 12pp poll book from Bradford, Indiana, listing 214 male voters eligible to participate in the November 8, 1864 presidential election. The bound ledger pages, on blue lined and red ruled cream paper, has a preprinted heading reading: "A Poll Book of an Annual Election held at the town of Bradford in Morgan Township, Harrison County, and State of Indiana, on the 8th of November, 1864, for the Election of thirteen Electors for President and Vice=President of the United States…" Docketed on the last page. There are some blank pages found in the middle of the booklet between the voters' names and the penultimate page, which provides a summary.  With intact threaded binding. 8.5" x 14.125".   Entries include the names of many members of extended families, and relatives of the 2 clerks, 2 judges, and the local inspector who oversaw the recording of the election results.   2. 1p tally paper on a large sheet of ruled blue paper measuring 17.25" x 22.25". Docketed verso. The sheet provides a visual overview of the election results by the inclusion of tally marks.   Bradford, Indiana, an unincorporated community platted in 1838, is located near the southern border of Indiana and Kentucky. The town's geography probably goes far in explaining its surprising 1864 election results: 157 votes for George B. McClellan vs. 59 votes for Abraham Lincoln!   Only 27% of Bradford's citizens voted for President Lincoln. These are similar returns to those of New Salisbury, Indiana, a nearby community, whose 1864 poll book is in the collection of the Indiana Historical Society.  Bradford is located only 30 miles northwest of Louisville, Kentucky, past the state lines and the Ohio River, and Kentucky was only one of two states (including New Jersey) that McClellan won in 1864.   Southern Indiana townships like Bradford might have gone to McClellan, but Indiana went to incumbent candidate Abraham Lincoln. Lincoln received 53.6% of the popular vote in Indiana, or approximately 280,000 votes statewide, giving him all 13 state electors. This reflected national returns, where Lincoln tipped the scales at a 55% popular vote nationwide.   Indiana was vital to securing Lincoln's reelection. It was only possible through the efforts of the Governor of Indiana, Oliver P. Morton, and those of U.S. Army commanders like William T. Sherman, who could temporarily release soldiers to vote in the election. Lincoln understood the impact winning Indiana would have on his reelection bid, and on the course of the Civil War in general. He wrote Sherman: "… the loss of it [Indiana] … would go far towards losing the whole Union cause. The bad effect upon the November election, and especially giving the State Government to those who oppose the war in every possible way, is too much to risk if it can possibly be avoided …" Not only did President Lincoln win Indiana in early November, but the entire Midwestern block.   Lincoln defeated McClellan 212 Electoral College Votes to 21, and 55% of the popular vote to 45%. Up until the summer of 1864, President Lincoln was confident that he would lose reelection. Yet Union victories in Atlanta and Cedar Creek, as well as impressive soldier voting turnout, ensured Abe's victory despite war fatigue.   This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.   WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!
Abraham Lincoln Collector Frederick H. Meserve ALS: "As far as I know Lincoln was never photographed in Ohio"

Abraham Lincoln Collector Frederick H. Meserve ALS: “As far as I know Lincoln was never photographed in Ohio”

[Lincoln Abraham] Abraham Lincoln Collector Frederick H. Meserve ALS: "As far as I know Lincoln was never photographed in Ohio" 1p typed letter signed by Arnold F. Gates (1914-1993), a Civil War enthusiast and amateur author, and addressed to notable Lincoln collector Frederick H. Meserve (1865-1962). At the bottom, Meserve has included a 20+ word reply in his own hand, and signed it "F.H. Meserve." Gates's original letter was written in Cleveland, Ohio on July 8, 1941, and Meserve's response was written three days later, probably in New York City. The cream stationery paper is in near fine condition, with expected light paper folds, 8.5" x 11". Gates, who was preparing for an upcoming university lecture, had inquired: "I would like to know if any of the Lincoln photographers were from Ohio." Meserve replied: "So far as I know Lincoln was never photographed in Ohio." Though this did not exactly answer Gates's question, it was offered in the best spirit of scholarly good will. Out of the 130 known photographs of Abraham Lincoln, the majority of them were taken between ca. 1846-1860 in Illinois. Locations in the state where Lincoln was photographed include Springfield, Chicago, Danville, Peoria, Beardstown, Urbana, Macomb, Pittsfield, Monmouth, and Decatur. Lincoln was also photographed in New York City, Washington, D.C., and Antietam, Maryland. One portrait dating from ca. 1858 may have ties to Ohio, but they are unclear. The daguerreotype depicting a bust portrait of Lincoln was from the personal collection of a Parma, Ohio Union soldier, and was later found in the papers of Cleveland collector Anthony L. Maresh. (See the Anton L. Maresh Papers, Western Reserve Historical Society, for a description of this collection.) Lincoln's portraits were typically taken before or after landmark events, such as an election, debate, inauguration, or battle. His most frequent photographers included Alexander Gardner (1821-1882) and colleague Mathew Brady (1822-1896), who dominated antebellum and Civil War-era American photography. Of the more than 50 official portraits of Lincoln taken from his lawyering days on the court circuit until his assassination, Gardner took 37 of these--approximately twice the number produced by other photographers. Gardner went on to photograph the execution of Lincoln's assassination co-conspirators. Frederick H. Meserve was a world-renown collector of Lincoln and Civil War-era photography, ephemera, maps. Meserve began collecting Lincolniana in 1897, with the intention of illustrating his father's Civil War diary. Meserve continued collecting over the next sixty years, eventually amassing 200,000 pieces including some previously "lost" or unknown images of Lincoln. Meserve's collection was so esteemed for its completeness that he essentially became the custodian of "Lincoln's image." For example, Meserve was approached by medal and currency engravers, as well as by the sculptors of Lincoln's Memorial Monument, for direct access to his presidential photographs. In 2015, the Meserve-Kunhardt Collection was acquired by the Yale Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library  in New Haven, Connecticut. Arnold F. Gates also had a lifelong interest in the Civil War. Gates edited and published works relating to the Civil War period, contributing to such works as the anthology Lincoln for the Ages. His independent monographs include Amberglow of Abraham Lincoln and Joshua Speed and The Rough Side of War: The Civil War Journal of Chesley A. Mosman, First Lieutenant, Company D, 59th Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment. Meserve and Gates corresponded over the next ten years. This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses. WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!
John F. Kennedy

John F. Kennedy, Jr. Baby Gift, Our Lady of Knock Religious Medal

Kennedy John John F. Kennedy, Jr. Baby Gift, Our Lady of Knock Religious Medal   A religious medal given to the Kennedys after the birth of John, Jr., from the collection of Mary Barelli Gallagher (born 1928), Jacqueline Kennedy's private secretary. The Italian round silver-finished medal depicts the 1879 apparition of the Virgin Mary, St. Joseph, and St. John the Evangelist outside a village chapel in Knock, County Mayo, Ireland recto, and is inscribed "Our Lady of Knock pray for us" verso. With expected light surface tarnish and verdigris, else near fine, measuring .625" dia. Accompanied by a photocopy of an original provenance document signed by Mary Barelli Gallagher on March 16, 2015.   As Gallagher explains, "This baby gift is one of the many gifts that had arrived daily to the home of President-Elect and Mrs. John F. Kennedy, 3307 N St., N.W., Georgetown, Washington, D.C. on the occasion of John Jr.'s birth, November 25, 1960. Mrs. Kennedy would ask that I prepare a letter of thanks to the sender for her to sign, and this is one of the gifts that she offered me to take home. I donated the vast majority of these gifts to various charities, others I gave away to friends, relatives, etc., keeping the more interesting ones, such as this, for myself…"   Since John F. Kennedy, Jr. was the first baby ever born to an incoming elected president, John-John's firsts were monitored with universal interest. The Kennedys received thousands of gifts from around the world, ranging from booties knitted by Kennedy supporters watching televised election debates, to Catholic devotional gifts like this religious medallion. Three presidential staffers worked full-time cataloging baby gifts, and as we know, Jackie needed a secretary to prepare all of her thank you notes!   Mary Barelli Gallagher served as secretary to then Massachusetts Senator John F. Kennedy between 1953-1956, and as private secretary to Jackie Kennedy between 1956-1964. During her time working for the Kennedys, Gallagher collected notes, photos, and mementoes, and even inherited some of Jackie's clothing and pets. Some of Gallagher's recollections are shared in her 1969 My Life with Jacqueline Kennedy.   Provenance: Ex-Bonhams March 9, 2017 sale; Ex-Mary Barelli Gallagher   This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.   WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE.
method-draw-image (23)

Woody Guthrie TLS to Asch Studios Regarding the Hoot Folk Festival

Guthrie Woody Woody Guthrie TLS to Asch Studios Regarding the Hoot Folk Festival Typed letter Signed "Woody Guthrie" 8.5"x10" 1p., June 7th, 1946, Brooklyn, NY, to Asch Studios regarding a folk festival called the Hoot. His daughter Cathy must have found it laying around the house and scrawled all over it in crayon. Edges are dog eared. Signed in pencil. Cellophane tape was placed over signature, now yellowed. Reads in part, "Dear Folks: The Daily Worker is using artists from peoples Songs in a Hoot to raise money on the 29th of June, this month. Six artists will preeform [sic. Cisco Houston, Charlotte Anthony, Sis Cunningham, Sonny Terry, Brownie McGhee, plus a speaker. This Hoot will be held at 3200 Coney Island Avenue (corner of Brighton Beach Avenue), and if it is a hit (as I expect), then it is to be repeated over and over again, all over Brooklyn, after the same general pattern and fashion. (The only change is that I am the one who made the deal with the representatives of the Worker on this, and am running said Hoot to suit my own ideas). You Ought to get your table of display set up there with lots of catalogs, lists, calendars, almanacs, handbills, pamphlets, time tables, bulletins, books, manuscripts, and plenty of material to sell as well as to give away for free. This is a strongly progressive district out in here with a strong majority always voting for Caccione and you can expect to be nicely received . . ." Several of these performers were Guthrie's longtime friends. In his book, "Bound For Glory" Guthrie describes how he and Cisco Houston first met, "I run into a guitar-playing partner standing on a bad corner, and he called his self the Cisco Kid. Lie was a long-legged guy that walked like he was on a rolling ship, a good singer and yodeler, and had sailed the seas a lot of times, busted labels in a lot of ports, and had really been around in his twenty-six years." Houston and Guthrie traveled and sang together in the years before World War II, parting ways when Houston joined the merchant marine. Upon his return, he rejoined forces with Guthrie and often teamed up with Leadbelly. The Hoot is still around in various cities.   This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.   WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!
U.S. Grant's Tomb Attracts Crowds

U.S. Grant’s Tomb Attracts Crowds, Beautiful, Large, & Early Mounted Photograph

Grant Ulysses U.S. Grant's Tomb Attracts Crowds, Beautiful, Large, & Early Mounted Photograph   Mounted photograph, 17" x 14.75", front and verso. Verso contains an advertisement for "Fine Cemetery Work". New York, New York, circa May 31, 1886. Slight yellowing. Fine Condition. The caption, in full, reads, "[handwritten] Grant, Ulysses Simpson. Funeral. / [typed] View Just In Front of Gen. Grant's Tomb. / Riverside Park, New York. / Showing part of crowd assembled to see the first decorations of the Tomb, May 31, 1886." Grant's funeral procession – on August 8, 1885 – was seven miles long as it wound its way through New York City. It is interesting to note that of his four pallbearers, two were generals for the Union (Philip Sheridan and William Tecumseh Sherman), and two for the Confederacy (Simon Bolivar Bucker and Joseph Johnston). Grant was actually initially laid to rest in a temporary tomb in Riverside Park, depicted in this photograph. He was buried in his final resting place, Grant's Tomb, twelve years later after the completion of the then-largest public fundraising campaign in history. In a savvy business move, Barre Granite of Burlington, VT uses the reverse of this photograph to advertise their "Fine Cemetery Work … Monuments and Headstones Supplied From Any Kind of Granite."   This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.   WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!
Ulysses S. Grant

Ulysses S. Grant, Two Enormous Period Photographs Relating to his Final Illness, Death, and Funeral

Grant Ulysses Ulysses S. Grant, Two Enormous Period Photographs Relating to his Final Illness, Death, and Funeral   Mounted photograph, 15" x 13.25", front and verso. Richmond, VA and Wilton, NY, circa 1885. Slight yellowing and wear at edges of mount, including a minor closed tear, not affecting photograph. Else near fine condition. The front contains a beautiful photograph of Company B of the 1st Virginia Regiment, also known as the Walker Light Guards. They are gathered outside of the Confederacy's old Capitol Building, before they left for New York, to join in Grant's seven-mile long funeral procession. The verso contains a photograph entitled "The Sick-Room." The room is located in banker Joseph Drexel's Adirondack cottage, on the slopes of Mount McGregor, but is now a New York State Historic Site known as Grant Cottage. Grant lived in the cottage for the six weeks prior to his death, where he completed his memoirs. The writer Mark Twain gave Grant a $25,000 advance to write his autobiography, which Grant completed a mere three days before succumbing to throat cancer in the room pictured.   This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.   WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!