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Narrative of the Surveying Voyages of His Majesty's Ships Adventure and Beagle

Narrative of the Surveying Voyages of His Majesty’s Ships Adventure and Beagle, between the Years 1826 and 1836, Describing Their Examination of the Southern Shores of South America, and the Beagle’s Circumnavigation of the Globe

Darwin, Charles; Philip Parker King; and Robert FitzRoy] First edition. xxviii, [4], 597; xiv, [2], 694, [1]; xiv, 615; viii, 352 pp. including half titles in three primary volumes plus forty-six plates (including two frontispieces), one plan, and nine folding maps and charts. 4 vols. 8vo. Darwin's First Book. The account of the Beagle's two voyages, edited by Robert Fitzroy, who served as commander of both voyages. Volume three of this work represents the first edition of Darwin's account of the voyage which provided the basis for his work on the origin of species, found here in its second issue entitled JOURNAL OF RESEARCHES INTO THE GEOLOGY AND NATURAL HISTORY OF THE VARIOUS COUNTRIES VISITED BY H.M.S. BEAGLE. "The third volume contains Darwin's account of the voyage, now famous as the genesis of his theory of evolutionary biology. The demand for Darwin's JOURNAL immediately exceeded that for the companion volumes of the NARRATIVE. Colburn therefore brought out a separate edition of it in the same year" - Hill. Freeman notes that Darwin's "first published book is undoubtedly the most often read and stands second only to ON THE ORIGIN OF SPECIES as the most often printed. It is an important travel book in its own right and its relation to the background of his evolutionary ideas has often been stressed." The first volume contains Captain King's account of the first coastal surveys of Patagonia and Terra del Fuego, produced on the first expedition between 1826 and 1830. The other volumes comprise the account of the second voyage of the Beagle. Between 1831 and 1836, the ship visited Brazil, Argentina, Terra del Fuego, Chile, Peru, the Galapagos Islands, Tahiti, New Zealand and Australia. The appendix to the second volume, bound here as the fourth volume of this set, includes a meteorological journal, official instructions, correspondence, and notes. Four of the six plates in the appendix volume consist of sixteen separate illustrations of various cloud formations. A fine, attractive set of a landmark of scientific exploration, one of the most important Pacific voyages, and Darwin's first substantial book publication. Hill 607; Freeman 10, pp. 31-39; Borba de Moraes, p. 247; Sabin 37826 Bound in period half dark green morocco and marbled boards, spines gilt, t.e.g. Repaired tear on half-title of vol. I, maps backed with japanese tissue. Bound without publisher's ads at end of appendix volume, which are often lacking. Fine xxviii, [4], 597; xiv, [2], 694, [1]; xiv, 615; viii, 352 pp. including half titles in three primary volumes plus forty-six plates (including two frontispieces), one plan, and nine folding maps and charts. 4 vols. 8vo
1914 and Other Poems

1914 and Other Poems

Shackleton, Sir Ernest Henry) Brooke, Rupert First edition of the poet's posthumous second book. Photogravure frontispiece portrait in profile view by Sherril Schell. 63 pp. 1 vols. Small 8vo. Shackleton's copy. Shackleton's copy of Rupert Brooke's landmark collection, gifted to him shortly after the rescue of the crew of the Endurance. A gift inscription on the front free endpaper reads, "Ernest Shackleton/from/A. Martinez-Inez?/Montevideo/Oct 6, 1916", and the explorer's ownership signature appears on the back of the frontispiece. Shackleton was in Montevideo recovering from the long ordeal of his Imperial Trans-Atlantic Expedition, a planned attempt to make a land crossing of Antarctica, which would be the last great undertaking of the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration. Shackleton not only failed to cross the continent, he didn't even reach the mainland. Instead, the party watched helplessly from an ice-floe as their ship was crushed by the ice. It was here that Shackleton "showed his supreme qualities of leadership. With five companions he made a voyage of 800 miles in a 22-foot boat through some of the stormiest seas in the world, crossed the unknown lofty interior of South Georgia, and reached a Norwegian whaling station on the north coast. After three attempts Shackleton succeeded (30 August 1916) in rescuing the rest of the Endurance party and bringing them to South America" (ODNB); not a single man was lost. Shackleton remained in South America where he and his crew were feted-- and where this copy of Brooke's poems was presented to him-- until departing in late October 1916 to rescue the stranded crew of the Auorora, the second ship involved in the expedition. Keynes 6; Hayward, English Poetry, 32; NCBEL, IV, p. 241. Provenance: Sir Ernest Shackleton (gift inscription on f.f.e.p., ownership signature to reverse of frontispiece); Granville Terry Nicholson (bookplate) Original blue cloth, printed spine label, extra label tipped in at back. Wear to head of spine, some rubbing to boards, very good Photogravure frontispiece portrait in profile view by Sherril Schell. 63 pp. 1 vols. Small 8vo First edition of the poet's posthumous second book.