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A journal of ramblings through the High Sierra of California by the "University Excursion Party." [By] Joseph LeConte

A journal of ramblings through the High Sierra of California by the “University Excursion Party.” [By] Joseph LeConte

LeCONTE, JOSEPH San Francisco: The Sierra Club, 1930. 21.5x14.5 cm, pp. [i-v] vi-x [xi-xvi] [1-3] 4-148 [149-151] 152 [153: blank] [154: colophon] [155-156: blank], flyleaves at front and rear, 4 inserted plates, title page and drop title have red ruled borders, original brown paper wrappers, printed paper label affixed to spine panel, fore and bottom edges untrimmed. Third edition. Fifteen hundred copies printed for the Sierra Club by Taylor & Taylor, San Francisco. Joseph LeConte (1823-1901), a native of Georgia and a pupil of Louis Agassiz, was appointed professor of geology and natural history of the newly established University of California in 1869, a post he held until his death in Yosemite Valley in 1901. LeConte's A Journal of Ramblings ... is an account of his first journey into the Sierra Nevada. Of this excursion during July and August 1870 he later wrote: "... at the end of the first session of the University, eight of the students invited Professor Frank Soule, Jr., and me to join them in a camping trip to the Sierras, and we joyfully accepted. This trip was almost an era in my life. We were gone six weeks and visited the Yosemite, the high Sierra, Lake Mono and the volcanoes in the vicinity, and Lake Tahoe. The trip was made in the roughest style of camp life, each man carrying his bedding and extra clothing in a roll behind his saddle, and a packhorse bearing the food and camp utensils for the party. We had no tent, but slept under trees with only the sky above us. I never enjoyed anything else so much in my life -- perfect health, the merry party of young men, the glorious scenery, and, above all, the magnificent opportunity for studying mountain origin and structure. Observations made on this and later trips formed the basis for ten or eleven papers on this most fundamental and fascinating subject and on others closely related. I subsequently made many similar trips, but this remained the most delightful ..." (The Autobiography of Joseph LeConte, ed. William Dallam Armes [New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1903], pp. 247-48). Portions of LeConte's A Journal of Ramblings ... appeared later as "Rough Notes of a Camping Trip," a series of three articles published in the October, November, and December 1885 issues of Overland Monthly. According to Joseph N. LeConte, son of Professor LeConte, about 120 copies of the 1875 first edition were printed for members of the excursion party. This third edition adds a foreword and notes by Francis P. Farquhar. "Although nothing can quite equal the charm of the original thin blue volume with its photographs, the 1930 edition is a very attractive book." - Farquhar (1948), p. 59. Farquhar (1948), title 14. Currey and Kruska 230. Farquhar 14c. Lacks the plate called for facing page 48, otherwise a nearly fine copy. (#166094)
A JOURNEY TO THE CENTRE OF THE EARTH

A JOURNEY TO THE CENTRE OF THE EARTH, CONTAINING A COMPLETE ACCOUNT OF THE WONDERFUL AND THRILLING ADVENTURES OF THE INTREPID SUBTERRANEAN EXPLORERS, PROF. VON HARDWIGG, HIS NEPHEW HARRY, AND THEIR ICELANDIC GUIDE, HANS BJELKE … Sold Only by Subscription

Verne, Jules New York: Scribner, 1874. 12mo, pp. [1-4] [i-ii] iii-vi [vii] viii 1-413 [414: blank] [415-420: ads], flyleaves at front and rear, 55 full-page illustrations and title page vignette by Riou, original brown cloth, front and spine panels stamped in black and gold, rear panel stamped in blind, yellow endpapers. First printing of Scribner, Armstrong's "complete" edition, published at $3.00 and released in late 1874 or early 1875. This undated 413-page edition with 55 full-page illustrations was preceded by a Scribner, Armstrong edition with title page dated 1874 with 384 pages and 52 full-page illustrations (a copy of this 1874 edition has been noted signed and dated 4 November 1873 by an early owner). This earlier version was offset from the plates of the British 1872 Sampson Low edition and was offered for sale at $2.00. It is probable that Scribner, Armstrong rushed out this early version to compete with the unauthorized edition published in Boston by the Henry L. Shepard & Co. in 1874. Scribner, Armstrong's "complete" edition has reset text with printer's imprints on title leaf verso reading "Jas. B. Rogers Co. / Printers and Stereotypers, / Philadelphia" and "John F. Trow & Sons, / Printers and Bookbinders, / 205-213 East 12th St., / New York." Pages [415-420] are publishers' advertisements with a single Verne title, FROM THE EARTH TO THE MOON DIRECT IN 97 HOURS, 20 MINUTES, listed on page [420]. The title page calls for 52 illustrations by Riou, the spine panel for 53, but there are actually a total of 55 full page illustrations in the text as per the "list of illustrations." This "complete" issue, published at $3.00, was probably released simultaneously with the "popular" issue, 305 pages with 20 illustrations, published at 75¢. In any event, both editions were available by or before Scribner, Armstrong issued the first part of THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND in 1875 as both are advertised on the title leaf verso along with A FLOATING CITY and THE BLOCKADE-RUNNERS, the latter noted as "just issued." Regardless of the matter of priority of these Scribner, Armstrong editions, this "complete" issue is quite scarce and it is a very desirable edition of A JOURNEY TO THE CENTRE OF THE EARTH. Translation of VOYAGE AU CENTRE DE LA TERRE (1864). Anatomy of Wonder (1995) 1-94 and (2004) II-1182. Angenot and Khouri, "An International Bibliography of Prehistoric Fiction," SFS, VIII (March 1981), 47. Bleiler, Science-Fiction: The Early Years 2228. Clareson, Science Fiction in America, 1870s-1930s 766. Survey of Science Fiction Literature III, pp. 1102-05. Suvin, Victorian Science Fiction in the UK, p. 16. In 333. Bleiler (1978), p. 199. Reginald 14630. Myers 35. Taves and Michaluk V002. This copy has smoke and water damage from a fire, but is a tight, presentable copy overall. A decent copy of a rare and desirable edition of this book. (#165801)
THE LOST WORLD: BEING AN ACCOUNT OF THE RECENT AMAZING ADVENTURES OF PROFESSOR GEORGE E. CHALLENGER

THE LOST WORLD: BEING AN ACCOUNT OF THE RECENT AMAZING ADVENTURES OF PROFESSOR GEORGE E. CHALLENGER, LORD JOHN ROXTON, PROFESSOR SUMMERLEE, AND MR. E. D. MALONE OF THE “DAILY GAZETTE.” ..

Doyle, Arthur Conan London, New York, Toronto: Hodder and Stoughton, 1912. Octavo, pp. [i-v] vi-vii [viii] 9-319 [320: printer's imprint], eight inserted plates, original pictorial blue cloth, front panel stamped in gold and white, spine panel stamped in gold. First edition. 10,716 copies printed. The first Professor Challenger story, in which the scientist and his exploring party locate a remnant of the prehistoric world on a plateau in South America. Challenger's narrative "remains the most famous of its type and has served as a model since its publication." - Anatomy of Wonder (1981) 1-63. "... written as pure entertainment, and as such it is a huge success. It stands at the very end of an era of great adventure stories, and it is the equal of anything else in its genre." - Survey of Science Fiction Literature III, pp. 1270-73. Anatomy of Wonder (1976) 2-67; (1981) 1-63; (1987) 1-31; (1995) 1-31; and (2004) II-354. Angenot and Khouri, "An International Bibliography of Prehistoric Fiction," SFS, VIII (March 1981), 43. Bleiler, Science-Fiction: The Early Years 612. Cawthorn and Moorcock, Fantasy: The 100 Best Books 27. Clareson, Science Fiction in America, 1870s-1930s 264. Locke, A Spectrum of Fantasy, p. 71. In 333. Bleiler (1987), p. 63. Reginald 04496. Green and Gibson A37a. Wolff 1908. Tissue guard foxed, a clean, very good copy. Enclosed in a custom cloth clamshell box with leather spine label. (#166099)
THE NEW PENELOPE AND OTHER STORIES AND POEMS

THE NEW PENELOPE AND OTHER STORIES AND POEMS

Victor, Frances Auretta Fuller (Barritt) San Francisco: A. L. Bancroft & Company, 1877. Octavo, pp. [1-5] 6 [7-9] 10-349 [350: blank], original decorated terra cotta cloth, front and spine panels stamped in gold and blind, rear panel stamped in blind. First edition. The ten stories, most set in California, are "sketches of Pacific Coast life, most of which have appeared, from time to time, in the OVERLAND MONTHLY, and other Western magazines. If they have a merit, it is because they picture scenes and characters having the charm of newness and originality, such as belong to border life" (author's preface). Frances Fuller Victor (1826-1902), was an American historian and historical novelist best known for her books about the West, especially Oregon history, as well as an advocate for women's rights. "When her husband, a naval engineer, was assigned to San Francisco in 1863, Frances Fuller Victor experienced no difficulty in finding literary pursuits in her new home; she was soon writing city editorials for the EVENING HERALD and poems, short stories, and a weekly column for the GOLDEN ERA. Her nom-de-plume on the ERA was Florence Fane, and her column covered a multitude of subjects, from society comments to book reviews. Never slipshod or careless, in her reporting of the news of the week she sometimes reflected the ability at observation which is to be found in a few of her short stories and in most of her historical studies. After two years in San Francisco her husband was transferred to Oregon, and the ERA lost one o its best columnists. Oregon, however, gained a historian. Entranced with the terrain and the people, she set herself the task of telling their story. Her volume on Joe Meek persuaded H. H. Bancroft that he needed her on his staff, and as a result she became an important cog in the remarkable machine that produced the Bancroft histories." - Walker, San Francisco's Literary Frontier, pp. 137-138. Baird and Greenwood, An Annotated Bibliography of California Fiction 2486. Wright (III) 5687. Remnants of two small old private book labels on the front paste-down. Cloth worn at spine ends and corner tips, some rubbing and scuffing to cloth, a very good copy. (#165929)
THE STRIKE OF A SEX. A NOVEL ..

THE STRIKE OF A SEX. A NOVEL ..

Miller, George N[oyes] Chicago: Stockham Publishing Co.. Octavo, pp. [1-7] 8-235 [236-240: ads], original red wrappers printed in black. Later printing. This is a facsimile reprint of a Stockham reprint (designated the "thirtieth thousand" at the top edge of the title page) of the 1890 Dillingham edition. A significant document in the second big wave of feminism (the first being taken as the period around Mary Wollstonecraft's 1792 A VINDICATION OF THE RIGHTS OF WOMEN, and the third as the period starting in the early 1970s). This second wave, part of a large and general cultural ferment, promoted sexual freedom (or the beginning of what would now be called reproductive rights) as well as political power. In this sleeper-awakes tale of the future, the narrator discovers that women have (in a variation on Aristophanes' 'Lysistrata') banded together and gone on strike, not to stop war, as in the case of Aristophanes, but to stop being forced to have babies they don't want. Indeed, the focus on sexual freedom is evident in the appearance of this present edition as part of the publisher's "Books on Health and Sexual Science" series. Alice B. Stockham, the publisher, was a medical doctor (the fifth female doctor certified in the United States) and a promoter of various causes, some but not all of which would be seen as in harmony with other 'progressive' positions of then (and now). For THE STRIKE OF A SEX, see Bleiler, Science-Fiction: The Early Years 1492 (citing a reprint). Sargent, British and American Utopian Literature, 1516-1985, p. 86. Suvin, Victorian Science Fiction in the UK, p. 46 (citing a 63-page British edition, a presumed reprint). Eaton Catalogue II, p.416 (listing a reprint). Bleiler (1978), p. 140. Reginald 37970. Not in Negley. Wright (III) 3735 (locating DLC copy only). For ZUGASSENT'S DISCOVERY, see Bleiler, Science-Fiction: The Early Years 1492 (citing the present edition). Lewis, Utopian Literature, p. 124 (ditto)). Sargent, British and American Utopian Literature, 1516-1985, p. 86 (misdating 1891). Suvin, Victorian Science Fiction in the UK, pp. 114-5. Bleiler (1978), p. 140 (citing an 1895 Arena edition). Not in Reginald (1979; 1992). Not in Negley. A fine copy. (#165931)
ON THE LOOSE ..

ON THE LOOSE ..

Raffalovich, George [London]: Publishing Office o the Equinox, 1910. Small octavo, pp. [1-8] 1-163 [164: printer's imprint] [165-166: ads] [167-168: blank] [note: last leaf is a blank], original pictorial red wrappers printed in black. First edition, later issue. A presentation copy with signed inscription dated 4 May 1910 on preliminary page [5]. This is a re-titled reissue of PLANETARY JOURNEYS AND EARTHLY SKETCHES (1908). "Whimsical fantasies; the first four a series of interplanetary visits, philosophical discussion with alien inhabitants that serve as vehicles for commentary on artistic and social issues of the day. Aliens descended from Empedocles, Greek philosopher who, 'voyaging through air,' reached this distant world, mated with its sole inhabitant and by her kiss became immortal. Hellenophilia pronounced throughout collection." - Robert Knowlton. The author was an occultist associated with Aleister Crowley, who published articles by Raffolovich in his journal, THE EQUINOX, and reissued PLANETARY JOURNEYS AND EARTHLY SKETCHES as ON THE LOOSE. Bleiler, Science-Fiction: The Early Years 1823. Locke, A Spectrum of Fantasy, p. 180. Locke, Voyages in Space (2011) V 556a. Sargent, British and American Utopian Literature, 1516-1985, Additions. Bleiler (1978), p. 163. Reginald 11972. Wrappers worn at edges, several creases, tape marks on front and rear covers near spine folds, a good copy. A scarce issue of this book. (#165930)
A BLACK ADONIS ..

A BLACK ADONIS ..

Porter, Linn Boyd, writing as "Albert Ross. New York: G. W. Dillingham, 1895. Octavo, pp. [i-iv] v-viii 9-318 [319-320: ads], original tan wrappers printed in red and black. First edition. At head of title: "Dillingham's American Authors Library, No. 4. / July 1895 ..." Issued in the paper wrapper of Dillingham's "Albatross Novels" series (which appears to have been devoted solely to publication of Ross' works); this title noted in the publisher's list of books in this series on page [ii] as "new." The novel was reprinted in 1972 by Books for Libraries Press as part of their Black Heritage Library Collection. Linn Boyd Porter (1851-1916) was a best-selling author of his day, "the most typical purveyor of literature to the masses now living in this country," according to the New York Evening Post. Following his debut novel THOU SHALT NOT (1889), Porter published at least twenty-two novels, most of which appeared in the 1890's. Among his most popular works was SPEAKING OF ELLEN ... (1890), a reform novel inspired by Bellamy's LOOKING BACKWARD, 2000-1887. All of Porter's novels are scarce. Wright was unable to locate a copy of this book; his information is based on the entry in PUBLISHER'S WEEKLY. Several creases, wrinkles and short closed tears to front and rear covers, wear along spine folds, printed on wood pulp paper which is tanned, a good copy with supple text block. The first printing of this book is uncommon, copies of this paperbound issue are rare. (#165909)
ARCHIBALD MALMAISON ..

ARCHIBALD MALMAISON ..

Hawthorne, Julian New York: Funk & Wagnalls, 1884. Octavo, pp. [1-2: ads] [1-5] 6-126 [127-142: publisher ads (variously paged)], original buff wrappers printed in red and black. First U.S. edition. The first printing with ad on page [142] headed "The Standard Library, 1884." Issued as part of Funk & Wagnalls' "Standard Library Series" in cloth at 75¢ and in paper as "Standard Library," No. 112, April 7, 1884 (as here) at 15¢. This edition contains the same five-page "Introductory" section found in the Bentley first edition (and omitted from the later 1899 Funk & Wagnalls edition). Hawthorne's neo-Gothic horror novel ARCHIBALD MALMAISON, first published in 1879 in London by Richard Bentley and Son, is his most melodramatically effective work of fiction. "Hawthorne's most powerful horror story ..." - Sullivan (ed), The Penguin Encyclopedia of Horror and the Supernatural, p. 196. "Crowded with many Gothic manifestations, it arouses still the horror intended ... The story proved to be one of Hawthorne's most popular, both in England and America ..." - Bassan, Hawthorne's Son: The Life and Literary Career of Julian Hawthorne (1970), pp. 126-27. The author is at his most assured in this book, in perfect control of his material, and a pleasure to observe. A contemporary review in The London Times was typical of its reception abroad: "After perusal of this weird, fantastic tale, it must be admitted that upon the shoulders of Julian Hawthorne has descended in no small degree the mantle of his more illustrious father. The climax is so terrible, and so dramatic in its intensity, that it is impossible to class it with any situation of modern fiction. There is much psychological ingenuity shown in some of the more subtle touches that lend an air of reality to this wild romance." Barron (ed), Fantasy Literature 2-77. Locke, A Spectrum of Fantasy, p. 107. Bleiler (1978), p. 96. Not in Reginald (1979; 1992). Touch of wear at spine ends, a nearly fine copy of a scarce issue of this book. (#165911)
THE DOOM OF MAMELONS: A LEGEND OF THE SAGUENAY

THE DOOM OF MAMELONS: A LEGEND OF THE SAGUENAY

Murray, W[illiam] H[enry] H[arrison] Philadelphia: Hubbard Brothers, 1888. Octavo, pp. [1-4] i-iv 3-136 [137-138: blank] [note: preliminary leaves erratically paginated], original salmon wrappers printed in black. First edition, promotional issue. This variant printing differs from the other Hubbard version which is also dated 1888 on the title page. It adds a four page introduction (here called an "argument" by Murray which follows his one page "preface" dated 7 January 1888. We do not know which printing is the earliest. This copy is part of a promotional issue with "Compliments of F. A. Babcock & Co." printed at the top edge of the front cover and an illustrated advertisement for their carriages and carts on the inside rear cover. A romantic novella with supernatural incidents and a pervading mood of otherworldly gloom and glory, autumnal in its mix of the sweet and the bitter, an elegy to the Old World that was dying in the birth throes of the New. Set in the backwoods of Quebec in an indefinite past, perhaps the colonial period, this is the story of John Norton, the heroically noble and simple trapper who was a recurring character in Murray's tales, and Atla, the beautiful and cultured princess and last of her line of Basque royalty. It is her hope to marry the trapper and start a new and more vital branch of her race, but a doom overhangs her and her people and cuts off the consummation of their romance. The background of the story is told in retrospect, through the narration, "half-chanted," of Atla's dying uncle, whose summons has brought John to their island mansion; and through the poetic words of her dead mother, found on a manuscript and read aloud by Atla. The Basques of the Iberian peninsula are represented in the story as the oldest race of Europe and, indeed, of the world, long established by the time the Egyptians began hauling blocks of stone over desert sands, and frequent visitors to North America. It is hinted by Murray that they are related to the mound builders, that shadowy race of advanced pre-Indian civilization in America, and that they were in fact, a remnant of the civilization of Atlantis -- and even more anciently, of the crossbreeding of gods and men referred to in Genesis (6:2). At some time in the recent past, an epic battle was fought between rival Indian tribes at Mamelons, the mouth of the Saguenay river, whose waters ("purple-brown ... gloomy and grewsome") lead into the St. Lawrence. In the battle, the ghosts of slain warriors on both sides rose up and fought side by side with the living, and nature warred against itself with storm and earthquake, until God brought the battle to a halt with a sudden total darkness. Afterwards it was discovered that Atla's uncle, chief of his tribe, had inadvertently killed his own brother, the father of Atla. He marries the widow and raises Atla lovingly as his own, even after the subsequent and untimely death of her mother. She is only 20 when her uncle dies and she is left alone in the world, though the heiress of a great fortune and vastly learned in antique lore. Her proffer of marriage encounters resistance from the 40-year-old trapper, who considers himself unworthy of her, but she finally wins him over. On their way back to Mamelons to be wed by the Catholic priest, a warning from their old Indian servant, who has seen a supernatural omen, is ignored, leading to the death of Atla on the shores of the Stygian Saguenay. The story is a meditation on matters of race and fate, especially germane to the American experiment of embracing cultural heterogeneity. The plot hangs on some rather complicated taboos about breeding, which will seem esoteric to most modern readers. An individual of mixed breeding is said to "bear a cross." Yet the doom hanging over Atla's race, a divine punishment for crossbreeding, can be removed only by her crossbreeding with an individual of purebred stock (Norton being white without taint of any other strain). But the story bears no whiff of "racism" in its generally understood sense, and shows a deep knowledge of and respect for the various Indian tribes, as well as, in passing, a curious veneration for Jews, not on the usual scriptural grounds as precursors of Christianity, but on purely racial grounds. The theme of crossing also characterizes certain aspects of Murray's own writing. With its frequent use of explanatory footnotes, the work crosses fiction and nonfiction. It crosses the archetypal with the highly specific. In its values, it embodies a Yeatsian admiration for both the primitive and the esoteric, peasant and aristocrat, while disdaining everything in the middle and everything that is modern or mongrel. In its style, the writing embodies its own nostalgia for the past. The epic similes carry with them echoes of Homer, and the heavy alliteration, of Old English epics. The conversations have sometimes the formality of a catechism. Whole sentences sometimes fall into an iambic chant. Overall, the work reads like a product of the Celtic Twilight, which was then starting to appear in Ireland, and in a sentence like, "What are books but oral knowledge spread out in words which lack the fire of forceful utterance?" we could almost be listening to Yeats. After speaking on behalf of the old ways of her race and their celebration of the old gods, Atla acquiesces to Norton's Christianity, with its emphasis on the afterlife, and she speaks, "In this thy faith is better -- it hangs a star above the tide of death for love to steer by." It is a sentence not unworthy of Yeats. The book is remarkable as a stylistic exercise. It also foreshadows Machen's mingling of the weird and the martial in "The Bowmen" (1914). And it is noteworthy as an example of the Last Man motif, harkening back to THE LAST OF THE MOHICANS (1826) and ahead to GREEN MANSIONS (1904), and to the more pronounced expressions of the motif in such works as Mary Shelley's THE LAST MAN (1826) and Shiel's THE PURPLE CLOUD (1901), and, of course, the more diffuse expressions found in the lost race genre which had just crystallized around Haggard's SHE (1887) a year before the publication of this book. The novella was republished in 1890 in MAMELONS AND UNGAVA, the latter being a sequel which is even more overtly supernatural and which also had an earlier separate publication (in 1889). All in all, a very interesting and unjustly overlooked work. (Reading note by Robert Eldridge). Not in Bleiler (1948; 1978) or Reginald (1979; 1992). Wright (III) 3907. Covers chipped at corners, 35x10 mm chip from the fore-edge of the rear cover, some fading and staining to covers, a good copy. (#165913)