Voyager Press Rare Books & Manuscripts

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Manuscript Journal of Letters from Travels to America

Manuscript Journal of Letters from Travels to America, Honolulu, and New Zealand – Meeting Brigham Young at the Tabernacle in Salt Lake City, Utah

Llewellyn, Robert William 8vo. 66 pages in manuscript. Ribbed, red, soft-leather boards with gilt ruled borders. Volume measures approximately 11,5 x 18 x 1 cm. Age-toning to boards, otherwise in very good condition, a fascinating account. Manuscript journal by British magistrate Robert William Llewellyn (1848-1910), in which he retains his own letters, written as he travelled to America where he attended a Mormon service by Brother Wilford Woodruff at the great Salt Lake City Tabernacle and also saw Brigham Young firsthand, subsequently making extensive travels through New Zealand in connection with new railway projects, there meeting Maori chiefs and British colonial administrators. Robert William Llewellyn (1848-1910), J.P., D.L., of Court Colman, Pen-Y-Fal, Bridgend and later of Baglan Hall, Port Talbot, was a magistrate, the discoverer of Mount Llewellyn in Tasmania, which is named after him. He made this discovery during his travels to Australia, New Zealand, and Tasmania with New Zealand's first railway contract negotiator James Brogden, part of which is revealed in the present volume. During this journey he also toured America, in 1871 visiting Salt Lake City, attending a service by in the city's great Mormon Tabernacle, the preacher being Wilford Woodruff, where also in attendance was Brigham Young. He also visited New York City, Niagara Falls, Chicago, and crossed the country to see San Francisco. Llewellyn was Justice of the Peace and Deputy Lieutenant of Glamorganshire. He was connected with the administration of justice at Bridgend, serving as Chairman of the Bridgend Justices from circa 1890 until his death, and also serving Chairman of the Newcastle and Ogmore Petty Sessions. He was active in his duties for a great number of years, and a very regular attendant at the courts. He was also a member of the Standing Joint Committee of the county, and became second vice-chairman of Quarter Sessions. In 1898 he inherited the Court Colman Manor in South Wales from his father, and in 1906-07 after his mother's passing, he made extensive and important renovations. The old building was elevated by an additional storey, and extensive wings were attached on either side, while the grounds were re-arranged and considerably beautified; it was subsequently described as "one of the finest residences in the countryside". Court Colman, incidentally, was near his friend Brogden's home at Tondu House, Aberkenfig. He also owned the Baglan Estates, inherited from his second cousin Mrs. Griffith Llewellyn. The Court Colman and Baglan Estates include extensive mineral properties in the Rhondda, Ely and Ogmore Valleys. He was also agent for many years to the Margam Estate. Llewellyn was prominent in Church work in the Diocese, contributing considerably to the construction of church buildings. His crowning work in this direction was the building, from his own designs, of the charming little church of All Saints at Penyfai on the Court Colman Estate, in about 1900. For this church he travelled over Europe in order to obtain copies of classic sculpture and old ironwork for inclusion in the structure. The church is one of the most expensive edifices in South Wales.
A Collection of Photographs and Ephemera from the Life and Political Rule of Fidel Castro

A Collection of Photographs and Ephemera from the Life and Political Rule of Fidel Castro, from Circa 1940s to 1980s.

Fidel Castro - Haydée Santamaría Collection of photographs and ephemera from the life and political rule of Fidel Castro, featuring a private family event, his closest administrators, members of the July 26 Movement, and assorted certificates for education and public works issued by the Castro's government and militia. All text is in Spanish. A Vernacular lot, evidently in part from personal albums, comprising 12 gelatin silver print photographs and 6 documents. Photographs vary in size, the smallest measuring approximately 11,5 x 9 cm, and the largest 19,5 x 24,5 cm. Some are mounted on leafs, some with evidence of mounting, others loose with captions to verso. Some minor creasing, otherwise in Very Good Condition, a fascinating lot with rare and personal photographs. Two photographs show Fidel Castro attending a private in-home birthday celebration for a man several years his senior, possibly an uncle. There are also exceedingly scarce photographs of Cuban revolutionary hero Haydée Santamaría, with members of the 26th of July Movement guerilla force. [Haydée Santamaría Cuadrado (1922-1980) was a Cuban revolutionary and politician, one of the first women to join the PCC, one of only 2 women to participate in the Moncada Barracks attack, and regarded as a heroine in post-revolutionary Cuba. She is among a relatively small group of people who were involved in every phase of the Cuban Revolution, from its inception to its fruition. Haydée participated in the assault on Moncada Barracks in Santiago de Cuba on July 26, 1953, an action for which she was imprisoned along with Melba Hernández. She was a founding member of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Cuba and maintained a high position in its leadership throughout her life.] Captain Diaz Rojas, Castro's "Ayudante de Salas" or assistant in office, is seen at his desk in 1952. His name appears on directive documents issued to army leaders on behalf of "Castro 7 Rojas." A photograph taken at the town hall in Holguin captures a group of officials on the second-floor balcony, for Mayor Ochoa to make a speech which would include a note of appreciation to General Pérez Dàmera, who since 1947 was Chief of Staff for the Cuban Army. Dr. Eduardo "Guarro" Ochoa y Ochoa was mayor of Holguin for two consecutive terms from 1946 to 1950. The caption to verso reads as follows: "El Dr. Eduardo E. Ochoa Ochoa, Alcalde Municipal de Holguin, pronunciando su discurso de gracias al General Pérez Dàmera, por el regalo de una bandera cubana al pueblo de Holguin." Two photographs show the military men in uniform, and one captures a public demonstration march of political cause, in which civilians carry the flag of the First Republic of Cuba, this taking place in a rural setting and surely in support of Fidel Castro. Colonel Enrique Diaz Horta, a leader of Cuban Army regiment number 8, is photographed in uniform in 1947, when Dr. Ramón Grau San Martín was the President of Cuba.
Portfolio of Fair Copy Letters of an Assistant Conservator of Forests

Portfolio of Fair Copy Letters of an Assistant Conservator of Forests, Describing His Work and Travels in Colonial Nigeria.

Edmund H. Probyn Portfolio of fair copy letters by Edmund H. Probyn, Assistant Conservator of Forests, describing his work and travels in colonial Nigeria, being employed in efforts of preservation of the region's coveted forests including teak and mangrove. 8vo. 77 pages in typescript. Contained in an "Anti-Aqua" springback portfolio, red leather boards tooled to front and rear, illustrated front pastedown, complete with publisher's original illustrated manilla folder and integral leather clip for additional papers. With Oxford bookseller's stamp. Volume measures approximately 24 x 28,5 x 2 cm. Minor markings to boards, otherwise in very good and original condition, an engaging primary source account of colonial forestry in the Niger Delta. From a time when forest conservation was gaining foothold, yet timber was still in high demand and Nigerian teak was most coveted, this primary source account provides fascinating information on forestry projects and politics affecting it, the controversial subject of convict labour, the colonial tax system and how rural inhabitants attempt to circumvent the policy, and some local customs such as ju-ju. In Britain's African colonies, convict labor was used from the 19th through to the mid 20th century, was prevalent until 1938 and still taking place in 1950. Drawing from prisons was a significant source of labor for public works and industrial projects, largely but not limited to work on road and railway projects. The revenue imperative of the British colonial effort, motivated largely by a concern with stabilizing fiscal capacity and minimizing costs to the regime, and faced with chronic labor shortages in Africa, viewed prison labor as an essential part of maintaining fiscal solvency, alongside direct and indirect taxation in the colonies. The imputed wages assigned to prisoners' labor from colonial officials was dramatically lower than the market rate. First landing on the African continent at Freetown, Sierra Leone, 9 August 1931, stopping at Takeradi the next day, and on the 11th at Accra, he disembarked at Lagos in Nigeria to stay there for a week. He eventually finds himself at Port Harcourt, and from there some 200 miles by rail to Enugu. Six months of work and travel throughout the Niger Delta region, encompassed tasks such as measuring, weighing, felling, and assessing various tree types, and also imposing taxes on civilians, and fines on those who were felling without a permit, all part of Britain's programme for timber economy and controlled regeneration. Two notable men with whom Probyn spent some time with are Captain James Robert Ainslie, botanist and Chief Conservator of Forests, and in the month of December 1931, the highly revered James Domone Kennedy who was an authority on Nigeria's forests and silviculture. Edmund Hamilton Probyn (1908-1981) was appointed Assistant Conservator of Forests, Department of Forestry, Commonwealth Forestry in 1931. He is mentioned in the published quarterly journal "Commonwealth Forestry Review." During the Second World War he served as a Lieutenant in the British Armed Forces, after which he returned to forestry. In 1947 he was employed in forestry in Cyprus. He contributed articles published in "Farm and Forest" which was a journal centering on colonial forest science and policy in southern Nigeria, and similar to its contemporary "Nigerian Forester: A Journal Devoted to the Interests of Land Use and Rural Planning in West Africa." Probyn's letters were written from Freetown, Lagos, Enugu, Nembe, Djema, Brass, Sapoba, and Onitsha, addressed to his parents Reverend Hubert Edmund Hamilton Probyn (1871-1947) and Emily Mabel née Cropper (1878-1962), as well as his two sisters Emily "Minnie" Araminta Probyn (1905-1955) and Margaret "Maggie" Eleanor Probyn (1906-1991). Margaret Eleanor Probyn (1906-1991) He is a relation of, and one generation younger than, Leslie Probyn, who had served as the Secretary and Acting High Commissioner of Southern Nigeria from 1901-
Specchio Geographico

Specchio Geographico, e Statistico Dell’impero Di Marocco. [Empire of Morocco]

GRABERG di HEMSÖ, Jacopo [Jacob Graberg of Hemse] The full title of the book: Specchio Geographico, e Statistico Dell'impero Di Marocco del Cavaliere Conte Jacopo Gråberg di Hemsö, gia officiale consolare in quell'impero per le LL. MM. Svezzese, e sarda, membro delle RR. Societa' Asiatiche di Londra, e di parigi, socio corrispondente dell' I. R. Academia della Crusca, ec. ec. ec. With author's manuscript dedication and original signature to front endpaper, dated 21 October 1838 and addressed to the venerable Dom José de Santo Antonio Moura, Arabic interpreter and member of the Lisbon Academy of Sciences. First Italian Edition. 8vo. 364 pages, plus 3 steel engraved plates, with a forward acknowledging King Leopold II. Text is in Italian. Publisher's original blue paper boards. Volume measures approximately 15 x 22 x 3,5 cm. This volume bound with three engraved plates, without the map as issued, some indication of burrowing, otherwise in very good and original condition, a pleasing volume featuring woven paper, untrimmed leafs, wide margins, a lovely dedication copy signed by the author. A fascinating historical sketch of Morocco, written by a respected scholar who spent fourteen years in the country in an administrative role, his immersion into Arab custom, keen observations of the various civilian groups, and learned studies of the region's history, form a comprehensive account. The work is divided into four parts: Corography - a description of the region's geographical features instrumental in mapping; Ethnography - the volume's most substantial and detailed work comprising nearly half of the text; Nomography - an economic and political assessment of the country Notes consisting of additional points of interest, largely historical. Jacob Gråberg (1776-1847) was born at Gannarve, near Hemse on the Swedish island of Gotland. He joined the British Navy, and after multiple sea voyages, and overland trips throughout Europe, he was appointed Swedish Vice-Consul in Genoa in 1811. In the same capacity, he went to Tangier in 1815 and then to Tripoli in 1823. He was General Consul for Morocco and Tripoli in 1827. In 1828, Gråberg returned to Europe, to work as a royal chamberlain and Chief Librarian to H.T. & R.H. the Grand Duke of Tuscany, working at the Pitti Palace Library in Florence. He developed extensive literary activity in the fields of statistics and geography, as well as that of the Arabic language and literature, the latter two of which he had learned during his fourteen-year stay in Africa. Fluent in several languages, and a great contributor of Orientalism, he was a member of several learned societies and academies, being a member of the Royal Asiatic societies of both London Paris, and a member of Accademia della Crusca - a Florence-based society of scholars of Italian linguistics and philology and the oldest linguistic academy in the world. He authored 154 works, being essays, treatises, and the like, published in seven languages, French, Swedish, Latin, Italian, English, German and Portuguese. Most notably, he shared his knowledge of North Africa and Arab custom in three books. In 1830 at Florence, he published "Essai géographique et statistique sur la régence d'Alger." He wrote the first version of the present work in German, titled "Specchio geografico estatistico del imperio di Marocco" and published it in Stuttgart in 1833. In 1834 the Italian version appeared. And, also in 1834, in Florence he published "Ibn Chalduns," being an historical sketck on the life and works of Ibn Khaldun, an ancient Arab Muslim historiographer and historian. Gråberg was a Knight in the dynastic chivalric Royal Sardinian Order of St Mauritius and St Lazarus, and several other Orders. He lived the remainder of his years in Florence and died there.
Manuscript Journal

Manuscript Journal, with Ink Drawings and Watercolours, of a Voyage to China, from 1893 to 1894.

Miss Frances Emily Turne Journal of a British female missionary with artistic skill, from 16 October 1893 - 13 October 1894, by miss Turner from Keswick in Cumbria who went to China to serve with the CMS, containing 41 manuscript drawings and watercolours, plus 45 pages of primary source manuscript descriptions, made as she embarked on an adventure and mission in the Far East, visiting Hong Kong and Hangzhou, taking a river tour to West Lake and Zhuji, to settle there in December 1894 during a most unsettled time. Thirty-twomo pocket-size art journal, burgundy leather boards, gilt title "pen and pencil jottings" to front, original burgundy floral patterned end papers. Volume measures approximately 12 x 9 x 1 cm. With dedication to front endpaper penned on 29 August 1893 by a D. Jones of Liverpool, addressed to Miss Turner shortly before her departure. Housed in a purpose-made light burgundy clamshell box with blue velvet lining for long-term preservation, measuring approximately 15 x 11,5 x 4 cm. Minor age-wear to boards, hinges professionally reinforced, otherwise very good condition, internally crisp and clean, a pleasing volume generous with art, an extraordinarily uncommon and intimate visual chronicle. Volume of Miss Frances Emily Turner, who arrived in China in 1893 to serve with the Church Missionary Society [CMS] at Chuki [Zhuji], under Reverend Ost. She was detained in Hangzhou for nearly one year however, along with two other ladies who were prevented from proceeding to their stations. The reason for Miss Turner's delay was waiting for the completion of construction of the mission house in the city of Chuki, which she confirms in the present journal. Through the text we learn that Miss Turner is travelling with Mrs. Ost, the wife of Reverend J. B. Ost of the CMS at Hong Kong, Mrs. Ost being most influential and helpful, particularly in women's side of the mission. Evidently, the Ost's had left Hong Kong by this time and planted a new church at Zhuji, with the preaching room being the main floor of their two-storey bungalow. Miss Turner had hopes of joining them there, but the lack of rooms prevented it for the time being. She settles in Hangzhou, near the bishop's house, until the mission house in Chiku was ready, departing for there on 13 October 1894. Miss Turner and Mrs. Ost were accompanied by a Chinese nurse on their river voyage. Reverend Ost, who had established the mission at Chuki, was caught in a battle over the land which he had purchased for its purpose. The leading monk of the adjoining Buddhist temple claimed that a Mr. Lih, the seller / former owner of the property, had stolen from the monk's monastery. Ost attended the court trial, which proved the accused to be innocent, although he still received a monetary fine and a punishment of 300 lashes with rattan. It was a troublesome time and foreigners were not always welcomed. In November 1894, a fanatic caused an uprising, stirring some 3,000 Chinese military students to call for the execution of Mr. Ost and his wife. He was apprehended, but the situation was quelled. Miss Turner arrived Chu-ki in December 1894, in this hostile time.
Rare Early Woodcut Map of Kyoto: Shinsen Zoho Kyo o-Ezu. [New and Increased Large-Scale Plan by Kyoto].

Rare Early Woodcut Map of Kyoto: Shinsen Zoho Kyo o-Ezu. [New and Increased Large-Scale Plan by Kyoto].

Hayashi-shi Yoshinaga Woodcuts printed onto several leafs assembled to create a large format plan, folded to a tidy size for protection and safe storage inside covers. Map measures approximately 121 x 159 cm, folded with two opposite end pieces mounted onto blue cardstock boards measuring 23,5 x 16 cm. Contained in a modern linen slipcase. Minor age wear including occasional signs of burrowing, slight loss of image at some folds, partly repaired. Boards lightly age-toned, title label rubbed off. Otherwise in very good condition, an exceptionally scarce and historically significant woodcut map of Kyoto, hand coloured by the artist and beautifully preserved in its original boards. Exceedingly scarce hand coloured woodcut map of Kyoto and surroundings, made by Hayashi-shi Yoshinaga circa 1728-34. Place names and legends in Chinese and Japanese characters, with a few manuscript additions and corrections in ink. This is a very detailed city plan with early street names, it also features lovely illustrations of temples and monuments in the lush hill regions surrounding the city. The publisher, Yoshinaga Hayashi, moved from Osaka to Tokyo. He was well-known and respected in his day, having produced maps of various parts of Japan since the late 17th century. With numerous legends in Sino-Japanese characters, this plan carries the publisher's name and address, though not acknowledging any artist. As usual, date is not printed, but according to the references, this is one of the earliest plans which were published in the Edo period from 1686 onwards, and is dated by the historians between 1716 and 1734.
Manuscript Travel Journal of Mr. and Mrs. Garlichs

Manuscript Travel Journal of Mr. and Mrs. Garlichs, Founders of the First Church in Femme Osage, Depicting Life in Missouri America.

Garlichs, Mr. and Mrs. Hermann and Adelheid The original joint manuscript travel diary, from 1835 to1840, of Mr. and Mrs. Hermann and Adelheid Garlichs, who settled in America and became founders of the Evangelical congregations. 8vo. 50 pages in manuscript. In addition, inversely there are 18 pages in manuscript by the same two writers, the first entry with a date as early as 1796 and possibly made by Adelheid's mother. The center of the volume contains 6 pages of recipes written by a family member in 1873, the year of Adelheid's death. All text is in German. Black paper boards, with floral cameo surrounding Adelheid's initials A.v.B. and the year 1835 tooled in gilt to front. With the stamp of the Steinlacke von Borries family library to front pastedown. Volume measures approximately 20 x 17,5 x 1 cm. Some wear to boards, otherwise in very good condition, an important primary source account of emigration to Missouri. Hermann Garlichs (1807-1865) was a German theologian and pastor, first arriving in America in 1833. He founded the first Protestant congregations west of the Mississippi and was the first president of the "German Evangelical Church Association of the West" in the USA. He was married to Adelheid von Borries. The couple's life became the subject of emigration research. In Anglo-Saxon literature, his name is sometimes seen as to Herman Garlichs, or Garlich. He grew up in Bremen in a wealthy Protestant family home, his father being a merchant. After completing his doctorate in philosophy, he was employed as an educator on the Steinlake estate of the district administrator C. L. Philip of Borries, and fell in love the administrator's daughter of the house, Adelheid von Borries (1815-1873). In 1833, when Garlichs was invited to go to America, miss Borries was only 16. As such, he emigrated there without her, but with Meller and Westerkappelner emigrants. Garlichs was inspired by Gottfried Duden's well-known descriptions of the good conditions in Missouri at that time. Duden was a Prussian lawyer who visited St. Louis, Missouri, in 1824 in search of land tracts for German settlements. Both Duden and his traveling companion, Ludwig Eversmann, purchased farms about fifty miles west of St. Louis. Duden spent nearly three years in the United States, reading, exploring the country, and writing letters while the Americans that he hired cleared his land and ran his farm. Duden returned to Germany in 1827. The result of this experiment was Report on a Journey to the Western States of North America [Bericht u ber eine Reise nach den westlichen Staaten Nordamerika's], which was published in Germany in 1829 to convince Germans to immigrate to Missouri. Duden described the advantages of moving to Missouri, and further provided advice on how to successfully create a new life in the United States. Duden's book was one of a large number of German books about America, but his was one of the most widely read. Germans faced many problems at home, including corrupt rulers, high taxes, and a lack of available land, thus Duden's account of the spacious expanse of Missouri plains sound very enticing to his fellow countrymen. Together with a few other missionaries who would become notable in the history in America, he made the voyage and settled in Missouri. Garlichs founded the first Protestant congregations west of the Mississippi in 1833 before he was ordained, i.e. as a lay preacher, in the small towns of Femme Osage and St. Charles. Originally known as the Deutsche Evangelische Kirchegemeinde, it was the first Evangelical congregation west of the Mississippi River. It still stands today, and has two church cemeteries, the first dating back to the 1830's and located next to the present-day school. Femme Osage was the mother-church for six other congregations: Friedens (St. Charles, 1834), Harmonie (Warrenton, 1842), St. Peter (Washington, 1844), Immanuel (Holstein, 1839), St. John (Cappeln, 1857), and Bethany (Schluersburg, 1844). In 1835 Hermann Garlich returned to Westphalia, ma
Rare Woodcut Map of Historic Kyoto: Shinzo Saiken Kyo'ezu Taizen ["New

Rare Woodcut Map of Historic Kyoto: Shinzo Saiken Kyo’ezu Taizen [“New, Increased Leader and Complete Plan of Kyoto”].

Ikeda Toritei and Takehara Yoshibei Woodcut Map published by Bunsodo, the firm of Takehara Yoshibei, Kyoto, circa 1835. Rare colored woodcut by Ikeda Toritei (Ikeda Tori; 1788-1857) and Nakamura Yurakusai, made in the Tempo era, with 2 cartouches, for title and legend. Map measures approximately 105 x 72.5 cm, printed onto four leafs assembled, folding, and mounted to two decorative colored cardstock boards measuring approximately 21,5 x 15 cm. Erroneously titled "Osakka" in ink on label mounted to front board. Some age-toning, occasional signs of burrowing in upper margin, wear at folds, otherwise in very good condition, a beautiful and early colour map of Kyoto. This map, by Ikeda Toritei and Takehara Yoshibei, is a stellar depiction of Kyoto's city streets, palaces, temples, shrines, sights of interest, and surrounding villages, some ninety years ago. Beautifully illustrated, vividly coloured, and highly detailed, this historic plan of Kyoto and the many cherished ancient landmarks all around it, is also an important and scarce work. The editor Ikeda Tooritei (1788-1857) was a Kyoto author who also wrote guide books to Kyoto. He was also a celebrated and accomplished calligrapher. [See Force 3, 632 note; Guys 1005 u. Yamashita 131 (other editions), Kraft.] Erroneously labeled "Osakka" in ink on the title plate. Even at this time, the only cities in Japan which were oriented neatly with streets going east to west, and north to south, were Nara and Kyoto, based on the Chinese model classical model of Xianthe ancient capital of China.
Some Pre-Islamic Inscriptions on the Frankincense Route in Southern Arabia.

Some Pre-Islamic Inscriptions on the Frankincense Route in Southern Arabia.

STARK, Freya Manuscript letter from Freya Stark to cellist Sheridan Russell dated 7/3/77, together with a rare offprint account by Freya Stark from her important travels with Gertrude Caton-Thomson and their archaeological discoveries made in the Hadhramaut in 1937-38. First Offprint Edition from the Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society. 8vo. 20 pages, plus frontis map and 8 photographic plates for illustration. Publisher's original printed orange wrappers, titled to front. Very good and original condition, an exceedingly scarce volume with original signed letter by Freya Stark. The letter, written in March, indicates that Freya intended to return from her Euphrates expedition by July and meet with her friend. Sheridan Russell (1900-1991) is the recipient of the letter. He was a cellist, medical doctor, and patron of the arts. He was Britain's first almoner and Head Almoner at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery. He founded the Paintings in Hospitals charity. During World War II, Russell worked for British Intelligence in Italy. It was in Asolo, Italy, that he met Freya Stark, back in 1929, before she was famous. They became dear life-long friends. He had come to spend the winter in Italy, during which time he was introduced to Freya's mother Flora Stark. She invited him to a large gathering at the Casa Freia. There he noticed Freya Stark, at 36 years of age, sitting in a corner with a bandaged head, not engaging in conversations. Unknown to him, she had just returned from her secret visit to Baghdad, Iraq (then a British protectorate) in 1928. During that trip, she had secretly travelled by donkey with a Druze guide and an English woman, a dangerous venture for anyone, but especially a woman. She kept the journey secret as Syria and Lebanon were under French control. This was a repressive government system that did not allow travel within the region. The group travelled by night and took remote, countryside routes, but eventually French Army officers caught them. Assuming the women to be spies initially, they released them three days later. As Russell was leaving the party, Freya followed him and invited him to walk with her the following day. The conversation was immediately engaging and the two forged a genuine and long-standing friendship, the likes of which Freya had with few or no others.
Archive of the Hampshire Regiment While Serving in Northern India During the Great War (1914

Archive of the Hampshire Regiment While Serving in Northern India During the Great War (1914, 1919), Containing a Photograph Album, Lose Photographs, and Manuscript and Typescript Letters.

Thomson, Captain Robert Archive of Captain Robert Thomson of the Hampshire Regiment which served in British India for the duration of the Great War, including an album of photographs illustrating army life and local civilian, custom, also including photographs of the 1857 Indian Mutiny Battle sites at Cawnpore. Also with 15 manuscript and typescript letters from the locals employed by the British Army in India, most being addressed to Thomson himself, having the title and responsibilities of Station Staff Officer, and 2 personal invitations to events hosted by notable Indian leaders - a maharaja and a zamindar. Also with 1 purchase receipt, 1 medical certificate belonging to Thomson. Text is in English, with the exception of 1 letter and the receipt which are written in the local language. Photographs vary in size, the smallest measuring approximately 5,5 x 8 cm, and the largest 28 x 22 cm, and some panoramas measuring approximately 10 x 22 cm. Oblong 8vo. album measuring approximately 33 x 25 x 4 cm, half morocco over red cloth boards. Contains 97 gelatin silver print photographs, most in large format, most with manuscript captions, mounted onto 34 thick cardstock leaves. An additional 9 photographs are loosely placed within the volume. Wear to boards, some fading to occasional photographs, otherwise in Very Good Condition. Military camp scenes, overland travels with the troops, various reported incidents and grievances by the locals, and two very special invitations addressed to Captain Thomas from the Maharajah of Bikaner and the State ruler Hon. Lala Sukhbir Sinha of Muzaffarnagar, make this a most engaging and personal primary source reveal of British military presence. Excellent panorama views of the Hampshire Regiment on parade, at the Barkacha camp in February 1915, and dispersed in a large field where they had performed "Lord Kitchener's test". Another camp was setup at Basario in Allahabad, and a remarkable aerial view shows the expanse of Camp Bareilly. The regiment also spent some time at Benares [Varanasi], at Cawnpore [Kanpur], and at the Royal Army cantonment of Chakrata, where they had the luxury of settling in proper bungalows. Captain Robert St Clair Thomson served in India with the 1/5th Hampshire Regiment, B Company, for the duration of the Great War. According to the present documents, he was Captain and Station Staff Officer at Bareilly for some time, at least in 1919. The Royal Hampshire Regiment was a Territorial Force. Part of Hampshire Brigade in Wessex Division, in August 1914 the force was in Southampton. The Wessex Division was asked to go out to India to replace the Regulars usually on duty there and perform their duties for them. Not only did this help them to complete war training but it also gave them a well-deserved opportunity by taking on a valuable duty. The Wessex Division was incredibly quick to form its "Foreign Service" units, and on 26th September 1914, it was declared that it would serve in India, with Hampshire Battalions following on 9th October. In total seven Hampshire Battalions joined the forces in India. Of these included were 1/4th, 1/5th, 1/6th and 1/7th Hampshire Battalions. They were assigned Garrison duty, whilst also acting as a police force. Indeed, on 9 October 1914, the 1/5th Battalion sailed for India, landing at Karachi on 11 November. They were at Benares [Varanasi], Cawnpore [Kanpur], Allahabad [Prayag], Lahore, Chakrata, and in 1918 were sent to Burma and towards Afghanistan. They returned to India in October that same year. In May 1919 they joined the 46th Mobile Indian Brigade at Kohat for service in Third Afghan War, withdrawing from there in June. They served in India for the duration of the war, arriving back in England at Southampton on 8 November 1919.
Search for Power in the British Columbia Coast Range.

Search for Power in the British Columbia Coast Range.

FARROW, R.C. The complete report of an important hydroelectric survey undertaken in 1928-1930 in the Chilcotin mountain range, led by provincial Chief Hydraulic Engineer R.C. Farrow, including a list of all 122 lantern slide photographs taken during the expedition, a separate list of 64 numbered lantern slides sent to Farrow presumably for a presentation. [On 14 February 1944 he would present his findings in a lecture.] Folio. 54 pages in typescript, plus title page. The primary account fastened with a brass brad, the lists stapled separately, altogether contained in a springback taupe cloth portfolio. Name stamp of Duart A. MacLean to front board and title page. With a numbered archival label from the Government of the Province of British Columbia Printing Department mounted to front pastedown. Volume measures approximately 24 x 34 x 1,5 cm. Some age-toning to boards, otherwise in very good condition, a complete primary source report logging all photographs taken, from the BC provincial archives. This is the first survey and hydroelectric planning around Chilko Lake, Tatlayoko Lake and Homathko River. Efforts resulted in the mapping of previously unsurveyed areas, a proposed Chilko-Homathko power scheme, and more. R.C. Farrow was the Chief Hydraulic Engineer of the Water Rights Branch of the Province of B.C. He headed the arduous but successful three seasons of field work in the years 1928, 1929 and 1930 throughout the Coast Range between the Fraser and Skeena Rivers, then a rugged and unsurveyed area. The task was to locate potential water power sources, estimate the reserves of water power, and devise a plan for harnessing the natural source of power from the lakes and glacial rivers. To carry out the work, a Power Investigation Division of the branch was set up with a staff of hydraulic engineers experienced in hydro-electric development. Divided into several small parties, the surveyors faced tremendous mountaineering challenges, and generally agreed that this was the most formidable and wild country they had ever worked in. Most of their time was spent in the Chilko Lake, Tatlayoko Lake and Homathko River sectors.
Manuscript Commonplance Book

Manuscript Commonplance Book, With Skillful Drawings, of Early Egypt Discoveries.

John Brown, M.D Substantial manuscript commonplace book of a learned man, a John Brown, M.D. featuring some lovely drawings, with a vast scope of entries concerning, among other subjects, Egyptian monuments then recently uncovered, natural history and early medicine, ancient monarchs, British and Scottish nobles, the works of many scholars and influencers, travel and discovery, war, colonies, philosophical reflections, and literature. Containing 621 pages in manuscript, plus alphabetical index. Ruled leafs bearing the watermark "J Dickson Kent 1822." Quarto morocco binding, renewed spine with gilt tooling and title "Omniana", gilt ruled boards with tooled floral border and symmetrical center pattern to boards, original endpapers, large working brass clasp. Volume measures approximately 21,5 x 26 x 6,5 cm. Professionally restored spine with retained original gilt title, hinge reinforced, otherwise in very good condition, beautifully preserved, clean and bright. The writer, who's authorship inscription "John Brown, M.D." is dated September 1st, 1823, may be a relation of the famed Scottish physician John Brown (1735-1788) and the creator of the Brunonian system of medicine, or John Brown FRSE FRCPE (1810-1882) a Scottish physician and essayist best known for his three-volume collection Horae Subsecivae (Leisure Hours, 1858), which included essays and papers on art, medical history and biography. A massive volume, with hundreds of manuscript entries, the physician creates a veritable treasury of all things pertinent and curious to a scholarly nineteenth century gentleman - monarchs and nobles, science, ancient and odern literature, exploration and discovery, British colonies, revolutions, and more! Brown initials some of his entries, and dates a scant few, in particular some of his own short poems written between 1823 and 1845. On 15 August 1845 he writes a poem titled "The Railway Train" which describes the powerful steel machinery and its use for the "thirst for gold". Upon starting his journal of jottings, he begins with historical plays by William Shakespeare, followed by verses 219-288 from Ossian's Oithona. Most certainly, a highlight of this volume are the drawings and early descriptions of Egypt, dispersed throughout the volume, when archaeological work had really just begun and numerous tombs and pyramids had not yet been discovered or excavated. Pre-dating the expedition of Karl Richard Lepsius in 1842-44, which discovered 67 pyramids and more than 130 tombs of noblemen in the area, which also claimed the title of 'first to enter the Great Pyramid,' Brown gleans fascinating information from the following sources: Travels in Egypt and the Holy Land, by William Rae Wilson (1772-1849) a Scottish solicitor, traveller and writer who visited the Near East in 1822.
1909 Photos 1st AMAZON RIVER VOYAGE - HMS PELORUS BRAZIL to PERU - Rubber Trade

1909 Photos 1st AMAZON RIVER VOYAGE – HMS PELORUS BRAZIL to PERU – Rubber Trade

Anon Uruguay, Peru, Brazil, 27 December 1908 - 31 March 1909. Album of primary source snapshot photographs taken by an officer of the HMS Pelorus during her voyage on the Amazon River from Belém to Iquitos, memorializing the first ever voyage of a battleship cruiser on the Amazon, a voyage purposed with establishing relations and trade in the interior for the rubber boom. Oblong 8vo. album measuring approximately 16 x 14 x 5,5 cm, green cloth boards, with the Amazon River itinerary in manuscript to front endpaper. Contains 48 gelatin silver print photographs neatly ensconced behind window mounts recto and verso onto 24 thick cardstock leaves, each captioned in manuscript and several dated. Photographs measure approximately 10 x 7 cm. Occasional age-toning, otherwise in Very Good Condition. In 1908 HMS Pelorus was sent to South America, to attempt to reach the interior of Brazil and Peru at the height of the rubber trade. Mission successful, she would become the first cruiser to navigate the narrow channels, navigating from Belém on the coast of Brazil, as far as Iquitos in the interior of Peru. It was February 1909 when her commander and crew steered her into the quaint harbour of the Peruvian town Iquitos, on the upper reaches of the Amazon. The objective of this good-will visit was to help promote British exports to Peru as the rubber boom had created an enormous demand for goods from the industrialised world. The achievement was a spectacular one. Pelorus had navigated some 2000 miles of winding, often forest-lined, river from its estuary on the South Atlantic coast, the voyage being seen here in a participant's own photographic chronicle. A rare primary source visual account of the first battleship cruiser to navigate the Amazon River, with dates and names in manuscript, this was a notable feat accomplished, for the purpose of tapping into the rubber trade in the interior of Brazil and Peru.
An Early Navigation Manuscript with Drawings

An Early Navigation Manuscript with Drawings, By a French Navy Officer.

Auguste Marie Gicquel des Touches An early manuscript mariner's apprenticeship journal of respected French navy officer Auguste Marie Gicquel des Touches (1784-1855), having already attained the rank of Lieutenant, and now learning critical sciences of navigation as needed for his imminent responsibilities as sea Captain, including arithmetic, principles of geometry, nautical distance calculations, instrumentation, time calculations by the sun, so forth, concluding with his manuscript signature as A. Cicquel. 8vo. 165 pages in manuscript, including an index table at rear, plus a hand-coloured pencil drawing frontis of a French first-rate sail-powered man-of-war. Text is in French. Neutral paper over leather boards. The volume is 4to and measures approximately 32 x 21 cm. Some chips to paper cover on boards, wear to corners, otherwise in very good condition, internally clean and bright, a lovely and most fascinating primary source navigation manuscript dating to the early phases of the Bourbon Restoration. The striking frontis drawing is of a French first-rate sail-powered ship of the line, sporting three levels of gun ports all open and ready for firing. Sails are down, making the three flags of France prominent in this scene. An early manuscript mariner's apprenticeship journal of respected French navy officer Auguste Marie Gicquel des Touches (1784-1855), having already attained the rank of Lieutenant, and now learning critical sciences of navigation as needed for his imminent responsibilities as sea Captain, including arithmetic, principles of geometry, nautical distance calculations, instrumentation, time calculations by the sun, so forth, concluding with his manuscript signature as A. Cicquel. 8vo. 165 pages in manuscript, including an index table at rear, plus a hand-coloured pencil drawing frontis of a French first-rate sail-powered man-of-war. Text is in French. Neutral paper over leather boards. The volume is 4to and measures approximately 32 x 21 cm. Some chips to paper cover on boards, wear to corners, otherwise in very good condition, internally clean and bright, a lovely and most fascinating primary source navigation manuscript dating to the early phases of the Bourbon Restoration. The striking frontis drawing is of a French first-rate sail-powered ship of the line, sporting three levels of gun ports all open and ready for firing. Sails are down, making the three flags of France prominent in this scene. A lovely drawing of a differenciometre, evidently a special sort of clinometer, complements a fascinating description of its use in calculating a ship's draught of water at sea. These types of instruments were typically used for measuring angles, usually of a slope, of an elevation, or of an object above the horizon. He mentions the barometer and thermometer, critical tools indeed. Calculation of declination of the sun was critical in this period, accomplished by method of measuring either the noon altitude of the sun or the meridian altitude of a star. Following concise instructions, specific examples are given, drawing from readings taken at the Paris observatory from April to July 1816, of the height of the sun, the moon, and some fixed stars. Latitude is calculated by the Meridien height of the sun and the moon, and also without a Meridien variable. He further makes complex calculations to ascertain the hours of sunrise and sunset. Different uses for a timekeeping device he calls a "montre de longitude" are presented, including how to calibrate a navigation clock or "montre marine" in his words. This too, is a multi-layered calculation, and he uses data acquired at Bordeau in 1818 to illustrate.
Manuscript Commonplace Book

Manuscript Commonplace Book, By a Young English Woman, Created at the York House, Malton, Where Charles Dickens Frequented.

Laura Simpson Manuscript commonplace book created at the York House - where Charles Dickens reputedly wrote some of his novels - by a woman called Laura Simpson, daughter of Malton solicitor Alfred Simpson, Esq., who was also appointed Bailiff of the Borough of Malton in 1856 by 6th Earl Fitzwilliam, owner of the York House, the most important historic house in Malton. Miss Laura signs and dates the front endpaper on 30 August 1872, and again to its verso on 2 February 1873, though dated entries range from 1870 to 1875. 8vo. 68 pages featuring manuscript entries and newspaper clippings of various subject matters. Quarter calf over brown and yellow marbled boards. Volume measures approximately 16,5 x 19,5 cm. Very good condition. The volume was created by a young woman who evidently lived at York House in Malton which has an interesting connection to Charles Dickens from only twenty-five years earlier. Her father having close ties with the owner of the Fitzwilliam Malton Estate, it is quite conceivable that he met or knew the great author personally. Laura Simpson is the daughter of Alfred Simpson, Esq., a solicitor, Chairman of the Malton Burial Board, and Bailiff of the Borough of Malton, whose residence was at Yorkersgate, presumably being a tenant of the York House owing to the Simpson-Fitzwilliam family connection through an earlier marriage. York House is an impressive 17th century home in Malton where Charles Dickens reputedly wrote many of his novels, where he certainly found inspiration for some of his characters. The reason for Charles Dickens' association with Malton, and York House in particular, was his long friendship with Charles Simpson, solicitor. The Smithson family had their offices on Chancery Lane in Malton and they also shared a practice in London. The death of Charles Simpson's father in 1829, had necessitated his brother Henry to return to Malton and take over the family business, whereas Charles remained in London. It is whilst residing in London that Smithson & Dickens met. Thomas Mitton, a friend of Dickens had persuaded him to act as surety on a loan to purchase a one-third stake of Smithson & Dunn. In 1840, Henry followed his father and brother John to his grave. Charles was compelled to leave London and take over both the Chancery Lane practice and the duties of the town Bailiff previously carried out by his father and brother. Dickens visited Malton often in the 1840s. He delighted audiences with his readings wherever he went. He read in Malton, in what was said to be a theatre, on one of his visits.
Revolutionary Government Document

Revolutionary Government Document, Signed and Sealed By Fidel Castro, Together with a Large Photograph

Fidel Castro Official decree of "Ley No. 99" [Act No. 99] "Dada en el Palacio de la Presidencia, Año de la Liberacion." [Given at the Presidential Palace, In the Year of Liberation]. From Fidel Castro's very newly established Ministry of Education, to amend Batista's earlier laws concerning limited education for the public, claiming that the latter contradicted the people's constitutional rights, signed in the original by three notable parties - Prime Minister Fidel Castro, his first President Manuel Urrutia Lleó, and the Minister of Education Armando Hart Dávalos. Quarto. 2 pages typescript document from 1959, two single leafs with text rectos only, from the "Consejo de Ministros, Ministerio de Educacion" [Council of Ministers, in the Ministry of Education] of the Republic of Cuba. Text is in Spanish. Leafs measure approximately 23 x 34,5 cm. Minor chips at folds and left margin, otherwise in very good and original condition, with Castro's initials to the fifrst leaf and full signature with seal to second leaf. Urrutia also signs and initials the document in two places. Together with one (1) large print press photographs of Fidel Castro, taken in Berlin in 1972, during his tour of East Germany to establish friendship and cooperation between German's Free Democratic Party (GDR) and the Cuban Republic. Photograph measures 40,5 x 30 cm. Accompanied with complimentary matte for framing. Very Good Condition, excellent, a rare vintage colour photograph. The signed government document, dated only 7 days after Fidel Castro became Prime Minister of Cuba, is an official decree issued by his newly appointed President Manuel Urrutia Lleó, through which previous "unethical" laws surrounding education are being revoked. Signed by 3 important revolutionary leaders - Castro himself, Urrutia, and Dávalos who was also on the council. Only 7 days before this document was signed and sealed, at the age of 32, Fidel Castro was sworn in as Prime Minister of Cuba, in the Cabinet Room of the Presidential Palace in Havana. Fidel Castro had proclaimed educational reform as a major issue for his revolution. He had mentioned plans to raise teachers' salaries and improve rural schools briefly in the manifesto of his revolution. However, when in power, it was clear that he saw education as having a pivotal role in consolidating his revolution. Education became universal, indeed, but it was also stipulated that anyone who received this education would have to actively promote government policies both during and after their schooling. They would also be required to take government-approved courses, a curriculum that didn't tolerate any criticism of socialism as a way of life. In other words, education was seen as key to the revolution taking hold and creating a literate population loyal to the government. As a first step in the perception of empowering the everyday Cuban population, the present document discredits Batista's former government by stating that the people's inherent right to education had been unscrupulously taken from them. The Act further revokes the government's overruling ability to appoint teachers, instead initiating an electoral process through which the public is involved in selecting their choice of teachers.
Lot of 8 Original Advertisements for an Amazon Cruise by Booth Line Between circa 1908 and 1930.

Lot of 8 Original Advertisements for an Amazon Cruise by Booth Line Between circa 1908 and 1930.

Anon. These are rare, original advertisements for a steamship cruise "1000 Miles Up the Amazon," beautifully illustrated with full colour art to front, three in the lot further featuring photographic images. Single leafs printed recto and verso, folded in two or three parts to measure approximately 9 x 14 cm, each with perforated return-addressed order form for a travel booklet still attached. Seldom found in such pristine and original condition, Near Fine. The adventure, which was in fact some 12,000 miles, included excursions arranged at Oporto, Lisbon and Madeira in Portugal, and then in northern Brazil at Pará, "the gateway of the Amazon" with a "river voyage. dense walls of forest. haunt of strange beasts and birds and gorgeous butterflies." The final excursion began at Manáo [Manaus], which is described is the brochure as "remote and forest-girt" and from there "days go by in expeditions on the waterways and through the forest, to see. native villages and plantations." Each item contains the lowest and highest fares, for different classes of passenger, as well as a brief description of the five excursion and locations. The latest three brochures include an itinerary with dates for each port of call. Three vessels are advertised for these cruises are: circa 1908-1910: SS Anselm (flagship) and SS Hilary, with fares from £60-£85; circa 1911-1912: SS Hildebrand (II), with fares from £70-£100; circa 1912-1913: SS Hilary, with fares from £75-£100; 1927-1930: Post-war refitted SS Hildebrand (II), with fares from £90-£120.
Two Illustrated Vellum Manuscripts from 1749 of a Monastic Vow Made to the Order of Hieronymites.

Two Illustrated Vellum Manuscripts from 1749 of a Monastic Vow Made to the Order of Hieronymites.

Hieronymite Monks Two manuscripts on one vellum leaf, dated 8 days apart, each being an illustrated manuscript vow of monastic service to the Order of Hieronymites, after the one-year probation had been completed, each elevating the writers from novice to a full Augustine monk, both of whom are pledging service to the Diocese of Burgensis [Burgos]. Both declarations are signed in the original by the new monk, and also by two superiors who are named in the vows. To one side, the declaration is by Josephus Manceto, dated 15 December 1749, beautifully illustrated with the drawing of a monk, presumably depicting himself. The second declaration to verso, made on 23 December 1749 is by another member of the Order, Joannes a Galbon. All text is in Latin. Item measures approximately 24,5 x 34 cm. Slightly age-toned, otherwise in very good condition, a beautifully preserved document, of which seldom survive. Skillfully illustrated in manuscript, a monk in cloak is serenely poised and waving a banner which bears the standard blessing, at the top of the vows which are penned in a neat circle bearing the Maltese Cross as its own symbolic header. Dramatic leafs, blooming flowers, and two birds resembling larks which are the symbol of the humility of the priesthood, complete the most satisfying image of a perfect life. The other side of the vellum leaf is equally impressive and intriguing for its artwork. Here we find long Roman spears entangled in the prayerful banner heading, a most imposing and frame around the text, drawn with precision. Symbolic animals include again the lark, as well as a crane which represents "good order in monastic life," and an ox which is the symbol of "Patience. Strength. Service. Endurance. Sacrifice." Monastic life was a respected career choice, attracting among them, the second or third sons of the aristocracy, who were not likely to inherit their father's lands. They were often encouraged to join the church and one of the paths to a successful career was to join a monastery and receive an education there. The attraction to it varied, and was sometimes more than piety. The fact was, that there was the chance of real power if one rose to the top; and one was guaranteed decent accommodation and above average meals for life. As most monks came from a well-off background; indeed, bringing a substantial donation on entry was expected. Recruits tended to be local, as seen in the present document, but larger monasteries were able to attract people even from abroad. Committing to communal life and a noble purpose after having been immersed into learning and practicing the eremitic ways of life for one full year, with the present document, the writer professes permanent vows of obedience to the Church, which were once binding for life, and thus he becomes a true monk. He claims his entitlement to the status, by including the names of his parents, and by doing so, confirming that he is 'of free condition and born of a legitimate marriage,' which was a common condition of acceptance into several monastic orders in the Middle Ages and even into the Early Modern Period.
Illustrated Vellum Manuscript from 1763 of a Monastic Vow Made to the Order of Hieronymites.

Illustrated Vellum Manuscript from 1763 of a Monastic Vow Made to the Order of Hieronymites.

Dominicus Avendaño, an Hieronymite Monk Illustrated manuscript vow of monastic service to the Order of Hieronymites, made on vellum, by Dominicus Avendaño after his one-year probation, this document officially making him a monk of the Diocese of Burgensis [Burgos], hand coloured, signed in the original by the new monk and also by two of his superiors who are named in the vow. With further text to verso listing events chronologically. All text is in Latin. Item measures approximately 24,5 x 34 cm. Slightly age-toned, otherwise in very good condition, a beautifully preserved document, of which seldom survive. This document is most unusual, owing to the fact that this monk later revoked his vows and commitment to the church, according to an annotation in the right margin, faint though remaining partially legible. An exquisitely decorated manuscript declaration of vows featuring an elegant crown header flanked on each side with Roman spears, leafs, and a banner intertwining. Lovely embellishments fill the wide margins, around a scroll-like frame which borders the manuscript declaration. Two birds resembling larks are meant to symbolize the humility of the priesthood. The three signatures are framed also, the new monk's signature being made within an arrow-pierced heart. Monastic life was a respected career choice, attracting among them, the second or third sons of the aristocracy, who were not likely to inherit their father's lands. They were often encouraged to join the church and one of the paths to a successful career was to join a monastery and receive an education there. The attraction to it varied, and was sometimes more than piety. The fact was, that there was the chance of real power if one rose to the top; and one was guaranteed decent accommodation and above average meals for life. As most monks came from a well-off background; indeed, bringing a substantial donation on entry was expected. Recruits tended to be local, as seen in the present document, but larger monasteries were able to attract people even from abroad.
Illustrated Vellum Manuscript from 1748 of a Monastic Vow Made to the Order of Hieronymites.

Illustrated Vellum Manuscript from 1748 of a Monastic Vow Made to the Order of Hieronymites.

Julianus Cidad, Illustrated manuscript vow of monastic service to the Order of Hieronymites, made on vellum, by Julianus Cidad after his one-year probation, this document officially making him a monk of the Diocese of Burgensis [Burgos], hand coloured, signed in the original by the new monk and also by two of his superiors who are named in the vow. With a second declaration to verso, uncoloured, made earlier by another member of the Order, Johannes de Larringan, and dated 29 October 1747. All text is in Latin. Item measures approximately 24,5 x 34 cm. Slightly age-toned, otherwise in very good condition, a beautifully preserved document, of which seldom survive. This document is most unusual, owing to the fact that this monk later revoked his vows and commitment to the church, according to an annotation in the lower margin. Beautifully illustrated in manuscript, the declaration is adorned with a hand-coloured heart motif surrounding the vows, topped with a crown and the cross of Jesus, each of the three signatures also bordered with lovely fluid shapes. Illustrated manuscript vow of monastic service to the Order of Hieronymites, made on vellum, by Julianus Cidad after his one-year probation, this document officially making him a monk of the Diocese of Burgensis [Burgos], hand coloured, signed in the original by the new monk and also by two of his superiors who are named in the vow. With a second declaration to verso, uncoloured, made earlier by another member of the Order, Johannes de Larringan, and dated 29 October 1747. All text is in Latin. Item measures approximately 24,5 x 34 cm. Slightly age-toned, otherwise in very good condition, a beautifully preserved document, of which seldom survive. This document is most unusual, owing to the fact that this monk later revoked his vows and commitment to the church, according to an annotation in the lower margin. Beautifully illustrated in manuscript, the declaration is adorned with a hand-coloured heart motif surrounding the vows, topped with a crown and the cross of Jesus, each of the three signatures also bordered with lovely fluid shapes. Committing to communal life and a noble purpose after having been immersed into learning and practicing the eremitic ways of life for one full year, with the present document, the writer professes permanent vows of obedience to the Church, which were once binding for life, and thus he becomes a true monk. He claims his entitlement to the status, by including the names of his parents, and by doing so, confirming that he is 'of free condition and born of a legitimate marriage,' which was a common condition of acceptance into several monastic orders in the Middle Ages and even into the Early Modern Period.
Visitors Book for Guests of the Hythe Golf Club

Visitors Book for Guests of the Hythe Golf Club, Founded in 1894, with 78 Manuscript Signatures Penned on 10 Leafs.

Ponting and British Royalty Visitors book for guests of the Hythe Golf Club, founded in 1894, with 78 manuscript signatures penned on 10 leafs. 8vo. Full calf binding, with impressed heraldic seal to front, raised lettering "CCW The Links Hythe" also to front, five raised bands to spine, untrimmed leafs. Volume measures approximately 21 x 26,5 x 2,5 cm. Wear to boards, front bowed slightly, otherwise in very good condition, containing some notable signatures. Members of the British monarchy's household are featured in the volume, with signatures made on 8 August 1823, including Albert, Duke of York, (later King George VI). His new bride, Elizabeth, Duchess of York (later the Queen Mother) evidently accompanied him, he signing on her behalf. Also with them, and signing in the original, was lady-in-waiting Katharine Meade, as well as the Duke's advisor Sir Louis Greig. Sir Clement Anderson Montague-Barlow, 1st Baronet, who at the time was Minister of Labour and a member of the Privy Council, also signed on the same day, as well as six others. Having just been married in April, during the summer of 1923 Albert and Elizabeth, future King and Queen of the United Kingdom, were travelling a fair bit. They first settled into White Lodge, in Richmond Park. They were spotted at the Richmond Show, and shortly after that at the Hendon Air Show. They visited Holyrood House in Edinburgh in July. Their social life was beginning on a grand scale. At the end of the season, they went to stay at Molecomb and attended the races at Goodwood. The present volume reveals a little-known and rather private event at the Hythe Links Golf Course on 8 August 1923. Among other elite visitors whose signatures are present in the volume, we find: - Antarctic explorer Herbert G. Ponting - Sir William Letts a pioneer of the British motor industry and founder member of the Automobile Association - City of London Alderman Sir Maurice Jenks, and family - Sir Samuel George Shead Esq. who was appointed one of the two Sheriffs of London in 1915 - Sir Herbert Benjamin Cohen 2nd Baronet Cohen of Highfield - Colonel J.V. Delahaye, first president of the WOSB.
Signed Manuscript Letter on Obeahism

Signed Manuscript Letter on Obeahism, a Form of Sorcery, Witnessed in Demerara in 1844.

French, Daniel Manuscript letter dealing entirely with Obeahism, a form of sorcery, witnessed in 1844 in Demerara [present day Guyana] featuring firsthand gleanings and a personal testimony by the writer, Daniel French, a missionary who had served in the West Indies colony in the 1840s with renowned pioneer missionary and reverend Leonard Strong. 8vo. 6 pages in manuscript. One double leaf stationery of the New Orphan Houses in Ashley Down, Bristol, and one single leaf, both measuring approximately 20,5 x 13 cm. Very slight age-toning, otherwise in very good condition, a rare primary source account with fascinating detail of nineteenth century witchcraft. Daniel French was a missionary in Demerara, West Indies, from 1842, serving with the Christian Brethren of Guyana, a mission established in 1826 by Reverend Leonard Strong (1792-1874), also of Bristol, after he left the Anglican Church to help the indigenous people. The first Brethren Assembly was at Victoria, some 18 miles east of Georgetown on the coast. Daniel French served at the pioneering mission station of Victoria from 1842 to 1844 (possibly longer), before going on to the Essequibo District. He is connected to several other notable Bristol men who pioneered the missions in British Guiana, including Mr. George Müller, founder of the New Orphan Houses of Bristol, who sent aid in 1843 to Reverend Strong. The present letter reveals that he worked in Demerara with Mr. Barrington, William Harrison, and Jean Meyer, and he that he had returned to Bristol by 1868, where he continued to work with Müller on benevolent humanitarian causes. Daniel French had a daughter named Mary E., born in Demerara, British Guyana, in 1846. According to the 1891 United Kingdom Census list of "Persons from British Guiana" she was then working as an assistant at "Müller's Orphanage", her residence being 86 North Rd in Bristol. The writer was one of the first missionaries to work among the oppressed African population in the colony of British Guiana in the 1840s. Slavery had only just been truly abolished in 1 August 1838. In the present correspondence, he recollects the local beliefs and practices of Obeahism, and one particularly hair-raising and haunting experience which he encountered personally.
Signed Manuscript Letter in German with a Red Wax Seal

Signed Manuscript Letter in German with a Red Wax Seal, Written During the Great Saxony Famine, Concerning the Scarcity of Corn.

Sxony Famine Primary source manuscript signed letter written during the great Saxony famine, which claimed many civilian lives, addressed to the Count of Lippe-Alverdissen [Philipp Ernest II], concerning the scarcity of corn. Text is in German. Quarto. 3 pages in manuscript. Double leaf aid paper measuring approximately 20 x 32 cm, with two watermarks, red and black marbles wax seal of a dove with olive branch. Minor indication of moisture to upper margin unobtrusive to text, otherwise in very good condition, a fascinating early correspondence with a beautiful intact red wax seal. Rare primary source account concerning a matter of urgency - the shortage of corn in the regions surrounding Lower Saxony - during the 1771-1772 famine, which reveals the geographical extent of the calamity as it spread beyond Saxony to its neighbouring counties, and provides specific corn measurements recorded by a notable corn keeper and merchant in Münster. The writer, W. Helbricht, appears to be the "frumentarius" (a corn dealer), and also the "kornschreiber" (one who keeps record of the corn). In his correspondence to the count, he pleads for mercy, explaining that in Alverdisser there had not been much corn recently. He provides specific measurements to illustrate the dire circumstances. His wax seal is also telling of the period, being a crisp image of a dove holding an olive branch, the traditional symbol of peace and hope. The scarcity of corn was so great in Saxony and Southern Germany, that large numbers of civilians died of starvation, some estimates citing approximately 150,000 deaths.