White Fox Rare Books

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A Second Century of Orchidaceous Plants. Selected from the Subjects Published in ‘Curtis Botanical Magazine’ since the Issue of the ‘First Century’ Selected from the Subjects Published in ‘Curtis Botanical Magazine’ since the Issue of the ‘First Century’

Bateman, James 4to. 31 by 24.5 cm. Half title, title, viii, followed by 100 hand-colored lithographic plates by or after Walter Hood Fitch, each accompanied by a page or two of explanatory text, except in this copy the explanation for plate 169 is missing. (All plates are present.) Text for plate 169 lacking, text for plate 117 and plate 118 with chipping to edges, laid down, light dampstaining at end.) Contemporary green cloth, edges gilt (some light darkening and staining); modern half morocco folding case. FIRST EDITION of Bateman’s continuation of Sir William Jackson Hooker's A Century of Orchidaceous Plants, published by Reeve in 1846. The present work was issued in parts between 1864 and 1870 (according to B. Jackson Guide to the Literature of Botany, 1881), and like its predecessor includes specimens originally featured in Curtis's Botanical Magazine. Many of the species described are cool-climate orchids: these were largely ignored by collectors, after some initial enthusiasm, until the basic fact that they required a cool climate to flourish was understood. This took over twenty years and the present work covers the period when the group was embraced with renewed enthusiasm. BM (NH) I,p.109; Great Flower Books (1990), p.73; Nissen BBI 87; Stafleu & Cowan TL2 344. Pebbled cloth. Later half green morocco custom box. Box with marbled paper boards.
book (2)

Souvenir of Choir “Surprise” — November 27, ’97

A beautiful, unusual homemade book celebrating, with gently mocking satiric verse and exquisite small silhouette drawings, an amateur choir in a Wisconsin. As if to reinforce the eccentric whimsy of the undertaking, this was done as a slant book, or parallelogram-shaped binding. Slightly oblong, 21 by 22 cm, and 20 cm in height. 32 leaves, with all text and illustrations on rectos. Small vignette illustrations, all in black ink and silhouette, on almost every page, up to four such whimsical illustrations per page. Most pages contains light verse poking fun at one of the members of the choir, including their leader, Pastor John E. Farmer. These are of various length -- four to sixteen lines -- and some qualify as limericks. Just one example of the verse: "E. A. Tostevin wouldn't say his prayers/ His wife boxed his ears and sent him downstairs/ He picked himself up and climed [sic] on the shelf/ If you want any more you may write it yourself." The choir sang at the First Methodist Episcopal Church in Racine. Our conjecture is that this album was a gift to the Pastor. Stab bound, with leather cord used to hold boards and leaves within together. Modern binding -- a replacement binding, of one quarter ridged morocco -- parallel lines impressed parallel to vertical slant. Marbled paper pastedown on boards. Condition: newer endpapers along with rebinding. Leaves not in original order probably, since light offsetting onto versos doesn't always correspond with facing recto. (But this doesn't matter, really, since each page is an entity unto itself.) Quarter Leather. Marbled pastedown on boards. Leather cord.
Three Albums of Monograms and Crests worked into Original Watercolors

Three Albums of Monograms and Crests worked into Original Watercolors

N.d., 1870s or 1880s. English in original. Albums are each 35 by 29 cm. In total, 309 original artworks incorporating monograms, crests and very occasionally other die-cuts, these being the size of typical monograms. Of these 309 separate specimens, we would say that 79, or slightly over 25 percent of them, stand out as extraordinary in some way compared to the more pedestrian monogram and crest album. Into this "extraordinary" category we would hold out as the most special those artworks which tell a story of some kind, such as one illustration in which we see cats tumbling into a tub. In another, manned balloons are flying over a coastal area. Then we include as "extrordinary" the wider category of paintings which have human and/or animal subjects, even if they do not have quite the same narrative thrust to them. To list just a few of these, there is the boy in a turban, the painting of a concubine, a boy with a kite, a painting of a peacock, of a cow, of butterflies . . . Also special, in our judgment, are paintings of objects that were not conventions in the monogram album, and particular objects that are elaborate, including a painting of an organ. Then there is the larger number that we are not categorizing as extraordinary, that isn't meant to disparage these, which can also be quite strikingly beautiful, and some of them are surely unique in their specific design. We throw into this larger grouping all the artworks which are fundamentally geometric designs, kaleidoscope-like, or of simple objects or objects which are comparatively common in the genre of monogram albums. We would note that these, too, are still painted by the artist, whereas in the majority of monogram albums the designs are printed. The geometric designs can also be very elaborate -- we make no distinction for the purposes of our general categorization -- and separating the more common and/or simple objects from the more rarefied ones is obviously a judgment call on our part.
The Park and Its Vicinity in the City of New York Gleanings from the Harvest-field of American history

The Park and Its Vicinity in the City of New York Gleanings from the Harvest-field of American history

Dawson, Henry B. Original watercolors added by Thomas Addis Emmet Lovely added watercolors in the margins and sometimes lightly overlaying the text, done in 1903 by Thomas Emmet. No. 96 of 250 copies in limitation and signed by Henry B. Dawson, and extra-illustrated ("Graingerized") separate from the watercolor work done subsequently. 4to. 27 by 20 cm. viii, 95 pp., not counting the many unpaginated plates. With 94 plates, nine of which are color or partly colored. 41 of these plates are architectural or panoramic in nature, 49 are portraits, one is a watercolor coat-of-arms, two, historical genre illustration. One plate folding. The book itself is about City Hall Park, which remains a gem in Lower Manhattan, and covered in the work is the history of the park's neighborhood from the English seizure of the city from the Dutch in 1664 to the nineteenth century. This is not a book that aims for literary honors; at best, its style might be described as quaint, with a knowing discursiveness and occasional opaqueness. It is the book's augmented elements -- rich variety of plates, and the charming watercolors -- that are far more bound to excite, both now and in an earlier time. Places painted include Burn's Coffee House, Bowling Green, the Jail, and views of City Hall and the park in front. Watercolored vignette portraits are of of Henry Dawson, David Valentine (the dedicatee and also the author of the numerous annual Manuals), Alexander Hamilton, James Duane (?) and George Washington. Finally there is a full page plate with a painting of the Delancey coat-of-arms. Condition: rebacked with a lighter brown morocco that is nonetheless most fitting and attractively melds with the leather on the boards. Light age toning of the leaves around the edges. Occasional light foxing. Generally clean, and a most handsome copy overall.