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Boston Book Company, Inc.

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MEDICAL ZOOLOGY AND MINERALOGY

MEDICAL ZOOLOGY AND MINERALOGY

STEPHENSON, John STEPHENSON, John. MEDICAL ZOOLOGY AND MINERALOGY; OR ILLUSTRATIONS AND DESCRIPTIONS OF THE ANIMALS AND MINERALS EMPLOYED IN MEDICINE AND OF THE PREPARATIONS DERIVED FROM THEM: INCLUDING ALSO AN ACCOUNT OF ANIMAL AND MINERAL POISONS: WITH FIGURES COLORED FROM NATURE. London: John Churchill, 1838. Second edition. A complete set of 46 lithographic plates, bright and clean. All but three are hand-colored. They are numbered 1-29, 29A, 30-45. (Although the final plate, number 45 is mistakenly numbered 42.) Plate 29, a folding plate, has short edgetears at creases. Ex-library, with no external marks and all of the usual marks within, but no marks to prints. 8vo., brown three-quarter morocco with marbled boards, slightly rubbed at edges and joints. An early text on the medical uses of plant and animal extracts, intended as a continuation of Stephenson and Churchill's treatise on Medical Botany. The author notes that "the medical reader will find every substance retained in modern practice has been fully and accurately described," and indeed this volume is a wealth of information on animal and minerals, with descriptions of the animal's habitats as well as their Latin, common and local names. The plates, were drawn from specimens held by the British Museum with additional specimens of poisonous snakes by Thomas Bell, another noted naturalist. A wide variety of useful creatures and minerals are depicted and described, including the recently discovered platypus, snakes, parasites and others. The text goes on to describe and illustrate minerals, denoting their chemical makeup and crystalline structures. The work of a meticulous, multi-talented naturalist from a golden age of scientific progress and publishing. A very good copy.
Nikuhitsu Manga KAIKOKU ROKUJUNENSHI ZU-E

Nikuhitsu Manga KAIKOKU ROKUJUNENSHI ZU-E

[PAINTING ALBUM] [PAINTING ALBUM]. Nikuhitsu Manga KAIKOKU ROKUJUNENSHI ZU-E. Done by the Chuo Bijutsu Kyokai in Tokyo in 1927 as a 43 x 31 cm portfolio of 52 original watercolor drawings (counting the table of contents and cover title label) on satiric and comical themes, done to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the opening of Japan in the mid-19th century. The title represents quite a liberal interpretation of chronology, since the opening of Japan was in 1854, but it is probably refers to the Meiji Restoration as the beginning of "opening" and also refers to Baron Okuma's somber and influential 50 year history of modern Japan with its almost identical title, done in 1909. There was more than one set of these drawings assembled. It seems to have been issued as a limited hand-drawn edition. One of several such major painted works in a manga style There is a hand-written table of contents/colophon with the captions of the drawings and their artists listed by Nakamura Fusetsu (1866-1943), the important Haiga artist. Two dozen or so of the most prominent cartoonists, satirists and artists are represented. One of the two watercolors by the great cartoonist Okamoto Ippei (1886-1948) is a caricature of his friend Natsume Soseki, the famous author of "I Am A Cat" captured with his pet tabby beside him, inextricably linked in Ippei's imagination, and ours. The "father of modern manga", Kitazawa Rakuten (1876-1955), has two, as do the important printmakers, Maekawa Sempan (1888-1960) and Mizushima Nihofu (1884-1958). The list of talented and significant contributors goes on as does the subject matter: political satire, China vs. Japan, East vs. West, tradition vs. modernity, technology vs. craft, from abstract Sumo wrestlers to a surreal embodied eye, a congeries of images overwhelms our eyes in turn. A wonderful visual epitome of the free spirit of democracy if not anarchy in the 1920s before the dark days to come. In very good condition, the watercolors are skillful and powerful. There is quite a bit of contemporary supplementary material included from the time.
TESUKI WASHI TAIKAN

TESUKI WASHI TAIKAN

[JAPANESE PAPERMAKING] MAINICHI SHINBUNSHA [JAPANESE PAPERMAKING]. Edited and compiled by the Editorial Committee for the Tesukiwashi Taikan; editorial staff: Bunsho Jugaku [and others], with the cooperation of the Printing Bureau, Ministry of Finance, the Paper Museum, the National Papermaking Technology Association, and the National Federation of "Tesukiwashi" Makers' Associations. TESUKI WASHI TAIKAN. Tokyo: Mainichi Shinbunsha [Mainichi Newspapers], 1974. 5 huge chitsu cases (each box is approximately 21 x 16 x 6 inches and weighs around 30 lbs.) containing a total of 1001 mounted paper samples:1000 numbered samples, plus 1 unnumbered sample of Uzokogami (Vol. 1, portfolio 5). Samples are mounted on and enclosed in kozo paper wrappers, either individually or in groups of 2-4, with explanatory letterpress. The paper samples are fine but for the usual and expected offsetting from samples that contain untreated organic materials, such as buckwheat, bark, etc., and a couple of samples that were treated with oil to boost their waterproofing qualities. The wrapper sheets are grouped and housed in colored paper portfolios within the chitsu cases. 7 text volumes (bilingual: Japanese and English, 14 6/16 X 7 5/16 inches, various pp.), some illustrated, some with samples. Limited to 1000 copies, this set is number 649. Each of the boxes has a text volume comprised of a table of contents, essays that relate to the type of papers included in the portfolios in that particular box, and a list of the papers included in the portfolios, along with the names of their makers: v. 1. Kizukigami. v. 2. Sukimoyogami. v. 3. Wazomegami. v. 4. Kako washi. v. 5. Chiyogami. Katazomegami. The first box contains another volume of equal size; it is a "Chronology and Glossary" of papermaking, again in both languages, but with a Japanese-language (only) index to the complete set at the end of the Japanese text. The second box also has another dual language volume, it is a slim photo-essay, "How Japanese Make Paper By Hand," that is of equal size to the text volumes. All text volumes, except "How Japanese make paper by hand," are printed on double leaves of kozo paper, Japanese style, and sewn in paper wrappers, Japanese style. A complete set, housed in the original, green cloth-covered clamshell boxes. All have some external spotting but are internally fine. Each clamshell box is housed in the publisher's protective cardboard carton with labels. To quote from Soren Edgren's description of this work, from a catalogue published in 1978, "The beauty and value of this collection defy description. The numbered samples with their detailed bilingual data constitute a Papermaking Museum. Another undertaking approaching this magnitude is inconceivable today." It is the ultimate work on the subject. In excellent condition overall. HOWEVER, please note this set is specially priced to reflect the fact that it is missing the "Chronology and Glossary" of papermaking, a pamphlet usually found in the first box. And, it lacks Folio 484 with a sample of "Ganryo Hikizomegami Oodan". The printed pamphlet will be supplied in a copy. The paper sample being missing the set only has 1,000 of 1,001 paper samples, and has been priced to reflect that.
book (2)

KINSEI KIJIN-DEN

[EHON] Mikuma Katen, artist [EHON] Mikuma Katen, artist. KINSEI KIJIN-DEN, 5 vols. Kyoto, Hishiya Magobei, et al. Kansei 2 [1790]. String-bound Japanese-style fukuro toji, in textured blue-grey covers with printed paper title labels. 37 single page and 2 double page b+w woodcuts, largely depicting the subject matter of the title: TALES OF ECCENTRICS FROM RECENT YEARS. Originally printed, as here, in 1790, this is a deservedly famous and oft-reprinted work in Japan. This is probably a relatively early reprint. It has Wonderful thin paper. The KIJIN_DEN catalogues the eccentricities and eccentrics of the late 18th Century - a time of florescence of the "bunjin" literati ideal in Japan. The bunjin created an esthetically pure environment in the midst of the bustle (and corruption) of everyday life. The initial exemplars were those scholars and artists who withdrew from public life in China after the fall of the Ming Dynasty to the alien Manchus in the mid-17th Century. The KIJIN-DEN represents one of the efforts by the Japanese to domesticate a Chinese cultural import and find native representatives of the literati ideal. It should be noted that this guide came out just as the Kansei Reforms, with a decidedly Confucian, if not authoritarian, bent, had just been promulgated. The "kijin" or literatus might well chafe under such a "reform" agenda. This book even well be seen as a bit of cultural protest on behalf of the individual ideal. The KIJIN-DEN is interesting for its exploration of the art world in Japan- for example, there is a domestic scene of the painters Ikeno Taiga and wife Gyokuran, among others. (Unfortunately, it is the only torn woodcut with part of the image missing) Indeed, there are many women depicted in the KIJIN-DEN. (See JAPANESE WOMEN ARTISTS 1600-1900) Also see Ryerson 416, Mitchell 364, Hillier/Ravicz 22. The condition is good over all, the printings are fair to good. There was a second series done some few years later, but this first series is complete as issued in 5 volumes.