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Mémoire sur la découverte du magnétisme animal

MESMER, Franz Anton Mesmerism MESMER, Franz Anton. Mémoire sur la découverte du magnétisme animal. Geneva: Chez P. Fr. Didot le jeune, 1779. First edition of the manifesto of mesmerism. Small octavo. [2], vi, 85, [3, blank] pp. With half-title. Garrison and Morton 4992.1. Hunter & Macalpine, pp. 480-482. Norman Library M4. Printing and the Mind of Man 225. [Bound together with:] ESLON, Charles d’. Observations sur le magnétisme animal. London: P. Fr. Didot, le jeune, 1780. First edition. Small octavo. [4], 151, [1, blank] pp. Norman Library M77 (1781 edition). [And:] ROUSSEL DE VAUZESME, August. De Sectione Symphyseos Ossium Pubis Admittenda. nova editio, aucta & emendata. Paris: in medicorum scholis apud autorem, 1778. A new edition, expanded and ammended, the same year as the first edition. Small octavo. [iii]-114, [1, errata], [1, blank] pp. Bound without half-title. A treatise arguing in favor of symphysiotomy over Caesarean section during childbirth. Together three works in one small octavo volume (6 1/2 x 4 1/8 inches; 166 x 104 mm), containing Mesmer’s work and a response supporting it. Contemporary quarter sheep over paste paper boards. Spine stamped in gilt with brown morocco gilt lettering label. Edges dyed red. Overall an extremely clean nice copy. "The manifesto of animal magnetism. On the eve of the French Revolution, Mesmer captured the imagination of the Parisian pubic with his remarkable ability to effect cures by throwing his patients into ‘mesmeric’ trances, and with his philosophical system aimed at creating amore perfect human society through harmony with the physical universe. As much a social movement as a medical practice, mesmerism spread quickly throughout Europe and America, and became such a mania in pre-Revolutionary France that between 1779 and 1789 more literature was generated on mesmerism than on any other single topic. At first Mesmer used actual magnets to perform his cures but later dispensed with these on the ground that nearly all substances could be magnetized by touch. He employed either direct contact between physician and patient, or contact via the ‘baquet,’ a tub-like apparatus which could be charged with the universal fluid like a Leyden jar. Mesmer always insisted on the physical nature of his cures, which he initially ascribed to magnetic forces or electricity; later he devised the theory of a ‘universal fluid’ acting on the nervous system, which was susceptible to this fluid on account of its inherent property of ‘animal magnetism.’ It is ironic that Mesmer refused to credit the agency of the mind in any of his cures, because his discovery led to the large-scale investigation of psychological phenomena, and is thus an ancestor of psychopathology and psychotherapy" (Norman Library). "Eslon, a docteur régent of the Faculté de Médecine, was the first important Parisian convert to mesmerism. His outspoken support and practice of Mesmer’s techniques caused dissention within the Faculté and so antagonized its conservative majority that he was eventually expelled. Eslon later broke with Mesmer and set up a rival mesmeric treatment center in Paris, where he practiced his own version of animal magnetism. When the royal commission to investigate mesmerism was formed it was Eslon’s practice and theory of animal magnetism that the commission examined, much to the displeasure of orthodox mesmerists. The present work is Eslon’s major treatise on magnetism, describing his first encounter with animal magnetism and how he became convinced of its efficacy. It also gives the details of eighteen cases treated by Mesmer under Eslon’s observation, one of the patients being Eslon himself" (Norman Library). Garrison and Morton 4992.1. Norman Library M4. Norman Library M77. PMM 225. HBS 68250. $4,500
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Doctrine of Chances or, a Method of Calculating the Probability of Events in Play.

DE MOIVRE, Abraham First Edition of This Very Important Title on The Subject of Probability and Statistics DE MOIVRE, Abraham. The Doctrine of Chances. or, a Method of Calculating the Probability of Events in Play. London: W. Pearson for the AUTHOR, 1718. First edition. Small folio (9 5/8 x 7 7/8 inches; 240 x 200 mm). [4], xiv, 175, [1, blank] pp. With an engraved vignette on title-page, numerous engraved head and tail pieces and initials, and an engraved vignette headpiece on page 1. With a dedication to Sir Issac Newton. Contemporary speckled calf, rebacked to style. Boards double-ruled in gilt. Spine with a red morocco label, lettered and ruled in gilt. All edges speckled brown. Some minor soiling to final two pages. Some light toning from glue on endpaper edges. Previous owner's armorial bookplate on front pastedown. Overall a very good copy. Abraham De Moivre (1667-1754), was a mathematician and a close friend of Sir Isaac Newton (to whom De Moivre dedicated the first edition of this work.) "His work on the theory of probability surpasses anything done by any other mathematician except Laplace." (Cajori, p. 245). "De Moivre's representation of the solutions of the then current problems of games of chance tended to be more general than those of Montmort. In addition he developed a series of algebraic and analytic tools for the theory of probability, like a ‘new algebra’ for the solution of the problem of coincidences which foreshadowed Boolean algebra, the method of generating functions, or the theory of recurrent series for the solution of differential equations. In the Doctrine de Moivre offered an introduction which contains the main concepts such as probability, conditional probability, expectation, dependent and independent events, the multiplication rule, and the binomial distribution." (DNB) HBS 68249. $10,000
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Mathematical Compendium or, Useful practices in arithmetick, geometry, and astronomy, geography and navigation, embattelling, and quartering of armies, fortification and gunnery, gauging and dyalling. Explaining the logarithms, with new indices; Nepair’s rods or bones making of movements, and the application of pendulums; with the projection of the sphere for an universal dyal, &c. By Sir Jonas Moore, Knt. late surveyor general of his Majesty’s Ord’nance. The Second Edition, with any large Additions.

MOORE, Jonas Second and Much Expanded Edition, In Contemporary Calf MOORE, Jonas. A Mathematical Compendium; or, Useful Practices In Arithmetick, Geometry, And Astronomy, Geography And Navigation, Embattelling, And Quartering Of Armies, Fortification And Gunnery, Gauging And Dyalling. Explaining The Logarithms, With New Indices; Nepair’S Rods Or Bones Making Of Movements, And The Application Of Pendulums; With The Projection Of The Sphere For An Universal Dyal, &c. By Sir Jonas Moore, Knt. late surveyor general of his Majesty’s Ord’nance. The Second Edition, with any large Additions. London: Printed for Robert Harford, 1681. [With separate title-page but continuous collation]: A Table Of Artificial Sines And Tangents, For Every Degree And Minute Of The Quadrant, Fitted To The Size Of The Logarithms. London: Printed for Robert Harford, 1679. Second and much expanded edition. Two parts in one twelvemo volume (5 x 2 7/8 inches; 125 x 73 mm). 24, 120, [178], [2, advertisements] pp. With one engraved folding plate (often lacking) and six engraved plates in the text, two of which are tipped in and folding. With numerous tables labeled "Brigg's Logarithms." With final advertisement leaf. First title-page in double-ruled border. The folding plates are as such, folding engraved perpetual calendar mounted on A1r; folding scale mounted on F5v; folding engraved plate of latitude calculations bound after page 120. This second edition with "many large additions" has nearly 100 pages more than the first edition. Full contemporary mottled calf, rebacked to style. Boards double-ruled in blind. Edges speckled red. Spine lettered in gilt. Corners slightly bumped. Final advertisement leaf trimmed a bit close on fore-edge. Overall a very good, clean copy. Regarding the first edition, "his notes were edited by his Ordnance second clerk, Nicholas Stephenson, to form a pocket-book, Mathematical Compendium (1674)." (DNB) "Handbook of applied mathematics first published in 1674, including instructions for using the elementary mechanical calculating device known as "Napier's Bones," a distant forerunner of the computer, developed in the early 1600s by John Napier, the inventor of logarithms." (Swann Galleries) "Sir Jonas Moore (1617-1679) was a practical mathematician, teacher, and author who, when unable to make a living as a tutor and professor of mathematics, rose to prominence in the Restoration court of Charles II, after demonstrating his value as a surveyor and cartographer. On being appointed to the high office of Surveyor General of the King's Ordnance, he used both his income and his influence with the King to become a patron of navigational astronomy. An able mathematician (he is best known for his work in trigonometry and the development of the 'cos.' in mathematical equations), his enduring importance derives from his strong support of mathematics and astronomy which made many other mathematical and astronomical advances possible." (DNB). ESTC R269. Wing M2573. HBS 68247. $3,000
Collection of 43 19th century original pen-and-ink botanical drawings

Collection of 43 19th century original pen-and-ink botanical drawings, captioned and inscribed U. S. Exploration 40th Parallel. King.

WATSON, Sereno A Collection Of Forty-Three Botanical Drawings, Most Likely By Sereno Watson. WATSON, Sereno, [illustrator]. A Collection of Forty-Three nineteenth-century original pen-and-ink botanical drawings, captioned and inscribed "U. S. Exploration 40th Parallel. King." and "U.S. Survey 35th Parallel." [C.a. 1876-77]. A collection of forty-three botanical drawings, most likely by Sereno Watson. Each cream colored paper sheet with botanical illustrations in brown ink on recto. (Sheet size 11 3/4 x 7 1/8 inches; 298 x 181 mm). Sheets with an occasional crease or small rust spot, however the illustrations in general are very clean and attractive. Illustrations with the inscribed captions as follows: Eight with "U. S. Exploration 40th Parallel. King." numbered in the upper right corner 2-9 Twenty-four with "U.S. Survey 35th Parallel." and one unmarked, but fits in with the pagination of the "35th Parallel" numbered on the bottom margin 18-38, 43-44, 48 & 50. Dated between "December 8th-21st/ 76," some marked "San Francisco." Two with "U.S.S. Cal Durand & Hilgard" numbered in bottom margin 62-63. dated "Dec 29th /76." One with "U.S.S. Cal Newberry" numbered in bottom margin 100 and dated "Jan 8th/ 77". Seven with "U.S.S. Cal Utah &c" numbered in bottom margin 1-7 and dated "San Francisco March 27th/77" In regards to the eight captioned "40th Parallel" each page with a number or two on the bottom right corner. The number/numbers correspond to the plate or plates in volume V of the "United States Geological Exploration of the Fortieth Parallel" by Sereno Watson. For example the figures on our first illustration numbered 2-3 on the bottom right corner are the plants found on plates II and III in the published volume. Most all other illustrations have page numbers on the bottom that correspond to the pages the plant is listed on in Watson's "Botany, The Geological Survey of California." There are no drawings associated with the volume, but the names correspond to the indexed listings. "[Watson] went to California and, after a while, joined Clarence King's Expedition, which was carrying out a geological survey of the 40th parallel. Watson started working without salary and eventually came to be appointed the expedition botanist, after William Whitman Bailey left due to illness. Although he had no prior botanical training, Watson wrote the Botany of the King Expedition (Vol. % for the Geological Survey, published 1871), working at New Haven under Daniel Cady Eaton and at Harvard under Asa Gray. Watson's botanical report is considered among the best of the survey expedition reports, owing in part to the careful notes on habitat made by Watson in the field. Asa Gray was much impressed with his work, and in 1873 appointed Watson an assistant in the Gray Herbarium. Watson's term as curator lasted until his death in 1892; he was also instructor in phytogeography from 1881 to 1884. After getting settled at Harvard, Watson was invited by W. H Brewer to work on the Botany of California. The first volume, by Brewer, Gray and Watson, was published in 1876; the second volume, by Watson alone, was published in 1880. Watson spent much time preparing a Bibliographical Index to North American Botany: only the first part -- Polypetalae -- was published, in 1878." ("Sereno Watson Biography", The Library of the Gray Herbarium). HBS 68089. $17,500
Political Anatomy of Ireland With the establishment for that kingdom when the late Duke of Ormond was Lord Lieutenant. Taken from the records. To which is added Verbum sapienti; or an account of the wealth and expences of England

Political Anatomy of Ireland With the establishment for that kingdom when the late Duke of Ormond was Lord Lieutenant. Taken from the records. To which is added Verbum sapienti; or an account of the wealth and expences of England, and the method of raising taxes in the most equal manner. Shewing also, that the nation can bear the charge of four millions per annum, when the occasions of the government require it.

PETTY, William "The Father of English Political Economy"- Marx PETTY, William. The Political Anatomy of Ireland. With the establishment for that kingdom when the late Duke of Ormond was Lord Lieutenant. Taken from the records. To which is added Verbum sapienti; or an account of the wealth and expences of England, and the method of raising taxes in the most equal manner. Shewing also, that the nation can bear the charge of four millions per annum, when the occasions of the government require it. London: Printed for D. Brown, and W. Rogers, 1691. First edition. Small octavo (6 5/8 x 4 3/16 inches; 168 x 106 mm). [16], 205, [1, blank], [2, half-title], 24, [4, blank] pp. Part two, "Verbum sapienti", has a separate half-title and separate pagination but collation is continuous. Contemporary blind paneled calf, rebacked to style. Spine with red morocco spine label, lettered in gilt. Gilt board edges. All edges speckled red. Edges a bit bumped and rubbed. Some chipping to boards where clasps have been removed. Some minor toning and a bit of light soiling throughout. Remnants of a removed bookplate on front pastedown. Overall a very good copy. "The key figure in the development of an agrarian model in English political economy is William Petty. Petty is widely acknowledged to be a founder of classical political economy. Marx dubbed him 'the father of English political economy' and praised his 'audacious genius.'" (Political Economy and the Rise of Capitalism, David McNally). "Sir William Petty (1623--1687), political economist, served as administrator in Ireland under Cromwell and Charles II. He completed the survey of Ireland, published an accurate map of the island, and worked throughout his life for the improvement of the English administration of that country, particularly in financial matters. He was the valued friend of Pepys and Evelyn, and author of various treatises on taxes, currency, economy and government, including the first book on vital statistics, a study of London. Although the Political Anatomy was written in 1672, this is its first publication. Also appearing in this volume, for the first time, is Petty’s essay Verbum Sapienti, a study of the English tax system." (Howell) Goldsmiths' 2868. Kress 1769. Wing P1931. HBS 68245. $6,500
History of the Indian Tribes of North America With Biographical Sketches and Anecdotes of the Principal Chiefs Embellished With One Hundred and Twenty Portraits. From the Indian Gallery in the Department of War

History of the Indian Tribes of North America With Biographical Sketches and Anecdotes of the Principal Chiefs Embellished With One Hundred and Twenty Portraits. From the Indian Gallery in the Department of War, at Washington.

MCKENNEY, Thomas L. First Edition Complete With One Hundred And Twenty Hand-Colored Plates Samuel Colt's Copy, With His Signature on Laid-in Original Wrappers MCKENNEY, Thomas L. HALL, James. History of the Indian Tribes of North America. With Biographical Sketches and Anecdotes of the Principal Chiefs Embellished With One Hundred and Twenty Portraits. From the Indian Gallery in the Department of War, at Washington. Philadelphia: Published by Frederick W. Greenough, 1838 (Volume I). Published by Daniel Rice & James G. Clark, 1842 (Volume II), Published by Daniel Rice & James G. Clark, 1844 (Volume III). First edition, mixed issue as usual. Bound from the parts, as so slightly larger than other copies. Subscriber Samuel Colt's copy. Colt is listed as a subscriber herein. Complete with one hundred and twenty hand-colored plates. According to BAL, volume I with title-page in State C, volume II with title-page in State B and volume III with title-page in State A. Three large folio volumes (20 3/4 x 15 inches; 524 x 380 mm). [2, title], [2, contents],[3]-4, [1]-202, [2], [203]-204; [2, title], [2, contents], [3]-237, [1, blank]; [4], [1]-196, [2, "The Genuineness of the Portrait of Pocahontas"] pp. Plus a single leaf of lithographed maps ("Localities of All Indian Tribes of North America in 1833") and a seventeen-page list of facsimile signatures of the subscribers. Complete with the 120 color-plates. The color-plates are after Charles Bird King, James Otto Lewis, P. Rhindesbacher and R.M. Sully, drawn on stone by A. Newsam, A.H., R.T., H.D. and others, printed and colored by Lehman & Duval, or J.T. Bowen. The "War Dance" plate is in state D and the "Red-Jacket" plate is in state F according to BAL, the order of states being "All but arbitrary." Plate to face page 75 in volume I (L'Ietan) is bound as the first plate in volume III. Laid in are original printed front wrappers to numbers 1-4, 7 and 9 and a rear wrapper listing the agents for the set by state from an unidentified number, each with the ink ownership signature of subscriber Samuel Colt. A very interesting provenance given the influence Colt's invention, the revolver, had on the settlement of the western Indian territories. Contemporary half red morocco over pebbled cloth. Boards tooled in gilt. Spines stamped and lettered in gilt. Marbled endpapers. Some foxing and staining to text throughout and some offsetting as usual. In general, the plates being on better stock, are in generally quite clean and the color is bright. Some repaired edge tears. A tear to text leaf (page 121, volume III) with loss. A few plates with some mostly marginal foxing, toning and staining. Each volume housed in a brick-red cloth clamshell, with red morocco labels. Overall a very nice set. 'One of the most costly and important works ever published on the American Indians' (Field), 'a landmark in American culture' (Horan) and an invaluable contemporary record of a vanished way of life, including some of the greatest American hand-colored lithographs of the 19th century. McKenney, who was superintendent of Indian trade from 1816-1822 and headed the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs from 1824-1830, collaborated with James Hall, the Illinois journalist, lawyer, state treasurer and from 1833 Cincinnati banker, to produce this book. The text, which was written by Hall based on information supplied by McKenney, takes the form of a series of biographies of leading figures amongst the Indian nations, followed by a general history of the North American Indians. The work is now famous for its color plate portraits of the chiefs, warriors and squaws of the various tribes, faithful copies of original oils by Charles Bird King painted from life in his studio in Washington (McKenney commissioned him to record the visiting Indian delegates) or worked up by King from the watercolors of the young frontier artist, James Otto Lewis. The original paintings were destroyed in the disastrous Smithsonian fire of 1865 so their appearance in this work preserves the only known likeness of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the early 19th century. This was the most elaborate plate book produced in the United States to date, and its publication involved a number of different printers and lithographers. The publication of volume I (in 1836) was initially undertaken by Edward C. Biddle, Biddle's firm was taken over by Frederick W. Greenough, who re-issued volume I and published the first issue of volume II in 1838 (as in the present set). Later, Greenough's firm was replaced by the printing form of Rice and Clark who re-issued volume I and volume II and published the first issue of volume III in 1844. The printing of the plates was chiefly carried out by Peter Duval of Lehman and Duval and James T. Bowen. BAL 6934. Bennett, p. 79. Howes M129. Sabin 43410a. HBS 68073. $85,000
Birds of America from Drawings Made in the United States and Their Territories. By John James Audubon. [with] ALS

Birds of America from Drawings Made in the United States and Their Territories. By John James Audubon. [with] ALS

AUDUBON, John James The First Octavo Edition, with ALS Signed by "John J. Audubon" AUDUBON, John James. The Birds of America, from Drawings Made in the United States and their Territories. New York: Published by J.J. Audubon, 1840-1844. First octavo edition. Seven large octavo volumes (10 3/16 x 6 3/8 inches; 258 x 161 mm). viii, [9]-246, [249-256, list of Subscribers]; viii, [9]-199, [1, blank], [201-205, lis of subscribers]; viii, [9]-233, [1, blank], [1, list of subscribers], [1, blank]; viii, [9]-321, [1, blank], [1, subscribers], [1, blank]; viii, [9]-346, [1, list of subscribers], [1, blank]; viii, [9]-457, [1, blank], [1, list of subscribers], [1, blank]; ix, [1, blank], [9]-371, [1, blank], [1, list of subscribers], [1, blank] pp. Bound with the lists of subscribers in each volume but without the half-titles. Complete with 500 hand-colored lithographed plates by J.T. Bowen after J.J. Audubon. Woodcuts in the text. With original tissue guards for all plates except one. Publisher's half green morocco over green cloth boards bound by J. Carrs & Co., rebacked with original spines laid down. Boards double ruled in git. Spines ruled and lettered in gilt. All edges gilt. Original yellow coated endpapers. Volume I with mostly marginal foxing and toning to text leaves throughout, but plates all remain very clean. One large dampstain to text page 235 of volume I, minimally affecting the surrounding plates (Plates 66 & 66). Volume II with some minor foxing, mainly to pages 143-162. Some browning to margin of pages 177-183 in volume II, mildly affecting the margins of plates 136 and 137. Volume III with some minor foxing, the worst of it on pages 62-68. Plates 187 and 188 are in reverse order. Some slight browning to the margin of plate 358 in volume VI. Otherwise the volumes are quite clean and the plates are extremely clean and bright. Previous owner's bookplate on back pastedown of each volume. Each volume housed in a green cloth slipcase with green morocco tips. Overall a very nice set. [Together with] AUDUBON, John James. Autograph Letter Signed "John J. Audubon" to "Charles C. Little." New York: February 1, 1841. One quarto page, lettered in ink on recto only (9 3/4 x 7 7/8 inches; 246x198 mm). Dated at the top "February 1, 1841" and addressed to Charles C. Little of Little & Brown, Boston. Light, unobtrusive glue stain on verso, slightly showing through. Sheet reinforced along left margin on verso with some show-through. Creased at folds Overall very good. "New York, 1 February 1841. My Dear Sir, Your prompt action of Jany 29th came safely to hand with the check on the Merchants Bank of Boston for Two hundred Dollars, which we have placed to your credit. I can scarcely yet say when you will receive No. 25 as one of the stories(?) containing 2 plates of that No. broke while printing It will come to you however very soon and will be a lovely Number! I am truly glad to know that our friend Brown made his way through thick and thin as far as Little Rock, and I hope that the grand business he will do may compensate him for all his travelling labours. Present my constant regards to Docr Parkman, Stattuck and Mr. Bancroft, and after all this believe me, My dear sir, Yours very sincerely, John J. Audubon Charles C. Little Esq. of Little & Brown Boston" The subscription of John J Audubon's masterpiece The Birds of America, 1st octavo edition which was published between the years 1840-1844 is most likely what is being discussed in the present letter. "The purely ornithological text of Audubon s Ornithological Biography, 1831-39, revised and rearranged by the author according to his A Synopsis of the Birds of North America, 1839, with much additional matter but with the Delineation of American Scenery and Manner omitted. The plates are modified copies of those of the original folio, The Birds of America, 1827-38, reduced by camera lucida and lithographed. Some of the backgrounds are entirely changed, others greatly modified, and the original
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. In the Year of our Lord

Commonwealth of Massachusetts. In the Year of our Lord, One Thousand Seven Hundred and Eighty-Seven. An Act describing the Disqualifications to which Persons shall be subjected, who have been, or may be guilty of Treason, or giving Aid or Support to the present Rebellion, and to whom a Pardon may be extended.

BOWDOIN, James The Disqualification Act put into Law in Response to Shay's Rebellion BOWDOIN, James. Commonwealth of Massachusetts. In the Year of our Lord, One Thousand Seven Hundred and Eighty-Seven. An Act describing the Disqualifications to which Persons shall be subjected, who have been, or may be guilty of Treason, or giving Aid or Support to the present Rebellion, and to whom a Pardon may be extended.[Boston: Adams & Nourse], February 16, 1787. Broadside, printed in three columns. (13 x 15 3/4 inches; 329 x 402 mm). With minor fold creases. Pinholes at two crease intersections, barely affecting text. A one-ince closed tear to top margin, touching the "C" in the headline "Commonwealth" but no loss of text. Minor dampstain and edges a bit frayed. Contemporary ink notes on blank verso, reading "To the town Clerk of Newberryport." Some toning to blank verso. Paper with a floral watermark. Overall very good. An Act put into law by Massachusetts Governor James Bowdoin in response to Shay's Rebellion which took please over the preceding year. "The Disqualification Act was passed by the House and Senate of Massachusetts on February 16, 1787. It sets forth conditions for granting pardons to the men who participated in Shays' Rebellion as privates or non-commissioned officers. The men were required to turn in their guns and take an oath of allegiance delivered by a Justice of the Peace. The Justice of the Peace was then required to relay the men's names to the clerks of their towns. The men were barred from serving as jurors, members of town or state government and certain professions for three years. They also lost their right to vote in town elections. The men would forfeit their pardons if they did not follow those rules. However, if they could prove their unfailing allegiance to the state on or after May 1, 1788, they would no longer be barred from being a juror, voting or being members of government or certain professions." (From Springfield Technical CC dot edu). "Shays’ Rebellion was a series of violent attacks on courthouses and other government properties in Massachusetts that began in 1786 and led to a full-blown military confrontation in 1787. The rebels were mostly ex-Revolutionary War soldiers-turned farmers who opposed state economic policies causing poverty and property foreclosures. The rebellion was named after Daniel Shays, a farmer and former soldier who fought at Bunker Hill and was one of several leaders of the insurrection. In January 1787, Governor Bowdoin hired his own army, privately funded by Boston businessmen. Some 4,400 men under the command of General Benjamin Lincoln were directed to put down the insurgency." Evans 20510. Ford 2466 HBS 68243. $2,750
Miscellany Poems: As Satyrs

Miscellany Poems: As Satyrs, Epistles, Love-Verses, Songs, Sonnets, &c

WYCHERLEY, William First Edition, Large Paper Copy The Bradly Martin Copy WYCHERLEY, William. Miscellany Poems: . As Satyrs, Epistles, Love-Verses, Songs, Sonnets, &c London: Printed for C. Brome, J. Taylor, and B. Tooke, 1704. First edition, first issue. Large paper copy Folio in fours. (13 7/8 x 8 1/2 inches; 352 x 215 mm). xlvi, [1, errata], [1, blank], 64, 63-438. pp. Pages 63-64 repeated in the pagination but text and collation continuous as usual. With mezzotint frontispiece portrait. Title-page in double-ruled border. The final leaf [pg 438] in an early state with "The end of the first volume" printed and no correction slip reading "THE END." Although it states "the end of the first volume, there were no more volumes published. Contemporary speckled calf, rebacked with original spine laid down. Boards paneled in gilt. Spine tooled in gilt. Two red morocco spine labels, lettered in gilt. All edges gilt. Some rubbing to board edges and spine. Previous owner's bookplates, two on front pastedown, one on rear pastedown. Bookplates of James Norman, H. Bradley Martin and William Marchbank. Minor paper flaw at bottom margin of a2, not affecting text. Bottom outer corners of leaves G2 and G3 torn, but not affecting text. Minor toning to endpapers from glue. Overall a very good copy, and internally very clean. "This is the most famous of literary mezzotints and is rarely found in such magnificent state still prefixed to this volume as intended." (Pforzheimer, 1101). Except for the piece 'Upon the Idleness of Business' the contents of this volume do not appear ro have been reprinted except in the Nonesuch collected edition of this author." (Pforzheimer, 1101). ESTC T144864. Pforzheimer 1101. HBS 68244. $1,750
Contemplations 11

Contemplations 11

SMITH, Philip A Beautiful Work by Master Bookbinder Philip Smith SMITH, Philip, [binder]. Contemplations 11. [The Book House, Yatton Keynell, Chippenham,Wiltshire, England: Philip Smith, 1987]. Original manuscript in black ink Smith's hand on paper marbled with multicolored acrylic paint and ink. Sixteenmo (4 1/8 x 2 3/4 inches; 105 x 70 mm). 104 pp. With thirty-one pages of quotations and phrases in manuscript. Signed and dated at head and foot of rear pastedown. Bound in vellum boards, similarly marbled, with blue leather yokes at head and tail of the spine. Otherwise, spine is open. Spine stitching, hand-colored. Housed in a blue felt drop-in slipcase, stitched with red. Overall a beautifully produced, about fine copy. Of the numerous quotations, some are from T.S. Eliot's The Wasteland, Mother Teresa and Proust among others. "Born in 1928, Philip began his career in bookbinding and book art in 1949, graduating from the Royal College of Art in London with First Class Honours in 1954. He was an internationally renowned designer bookbinder and book artist. He designed and created intricate and fascinating bindings for well over 50 years and was awarded gold and silver medals in several international competitions. In 2000 he was awarded an MBE for services to Art. Philip was a great innovator, having invented and pioneered several ground-breaking and influential techniques and structural developments. His work is represented in many private collections and can be seen in several public collections overseas and in the UK including the V&A National Art Library and the British Library." (From the Estate of Philip Smith, Obituary on PhilipSmithBookArt website). HBS 68235. $2,500
U.S. Continental Congress] Journals of Congress. Containing the Proceedings in the Year

U.S. Continental Congress] Journals of Congress. Containing the Proceedings in the Year, 1776. Published by Order of Congress. Volume II.

DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE First Issue of Aitken's Volume II of the "Journals of Congress" Complete the First Congressional Printing of the Declaration of Independence [DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE]. [U.S. Continental Congress] Journals of Congress. Containing the Proceedings in the Year, 1776. Published by Order of Congress. Volume II. Philadelphia: R. Aitken, 1777. First edition, first issue of Volume II of the Journals of Congress with the rare Aitken imprint and the first Congressional printing of the Declaration of Independence (found on pages 241-246). Octavo (8 3/4 x 5 1/2 inches; 222 x 140 mm). [2], 513, [22, index], [1, blank] pp. Rebacked in old quarter parchment over contemporary drab boards. Pages uncut. Boards with some minor wear. Pages with some occasional and expected toning. Overall a very good copy. "Robert Aitken was licensed by Congress to publish the Journals on 26 September 1776. Volume I of the series comprised reprints of his "Cartridge Paper" edition, the monthly issues which covered the first four months of 1776; the present volume II included the first publication of the June-December Journals, and came off the press the following year. According to Aitken, 532 copies were printed, but when Congress had to flee from Philadelphia in the autumn of 1777 Aitken's press was lost and many copies were seemingly left behind and destroyed by the British.The volume records some of the most tumultuous events of the Revolution, and the text of the Declaration appears in full, with the names of the signers, on pages 241-246." (From Bonhams). In March of 1776, after the printers the Bradfords of Philadelphia's work of printing the previous transcripts of Congress were deemed unsatisfactory, "Robert Aitken now makes his first appearance upon the scene as a printer of Congressional proceedings. Beginning the work where the Bradfords left off, and without express order of Congress other than such sanction as he may have received from their printing committee, he published the Journals in monthly subdivisions from January to May, 1776, inclusive. Aitken had now found favor in the eyes of Congress, and on September 26, 1776 the committee appointed to superintend the publication of the Journals were instructed to employ him to reprint the Journals from the beginning, with all possible expedition, and to continue to print the same. The Congress agreed to purchase of him five hundred copies when printed, and Aitken was further directed to purchase from the Bradfords, on reasonable terms and at the expense of Congress, such parts of the Journal as they had printed but had not yet published. In pursuance of this order and under the supervision of the printing committee, Aitken, in the spring of 1777, issued what he termed a "New Edition" of the Journal of Congress in two volumes; the first containing the proceedings for 1774 and 1775 and the second those of 1776. This became the authoritative edition for those years and has always been followed whenever reprinted." (The Journals and Papers of the Continental Congress By Herbert Friedenwald, pg 15-17). Pp.1-424 were later reissued as part of: ’Journals of Congress. . Volume II’. York-Town [Pennsylvania], printed by John Dunlap, 1778. The Aitken imprint of this present copy is far more rare. Evans 15684. ESTC W20602 HBS 68168. $32,500
Poems on Various Subjects

Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral By Phillis Wheatley, Negro Servant to Mr. John Wheatley, of Boston, in New-England. Dedicated to The Countess of Huntingdon. [Bound within] The Negro Equalled by Few Europeans. Translated from the French. To Which are Added, Poems on Various Subjects, Moral and Entertaining.In Two Volumes.

WHEATLEY, Phillis Early American Edition of the First Book Written by an African American Woman and the First Published Book by an African American on Any Subject WHEATLEY, Phillis. [LAVALLÉE, Joseph]. Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral. By Phillis Wheatley, Negro Servant to Mr. John Wheatley, of Boston, in New-England. Dedicated to The Countess of Huntingdon. [Bound within] The Negro Equalled by Few Europeans. Translated from the French. To Which are Added, Poems on Various Subjects, Moral and Entertaining.In Two Volumes. Philadelphia: William W. Woodward, 1801. Fifth American edition and the first nineteenth-century edition of Wheatley's "Poems." (First published in London in 1773, all of the early American editions are exceptionally scarce). Within the first American edition of the translated work by Louis-Joseph Lavallée, "The Negro." With a separate title-page for "Poems." Two twelvemo volumes (6 1/2 x 3 7/8 inches; 165 x 99 mm). [1]-259, [1, blank; [1]-244 pp. With "Poems" being pages 167-148 [i.e. 238] of volume II. With final six pages as list of subscribers. We could find no other copies at auction since 1922. Recycled contemporary full speckled calf, over original boards. Spines ruled and numbered in gilt. Each spine with contemporary red morocco spine label, lettered in gilt. Pages a bit soiled and toned. Overall very good. "Wheatley wrote at a time when women suffered great discouragement for expressing political and literary thoughts. She made a brief visit to England in 1773 during which her Poems. were printed. A second London edition appeared in the same year. Wheatley has been called African America's peerless and was the first African American to publish a book of any nature. The first edition of Wheatley's Poems. are considered one of the most important books relating to African-American literature and one of the most celebrated relating to a black author." (Charles L. Blockson, A Commented Bibliography of One Hundred and One Influential Books By and About People of African Descent (1556-1982). A Collector's Choice). "Phillis Wheatley, later Peters, 1753?-1784, slave and poet. Born in Africa, she was shipped to Boston, Mass. in 1761, aged about seven, and bought for Susannah W. (wife of a rich tailor), who with her teenage daughter took the unusual step of educating her. Writing poems by 1765, publishing one in a newspaper in 1767, she was noticed in society as a curiosity. Proposals for publishing a volume by subscription at Boston in 1772 failed: next year her respiratory complaints caused the W.s to send her on a visit to London; there her Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral, appeared in 1773, certified by prominent citizens the unaided work of a ‘Negro servant’. She was both lionized as an untaught genius, and savaged in the Public Advertiser as part of ‘a Flood of female Literature’; she kept all her life a copy of Paradise Lost given her by the Lord Mayor of London. Her work is fluent, polished, not merely conventional. She expresses fervent Christian piety, celebrates liberty of various kinds, laments a large number of public and private deaths (many of children), and praises a black artist's work. She calls Africa ‘land of errors’, ‘dark abodes’, yet paints her father's ‘excruciating sorrow’ at her capture. Freed on her return, she married in 1778 another free black, John Peters. She published a few more poems, and made vain proposals for another volume, 1779, but sank into poverty (her husband jailed for debt), drudgery, illness, and the birth and death of three babies." (Virginia Blain et al., The Feminist Companion to Literature in English, pp. 1155-56). Sabin 39282. Mentioned in Sabin, 103139. American Imprints, 798. HBS 68169. $12,500
Politique discourses

Politique discourses, treating of the differences and inequalities of vocations, as well publique, as priuate: with the scopes or endes wherevnto they are directed. Translated out of French, by Ægremont Ratcliffe Esquire

LA PLACE, Pierre-Antoine de First Edition in English [LA PLACE, Pierre-Antoine de]. RATCLIFFE, Aegremont, [translator]. Politique discourses, treating of the differences and inequalities of vocations, as well publique, as priuate: with the scopes or endes wherevnto they are directed. Translated out of French, by Ægremont Ratcliffe Esquire London: [by T. Dawson?] for Edward Aggas, 1578. First English edition, a translation of Discours politiques sur la voye d'enter deuëment aux estats. Small quarto (6 3/4 x 4 3/4 inches; 171 x 120 mm). [1]-81, [1, blank] leaves. Title within engraved border and with engraved printer's device. With engraved historiated initials. With final blank. "Anonymous. By Pierre de la Place. Printer’s name conjectured by STC" (BL). We could find no copies at auction in the past 35 years. Modern half black morocco over marbled boards. Spine lettered and ruled in gilt. Edges speckled brown. Title-page lightly toned with fore-margin a bit frayed and a small repair to upper, outer corner. Pages trimmed close at top margin, affecting some headlines and page numbers. The first 20 leaves with some marginal worming, occasionally barley touching text or affecting printed side-notes. Overall a very good copy. The English translation of La Place's Discours politiques sur la voye d'enter deuëment aux estats, Politique discourses is a "treatise covering statesmanship, government office, military conduct, marriage and domestic ethics." (Forum Auctions). Egremont Radcliffe, rebel and alleged assassin took part in the Rising of the North of 1569. "Radcliffe was sent to the Tower of London—it was reported to Spain that he was about to make false statements against Philip and would claim that the latter planned to retaliate for English provocations. He carved his name in the Beauchamp Tower, and wrote Politique Discourses Translated out of French (1578), which he dedicated to Walsingham. It was a personal volte-face, advocating acceptance of the social and political order. He might well ask, 'who ever sawe so many discontented persons . so many controllers of princes and their procedinges: and so fewe imbracing obedience?' (E. Radcliffe, Politique Discourses, 1578, sig. A3v)." (Oxford DNB). ESTC S110593. HBS 68232. $5,500
Navigation improv’d: or

Navigation improv’d: or, the art of rowing ships of all rates, in calms, with a more easy, swift, and steady motion, than oars can. Also, a description of the engine that performs it; and the author’s answer to all Mr. Dummer’s objections that have been made against it. By Tho. Savery, gent

SAVERY, Thomas An Account of One of Savery's First Patented Inventions, Published the Same Year as His Patent for the First Steam Engine SAVERY, Thomas. Navigation improv’d: or, the art of rowing ships of all rates, in calms, with a more easy, swift, and steady motion, than oars can. Also, a description of the engine that performs it; and the author’s answer to all Mr. Dummer’s objections that have been made against it. By Tho. Savery, gent London: Printed and Sold by James Moxon, 1698. First edition. Small quarto (7 1/2 x 5 1/2 inches; 190 x 142 mm). [8], 22, [2, publisher's advertisements] pp. With one folding plate, and three engraved figures tipped in to the text. With two pages of publisher's advertisements. No complete copy on ABPC with the folding plate in the past 50 years. Bound by Sangorski & Sutcliffe in full dark blue morocco. Spine lettered in gilt. Board edges ruled in gilt. Gilt double-ruled dentelles. Original stab-marks visible. Previous owner's bookplate on front pastedown. Small bookseller sticker on each pastedown. Leaves a bit toned. Overall a very nice copy. "In the year 1696, Thomas Savery, Gent., obtained a patent for his 'new invention, consisting of mill work to grind and pollish looking glasses, coach glass plates, and marble stones; and, also, for rowing of Ships with greater ease and expedition than has hitherto been done by any other.' This invention consisted in moving a paddle-wheel on each side of the ship, by men turning round the capstan, and thereby giving motion through ropes to the axis of the wheels. Savery published a very interesting pamphlet on the subject of this invention in 1698, entitled 'Navigation Improved.' In the same year he obtained a patent for 'raising of water and occasioning motion to all sorts of mills works, by the impelling force of Fire (steam engine), which will be of great use for draining mines, serving towns with water, and for the working of all sorts of mills where they have not the benefit of water nor constant winds.' He also published a very interesting account of this his improved steam engine in 1701, entitled the 'Miner's Friend.'"(A Sketch of the Origin and Progress of Steam Navigation from Authentic Documents. By Bennet Woodcroft). "In 1696 [Savery] patented (no. 347) a machine to grind and polish plate glass, and a contrivance for rowing ships in a calm using two paddle-wheels worked by a capstan. William III thought highly of the second invention, but although Savery demonstrated its practicability by fitting it to a small yacht, official jealousy prevented its adoption in the navy. Undeterred, he published an account of his invention in a work entitled Navigation Improved (1698), and this contained a denunciation of his treatment in official circles. (Oxford DNB). ESTC R183251. Wing S773. HBS 68231. $13,500
Schoole of Skil: Containing Two Bookes: the first

Schoole of Skil: Containing Two Bookes: the first, of the sphere, of heauen, of the starres, of their orbes, and of the earth, &c. The second, of the sphericall elements, of the celestiall circles, and of their vses, &c. Orderly set forth according to art, with apt figures and proportions in their proper places, by Tho. Hill.

HILL, Thomas The Last Book of the 16th-Century to Reject Copernicus’ Heliocentric Theory HILL, Thomas. The Schoole of Skil: Containing Two Bookes: the first, of the sphere, of heauen, of the starres, of their orbes, and of the earth, &c. The second, of the sphericall elements, of the celestiall circles, and of their vses, &c. Orderly set forth according to art, with apt figures and proportions in their proper places, by Tho. Hill. London: Printed by T. Judson, for W. Jaggard, 1599. First Edition. Two parts in one octavo volume (7 1/4 x 5 5/8 inches; 185 x 142 mm). Continuous pagination. [6], 267, [1, blank], [2, table of contents] pp. Lacking initial blank [sig. "A"]. With Spherical woodcut device on title-page, and numerous woodcut illustrations, diagrams and initials throughout. This has been the only copy at auction in the past 30 years. All English 16th-Century books on Astronomy are rare. Half 19th-Century maroon morocco over cloth boards. Spine lettered and stamped in gilt. Edges dyed red. Edges a bit rubbed. Inner hinges cracked but firm. Top margin of title-page trimmed close, just touching first word. Fore-edge of leaf D5 frayed. Some marginal dampstaining to pages 49-56 and 233-final leaf. Pages 118-119 misnumbered 102-103, and 122-123 misnumbered 106-107. Leaves M5 and M6 misbound between M2 and M3, but all leaves present and complete. Leaf edges around "Table of contents" a bit darkened and last leaf of "Table" with a repaired marginal tear, not affecting text. Overall very good. Thomas Hill [pseud. Didymus Mountaine] was a writer and translator. He "knew Latin and Italian and he became known as a translator of popular books on science and the supernatural.In 1560, the year of his first extant almanac, he was described as a leading almanac-maker. A mathematical and astronomical textbook, The Schoole of Skil, which rejects Copernicanism, was printed [posthumously] by William Jaggard in 1599." (Oxford DNB). "Apart from Blundeville.the only other 16th century astronomical writer of any significance who explicitly rejected the Copernican system was Thomas Hill, who died about 1575." (The Reception of Copernicus’ Heliocentric Theory, John L. Russel, pg 198). On page 42 of The Schoole of Skil, Hill writes "Aristarchus Samius, which was 261 years before the birth of Christ, took the earth from the middle of the world, and . . . [put it in motion] about the sun, which he feigned to stand in the middle of the world as immoveable, after the manner of the fixed stars. The like argument doth that learned Copernicus apply unto his demonstrations." [pg. 42]. "Hill alludes to the fact that the idea of heliocentrism was ancient and familiar. Medieval and early modern scholars all knew about Aristarchus, but they believed they had very convincing arguments (drawn from Aristotle) that the earth was in the center of the cosmos and was stationary. Although Hill is about to launch into a number of arguments against Copernicus’ heliocentric model of the cosmos, he nonetheless accords him a certain respect, referring to him as "that learned Copernicus." And indeed, if you read the entire book, you find numerous positive references to Copernicus. Hill often uses Copernicus’ calculations for various astronomical values like the length of the solar year. Many early readers of Copernicus used the mathematical models in On the Revolutions for calculating planetary positions. Although very few sixteenth-century readers accepted the physical reality of heliocentrism, they still saw considerable value in Copernicus’ work." (Before Newton. Kathleen Crowther, University of Oklahoma). ESTC S104125. STC 13502. HBS 68233. $9,500
Discourse of the Felicitie of Man Or His Summum Bonum.

Discourse of the Felicitie of Man Or His Summum Bonum.

BARCKLEY, Sir Richard, Knight An Important Shakespeare Source Book [SHAKESPEARE, William]. BARCKLEY, Sir Richard, Knight. A Discourse of the Felicitie of Man. Or His Summum Bonum. London: William Ponsonby, 1598. First edition. Small quarto (7 1/4 x 5 1/8 inches; 185 x 131 mm). [31, [1, blank], 155, 158-618 pp. Same as British Library copy, pagination skips 156-157 but collation is complete. With errata leaf, and two leaves with woodcut tree emblems with the author’s monogram (wone with tiny closed tear). Errata leaf and final woodcut leaf, misbound towards the front between leaves *3 and *4. Leaf *6 misbound before *5. Engraved head and tail pieces. Title-page with engraved headpiece and central anchor device. Nineteenth-century half calf over marbled boards. Spine lettered and ruled in gilt. Edges speckled brown. Outer hinges starting, but holding firm. Edges a bit rubbed. Previous owner's bookplate on front pastedown. Title-page and final leaf toned. Title-page trimmed short at top margin, not affecting headpiece. Various old ink ownership notes on title-page, one dated 1698. More ink scribbles on blank recto of woodcut page. A bit of neat marginalia and some underlining, particularly to pages 45, 111, 212, and 318. Outer margin of leaf E2 with paper loss, not affecting text. Final 100 pages with some intermittent dampstaining. Page 596 with some marking and a small hole in outer margin. A tiny paper repair to upper outer corner of page 616, not affecting text. Final leaf with some ink marking, and minorly trimmed at top and bottom, a small marginal tear and a tiny hole to inner margin, nothing affecting text. A rare and important work containing inspiration for three of Shakespeare's plays. A fine collection of amusing histories and small narratives; including the foundation of the Taming of the Shrew, pp. 23-26, Antony and Cleopatra, p. 46, and Pyramus and Thisbe, p. 52. [A Discourse of the Felicitie of Man] purports to be an ethical treatise on human happiness, consisting of six books. In the first, the author offers to prove, and by example to shew, that felicity consists not in pleasure,- In the second, not in riches,- In the third, not in honour and glory,- In the fourth, not in moral virtue, or in the action of virtue, after the academicks and peripateticks, nor in philosophical contemplation,- In the fifth he declares his own opinion of the happiness of this life- and in the sixth, he shews, wherein consists the true felicity and summum bonum of man, and the way to attain it." (Retrospective Review: And Historical and Antiquarian Magazine, Volume 1. By Henry Southern, Sir Nicholas Harris Nicolas, pg 271-272). Jaggard, p. 15. Graesse ("Ouvrage tres amusant par les historiettes entremelées"). STC 1391. ESTC, S100775. HBS 68229. $6,000
Royal-cookery: or

Royal-cookery: or, the Compleat Court-Cook Containing the choicest receipts in all the several branches of cookery, viz. for making of soops, bisques, olio’s, terrines, surtouts, puptons, ragoos, forc’d-meats, sauces, pattys, pies, tarts, tansies, cakes, puddings, jellies, &c. as likewise forty plates, curiously engraven on copper, of the magnificent entertainments at coronations and instalments; of balls, weddings, &c. at court; as likewise of city-feasts. To which are added, bills of fare for every month in the year. By Patrick Lamb, Esq; near fifty years master-cook to their late Majesties King Charles II. King James II. King William and Queen Mary, and Queen Anne. The Second Edition, with the Addition of severa; new cuts, and above five hundred new receipts, all disposed alphabetically.

LAMB, Patrick Second, Much Expanded Edition, With Over 500 New Recipes and Forty Engraved Plates LAMB, Patrick. Royal-cookery: or, the Compleat Court-Cook. Containing the choicest receipts in all the several branches of cookery, viz. for making of soops, bisques, olio’s, terrines, surtouts, puptons, ragoos, forc’d-meats, sauces, pattys, pies, tarts, tansies, cakes, puddings, jellies, &c. as likewise forty plates, curiously engraven on copper, of the magnificent entertainments at coronations and instalments; of balls, weddings, &c. at court; as likewise of city-feasts. To which are added, bills of fare for every month in the year. By Patrick Lamb, Esq; near fifty years master-cook to their late Majesties King Charles II. King James II. King William and Queen Mary, and Queen Anne. The Second Edition, with the Addition of severa; new cuts, and above five hundred new receipts, all disposed alphabetically. London: Printed for J. Nutt and A. Roper, 1716. Second, much expanded edition, with "several new cuts and above five Hundred new receipts." Octavo (7 5/8 x 4 1/2 inches; 195 x 115 mm) [8], 302, [10] pp. Five of the final leaves comprise ’A bill of fare for every season in the year.’ Complete with forty engraved plates, thirty-three of which are folding. Plates are not bound in numerical order, but all are present. This edition is mentioned in Bitting, but not in the collection. Contemporary paneled calf, rebacked with spine laid down. Board edges gilt. Newer red morocco spine label, lettered in gilt. Some rubbing to boards and corners a bit bumped. Previous owner's armorial bookplate on front pastedown. Inner hinges cracked but firm. A bit of dampstaining and a few very minor marginal wormholes. Small tear to crease of plate "21", a paper flaw to plate " 9" and plate "11' trimmed close, mildly affecting engraving. Overall text and plates generally very clean. A very good copy. "In August 1677 Lamb was appointed as master cook to the queen consort, held in tandem with the office of sergeant of his majesty's pastry in ordinary, to which he was elevated in November 1677. Finally, in February 1683, Lamb attained the status of master cook to the monarch. He was reappointed to this post under the successive household regulations of James II, William and Mary, and Anne, and was removed from it only by death. His services as a royal cook encompassed the provision of prepared dishes for daily and extraordinary consumption by the monarch and his guests at table.Lamb's culinary skills were most effectively demonstrated in extraordinary events, and his claims for large expenditures on such occasions as the Westminster visit of the Venetian ambassadors in December 1685 testify to the splendour of these.These and other junkets are evoked in the text of Royal Cookery, published posthumously in London under Lamb's name by John Morphew and Abel Roper in 1710, and subsequently reprinted in 1716, 1726, and 1731. The text incorporated recipes for elaborate dishes alongside engravings of lavish table layouts for occasions such as royal suppers. Such details suggest that the text was drawn from Lamb's papers, rather than being speculatively published under his name as some contemporaries contended." (Oxford DNB). Bitting, Pg.271. ESTC T91553. HBS 68226. $2,500
True Prophecies or Prognostications of Michael Nostradamus Physician to Henry II. Francis II. and Charles IX. Kings of France

True Prophecies or Prognostications of Michael Nostradamus Physician to Henry II. Francis II. and Charles IX. Kings of France, and one of the best Astronomers that ever were. A Work full of Curiosity and Learning. Translated and Commented by Theophilus de Garencieres, Doctor in Physick Colleg. Lond.

NOSTRADAMUS 1672 First English Translation Of Nostradamus’ Prophecies NOSTRADAMUS. The True Prophecies or Prognostications of Michael Nostradamus. Physician to Henry II. Francis II. and Charles IX. Kings of France, and one of the best Astronomers that ever were. A Work full of Curiosity and Learning. Translated and Commented by Theophilus de Garencieres, Doctor in Physick Colleg. Lond. London: Thomas Radcliffe and Nathaniel Thompson, 1672. First English edition of Nostradamus’ famous prognostications. Small folio in fours (11 3/4 x 7 1/2 inches; 299 x 191 mm). [36], 522, [2, blank] pp. With scarce engraved frontispiece portrait by Dolle, often not present. Decorated woodcut initials and headpieces. Title page printed in red and black. Contemporary mottled calf, neatly rebacked, retaining original red morocco lettering label. Board edges tooled in gilt. Marbled edges. With two previous owner's bookplates on front pastedown, including an eighteenth-century armorial bookplate of Sir George Cooke of Westminster. Pages with some occasional foxing and toning. A few tiny burn holes, only slightly affecting text on leaf F4. Otherwise a very good copy of this controversial work. Nostradamus's famous prophecies were first published in Lyons in 1555. Nostradamus (Michel de Notredame) was for years a wandering physician, until 1547 when he married a wealthy widow. His major energies, though, were directed towards the pursuit of knowledge from the ancient Hebrew prophets, to whose religion his ancestors had adhered until his grandfather converted to Catholicism. In 1555 he claimed divine inspiration for his astrological forecasts and his first book of prophecies was printed in Lyon. This work garnered him instant success and by the end of the year he was summoned to the French court to cast the horoscopes of the royal children. "Although he earned both admiration and enmity already in his own time, the controversy over the credibility of his vague prognostications endures" (Kenney). Caillet III, 8073. Kenney, Catalogue of the Rare Astronomical Books in the San Diego State University Library, 134. Wing N1399. HBS 68228. $14,500
Accomplisht Cook

Accomplisht Cook, or the Art and Mystery of Cookery. Wherein the whole art is revealed in a more easie and perfect method, then hath been publisht in any language. Expert and ready wayes for the dressing of all sorts of flesh, fowl, and fish, with variety of sauces proper for each of them; and how to raise all manner of pastes; the best directions for all sorts of kickshaws; also the tearms of carving and sewing. An exact account of all dishes for all seasons of the year, with other a la mode curiosities. The second edition, with large additions throughout the whole work; besides two hundred figures of several forms for all manner of bake’t meats, (either flesh or fish) as pyes, tarts, custards, cheesecakes, and florentines, placed in tables and directed to the pages they appertain to. Approved by the fifty five years experience and industry of Robert May, in his attendance on several persons of great honour.

MAY, Robert Second and Much Expanded Edition MAY, Robert. The Accomplisht Cook, or the Art and Mystery of Cookery. Wherein the whole art is revealed in a more easie and perfect method, then hath been publisht in any language. Expert and ready wayes for the dressing of all sorts of flesh, fowl, and fish, with variety of sauces proper for each of them; and how to raise all manner of pastes; the best directions for all sorts of kickshaws; also the tearms of carving and sewing. An exact account of all dishes for all seasons of the year, with other a la mode curiosities. The second edition, with large additions throughout the whole work; besides two hundred figures of several forms for all manner of bake’t meats, (either flesh or fish) as pyes, tarts, custards, cheesecakes, and florentines, placed in tables and directed to the pages they appertain to. Approved by the fifty five years experience and industry of Robert May, in his attendance on several persons of great honour. London: Printed by R. Wood for Nath. Brooke, 1665. Second edition, largely expanded. Octavo (6 5/8 x 4 1/4 inches; 168 x 105 mm). [30], 461, [10, table], [1, blank], [20, publisher's ads] pp. With the frontispiece portrait (lacking in most copies). With numerous woodcuts throughout the text. Title-page with engraved border. Lacking initial blank, and two folding plates (as per BL copy). Although the BL copy lists plates, we could find no other copy of this edition containing the plates, and the first edition of 1660 did not include any folding plates, later editions after this second edition contain 4 folding plates. At any rate, this is a scarce book as we could only find copies at a handful of libraries and no complete copy at auction in the past 30 years. This edition is mentioned in Bitting pg. 318, but is not included in the collection. Modern full brown sheep. Boards and spine double-ruled in blind. Spine with brown morocco spine label, lettered in and tooled in gilt. Edges dyed brown. Newer endpapers. Portrait with some creasing and neat repairs along inner margin. Portrait has been reattached as well. Some occasional toning and dampstaining throughout. Previous owner's old ink ownership inscription on rear final blank, dated 1777. Overall a very good copy. "In this Edition, I have enlarged the whole work; and there is added two hundred several Figures of all sorts of Pies, Tarts, Custards, Cheesecakes, &c. more then was in the former." (from the author's Preface to this second edition). Robert May, chef and author, "May, by his own account, learned the French language, studied manuscripts of French cookery, and read printed cookery books. (In later years, he stated in his own book, he read Italian and Spanish authorities on cooking.) .The Accomplisht Cook was the first substantial English recipe book to appear after the Restoration and was to go into five editions by 1685. It was a book that looked back to a golden age of generous hospitality and magnificence, but also recognized more recent developments, such as the publication in France of François Pierre de la Varenne's Le Cuisinier François (1653). May's work was a longer and more complete collection of recipes than had appeared before in English, and made use of illustration in a way that had not yet been seen. Cookery was still a closely guarded trade mystery, which May desired to make accessible to all, though admitting that not every reader could afford his most extravagant dishes." (Oxford DNB). ESTC R214148 . Wing M1392. HBS 68225. $3,750
Tomb of Tut-Ankh-Amen Discovered by the Late Earl of Carnarvon and Howard Carter.

Tomb of Tut-Ankh-Amen Discovered by the Late Earl of Carnarvon and Howard Carter.

CARTER, Howard First Edition of the Tomb of King Tut CARTER, Howard, and A.C. Mace. The Tomb of Tut-Ankh-Amen. Discovered by the Late Earl of Carnarvon and Howard Carter. With 104 [and 153 and 156] illustrations from photographs by Harry Burton (of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York). London: Cassell and Company, 1923 [and 1927 and 1933]. First edition. Three large octavo volumes (9 1/4 x 6 3/8 inches; 234 x 163 mm). xxiii, [1, blank], 231, [1, colophon]; xxxiv, 277, [1, colophon]; xvi, 247, [1] pp. With appendices by Douglas E. Derry, A. Lucas, P.E. Newberry, Alexander Scott, and H.J. Plenderleith in Volume II and Douglas E. Derry and A. Lucas in Volume III. Each volume with a frontispiece and numerous photographic plates. Half-titles in each volume. Original light brown cloth lettered in gilt on front cover and spine. Front covers with black labels stamped in gilt with a scarab. Pictorial endpapers in green and white. Some minor rubbing to covers, very minor shelfwear wear to spine edges. Slight bowing to front board of volume II and boards of volume I. Inner hinges of volume III show slight cracking but holding. Volume III with some sunning to front board, and a small hole to cloth of the spine. Volume I with a small embossed blindstamp on outer margin of title-page, not affecting text which reads "presentation copy". A bit of foxing to text leaves and edges, but not affecting plates. Overall a very good copy with the gilt still very bright. "This narrative of the discovery of the tomb of Tut-ankh-Amen is merely preliminary: a final record of purely scientific nature will take some time, nor can it be adequately made until the work of investigation of the tomb and its vast material has been completed. Nevertheless, in view of the public interest in our discovery, we felt that some account without the loss of time, no matter how summary, was necessary, and that is the reason for the publication of this book. We have here for the first time, a royal burial very little disturbed in spite of that hurried plundering it has suffered at the hands of the ancient tomb-robbers, and within the shrines of the tomb-chamber I believe the Pharaoh lies intact, in all his royal magnificence." (From the Preface). HBS 68224. $2,500
Little Dorrit [with ALS] With Illustrations by H.K. Browne.

Little Dorrit [with ALS] With Illustrations by H.K. Browne.

DICKENS, Charles First Edition, First Issue, with an ALS Signed "CD" Tipped In DICKENS, Charles. Little Dorrit. With Illustrations by H.K. Browne. London: Bradbury and Evans, 1857. First edition, first issue with "Rigaud" for "Blandois." on pages 469 470, 472, & 473. Bound from the original monthly parts, with stab-marks occasionally visible. With forty inserted plates, including the 8 "dark Plates" and the Frontispiece and Engraved title. Original blue printed front wrapper for part XII, "November" inserted at the rear along with the twelve pages of "Little Dorrit Advertiser" for the November part XII, identical to what is called for in Hatton & Cleaver. Octavo (8 1/4 x 5 1/4 inches; 207 x 133 mm). xvi, 625, [1, blank], [12, advertisements] pp. Beautifully bound in 20th-century brown morocco by Sawyer. Boards double ruled in gilt. Spine stamped and lettered in gilt. Board edges gilt, and gilt dentelles. Marbled endpapers. All edges gilt. Overall about fine. 11/3 page letter (7 x 4 3/8 inches; 177 x 112 mm) on blue paper tipped-in to front endpapers reads as such: Villa du Camp de droite, Boulogne Thursday, Fifth october 1854 Dear Milton Wednesday the eleventh will do perfectly well for us, as we have no intention of returning home until the following week. My term here expires on the Nineteenth. Therefore on Wednesday the eleventh, we shall expect you. I hope the weather may be sufficiently ? give you a fair idea of the lightness of the air. ? it has been so extraordinarily fine, that we must anticipate a little wet. It blew a gale of wind last night and is very lowering this morning, so I hope we may get it over before you come. Kind words from all. Ever Faithfully (?) CD. Villa du Camp de droite, Boulogne was a "favorite French watering hole" of Dickens' and one where he spent 3 summers. During the summer of 1853 he wrote Bleak House while in Boulogne. "The summer of this year [1854] was also spent at Boulogne, M. Beaucourt being again the landlord; but the house though still on the same "property," stood on the top of the hill, above the Moulineaux, and was called the Villa du Camp de Droite. He was still at work upon "Hard Times," which was finished during the summer, and was constantly occupied with "Household Words." Many of the letters for this year are to the contributors to this journal." (Letters of Charles Dickens: 1833-1870). Hatton and Cleaver, 305-333. HBS 68221. $3,850
Typed Letter Signed

Typed Letter Signed

EINSTEIN, Albert Typed Letter Signed by Einstein EINSTEIN, Albert (1879-1955). Typed letter signed ("A. Einstein"), to Mr. Daniel M Lipkin. Princeton, New Jersey, October 1st, 1952. 1 page, Quarto (11 x 8 1/2 inches; 279 x 217 mm). On stationary for the Institute for Advanced Study, School of Mathematics. Also with the corresponding transmittal envelope. With one horizontal center crease and two vertical creases as expected in a letter. Overall about fine. This 1952 typed letter signed by Einstein is to Daniel Lipkin, an engineer and a former student of his friend David Bohm at Princeton regarding some equations he had sent to Einstein for comment. "Mr. Daniel M. Lipkin 4925 Rubicam Street Philadelphia, 44, Pa. Dear Mr. Lipkin: The possibility of this choice of coordinate system is quite obvious and generally known. It is, however, an incomplete determination fixing only 1 of the 4 arbitrary functions. For developing the theory generally it seems to me better not to specialize the coordinate system at all. Sincerely yours, A. Einstein Albert Einstein" "Daniel Lipkin, a Bronx, New York native, who as a self-described "awestruck 15 year-old high school student," first wrote to Einstein in 1944 and continued his correspondence with the physicist after completing his studies at Princeton (1946-1949) under Einstein's friend David Bohm. Lipkin went on to work as an electrical engineer working for Sperry Univac designing early computers, and later at American Electronic Laboratories. (Lipkin, letter to the editor, American Journal of Physics, 1981, p. 619; Obit., Philadelphia Inquirer, 29 June 2009)." (From Christie's). HBS 68216. $8,500
Typed Letter Signed

Typed Letter Signed

EINSTEIN, Albert Typed Letter Signed and Annotated by Einstein Discussing Quantum Theory and the Principle of General Relativity EINSTEIN, Albert (1879-1955). Typed letter signed ("A. Einstein"), to Mr. Daniel M Lipkin. Princeton, New Jersey, July 5th, 1952. 1 page, Quarto (11 x 8 1/2 inches; 279 x 217 mm). On stationary for the Institute for Advanced Study, School of Mathematics. As well as the signature, the letter contains a few ink notations including an equation. Also with the corresponding transmittal envelope. With one horizontal middle crease and two vertical creases as expected with a letter. Overall about fine. This 1952 typed letter signed and annotated by Einstein is to Daniel Lipkin, an engineer and a former student of his friend David Bohm at Princeton regarding some equations he had sent to Einstein for comment. Einstein discusses that he has reason to belive that the "present quantum theory, inspite [sic] of it's many successes, is far from the truth." "Mr. Daniel M. Lipkin 4925 Rubicam Str. Philadelphia 44, Pa. Dear Mr. Lipkin: It is, of course, an obstacle for the testing of the theory that it is practically impossible to operate with the solution of the equations g i k. l ¤ 0 + -1 with respect to the T. Your point of view to try to operate on the basis of certain lines analogous to the geodetical line seem to me not appropriate for reasons of principles. A relativistic theory of the total field should, according to my opinion, cannot admit singularities. Particles concentrated in a point can therefore not be used in such theory. For this reason I do not believe that any lines should play a fundamental role. The conviction that only solutions without any singularities can claim physical meaning creates a tremendous difficulty, because there are for non-linear differential equations—as far as I know—no methods to find them out systematically or even to find general theorems. I too have many reasons to believe that the present quantum theory, inspite [sic] of its many successes, is far from the truth. This theory reminds me a little of the system of delusion of an exceedingly intelligent paranoiac concocted of incoherent elements of thought. As you also seem to believe I believe it impossible to get a real insight without satisfying from the start the principle of general relativity. I feel, however, by no means sure that my own approach is the right one. I do also not believe that the de Broglie-Bohm's approach is very hopeful. It leads, f.i., to the consequence that a particle belonging to a standing wave has no speed. This is contrary to the well-founded conviction that a nearly free particle should approximately behave according to classical mechanics. Sincerely yours, A. Einstein Albert Einstein" "Daniel Lipkin, a Bronx, New York native, who as a self-described "awestruck 15 year-old high school student," first wrote to Einstein in 1944 and continued his correspondence with the physicist after completing his studies at Princeton (1946-1949) under Einstein's friend David Bohm. Lipkin went on to work as an electrical engineer working for Sperry Univac designing early computers, and later at American Electronic Laboratories. (Lipkin, letter to the editor, American Journal of Physics, 1981, p. 619; Obit., Philadelphia Inquirer, 29 June 2009)." (From Christie's). HBS 68215. $35,000