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Industrial Drawing; Comprising the Description and Uses of Drawing Instruments

Industrial Drawing; Comprising the Description and Uses of Drawing Instruments, the Construction of Plane Figures, the Projections and Sections of Geometrical Solids Architectural Elements, Mechanism, and Topographical Drawing; With Remarks of the Method of Teaching on the Subject

Mahan, D. H. New York: John Wiley, 1863. 8vo.  240 x 150 mm., [9 ½ x 6 inches].  xvi, 156, [1] pp.  Illustrated with 20 folding diagrams; tear to plate 6 without loss.  Bound in publisher's brown cloth, title gilt on spine; spine chipped and expertly repaired.  Ownership inscription of C. Whitaker, and  Harriet N. Whitaker on the title-page.  . Second edition, revised and corrected; published again at the height of the Civil War.  Includes instruction on method of drawing and its instruments, construction of arcs and circles, problems of rectilinear figures, construction of proportional lines and figures, projection, drawing machinery and topographical drawing.  Fully illustrated with diagrams to compliment the text. Dennis Hart Mahan was a graduate of West Point, who after graduating continued his education in Europe and upon his return became Professor of Civil and Military Engineering at the Academy.  In addition to this work on drawing, he was the author of six other text books, focusing on engineering, fortification, geometry, and mechanics.  They were published in South as well as the North and had influence on CSA engineers and tacticians as well as their counterparts in the Union cause.  His works were also translated in to German and used in Prussian military academies. Mahan was considered one of the most influential teachers and innovators of his time who had significant impact on the conduct of the War on both sides of the conflict.  After the War he was forced to resign from the Academy and committed suicide in 1871. Allibone, Critical Dictionary of English Literature and British and American Authors, ii, 1203.  Appleton's Encyclopedia of American Biography  IV, p, 176.
Practice of Architecture.  Containing the Five Orders of Architecture

Practice of Architecture. Containing the Five Orders of Architecture, and an Additional Column and Entablature, with all their Elements and Details Explained and Illustrated. With Sixty Plates

(Architecture). Benjamin, Asher Boston & Philadelphia: Benjamin B. Mussey & Deliver, Thomas & Co., 1836. Large 4to.  275 x 215 mm., [10 ¾ x 8 ½ inches].  viii-116 pp., 60 engraved plates.  Contemporary sheepskin binding, worn at edges and spine, joints cracked and expertly repaired; some foxing to the margins and plates; generally a good, sound copy. Third edition, with alterations and improvements, originally published in 1833, followed by a second edition in 1835.  This was Benjamin's fifth of seven publication on the history and practice of architecture and building construction.  His taste and technique in the field had enormous impact on the design of homes and communities in the North East before the Civil War. The Practice of Architecture built on the design and techniques that appeared in his The Architect or Practical House Carpenter which he published in 1830.  In his new book he included more complex drawings and sophisticated designs and contributed a 'sixth' order which he entitled Column and Entablature.  This was based on best construction practices of the day and but from Benjamin's point a view, it needed rules that would both classify the order and also give instruction on how to accomplish its construction. Hitchcock, American Architecture Books, 136 (for the first edition).  Juliette Tomlinson, "Asher Benjamin -- Connecticut Architect," Connecticut Antiquarian 6 (1954).  A Bibliography of Writings by and about Asher Benjamin Author(s): Asher Benjamin and Jack Quinan Source: Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians , Oct., 1979, Vol. 38, No. 3 (Oct., 1979), pp. 254-256.
The Carpenter's Assistant:  Containing a Succinct Account of Egyptian

The Carpenter’s Assistant: Containing a Succinct Account of Egyptian, Grecian, and Roman Architecture. Also, a description of the Tuscan, Doric, Ionic, Corinthian and Composite Orders. . . Revised, Improved, and Enlarged with Additions on Rural Architecture, including Plans Elevations, Grounds &c., &c., of Cottages, Villas, and Farm Buildings

(Architecture). Brown, William Worcester: Published by Edward Livermore, 1852. Large 4to.  280 x 215 mm., [11 x 8 ½ inches]. 148 pp.  Illustrated with 200 plates of plans, elevations, details, and practical stair-building on 54 plates and in the text.  Contemporary sheep, Black leather label with title in gilt on spine; some rubbing to binding; text block clean and bright; six examples of dried leaves inserted and now removed, causing browning to paper stock on verso and recto of the page.  Ownership inscription in pencil of "Harvey Bricknell, Barnard Vt." on front free endpaper. With faults a very good, sound copy in original binding. Fifth edition, revised and enlarged with new plates and a chapter on rural architecture.  Original issued in 1848, Brown's work became a standard manual for carpenters and builders and went through at least six editions, the final one being printed in 1854.  Brown was a practicing Lowell, Ma. architect, whose goal was to produce a manual, written in simple terms, which explains the techniques of construction without the complexity of a treatise on architecture.  Interesting text which places some focus on existing home built in Worcester and surrounding area, with details of construction and design patterns. Hitchcock, American Architectural Books, 217 (for 1851 edition). .
Essay on Gothic Architecture.  With Various Plans and Drawings for Churches:  Designed Chiefly for the use of the Clergy

Essay on Gothic Architecture. With Various Plans and Drawings for Churches: Designed Chiefly for the use of the Clergy

Hopkins, John Henry Burlington (VT): Printed by Smith & Harrington, 1836. 4to.   275 x 225 mm., [10 ¾ x 9 inches].  vi. 46 pp.  Lithographic title-page and 13 full-page lithographic plates.  Original cloth, paper label on spine; cloth discolored and shows some remnants of water staining, spine and tips expertly repaired with tissue, spine label chipped; tide marks to preliminary leaves, frontispiece and title-page, plates 12 and 13 and rear end leaves.  With fault a good copy. First edition.  Illustrated with fourteen finely drawn and printed lithographs designed by the author and printed by the Pendleton's Lithographic Company, Boston.  "John Pendleton, Lithographer.  Born in New York State.  While traveling in France, he became interested in lithography and studied the art under the best masters in Paris.  On returning to America, he settled in Boston with his brother, a copperplate printer, and they established a lithographic establishment in 1825." John Henry Hopkins was an Irish immigrant, home schooled by his mother, who became a lawyer, musician, ordained minister, bishop and author of over thirty publications.  He studied gothic architecture during his time in Pittsburg where he was charged with supervising the construction of Trinity Church.  Dismayed with the unsightly designs of most churches in America he decided to compile his information as a guide to the elements of style and design characteristics of the gothic.  He became of the most notable experts in the field and he published this work, one of the first of its kind in America, for the benefit of local ministers charged with the building of churches in the gothic style. Hitchcock American Architectural Books, 606. Fielding, Dictionary of American Painters, Sculptors and Engravers, p. 278.  Peters, American on Stone, pp. 312-323. Allibone, Critical Dictionary of English Literature and British and American Authors I, p. 885.  (571).
Jay

Jay, John C. A Catalogue of the Shells, arranged according to the Lamarckian System; together with Descriptions of New or Rare Specimens, contained within the Collection of John C. Jay M.D.

Jay, John C. New York: Wiley and Putnam, 1839. Folio.  310 x 250 mm., [12 x 9 ¾ inches].  126 pp.  10 full-page plates.  Bound in printer's wrappers; some minor chipping at the spine, expertly repaired.  With the embossed stamp of the American Museum of Natural History, who upon being contacted states that all the copies called for are presently in the Museum's collections.  This appears to be a copy printed by the Museum for public sale or presentation. Third and most complete edition.  John Clarkson Jay was a physician in New York City who amassed the largest collection of shells and conchology in the United States to date. "The value of Dr. Jay's collection of shells and of his conchological library, is well known to the students of this department.  Dr. Jay's Catalogue enumerates about 11,000 well-marked varieties, and at least 7000 well-established species."  His collection of shells and books was purchased by Catherine Wolfe and presented to the American Museum of Natural History.  "It is known as the Jay Collection."  In the Introduction Jay writes, "I repeat, it will give me pleasure to exchange duplicate specimens, and will receive live and perfect shells, whether they are enumerated  in this Catalogue or not; and, as far as I am able, supply whatever may be desired in return."  Surprisingly, this title was cited by Brunet in his Manuel du Libraire. Jay was also a member of the Lyceum of Natural History, now known as the New York Academy of Sciences and was, as treasurer, a founder of the New York Yacht Club, trustee of Columbia College, and author of a number of books on his collection and rare specimens of shells. Brunet III, 518.  Sabin 35851.  Allibone, A Critical Dictionary of English Literature and British and American Authors I, p.957.  Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography III, p. 413.
Catalogus Novus Stellarum Duplicium et Multiplicum

Catalogus Novus Stellarum Duplicium et Multiplicum

Struve, F.G.W. Doprati: Typis J. C. Schuenmanni, typographi academici, 1827. Folio.  340 x 210 mm., [13 ½ x 8 ¼ inches].  [8], lii, 88 pp.  With two plates, one folding.  Original blue paper wrappers, white paper spine, paper label with title on upper board; boards a bit soiled, paper at spine chipped in places; text clean and bright, some foxing and tide marks to two plates;  sound and attractive copy. First edition.  Star catalogue compiled by Friedrich Georg Wilhelm Struve, Director of the Observatory at the Imperial University of Dorpat in Russia.  Struve was the founding father of a family of astronomers whose impact on the field covered over 150 years. His original research focused on the study of 'double stars" or stars that were situated in the heavens so close together that the appeared to be of the same source.  His Catalogus Novus, published in 1827, contains the classification of the angular separation of 3,112 double stars from his observations of over 122,000 stars.  He began his research on the subject in 1820 and ending with the publication of this work. Struve was elected to membership in academies of science in Russia, England, Sweden and the United States (1834) for his astronomical work and his research continued into the 1860's when he died in St. Petersburg in 1864.  He is perhaps most well know for his study of geodesy, or the study of the earth, its orientation in space, and the gravitational field in which is exerted in the solar system. Dictionary of Scientific Biography XIII, pp. 108-113. .
Supreme Court of Pennsylvania.  Western District. Together 21 8vo. pamphlets.  WITH:  Two Trial Pamphlets of Stephen T. Beale and Doctor George Parkman

Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. Western District. Together 21 8vo. pamphlets. WITH: Two Trial Pamphlets of Stephen T. Beale and Doctor George Parkman

Legal Pamphlet: Railroads Philadelphia, 1850. 23 Legal Pamphlets in all.  Bound in contemporary sheep over marbled paper boards, rubbed. 1.  Thompson Cowen, Robert Fullerton, et. al., versus The New Castle and Darlington Rail Road, et. al.  Paper Book and Complainants.  Stephenson & Foster Att'y for Complaintants.  Mercer, Pa., 1857.  92 pp. 2.  The County of Lawrence versus The North-Western Rail Road Co. et al. In Equity.  Paper Book Complainants.  R. B. M'Comb & J. F. Johnston, Solicitors of Complainants.  Pittsburgh: Printed by W. S. Haven, 1858.  82 pp.; with, Appendix, Abstract of Complainants' Bill.  55 pp., plus 1 pp. index. 3.  Daniel Diamond, Plaintiff in Error, versus the County of Lawrence, Defendant in Error.  Error of the Court of Common Pleas of Lawrence County.  Paper Book of Plaintiff in Error.  D. B. Curtz, Attorney for Plaintiff in Error.  New Castle, PA.: E. S. Durban, Book and Job Printers, 1860.  42 pp. 4.  Daniel Diamond, Plaintiff in Error; versus The County of Lawrence, Defendant in Error.  Error of the Court of Common Pleas of Lawrence County.  Paper Book of Defendant in Error.  L. Taylor and R. B. McComb, Attorneys for Defendant.  New Castle, PA. E. S. Durban, Book and Job Printer, 1860.  38 pp.; with, Argument of R. B. McComb, 10 pp. 5.  Robert Thompson, Plaintiff in Error. VS. the Commonwealth, Defendant in Error.  Error to the Common Pleas of Lawrence County.  Paper Book of Plaintiff in Error.  R. B. McComb, Attorney for Pl'ff in Error.  New Castle, PA.:  E. S. Durban, Book and Job Printer, 1859.  10 pp. 6.  Nos. 106 and 107 of Common Pleas of Lawrence County, September Term 1858.  Dilwin Parish, William Parish, and William Wharton, Jr., Executors of the Will and Testament of Rodman Wharton, versus the New Castle Gas Light Company. Susan D. Wharton versus The Same.  38 pp. 7.  The County of Lawrence, Plaintiff in Error. versus The Bank of Lawrence County, Defendant in Error.  Error to the Common Pleas of Lawrence County.  Paper Book of Plaintiff in Error.  R. B. McComb & Lewis Taylor, Att'ys for Pl'ff in Error.  New Castle, PA., E. S Durban, Book and Job Printer, 1859.  30 pp. 8.  The County of Lawrence, Plaintiff in Error versus the Bank of Lawrence County, Defendant in Error.  Error to the Court of Common Pleas of Lawrence County.  Paper Book of Defendant in Error.  L. L. M'Guffin, Attorney for Defendant in Error.  New Castle, PA., E. S. Durban, Book and Job Printer, 1859. 9.  The Bank of Lawrence County, Plaintiff in Error.  versus the County for Lawrence, Defendant in Error.  Error to the Court of Common Pleas of Lawrence County.  Paper Book of Defendant in Error.  R. B. McComb & Lawrence Taylor, Att'ys for Defendant in Error.  New Castle, PA., E. S. Durban, Book and Job Printer, 1859.  5p. 10.  Overseers of Poor of Shenango Township Pl'ff in Error.  versus Overseers of Poor of Wayne Township, Def'ts in Error.  Certiorari to the Quarter Sessions of Lawrence County.  Paper Book of Plaintiffs in Error.  L. L. McGuffin Attorney for Plaintiffs in Error.  New Castle, PA., E. S. Durban, Book and Job Printer, 1859.  30 pp. 11.  Overseers of Poor of Shenango Township Pl'ff in Error.  versus Overseers of Poor of Wayne Township, Def'ts in Error.  Certiorari to the Quarter Sessions of Lawrence County.  Paper Book of Plaintiffs in Error.  D. B. Kurtz, Attorney for Defendants in Error.  New Castle, PA., E. S. Durban, Book and Job Printer, 1859.  13 pp. 12.  James Hunt and Alexander Hunt, Plaintiffs in Error.  versus.  Robert McFarlan, Defendant in Error.  Error to the Court of Common Pleas of Lawrence County.  Paper Book of Plaintiffs in Error.  L. Taylor, Attorney for Plaintiffs in Error.  New Castle, PA., E. S. Durban, Book and Job Printer, 1860.  12 pp. 13.  James Hunt and Alexander Hunt, Plaintiffs in Error.  versus.  Robert McFarlan, Defendant in Error.  Error to the Court of Common Pleas of Lawrence County.  Paper Book of Defendant in Error.  L. L. McGuffin and D. B. Kurtz, Attorney for Defendant.   New Castle, PA., E. S. Durban, Book and Job Printer, 1860.  6pp. 14.  The Pittsburgh, New Castle & Cleveland Rail Road Co., Plaintiff in Error.  versus.  Daniel H. Wallace, Defendant in Error.  Error to the Court of Common Pleas of Lawrence County.  Paper Book of Plaintiff in Error.  R. B. McComb & Lawrence Taylor, Att'ys for Plaintiff in Error.  New Castle, PA., E. S. Durban, Book and Job Printer, 1859.  12 pp. 15.  Jas. Wilde Jr & Co's Appeal.  Paper Book of Appellants.  L. L. McGuffin, Attorney for Appellants.    New Castle, PA., E. S. Durban, Book and Job Printer, 1860.  38 pp. with:  Appendix 59 pp. 16.  James Wilde Jr., & Co.'s Appeal.  Paper for Appellees.  D. Craig Attorney for Powell, Hazlett & Co., Appellees.  Johnson & Dana, Att'ys for Brown, Frederick & Kunkle, Appellees.  New Castle, PA., Coal City Chronicle Book and Job Printer, 1860.   4 pp. 17.  Error to the Common Pleas of Lawrence County, William Cairnes, Plaintiff in Error.  vs.  Joseph T. Dushane and Richard Fullerton, Executors of William Cairnes, Dec'd, Defendant in Error.  Paper Book of the Plaintiff in Error.  8pp. 18.  Paper Book of Defendant in Error.  In Supreme County of Penn'a. Western District, Error to Common Pleas of Lawrence County.  Thomas Pearson vs Robert Wallace.  1853.  4 pp. 19.  Argument of Hon. John M. Read, in Favor of the Constitutionality of the Subscription by the City of Philadelphia, to the Capital Stock of the Hempfield, and Philadelphia, Easton, and Water Gap Railroad Companies, Delivered before the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, on Monday, the 25th July, 1863.  In the Cast of Sharpless and Others v. The Mayor, Aldermen and Citizens of Philadelphia.  Philadelphia:  C. Sherman, Printer, 1853.  31 pp. 20.  Opinions of the Judges of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania in the Cases of the Cleveland, Painesville & Ashtabula R. R. Co., and the Erie & North East R. R. Co.  Supreme Court of Pennsylvania.  Cleveland, Painesville, and Ashtabula R. R. Co.  vs The City of Erie.  In Equity.  Opinion. [1854]. 60 pp. 21.  The Erie and North East Railroad Co. vs. Joseph Casey.  Statement of Brief on Behalf of Complaintants.  1855.  76 pp. 22.  Trial and Conviction of Dr. Stephen T. Beale; With the Letters of Chief Justice Lewis, and Judges Black and Woodward, on his Case.  Interesting Ether Cases, and Letters of Prof. Gibson, Prof. Wiltbank, Wm. Badger, Esq., W. L. Hirst, Esq., Rev. Albert Barnes, Dr. Henry A. Boardman, &c.  Philadelphia" T. K. Collins, Jr., 1855.  30 pp. 23.  Trial of Professor John W. Webster for the Murder of Doctor George Parkman.  Reported Exclusively for the N. Y. Daily Glob.  New York: Stringer & Townsend, 1850.  76 pp., plus two pages of illustrations.
Eagle Pass; Or

Eagle Pass; Or, Life On The Border

Montgomery, Cora [Jane Maria Eliza Storms Cazneau] New York: George Putnam & Co, 1852. 12mo. 110 x 65 mm. (6 ¾ x 4 ¾ inches). 188 pp. Binding absent and spine exposed. This is the textblock only. Some damp staining to title page and edges, but text is unaffected. Pages overall clean and unmarked.    A memoir by journalist Jane Cazneau, using the penname Cora Montgomery, about her experience living on the Mexican border in Texas in the early 1850s. In it, she asserts that legal Texas residents are being kidnapped and forced into "Peon Slavery" in Mexico and in the 'Introduction' she pleads for assistance from authorities. In his Bibliography of Texas, Raines calls it, "An unpleasant picture of maladministration on the Rio Grande."   Cazneau wrote extensively during her lifetime and was a  reporter for the New York Sun among other publications. During the Mexican War, she reported from behind enemy lines, becoming one of the first women war correspondents. She strongly believed in Manifest Destiny, possibly even coining the phrase, and supported, U.S. annexation of Mexico and, with it, slavery in the South. Because of her nationalist views, however, she ultimately opposed succession of the Confederacy during the Civil War.    Sabin 50123.  Howes C251. Raines, A Bibliography of Texas: pp. 151-52.  Reilly, Tom, "Jane McManus Storms: Letters from the Mexican War, 1846-1848", The Southwestern Historical Quarterly Vol. 85, No. 1 (July, 1981), pp. 21-44. Elizabeth Piedmont-Marton, "Manifest Destiny," Texas Observer, August 3, 2001.
Last illness and death of Mary Emlen Newbold as Recorded in Writing by her Brother James Emlen.  with: The Death Bed Testimony of William Williams

Last illness and death of Mary Emlen Newbold as Recorded in Writing by her Brother James Emlen. with: The Death Bed Testimony of William Williams, Society of Friends Minister

(Quaker Testimonials) 1820. 12mo.  200 x 70 mm. [7 1/2 x 6 3/4 inches]. [11] pp. Manuscript with hand-sewn binding and small (25 mm.) straight pin near bottom corner. Edges worn with chipping and tears. Cover partially torn horizontally, but still attached. Damp staining to right edge of first three leaves, fragile condition, with expert paper repairs to folds and tears.  A set of Quaker deathbed testimonies, one attributed to Mary (Emlen) Newbold and the other to William Williams, a Society of Friends minister. The two accounts appear to have been written at different times and in different handwriting and later bound together.    Both testimonies recount the deathbed experience of two Quakers, one expressing doubt and fear of damnation and the other the certainty of God's love and everlasting life in Heaven. On the day before her death Mary's resolve takes a dark turn when she wakes her brother James  and tells him: "Oh! Brother I am dead and in hell, I have deceived you all and you all have deceive me... I must be shut up forever in utter darkness with the spirits of wicked men whom I always hated." James writes that she ultimately did find comfort and "breathed her last with uplifted eyes and hands she exclaimed draw me, draw me, draw me, as if endeavoring to say draw me with the cords of thy  love."   On the verso of the first page, it states: "Account of the last illness and death of Mary Newbold written by her brother James in a letter to his Sister Ann." And then in a different ink, it states: "M.N. (Mary Newbold) was the wife of George Newbold of New York and sister of James Emlen."  On the cover the name "Phebe Haines" is written on the top edge and that of "Jane Peirce, Philadelphia" in the middle, dated August 8, 1823.    Mary Emlen (1787 - 1820) married George Newbold in 1807. And the two raised James Emlen in New York City after he was orphaned at the age of 6. Their family history and various connections are well documented in John Woolf  Jordan's Colonial And Revolutionary Families of Pennsylvania.  A manuscript note which appears before the testimonial of William Williams reads in part. "Copy of a testimony of William Williams who departed this life about the 1st of 9 1824, delivered about a week before his death." The text matches the final entry of Williams' journal published in 1828 by his followers in the Quaker community.    William Williams, Journal of the life, travels and gospel labors of William Williams. dec., a minister of the Society of Friends, late of White-Water, Indiana. Cincinnati, 1828, pp 270 - 272.   Jordan, John Woolf, Colonial and Revolutionary Families of Pennsylvania. Baltimore, 1978. pp. 196. William S. Powell, Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press, 1999 - online. .
An Account of the Convincement and the Call to the Ministry of Margaret Lucas

An Account of the Convincement and the Call to the Ministry of Margaret Lucas, Late of Leek, In Staffordshire

(Lucas, Margaret) Stanford (New York): Printed by Daniel Lawrence for Henry and John F. Hull, 1803. 12mo. 160 x 100mm. [6 1/2 x 4 inches]. vi, [7]-111, plus 1 p. ads. Contemporary calf binding. Head of spine chipped with a crack along front hinge but sound. Some pages lightly foxed.   First American edition, originally published by Darton & Harvey in 1797.  Margaret Lucas (b. 1701), was the owner of a china shop in London, inherited from her father who died in 1708.  In her Account she recounts her conversion to the Quakerism, which she did against the will of her aunt and uncle, who also had an interest in the shop.  Their response to her conversion resulted in physical and emotional abuse in their attempt to dissuade her, including pinching, throwing a brass candlestick at her and using a whip.  Her book had two goals.  First, to characterize the practices of Quakerism and demonstrate the strength of those who adhered to its tenants.  Secondly, to illustrate to the public the nature of the persecution experienced by Quakers in the practice of their faith.   At the time, Quakerism was considered radical for allowing women to participate and speak in worship and for asking them to prioritize their relationship with God over earthly relationships, including those with men in positions of power.    The book was printed by Daniel Lawrence, a Quaker practicing his faith in Stanford, New York.  It contains one page of advertisements of books for sale by Henry and John F. Hull at back of volume. The list includes several other published Quaker journals by women including Sarah Grubb, Catharine Philip, Mary Neale and Patience Brayton. Daniel Lawrence became a Quaker in 1788 and printed material for the Hull brothers between 1802 and 1805.    Brown, Sylvia (ed.). Women, Gender and Radical Religion in Early Modern Europe. 2007, pp. 100 - 103 pp.  Bradley, "Daniel Lawrence, Quaker Printer of Burlington, Philadelphia, and Stanford, N.Y."  Quaker History, Volume 65, Number 2, Autumn 1976, 100-102 pp.   .