last 7 days
last 30 days
older than 30 days

De Simone Company, Booksellers

Essay on the Anatomy of Expression in Painting

Essay on the Anatomy of Expression in Painting

Bell, Charles London: Longmans, Hurst, Rees and Orme, 1806. 4to. 295 x 230 mm. (11 1/2 x 9 inches). [xii], 184 of 186 pp., missing the half-title to Essay VI at p. 105-106. Illustrated with 7 engraved plates and stipple engravings in the text. Near contemporary black leather spine and tips, marbled paper boards; some light rubbing to the joints, otherwise very sound and attractive. Engraved bookplate of Thomas Picton Rose Richards. Like his older brother John Bell, Charles was not only a noted and highly regarded surgeon, but also an accomplished artist who brought his skills at drawing and painting to the field of anatomy. In this work on the anatomy of expression Bell's goal was to provide artists with a better understanding of the physiological nature of the human body in order for them to better delineate emotions in their artwork. The text engravings that accompany much of the text demonstrate Bell's skills, both as an observer and practitioner of the art of drawing. Some are quite disturbing as he attempts to depict the effects of emotions on human face. The engravings were executed by John Stewart of Edinburgh, who was one of the founding members of the Royal Society of Scotland in 1835. He apprenticed to Robert Scott of Edinburgh and studied at the Trustees' Academy in that city. In his introductory essay Charles Bell writes, "The anatomy of painting . . ., forms not only a science of great interest, but that from which alone the artist can derive the true spirit of observation; learn to distinguish what is essential in just expression; and be enabled to direct his attention to appearances which might otherwise escape his notice, but on which much of the effect and force, and much even of the delicacy of his delineations, will be found to depend." In his book Expressions of the Emotions, Charles Darwin writes that Bell, "laid the foundations of the subject as a branch of science." (307). Intersection of Art and Science.
Martin's System of Practical Penmanship Taught in 24 Lessons at His Writing and Book Keeping Academy

Martin's System of Practical Penmanship Taught in 24 Lessons at His Writing and Book Keeping Academy, N. 182 Main Street, Worcester, Mass

Martin, E. T. Worcester, MA: (Printed by Henry Holland), 1848. Oblong quarto. 255 x 330 mm. (10 x 13 inches). (16) pp. text. Illustrated with an engraved portrait of Martin designed by Oliver Pelton, engraved title-page, and 11 writing samples. Original green publisher's cloth, title embossed in gilt on upper cover, spine decoratively gilt. Minor foxing, mostly to the tissue guards. First edition. Very nice copy of Martin's manual of penmanship illustrated with a highly detailed and attractive portrait of Martin by Oliver Pelton. Pelton was a Connecticut trained engraver who produced a number of fine portraits, include an engraving of Washington after the painting of Gilbert Stuart. He was a partner in the company Terry & Pelton that specialized in bank note engraving, a skill which is apparent in the portrait of Martin. The eleven engraved plates that comprise Martin's manual of penmanship are beautifully produced with fine flourishes and the use of fish and birds, common calligraphic motifs, which give the page a light and airy form. The engravings were created by William B. Emery after designs by Martin and each individually printed by the copperplate printer, A. C. Beaman of Worcester. The text of twenty-four lessons was printed in two columns by Henry Holland also of Worcester. The manual appears to be scarce. OCLC cites copies at Winterthur, Harvard, Penn State and AAS, adding a copy at McGill in Montreal. Not cited in NUC. Nash, American Penmanship, 350. (308).
Narrative of the Festivities Observed in Honor of the Completion of the Grand Erie Canal

Narrative of the Festivities Observed in Honor of the Completion of the Grand Erie Canal, Uniting the Waters of the Great Western Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. Begun at Buffalo

Stone, William Leete New York: (Corporation of the City of New York), 1825. 4to. 250 mx 200 mm. (10 x 8 inches). [2]. pp. 293-334. Illustrated with a lithographic portrait of William Stone by Anthony Imbert, engraved folding map of the canal route from the Atlantic to Lake Eire, 8 lithographic views by Imbert of the canal route and its construction, 5 engraved portraits by A. B. Durand, 7 lithographic facsimiles of original document by Imbert. Bound in contemporary red morocco spine and tips, over marbled paper boards; spine scuffed but sound and attractive; some of the usual light foxing throughout. Presentation inscription dated May 25th, 1855 from James R. Woodbridge to Roderick Lawrence. Separate printing of the William L. Stone's Narrative which recounts the celebrations of the opening of the Erie Canal that first appeared in Cadwallader Colden's Memoir printed earlier in 1825. Stone's Narrative was "prepared for the Committee of the Corporation of the City of New York" and privately distributed in a limited number of copies. This is one of the earliest books printed in New York to be illustrated with lithographs. Antony Imbert, "a pioneer lithographer" was the second lithographer to set up shop and his lithographs are highly sought after as early examples of art in America. His portrait of Stone and the eight views of the canal route are beautifully produced and are rich and highly toned examples of his art. An article that appears in the Proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society, April 1922, has a profile of Imbert and cites a notice which written by William Dunlap in his History of the Arts of Design (1835) which says that Imbert lithographic studio is the first that he had encountered in New York. Harry Peters writes, "The place of honor undoubtedly goes to the illustrations in what is commonly called, 'Colden's Canal Book' which documents the triumphal progress of a canal boat from Buffalo to New York in 1825. This work also contains engraved portraits by the Hudson River painter, A. B. Durand, who began his career with Peter Maverick as an engravers' assistant. Before taking up painting Durand was considered one of America's finest engravers. The folding map of the canal route is printed from three plates on three leaves and pasted together to create to kind of panorama of the Erie Canal from Buffalo to the Hudson. Sabin 92149. Peter, America on Stone pp. 228-235. (309).
$1

$1,000.000! Public Library of Kentucky. Free Reading for All and Half a million in Gifts!! [caption title]. Fourth St., bet. Green & Walnut, Louisville, Ky

(Library Lottery) (Lousivlle): Stackhouse Print, 1872. Broadside. 510 x 135 mm. (19 1/2 x 5 1/4 inches). Text within a double rule border. Illustrated with a woodcut image of the public library. Signed in type at conclusion of the text by Thos. E. Bramlette, Agt. of the Kentucky Public Library. Folded; light foxed; one clean 1 3/4-inch tear from left margin with no loss of text. With fault a very good copy. Rare broadside advertising a funding scheme for financing the establishment of a free library in Louisville, Kentucky. On the Library's website there is a short statement about the "lottery" which reads in part: "Our city had a library as early as 1816, but it was not a free public library. It was a small collection housed in the old Court House. It soon folded for lack of funds as did others to follow it. In1870 some progressive individuals decided to create a public institution for information and enjoyment where anyone could borrow books without charge. The word "lottery" was carefully omitted from the 1871 charter to the Public Library of Kentucky, but trustees were able to sell tickets to fund-raisers at which lucky ticket holders would win a portion of the funds. Prizes as high as $35,000 were awarded!" "The trustees then began acquiring a collection and bought the Weisinger Hall (the old Kaufman's department store) to store the materials. Shortly after, a group of citizens organized to form the Polytechnic Society of Kentucky as a funding body for the library. Theirs was not a glowing success but it kept the library alive until the turn of the century, when the promise of a grant from philanthropist Andrew Carnegie, as well as local taxes, raised the prospects for a stable well-funded institution." OCLC cites one copy only, at American Antiquarian Society. (301).
The Color Printer:  A Treatise on the Use of Color in Typographic Printing

The Color Printer: A Treatise on the Use of Color in Typographic Printing

Earhart, John F. Cincinnati, Ohio: Earhart & Richardson, 1892. 4to. 260 x 200 mm. (10 1/4 x 8 inches). 137 pp. text. Portrait. Illustrated with 90 plates, printed in color or embossed. Signed on a dedication page by Earhart. Library buckram binding. With the bookplate of the Updike Collection of Books on Printing and the embossed ownership mark on many plates of the Providence Public Library. Standard work on the methodology of color printing, illustrated with 90 pages of plates showing examples of hundreds of applied color combinations, with corresponding text that provide helpful hints on successful application. A true manual, Earhart's book offers information on colored inks, process of mixing colors, tints, half tones, composition, best presses, rollers, and papers to use in the color process, methods of embossing and a dictionary of terms. Earhart and Richardson were some of the finest color printers in America during the 19th century and had both the skill and patience to produce color images using as many as 37 inks printed in six pulls through the press. In his description of Earhart's book David Pankow called the work a "landmark" manual and that most of the plates "are intended to show color harmonies and how tints in various strengths could be combined. Incredibly he was able to produce more than 1,000 distinct color and tint values from just twelve stock inks." From the library of Daniel Berkeley Updike. Pankow, David. The Printer's Manual, p. 64. (289).
The Tiger's Eye. On Arts and Letters

The Tiger's Eye. On Arts and Letters

Stephan, Ruth and John Westport, Connecticut: The Tiger's Eye Publishing Company, 1949. 9 issues all published. 4to. Original color printed wrappers; spine edges rubbed, with a few minor repairs, and a few pieces missing, otherwise sound and attractive. First edition of this highly regarded art and literary magazine edited by Ruth and John Stephan, which became the voice for abstract expressionism, surrealism, and the Latin American avant-garde in the United States. Blending the prose and images of post WWII artists like Max Ernst, Alberto Giacometti, Stanley William Hayter, Pablo Picasso, Rufino Tamayo and Anne Ryan, to name a few, the Tiger's Eye became the visual forum for the "new". In a review of an exhibition on the Stephans at Yale University in 2002 Roberta Smith of the NY Times wrote, "the magazine, which took its title from William Blake, was one of the few that 'took visual art as seriously as literature.' It was also an eccentric mom-and-pop operation, put together with love, sophistication and a fair amount of attitude, as well as Ruth's money. (Her family owned Walgreen's). It largely excluded criticism in favor of artist's writings and reproduced artwork without captions, to unfetter the reader's response." Ruth and John Stephan's papers are at Yale University. In 2002 the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library organized an exhibition of their work with emphasis on The Tiger's Eye. Pamala Franks published a catalogue entitled The Tiger's Eye: The Art of a Magazine and Robert Smith reviewed both the exhibition and the publication for the NY Times, March 22, 2002. "The Tiger's Eye was designed by Ruth Stephan. Cover and color scheme by John Stephan. Typography by Sven Jansen. Composition and printing by the Elm Tree Press, Woodstock, Vermont. Collotypes by Meriden Gravure Company, Meriden, Connecticut. Color Reproductions and Photo Engraving by Melford Photo Engraving Company, New York." With faults a very good copy of the complete set. (293).
John Rauch's Receipts on Dyeing

John Rauch's Receipts on Dyeing, in a series of Letters to a Friend. Containing correct and exact copies of all his best receipts on dyeing cotton & woolen good, obtained and improved by him, during twelve years practice at different manufactories, in Switzerland, France, Germany and America. Also, a true Description of His Invented Substitute for Woad, Being a Cheap and Preferable Material, and the Produce of this Country

Rauch, John New York: Printed for Joseph I. Badger & Co., Proprietors in New-Haven, 1815. 8vo. 210 x 135 mm. (8 1/4 x 5 1/4 inches). 97 pp. Contemporary leather spine and tips, marbled paper boards. Preliminary leaves stained brown at margins, a few minor tears, otherwise a very good copy in an original binding. This copy inscribed on front free endpaper, "Selah North Book/Price one hundred dollars AD 1815./ Presented by Selah North to Gideon L. North May 15, 1847." Rare receipt book for dyeing textiles, written by a well-traveled practitioner of the trade, Rauch was from Switzerland and "spent time at dye houses in Germany and France before coming to the United States sometime in 1812. Traveling in New England and the Mid-Atlantic States between 1812 and 1815, Rauch 'instructed more than 30 persons,' sharing his expert knowledge for a fee." His book written in the form of letters to a colleague, include techniques for working with cotton, linen and wool and the process of using natural dyes to create bold colors of red, blue and yellow, to more subdued tints of grey, slate, olive. He also describes in detail how to process the cloth so that it accepts the tints in a true and consistent way. One of the more interesting aspects of the book is that Rauch provides a considerable amount of information on the American textile trade in the early decades of the 19th century and lists over 30 New England manufactures who have paid him for his service. According to Rink, there were two separate settings of the text of this work, one in 98 pages, and one like this copy in 97 pp. Both appear to be rare. Rink 1855. See Linda Jean Thorsen. "The Merchants and the Dyers: The Rise of a Dyeing Service Industry in Massachusetts and New York 1800-1850." Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings, 2016. p. 497. (290).
Catalogue of Sole Leather

Catalogue of Sole Leather, to be Sold by Messrs. Franklin & Minturn, on Thursday, August 9th, 1827, at 10 o'clock A.M. at the Stores of Gideon Lee & Co., No. 20 Ferry-Street [New York]. Terms Under $100, cash; from $100 to $500, four months;… The name of the Purchaser will be required, either as Drawer or Endorser. [Caption & text];

Gideon Lee & C. New York, 1827. Narrow folio. 332 x 208 mm., (13" x 8-1/8"), [5] pp., Printed on heavy paper, the final page addressed in manuscript to Messrs. Newhall & Eveleth, Boston. Old folds, one small hole where originally sealed. Some migration of ink through the paper. Still, about fine. Printed auction form consisting of 10 columns: [Lot] No.; Sides; [Total] Pounds; Avg. [Wgt.]; Weights [Range]; Hide [Source]; Tannery; Value; Purchaser; and Price. The first seven columns have printed data entered, the eighth, Value, has figures neatly supplied in manuscript, and the last two have been left blank. The columns are divided into sections according to the location of the material: lots 1-5 are on the "First Floor, Middle Store," lots 6-24 on the "Second Story, Middle Store," lots 25-72 on the "Second Story, Back Store," and so forth. There is a total of 185 lots. At the end of the printed form (occupying the two blank columns) there is a short manuscript note regarding the sale signed "Gideon Lee & Co." Sale contains tens of thousands of pounds of hides from Carthegena, Pernambuco, Buenos Ayres, Porto Rico [sic], Oronoko [sic], New Orleans, Madagascar, Russia, et al., offered by approximately 25 named tanneries (e.g. Northampton, Cummington, Worthington and Franklin in western Massachusetts), together with a pre-sale value supplied in manuscript for each lot. Gideon Lee learned shoemaking in Amherst, MA. In 1807 moved to New York and opened his own shop. He became the largest tanner and supplier of leather skins to the trade and his business after passing through three generations was finally absorbed into the United States Leather Company in 1893. In addition to his business acumen Gideon Lee was elected to the New York State Assembly in 1823, Mayor of New York City in 1833, and the United States Congress in 1835-17. Not in Romaine. Not in OCLC; the earliest leather auction catalogue listed was printed in New York in 1841. See Biographical Dictionary of the U. S. Congress and Hide and Leather: The International Weekly, Vol. 61, No. 1 (January 1921) p. 54 for biographical information. At the end of the printed form (occupying the two blank columns) there is a short manuscript note regarding the sale signed "Gideon Lee & Co." Sale contains tens of thousands of pounds of hides from Carthegena, Pernambuco, Buenos Ayres, Porto Rico [sic], Oronoko [sic], New Orleans, Madagascar, Russia, et al., offered by approximately 25 named tanneries (e.g. Northampton, Cummington, Worthington and Franklin in western Massachusetts), together with a pre-sale value supplied in manuscript for each lot. Gideon Lee learned shoemaking in Amherst, MA and in 1807 moved to New York and opened his own shop. Overtime he became the larges tanner and supplier of leather skins to the trade and his business after passing through three generations was finally absorbed into the United States Leather Company in 1893. In addition to his business acumen Gideon Lee was elected to the New York State Assembly in 1823, Mayor of New York City in 1833, and the United States Congress in 1835-17. Not in Romaine. Not in OCLC; the earliest leather auction catalogue listed was printed in New York in 1841. See Biographical Dictionary of the U. S. Congress and Hide and Leather: The International Weekly, Vol. 61, No. 1 (January 1921) p. 54 for biographical information.
Pacific Hotel

Pacific Hotel

New York Trade Card (New York), 1836. Colored lithograph, 12" x 12." Laid-down on card stock at an early date, light foxing & slight staining.   A splendid advertising card for the newly opened Pacific Hotel, with ten lines of lithographed text, dated "New York, July 1st 1836." According to the text which is printed beneath the large colored image of the hotel the address of the newly constructed building is 162 Greenwich Street, two doors north of Courtland Street, in downtown Manhattan. The hotel is conveniently location between the landing of the Philadelphia and North River [Hudson] Steam Boats. The Pacific Hotel is under the superintendence of Benjamin Jesup and R.C. Nichols, who is the proprietor of the hotel and the Mansion House was constructed under the direction of the owner, William Bunker. The text goes on to state that the Hotel can accommodate 150 visitors, is furnished in a new and modern style and that neither expense or exertion was spared "to assure internal order and regularity." The colored lithograph illustrates the five-story hotel and focuses attention on about ten nicely dressed people on the street, and a number of hotel guests visible through the first-floor curtained windows. Although the perspective of the image is clumsy it shows the newly constructed hotel in a very positive light and illustrates how it is situated on Greenwich Street near Courtland. Although the name of the lithographer is not printed on the advertising card, it is probably by either Georg Endicott & Swett, John B. Pendleton or Mesier's Lithographer, all working in New York in the mid-1830's. This colored lithograph appears to very rare. Not cited in either Peter, American on Stone or Stoke's Iconography of Manhattan Island. A colored copy was part of an exhibition entitled, A Loan Exhibition of Rare Views of Old New York organized by the Lawyers Title Insurance and Trust Company in 1909 and curated by J. H. Jordan. An uncolored copy is in the New York Public Library, trimmed at the bottle removing all the text. Another uncolored copy is cited in the sale catalogue of Edwin Babcock Holden, American Art Gallery, April 21, 1910.
Sopra alcuni colori che nei secoli XIV e XV furono adoprati per le pitture dell'insigne Campo Santo di Pisa

Sopra alcuni colori che nei secoli XIV e XV furono adoprati per le pitture dell'insigne Campo Santo di Pisa, e sulla composizione dell'intonco che fu fatto per le pitture medesime. Lettera al Chiar. Sig. Cav. Conservatore Carlo Lasinio

Branchi, Giuseppe Pisa: Tipografia Nistri, 1836. 8vo. 220 x 140 mm. (8 3/4 x 5 1/2 inches). 25 pp. Later wrappers. Rare pamphlet describing the composition and methods for recreating the colors used in the frescos that were painted on the walls of the 12th century Campo Santo in Pisa. In addition, the pamphlet includes the techniques for how the plasters of the fresco were made at the time of their creation and an analysis of the ingredients that that went into their composition. The author, a professor of chemistry at the University of Pisa, provides historical information on the fresco's as well his analysis and description of the medieval paintings. The Campo Santo is monumental cemetery the construction of which began in 1287 and was not completed until 1464. The frescos were applied to the walls of Campo Santo from about 1380 until 1600. By the middle of the 18th century restoration was required and by 1836 when Branchi published his pamphlet the need for conservation was becoming critical. The Campo Santo was heavily damaged during WWII and restoration of the building and the frescos is ongoing. Branchi addresses this letter to Carlo Lasinio, the noted Italian engraver, collector and dealer. Rare: ICCU cites 9 copies in Italy, NUC cites only a copy at NYPL. OCLC only cites copies in Bologna, Florence, Paris and Pisa. (117).
Novelle Letterarie pubblicate in Firenze.; Edited by Giovanni Lami

Novelle Letterarie pubblicate in Firenze.; Edited by Giovanni Lami

(Lami, Giovanni) Florence: All' Insegna del Centauro, 1768. First Series, 27 volumes of 29. 4to. Each annual volume consists of 52 numbers, printed in 8-page issues. Volumes 1-25 bound in publisher's boards; vols 28-29 bound in contemporary half vellum with morocco labels, marbled boards. Missing volumes 26 & 27. Some minor worming at ends of last 4 volumes, otherwise in very good condition; title and index of volume 29 (1768) in facsimile. This rare periodical is a treasure trove of information and a powerful tool for scholars documenting the history of ideas over the twenty-five-year period that it covers. Each volume contains three indexes, one listing the cities where reports originated; a second index for authors and titles of articles; and a third a subject index. For example, in volume I on pages 66 and 68, there is information on recent books that were place on the Index of Prohibited Books. There are also three articles on fables, numerous reports on recent scientific publication issued by various academies, descriptions of ancient costumes, libraries, and museums in Italy and across Europe. Hundreds of reports of human activity are covered in each volume and the indexes, make that information easily accessible to the scholarly community. One of the more interesting aspects of the publishing history of this periodical is Giovanni Lami's decision to create a printing company to produce each issue. In an article by Elisa Marrucchi published in La Bibliofilìa, she describes a series of documents that record the organization of the printing company under the name Stamperia del Centauro. It was financed by a syndicate of eight Florentines and she speculates that the reason for establishing this press, was so it could secure its independence and freedom to publish without fear of local interference. Novelle Litterarie, founded by Giovanni Lami (1697-1770), librarian of the Biblioteca Riccardiana in Florence, is the earliest literary journal printed in Tuscany and voice for literature, science and reform in the Florentine states. It is an innovative weekly focusing on the contemporary debates over education, religion, social reform, literature and science, highlighting not only the intellectual life of Florence but also cultural developments taking place in almost every major Italian city. Novelle Litterarie also contains reports of recent publications and events from other literary centers across Europe and Great Britain. According to his biography in DBI, Lami received and printed over 14,000 reports from correspondence over this 28 year period. Giovanni Lami was sole editor of the First Series, which was published between 1740-68. A second series began in 1770 under a new editor and was published for another 22 years. Lami studied law at Pisa, and philosophy and Greek at Florence, and previously acted as librarian to Gian Luca Pallavicino with whom he travelled widely in Europe; he was made a professor of ecclesiastical history by Gian Gastone di Medici, last Grand duke of Tuscany, whose biography he wrote. Lami was a member of many prestigious Florentine academies and contributed to numerous publications such as the Vocabulario della Accademia della Crusca. His extensive library is now held at the Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale in Florence; his letters and unpublished works are kept at the Biblioteca Riccardiana. This run of Novelle Litterarie is very rare and like the other Italian periodicals that heralded in the Enlightenment in Italy (Novelle della repubblica letteraria, Storia letteraria d'Italia, Giornale dei letterati and Il Café, it is nearly impossible to find in the market. OCLC cites three complete set in the US; Yale, University of Illinois, and UC Berkeley. Cochrane, Florence in the Forgotten Centuries (1527-1800), Chicago-London 1973, pp. 315-396. Elisa Marrucchi, "Giovanni Lami Stampatore". La Bibliofilìa, V. 52. No. 3 (1950), pp. 264-67. Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani, http://www.treccani.it/enciclopedia/giovanni-lami_%28Dizionario-Biografico%29/. Laterza vol. 3, p. 320. Benvenuto Righini, I periodici fiorentini (1597-1950). Florence, Sansoni, 1955, n.1893. Venturi, Italy and the Enlightenment, pp. 273-4.
Alexandri. P.P. VI Diaria a Joanne Burcardo Argentinensi Clerico Cappellae et Magno Caerimoniario Eiusdem.  Papae Ecclesiae Horianae a Julio PP. II Praefecio aedita Liber. I (et Liber II)

Alexandri. P.P. VI Diaria a Joanne Burcardo Argentinensi Clerico Cappellae et Magno Caerimoniario Eiusdem. Papae Ecclesiae Horianae a Julio PP. II Praefecio aedita Liber. I (et Liber II)

Burckhard, Johann Italy (Rome?): N.p., 1630. Folio. 305 x 210 mm. (12 x 8 ½ inches). 608 numbered leaves. 17th century Latin manuscript in one hand, highly legible, covering the years 1492-1503. Illustrated with two engraved title-pages by Francesco Villamena (1566-1624) in the monumental style with a large architectural border with the title written in ink. Pen and ink coat-of-arms of Federico Cesi and the Accademia dei Lincei written on the engraved plate. Full 18th century sheep binding, red leather label; spine and edges rubbed, but sound. Some browning to the paper stock, but no deterioration to the paper and not effecting the legibility of the text. Otherwise very good copy. Johann Burckhard (ca 1450-1506), a member of the court of Pope Alexander VI, oversaw papal ceremonies and official activities of the Pontiff from the 1480's until his death in 1506. During this time, he maintained a diary, which recorded many of the Pope's activities and described many of the events and illustrious visitors who made their way to Rome. His diaries include details of the coronation of Alfonso II of Naples, the visit to the Pope by Don Federico de Aragon, the reception of Charles VIII of France, the Papal Embassy of Emperor Maximillian, and the Jubilee of 1499 to name a few of the historic ceremonies recorded in this manuscript. Pope Alexander VI (1492-1503), was member of the Borgia dynasty that ruled much of Rome during the period and one of the more notorious popes of the 15th century. Alexander's Papacy is remembered for its disregard for convention and his outright hostility to his priestly duties. He ran the Vatican as his personal empire rather than a follower of Saint Peter. During his reign Alexander VI fathered several illegitimate children and elevated members of his family to lucrative positions in the Church's hierarchy. The record of the Borgia Papacy that appears in this fair copy of the Diaria describes Alexander's administration during the last decade of the 15th century, as well as numerous mentions of his family including the exploits of Lucretia Borgia, and descriptions and critiques of members of the Roman nobility that were part of the Borgia court. Finally, it includes descriptions of some of the salacious behavior of the Borgia family and its Court, which marked it as one of the most corrupt papacies in history. Because of its content, Burckhard's manuscript was prohibited by the Papacy from being printed and stimulated the production of several manuscript copies like the one offered here. The size, format, and legibility of this copy, and the provenance that links it to the Cesi Library supports the conjecture that it was produced for an important member of the Roman nobility for personal use. It was not until 1883 that an edition of the diaries was published in Paris covers the years 1483-1506. Of the printed editions, OCLC records a copy at the Morgan Library, Princeton, Dublin, one in Poland, and 7 copies in Germany. Calvi, Repertoire des sources historiques du moyen age. No., 172. Chevalier, Repertoire des sources historiques du moyen age. No., 371. Forcella, Iscrizioni delle chiese e di altri edifici di Roma dal sec. XI ai giorni nostril. V, 42; 61-62. Potthas, Repertoire des sources historiques du moyen age. II, pp. 611-12. Williams, George, Papal Genealogy, the Families and Descendants of the Popes. Jefferson, North Carolina, 1998.