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B & L Rootenberg Rare Books

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A letter from General Ludlow to Dr. Hollingworth, their Majesties chaplain at St. Botolph-Aldgate. Defending his former letter to Sir E.S. which compared the tyranny of the first four years of King Charles the Martyr, with the tyranny of the four years of the late abdicated king .

LUDLOW, Edmund Half-calf and marbled boards, spine label; red fore-edge. Dated (1860) armorial bookplate of North Library (Earl of Macclesfield Library). First edition. This text is one of many in a "pamphlet war" between the author General Ludlow, a republican, and Dr. Richard Hollingwoth, a Royalist. Hollingwoth sought to defend the late King Charles I against those who criticized his reign. He also argued that Charles I was the true author of Eikon basilike (1649), a work published just before his execution which was the subject of great debate as to its authorship. Republicans like Ludlow agreed with John Milton and others who questioned the authenticity of the claim that Charles was the author, and furthermore viciously attacked not only Charles but the current monarch, James II. Ludlow published his first attack in 1691 in a pamphlet entitled A letter from Major-General Ludlow to Sir E.S. In response, Hollingworth issued A defence of King Charles I: occasion'd by the lyes and scandals of many bad men of this age (1691). This work is the rebuttal, in which Ludlow scathingly characterizes Hollingworth's pamphlets as "pieces of flattery compiled by a hungry Levite, gaping at a deanery or chaplainship at Whitehall." To add insult to injury, he amplifies his attack on the monarchy by including a critique of Charles II. Hollingworth continued to assail Ludlow in his writings. This back-and-forth demonstrates the continued importance of pamphlet wars in the decades after the English Civil War. The authorship of this work is dubious. The name "General Ludlow" was possibly a reference to Edmund Ludlow (1617?-1692), a radical republican and soldier who fought for Parliament against Charles I and the Royalists. In 1648, he assisted the Independents (radical Puritans) in ousting the Presbyterians (modern Purtians) from Parliament, and the following year was one of the judges against Charles I (and actually signed the warrant for his execution). However, when Oliver Cromwell declared himself Lord Protector in 1653, Ludlow openly opposed him. He continued to fight against the Protectorate until the Restoration in 1660 when he was forced to flee to Switzerland.
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Canterburies doome. Or the first part of a compleat history of the commitment, charge, tryall, condemnation, execution of William Laud, late Arch-bishop of Canterbury. . .

PRYNNE, William Complete with all blanks. Text continuous despite pagination. Includes the cancel leaf O4 (p. 103) which is loose and as per the instructions printed at the recto bottom placed before signature P. Engraved portrait of Laud, engraved portrait of Prynne and engraving of the room setup, plus full-page engraving on p. 122 explaining where everyone was placed in the courtroom, plus woodcut headpieces and initials. Beautiful contemporary calf with paper spine label. Ownership stamp in black on flyleaf of a horned sheep under branches over the name Sheppard, some marginal notations throughout. An excellent copy. First edition. Canterburies doome was the culmination of Prynne's revenge against the Archbishop of Canterbury, William Laud (1573-1645). In 1632, Prynne, a staunch Puritan, published Histriomastix, in which he argued that stage plays of all kinds were affronts to Christianity. Unfortunately for Prynne, the Queen acted in a play soon after the publication, so his condemnation was construed as a critique of her. Prynne was jailed in the Tower, stripped of his degree, was fined and sentenced to lose his ears in the pillory. Earless and incensed, Prynne identified Laud, the King's religious advisor, as his chief persecutor. In 1640, King Charles I summoned the Long Parliament, and the newly installed legislature was quick to undermine the king's authority. They accused Laud of treason, and Prynne, seizing the opportunity, aggressively gathered evidence against the aging archbishop and managed the ensuing trial. Laud was executed in 1645, and the House of Commons tasked Prynne with publishing an account of the trial. Prynne (1600-1669) was a prolific pamphleteer and attorney who wrote on numerous subjects from theater to theology and published about 200 books and pamphlets during his lifetime.
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Iter boreale, with large additions of several other poems being an exact collection of all hitherto extant. Never before published together .

WILD, Robert Later edition. Wild began printing Iter boreale in 1660 and published twelve more issues through 1668. The present copy was the first issue printed in 1670 followed by two more in 1671 and 1674. All editions printed before 1668 were quarto and those after 1670 were octavo. Moreover, nearly every issue has a different imprint. Wild continued to expand and add to each version. This copy begins with a very popular ode to George Monck, a key figure in the restoration of the monarchy, whom Wild praises as the savior of the nation. It also includes his poem "The Tragedy of Christopher Love" (1660) lamenting the Presbyterian minister's execution at the hands of Oliver Cromwell, and many other elegies and epitaphs. Wild also added "The Grateful Noncomformist" (1665), a scathing ridicule of Robert L'Estrange, the surveyor of the press who persecuted many Presbyterians. Following this are his two poems about the imprisonment and death of Edmund Calamy, also a Presbyterian. He also took the opportunity to profess his loyalty to the monarchy after the Restoration with "The Loyal Nonconformist" (1666). Throughout, he defends the nonconformists and here issues his response to critics with "The Fair Quarrel" (1666). Wild (1615-1679) was a satirical poet and nonconformist minister. He was largely supportive of Presbyterians, but as a nonconformist, a Protestant who did not adhere to the governance of the Church of England, he was against sectaries of any kind. He was highly critical of Cromwell and supported the monarchy after the Restoration as is evident in his poetry, the highlights of which are all included in this edition.
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The Parliaments resolution, concerning the Kings most excellent Majesty, and the Lords and Commons, which have absented themselves from the said Houses, and are now at Yorke attending on His Maiestie . Whereunto is annexed severall reasons to prove that every man is bound to defend and uphold the Parliament and priviledges thereof against all opposers whatsoever

PARLIAMENT Title within ruled border, large oodcut initial and headpiece. Disbound; interior in very good condition. Rare second issue of first edition. Wing (E2145) lists a first issue with a different imprint ("by T.F. for N.R.") published the same year. Issued at the request of the Parliament and carried out by the clerk, John Browne, this pamphlet updates the English public on the current state of a nation on the brink of civil war. By mid-1642, as tensions grew and relations crumbled, the Parliamentarians and the Royalists began to arm themselves. This tract reveals Parliament's final attempts to negotiate with King Charles I to prevent an all-out war. However, it is certain that the Long Parliament was intent on removing Charles I from power given their hostility and legislative actions against the king in the early 1640's. The Parliaments resolution claims that they intend to preserve "religion, liberty, and publique safety" which are "like to be overwhelmed and lost in the generall confusion, and calamity of this distracted kingdom." For this reason among others, Parliament hoped that Charles I would consent to their requests, of course to no avail as war began in earnest during October of 1642.
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A letter of a French Protestant to a Scotishman of the covenant. Wherein one of their chiefe pretences is removed, which is their conformitie with the French churches in points of discipline and obedience

DU MOULIN, Pierre Small woodcut device on title, woodcut headpiece and initial. Disbound; the first leaf (blank) before the title with hand-written title, year, and author in a contemporary hand, interior in excellent condition. First edition. This tract is Du Moulin's first entry into the debate concerning episcopacy. This system of church governance overseen by bishops was a crucial component in the Church of England. However, many viewed the episcopal system as a holdover from the Catholic Church and therefore antithetical to the Reformed religion. Du Moulin, a "Frenchman borne" but "happily engrafted into the body of the Church of England" argues in favor of the episcopacy. He here recognized the unity of doctrine within the reformed churches of France, Scotland, and England, as well as the necessity that some practices should differ according to circumstance. He states that in England, obedience to the king necessitated submission to the episcopacy that was desired by the monarchy. Overall, the pamphlet is an important contribution to the debate over religious governance on the eve of the English Civil War as well as the first publication from an significant religious figure. Du Moulin (1601-1684) was a clergyman in the Church of England and a religious controversialist. His father was a well-known Huguenot pastor, Pierre du Moulin, and the younger Pierre followed closely in the footsteps of his career and ideology. After A letter of a French Protestant, he continued to publish works during and after the Civil War, often anonymously, that on the whole supported the monarchy and protested the regicide of Charles I. After the Restoration in 1660, he found favor again and printed numerous works advocating the Church of England and condemning Catholicism.
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Memoirs official and personal; with sketches of travels among the northern and southern Indians, and descriptions of scenes along the western borders; On the origin, history, charactyer, and the wrongs and rights of the Indians, with a plan for the preservation and happiness of the remnants of that persecuted race

MCKENNEY, Thomas L. With frontispiece portrait of the author in the first volume and colored frontispiece portrait of Pocahontas in the second, an additional 11 wood engravings, facsimile of a letter from Dolly Madison to the author. Publisher's cloth, spine with gilt title and decoration; interior with some foxing, otherwise a fine copy with the ownership signature of Henry A. Breed (1842-1914) on the title. Second edition, published the same year as the first, of McKenney's travels in the midwest and southern states. Memoirs describe the author's travels during September and October, 1827 by steamboat from St. Louis to Memphis, then overland into Northern Mississippi where he held a council with the Chickasaws, then through the Choctaw country, and back to Washington by way of Tuscaloosa, Montgomery and Alabama. McKenney's narrative of navigating the Mississippi River, as well as material relating to Native Americans (especially tribal leaders) are rich and descriptive. His stories of political life in Washington during the Monroe, Adams and Jackson administrations illustrate the corruption in government contracts, especially related to Native Americans. A plan for improving the situation of the Native Americans through education programs is outlined. The second part of the work contains lectures on Indian life. McKenney (1785-1859) served as the Superintendent of Indian Affairs between 1824 and 1830. He was known for his extensive knowledge and compassion for Native Americans, likey due to his Quaker beliefs. Even though he promoted the "civilization" program that removed Native Americans west of the Mississippi River, President Andrew Jackson eventually dismissed McKenney from his position because he held the opinion that Native Americans were the equals, morally and intellectually, to the white man.
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August 5. Two letters, the one from the Lord Digby, to the Queen’s Majestie: the other from Mr. Thomas Elliot, to the Lord Digby, with observations upon the same letters .

DIGBY, Lord George Title within woodcut-decorated border, woodcut initial and headpieces. Later vellum-backed boards, title on spine; inter-leaved with modern paper. From the library of Baron Albert Fairfax (1870-1939), an American-born Scottish politician with the armorial bookplate of Fairfax of Cameron. First edition, one of five issues of Lord Digby's letters printed in 1642, each from a different printer. Digby (1612-1677) was the second earl of Bristol and a prominent politician during the English Civil War. He was known for his intelligence and proficiency in navigating court life. At the outbreak of the war in 1642, he became one of Charles's most notorious advisors. Publications of his letters helped to cement his nefarious reputation among Parliamentarian supporters. The first of the two letters is one Digby wrote to Charles's queen, Henrietta Maria, on March 10, 1642. Henrietta Maria at this point had already left England for the Hague amid rising tensions. Digby applauds her flight saying he is glad that she had "withdrawn from a country so unworthy" of her. The second letter is from Thomas Elliot beseeching Digby to ask the Queen for employment in the King's court. Following the two letters is a "Noat of Arms sent for by the King" that was seemingly a list of weapons and ammunition for the Royalist forces. These letters and the list of arms were intercepted and used as fodder to garner support for the Parliament. Henry Elsynge (c. 1606-1656), who was a clerk of the House of Commons, provided commentary on the letters stating that they reveal Digby's "venomous heart" and the rampant nepotism in the monarchy. Digby was impeached from the House of Lords soon after Two letters was published. He went on to advise the king during the war, and he always chose the most risky and aggressive actions against Parliamentarians. For instance, he is considered responsible for the King's disastrous defeat at the battle of Naseby, which effectively turned the tide in the favor of Parliament. The DNB (V, pp. 957--965) names Digby as one of "English history's most dangerous men.".
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Of the advancement and proficience of learning or the partitions of sciences IX. Written in Latin by the most eminent illustrious & famous Lord Francis Bacon . Interpreted by Gilbert Wats

BACON, Francis Engraved frontispiece portrait of the author and engraved title signed by William Marshall, woodcut initials, head- and tailpieces. Early tree calf, rebacked with decorations and title in gilt on spine; interior excellent. With three bookplates on the paste-down: (1) the physician and collector M[ario] Gonzales-Ulloa, Mexico, with woodcut depicting explorers and navigators; Valentine Smith, with illustration of a small cottage in a wooded landscape and a title, "Thatched Cottage | Virginia Water"; Robert Washington Oates with armorial and motto "Esse quam Videri" and a small book label with "Presented by Robert Washington Oates" printed underneath his bookplate, plus a small blind embossed stamp with Robert Washington Oates and his address on the first fly-leaf and ownership stamp "Bibliotheca Oatesiana MCM" on title-page and final leaf. First edition of the English translation and expansion of Bacon's De dignitate & augmentis scientiarum (first printed in 1623), second issue with the 1640 date on the colophon. Bacon (c. 1561-1626) was a politician, lord chancellor, and philosopher who is known as the father of empiricism. Of the advancement and proficience of learning was part of his greatest mission, the Instauratio Magna (Great Instauration), which was an attempt to reform all the processes of knowledge on the basis of empiricism. This work was originally printed in 1605 in English and was expanded in the 1623 Latin title. Importantly, Bacon throughout the text argued in support of the empirical philosophy that formed the foundation of Enlightenment thinking in the eighteenth century. This highly influential book shaped the taxonomic structure of Jean d'Alembert's and Denis Diderot's significant Encyclopédie (1751-1766). The translator, Gilbert Wats (d. 1657), was a preacher and linguist at Oxford. The present copy was once in the library of Robert Washington Oates (1874-1958), whose cousin, Lawrence, was a member of the Scott's Antarctic Expedition and his uncle, Frank, was also an explorer who was one of the first Europeans to see Victoria Falls. Robert, who had amassed his own fortune during the World War I, collected books and eventually founded the Oates Memorial Museum and Library. The Library once held an estimated 40,000 volumes. There are two variant editions also printed in 1640. The first issue (STC 1167) has a colophon dated 1639 (but was printed in 1640) and the third issue (STC 1167.7) has a colophon with the date 1640 but a cancel letterpress on the title-page. According to Gibson, who examined more than 30 copies, no two copies are identical. FIRST EDITION OF THE ENGLISH TRANSLATION AND EXPANSION.
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History of the Indian Tribes of North America, with biographical sketches and anecdotes of the principal chiefs. Embellished with one hundred and twenty portraits, from the Indian Gallery in the Department of War, at Washington

MCKENNEY, Thomas & HALL, James Complete (despite pagination) with a total of 120 plates of hand-colored lithographs; all tissue guards present. Bound in an exquisite full red gilt-decorated morocco binding, spine in compartments with title, date and decorations in gilt, gilt dentelles, a.e.g.; interiors in absolutely excellent condition. Bookplate of William Burgess Cornell, M.D. in Volume I. Fourth octavo edition. The first folio edition was issued between 1838 and 1844 and the first octavo edition between 1848 and 1850. This popular book is an incredibly important and early work of Native American history, anthropology, and ethnography. The authors and publishers began printing the octavo editions in order to "place the book within the reach of thousands" without sacrificing the quality and accuracy of plates. The detailed and beautifully colored lithographs are based on the oil paintings of Charles Bird King (1785-1862) who painted the portraits of several Native delegates in Washington at the behest of McKenney. The text and images include descriptions of the Sauk, Ojibway, and Chippeway as well as the Seminole, Creek, and Cherokee. Among the biographical sketches are those belonging to chiefs Red Jacket, Black Hawk, and Keokuk. Additionally, new to the octavo edition, McKenney and Hall added a portrait of Winnebago chief Red Bird. Most importantly, the three volumes preserved the biographies and cultures of rapidly disappearing peoples for future generations. McKenney (1785-1859) served as the Superintendent of Indian Affairs between 1824 and 1830. He was known for his extensive knowledge and compassion for Native Americans, likey due to his Quaker beliefs. Even though he promoted the "civilization" program that removed Native Americans west of the Mississippi River, President Andrew Jackson eventually dismissed McKenney from his position because he held the opinion that Native Americans were equals, morally and intellectually, to the white man. Hall (1793-1868), was a lawyer who wrote extensively about the west, and served as McKenney's longtime collaborator.
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Life of Ma-ka-tai-me-she-kia-kiak or Black Hawk, . with an account of the cause and the general history of the late war, his surrender and confinement at Jefferson barracks, and travels through the United States dictated by himself

BLACK HAWK [MA-KA-TAI-ME-SHE-KIA-KIAK]; LECLAIR, Antoine; PATTERSON, J.P. (ed.) Contemporary paper over boards, worn and stained, remnant of original spine label; interior foxed and stained. Pencil inscription on pastedown dated January 12, 1861, another ownership inscription of J.S. Whitney dated 1835 on the fly-leaf. Rare first edition. Black Hawk led a faction of Sauk, Fox, Kickapoo, and Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) peoples in an effort to fight the disposition of fifty million acres of territory once promised to him in a treaty with the U.S. government in 1804. Tensions and fighting culminated in 1832 during the short-lived Black Hawk War in which he attempted to re-occupy his tribal land along the Rock River in Illinois. Suffering from depleted resources, Black Hawk's followers, including women and children, were massacred at the Bad Axe River. Black Hawk and a few others momentarily escaped but were quickly captured and held in captivity, during which time they were met by artists and authors like George Caitlin and Washington Irving as well as huge crowds hoping to catch a glimpse of the prisoners. Black Hawk (1767-1838) dictated his life story to LeClair who was a mixed-race interpreter towards the end of his captivity 1833 at Fort Armstrong. The editor, Patterson, published the work soon after. It is important to recognize that the editor, Patterson, as well as LeClair likely added their own interpretation of events in order to appeal to an American audience. Nonetheless, it is one of the few autobiographies from a Native American and a rare glimpse into the history and tragedy of Black Hawk's people.
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A tour in America in 1798, 1799, and 1800. Exhibiting sketches of society and manners and a particular account of the American system of agriculture, with its recent improvements

PARKINSON, Richard Later half-morocco over cloth, spines in compartments with decorations, title, author and date in gilt; marbled endpapers, light spotting and foxing, but overall a very good wide-margined copy. From the library of W. Lloyd Wright with his bookplate in each volume (see provenance below). First edition under this title; it was also published the same year as The experienced farmer's tour in America: exhibiting, in a copious and familiar view, the American system of agriculture and breeding of cattle, with its recent improvements. Parkinson wrote this two-volume treatise on American agricultural practices expressly to discourage emigration to the newly formed country. He warns against trusting the writings of other farmers who entice immigrants with cheap land and promises of rich soil. In Parkinson's opinion, he "found the climate and soil there to be of such as a nature as to put it out of the power of man to enrich the land without such an enormous expense as . must ruin any one." During tours around his home base of Orange-Hill (near Baltimore), he focused on various crops such as wheat, vegetables, cotton, and tobacco, timber, soil management, and the raising of sheep and cattle. He also provides instruction as to brewing and malting, including cost of ingredients and prices of finished products on the current market. He further opines on slavery, religion and transportation as related to agriculture. In addition to his poor assessment of America's agriculture, he also is aghast at how white servants address their masters with "sir" or "mister." His critique of the "equality" preached in American society (disregarding the black slaves) and his outlook on the land itself provides crucial insight as to American and English perspectives in the years following the Revolutionary War. Parkinson (1748-1815) was an English agriculturist. Sir John Sinclair, the president of the Board of Agriculture in England, supported his interest in improving farming methods, and recommended Parkinson to George Washington, from whom Parkinson both rented a farm as well as worked at Mount Vernon (during which time he wrote this book, which contains some interesting information about our country's first president). Provenance: W. Lloyd Wright (1876-1950), with his dated bookplate (1932) by Julius J. Lankes. Wright, a draftsman and engineer for the Navy, was a major collector of Washington and items related to Washington, D.C. Today the W. Lloyd Wright Papers are housed at George Washington University.
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Anglia rediviva, or, Englands recovery: being the history of the motions, actions and successes of the army under the immediate conduct of his Excellency Sr. Thomas Fairfax, Kt. .

SPRIGGE, Joshua Full-page woodcut of Fairfax's coat of arms, large folding plates of Fairfax's army at the Battle of Naseby, folding table, but lacking the folding portrait of Thomas Fairfax. Woodcut initial, head- and endpieces. Contemporary calf, spine label; interior excellent with only minor browning around the margins. From the library of the Earls of Macclesfield with the dated armorial book plate of the North Library (with the motto "Sapere aude"), 1860, and a small blind-embossed stamp of armorial on first three leaves. There is also an ownership inscription on title of Theophil[us] Pickering, (1700-1747), a reverend in Ipswich, Massachusetts. First edition of Sprigge's most important work, basically a compilation of the newspapers and pamphlets issued during the period from approximately 1645 to 1647. The book was published one year before the Independents, a faction of radical Puritans led by Oliver Cromwell, took over the Long Parliament. There is a particular focus on the Parliamentarian army led by general Thomas Fairfax. An exceptionally large foldout engraving in excellent condition depicts the Battle of Naseby, one of the most important battles of the English Civil War, where Fairfax defeated the army of Charles I. There is also a folding table detailing the activity of Fairfax's troops between April 15, 1645 to August 19, 1646. Sprigge (1618-1684), was a preacher and Independent theologist. A theory propounded by Clement Walker (d. 1651), a critic of the Independent movement and an ally of William Prynne, states (in his History of Independency series, 1647-51) that the real author of Anglia rediviva was Colonel Nathaniel Fiennes, another officer in the Parliamentary army. This theory is based on the portion of the text justifying Fiennes's surrender of Bristol in 1643. Walker apparently believed that Fiennes wrote the book as vindication for his actions, despite even though there is no other evidence to support this claim (see DNB, Vol. XVIII, p. 835).
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The workes of the most high and mightie prince, James by the grace of God, King of Great Britaine, France and Ireland, defender of the faith, &c. Published by James, Bishop of Winton, and deane of his Maiesties Chappel Royall

James I. Engraved frontispiece portrait of the King signed by Simon van de Pass and John Bill, 2 title pages, the first engraved and signed by Renold Elstracke, the second with woodcut device, full-page woodcut of James I armorial, small engraved portrait of Charles I, woodcut historiated initials, head- and endpieces. Contemporary full calf with the initials "H A" blind-stamped on front and back, spine with 6 raised bands plus label, edges sprinkled red; other than a minor repair to L2, interior in excellent condition. From the library of John David Drummond (1907-2002), 17th Early of Perth and Viscount of Strathallan with his bookplate (see below). Second edition, a reprint of the first printing of 1616 with additions. Collected by Bishop James Winton, the book consists of a compilation of King James's I most accomplished literary works including Demonologie dealing with witchcraft, Basilikon Doron regarding king, God, and nobility, and The Trew Law espousing his theoretical ideas about ruling and kingship, among many others such as his speeches to Parliament and scriptural interpretations. All of the texts are in the vernacular demonstrating James's celebration of the English language as well as his mastery over it. Although the king wrote ample poetry, Workes consists primarily of his ecclesiastical and political writings. The second edition also contains beautifully engraved frontispieces including a portrait of the author, a fabulous engraved title page and a portrait of the young dedicatee, James's son, Charles I. James I (1566-1625), known as the scholar king, served as King of Scotland (as James IV) from 1567 and King of England and Ireland from 1603 until his death. James was a prolific writer from his youth and continued until his later years. In addition to his own literary forays, he was an avid supporter of writers such as Ben Jonson. While his reign was fraught with financial issues and political tensions, James' scholarly contributions remain some of the most important of any British monarch. Provenance: Armorial ex libris of Strathallan with banner motto "Lord have mercy." The earliest Strathallan bookplate dates to the late seventeenth century. The bookplate in the present copy has a tighter composition as well as an additional goshawk above the shield. The book likely belonged to a later Viscount of Strathallan, probably John David Drummond (1907-2002), 17th Earl of Perth. He was a Scottish peer, politician, and banker who also served at the Minister of State for Colonial Affairs under Harold Macmillan. Annotation in early hand on second fly leaf.
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22 issues

DERRIERE LE MIROIR Each with text, lithographs, and photographic reproductions Original printed wrappers. All in excellent condition. First editions. Twenty-two complete issues of the most successful art publishing venture in the postwar period. Aimé Maeght (1906-1981), a French art dealer and owner of an eponymous gallery in Paris, founded Derrière le Miroir (Behind the Mirror) in October 1946 and continued publishing until 1982, a total of more than 200 issues. The magazine was devoted exclusively to contemporary graphic works from artists represented by the gallery. Many of the most acclaimed artists of the time, including Francis Bacon, Fernand Léger, Alexander Calder, Alberto Giacometti, Ellsworth Kelly, and Henri Matisse submitted their works to the magazine. Each issue of the magazine featured an artist's original color lithographs and reproductions. In some cases, the graphic work was accompanied by poetry and articles from writers like Guillaume Apollinaire, André Breton, Francis Ponge, among many others. Derrière le Miroir at its core represented art's triumphal return to France after the devastation of World War II and disseminated the work of the greatest artistic minds of the twentieth century. The twenty-two issues in our collection includes many significant works from the series. Notable publications include the triple issue celebrating Joan Miró's works on the artist's 60th birthday in 1953, and the double issue of Vasilly Kandinsky's retrospective at the Maeght Gallery that same year. The following is complete list of the issues: 1. G. Braque No. 25-26 (1950); 2. G. Braque No. 48-49 (1953); 3. Miró No. 57-58-59 (1953); 4. Kandinsky No. 60-61 (1953); 5. G. Braque No. 71-72 (1954); 6. Raoul Ubac No. 74-75-76 (1955); 7. Derain No. 111 (1958); 8. G. Braque No. 115 (1959); 9. Kandinsky: 1921-1927 No. 118 (1960); 10. Miró No. 125-126 (1961); 11. Ubac No. 130 (1961); 12. Tal-Coat No. 131 (1962); 13. Georges Braque: Papiers collés 1912-1914 No. 138 (1963); 14. 5 peintres et 1 sculpteur No. 150 (1965); 15. Miró: l'oiseau solaire, l'oiseau lunaire, étincelles No. 164-165 (1967); 16. Tàpies No. 168 (1967); 17. Miró: Aquarelles, album femmes, Hai-ku No. 169 (1967); 18. Tàpies No. 175 (1968); 19. Garache No. 213 (1975); 20. Garache No. 222 (1977); 21. Tàpies No. 234 (1979). 22. There is also a special issue entitled Maeght Editeaur Faux-Fortes et Lithographies Originales Derriere le Miroir Affiches summarizing the 1964-1965 issues that are signed or contain original art.
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The heads of a conference delivered by Mr. Pym. At a committee of both Houses, Junii 24. 1641

PYM, John Title-page with medallion woodcut device with motto "Os homini sublime dedit." Woodcut headpiece. Disbound; interior in excellent condition. First issue of the first edition. According to Wing, there were four issues in total, each with varying settings of the title-page. The heads of a conference details the demands of John Pym addressed to Charles I. The brief pamphlet calls for the king to disband his army, give his assent to disputed bills, and to remove his counsellors and the Catholics from his queen's retinue. It also calls for the king's guarantee of Pym and his family's safety if these demands are agreed to. Printed on the eve of the English Civil War, The heads of a conference shows the deteriorating situation in the country between the monarchy and Parliament. Pym (1584-1643) was a prominent politician, always critical of the monarchy since his political debut under James I. Notably, he was one of the "Five Members" of Parliament that King Charles I ordered the arrest of in 1642. For his part during the war, Pym, who was a staunch protestant, secured the alliances of the Scots and the French based on this shared religious belief. He also strategically arranged loans and taxes for the funds necessary for Parliament to raise an army. He passed away in December 1643, before the war ended, but his financial decisions secured the success of the Parliamentarian forces.
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Some few observations upon his Majesties late answer to the declaration, or remonstrance of the Lords and Commons of the 19. of May, 1642. [London

PARKER, Henry Caption title. Woodcut initial, head- and tailpiece. Disbound; other than a tear down the center of A2, interior in good condition. The letter "G" in brown ink in upper left corner of the title page. First edition, second issue; according to Wing, this copy is an enlarged printing of a previous pamphlet issued the same year (Wing, P422). The anonymous author, quickly identified as Henry Parker, published Some few observations on the eve of the English Civil War. He here argued in support of the Parliament, stating the need for a bicameral legislature with complete sovereignty. He also discusses the importance of the king's assent in legislative matters. However, he insisted that the two house of parliament had the absolute power to enact emergency action to serve the populace, saying that the "surest basis" of government "is the common consent and whose most honourable end is the common good." Parker's incisive and inflammatory comments produced countless rebuttals and responses from Royalists, and decisively set the pamphlet wars into motion. Parker (1604-1652) was a political writer. After anonymously issuing Some few observations he was given the moniker "The Observator" thereby becoming the unofficial spokesperson for Parliament during the pamphlet wars (ODNB). His slogan throughout Some few observations that the monarchy was "singulis major, universis minor" (greater than any but less than the whole) shaped public discourse in the early years of the English Civil War. Despite some ups and downs, Parker continued his pamphleteering throughout the war arguing for public over private interests, the supremacy of the state over the clergy, and insisting that a bicameral parliament was the embodiment of the nation.
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The Popish royall favourite: or, a full discovery of His Majesties extraordinary favours to, and protections of notorious papists, priests, Jesuits, against all prosecutions and penalities of the laws enacted against them

PRYNNE, William Title within decorative border, woodcut initial and headpiece. Disbound; some soiling, a few leaves need re-sewing, some minor tears and chipping to corners (without loss to any print). Inscription in lower right corner of title. First edition, first issue, with the author's name in italics. In this pamphlet, Prynne, a staunch Puritan, criticizes Charles I for his connections to the Catholic Church and Rome. While initially calling for peace at the outbreak of the English Civil War in 1642, here he rallies against the "Popish and Malignant Party" who have poisoned the king against his kingdom and Parliament. Prynne is especially critical of the Queen and the "popish Rebels in Ireland." Charles's I consort, Henrietta Maria of France, was Roman Catholic and her religion was long a source of contention among the public and members of Parliament. While he is careful not to attack the king outright, Prynne is insistent that the "antichristian adverse power of the Romish malignant party" is truly to blame for the country's current state of affairs. Prynne (1600-1669) was a prolific pamphleteer and attorney who wrote on numerous subjects from theater to theology, and published about 200 books and pamphlets during his lifetime.
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Travels in Canada and the United States, in 1816 and 1817

HALL, Francis Large folding engraved map of the Niagara frontier signed Sidney Hall and wood-engravings in the text. Contemporary half-calf and marbled boards, rebacked with spine label; red speckled fore-edge. An excellent, very clean copy with the bookplate of Joseph Harrison Jr. on the front paste-down and Theodore L Harrison on the rear paste-down, small label of Henry Selden Weller, and an ownership stamp of Pierre de Poletica (1778-1849), Russian charge d'affaires in Washington from 1819-1821, above the title. First edition. After his arrival in New York, Hall traveled up the Hudson to Albany and into Canada where he visited Quebec, Montreal, Kingston, Niagara, and York. Returning to America, he toured Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, Harpers Ferry, Charlottesville, and Monticello, where he stayed with Jefferson for one night. He then visited Richmond, Petersburg, Raleigh, Fayetteville, China Grove, Georgetown and Charleston, South Carolina. Hall's descriptions of the topography and geography of the land are detailed and concise and paint a romantic picture of area. He provides a precise travelogue of his journey, including a listing of costs expended for food, lodging, etc. Although in an appendix he offers his opinion on the American character, government, and slavery, both Clark and Sabin note his remarkable lack of prejudice for a British visitor of the period. The map, "The Niagara Frontier," depicting the region between Lake Erie and Lake Ontario, is in excellent condition with no rips or tears. The fine wood-engravings consist of small aerial views of towns and river systems. Hall (d. 1833) was a lieutenant in the British army as well as an author. He traveled to North America as a military secretary in 1815 and retired from active duty in 1817 upon which he recorded his journeys through Canada and the United States. In 1819, he joined the revolutionary cause in South America and eventually settled in the new nation of Columbia where he served as the head of the government's topographical department.
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The doome of cowardize and treachery or, a looking-glasse for cowardly or corrupt governours, and souldiers, who through pusillanimity or bribery, betray their trusts, to the publick prejudice .

PRYNNE, William First edition, first issue (Wing, P3947A lists a second issue with "cowardisze" in the title). Prynne published this pamphlet shortly after the Parliamentarian victory over Royalist forces at the siege of Hull in October 1643. He here writes about the proper rules of engagement in war times, warning that "cowardly, mercenary Souldiers and Governours, who through feare or covetousnesse betray their trusts, have undergone most exemplary censures and punishments." Prynne framed these rules using King Charles I's own prescriptions of martial law as a not-so-subtle critique of Royalist forces who break these laws. Notably, he also encourages the governors of recently captured towns to submit to the conquering army lest they be accused of treason. Prynne is also sure to turn his attention to the Parliamentarian army suggesting that they follow these rules as well. Prynne (1600-1669) was a prolific pamphleteer and attorney who wrote on numerous subjects from theater to theology, publishing over 200 works during his lifetime. He denounced the monarchy and Charles I at the onset of the English Civil Wars in the 1640's. Ever the staunch Puritan, however, he viewed Oliver Cromwell's faction of Independents and their brand of radical Puritanism as detrimental to the state's power. When the Independents took control of the Parliament in 1648, Prynne was swiftly expelled. He later opposed the execution of Charles I, and after the regicide, he supported the Restoration. After Charles II took the throne, he gave Prynne the position of the Keeper of the Records in the Tower of London.
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An humble remonstrance against the tax of ship-money lately imposed: laying open the illegality, injustice, abuses, and inconveniences thereof. . .

PRYNNE, William Title within woodcut border, woodcut initial and headpiece. Modern boards; numerous blank leaves following text. First authorized edition. There was a 1641 printing under a slightly different title and with no place of publication or printer listed (Wing, P3983); on the title-page, Prynne refers to this earlier text as "an imperfect copy . so full of non-sence errors, and mistakes almost in every line, as makes it altogether uselesse, yea ridiculous." Published after his release from the Tower of London, Prynne here condemns a tax that Charles I imposed on ships leaving England in the mid-1630's. He viewed the tax as illegal and unjust as traditionally ship-tax was only collected during wartime. Even though the pamphlet was issued later, Charles' ship-tax continued to be a significant point of protest and opposition among the people and Parliament during the Civil War. A second part containing his observations on the Great Seal of England was not included with this first authorized edition, but was released in later printings. Prynne (1600-1669) was a prolific pamphleteer and attorney who wrote on numerous subjects from theater to theology and published nearly 200 books and pamphlets during his lifetime. He had initially written this tract during his imprisonment in the 1630s, where a friendly jailer assisted in smuggling out his pamphlets. Prynne, a Puritan who began his political career as a staunch supporter of the Parliament during the English Civil War, was released in 1641 after the Long Parliament took control of the government.