last 24 hours
last 7 days
last 30 days
older than 30 days

B & L Rootenberg Rare Books

method-draw-image (23)

August 5. Two letters, the one from the Lord Digby, to the Queen’s Majestie: the other from Mr. Thomas Elliot, to the Lord Digby, with observations upon the same letters .

DIGBY, Lord George Title within woodcut-decorated border, woodcut initial and headpieces. Later vellum-backed boards, title on spine; inter-leaved with modern paper. From the library of Baron Albert Fairfax (1870-1939), an American-born Scottish politician with the armorial bookplate of Fairfax of Cameron. First edition, one of five issues of Lord Digby's letters printed in 1642, each from a different printer. Digby (1612-1677) was the second earl of Bristol and a prominent politician during the English Civil War. He was known for his intelligence and proficiency in navigating court life. At the outbreak of the war in 1642, he became one of Charles's most notorious advisors. Publications of his letters helped to cement his nefarious reputation among Parliamentarian supporters. The first of the two letters is one Digby wrote to Charles's queen, Henrietta Maria, on March 10, 1642. Henrietta Maria at this point had already left England for the Hague amid rising tensions. Digby applauds her flight saying he is glad that she had "withdrawn from a country so unworthy" of her. The second letter is from Thomas Elliot beseeching Digby to ask the Queen for employment in the King's court. Following the two letters is a "Noat of Arms sent for by the King" that was seemingly a list of weapons and ammunition for the Royalist forces. These letters and the list of arms were intercepted and used as fodder to garner support for the Parliament. Henry Elsynge (c. 1606-1656), who was a clerk of the House of Commons, provided commentary on the letters stating that they reveal Digby's "venomous heart" and the rampant nepotism in the monarchy. Digby was impeached from the House of Lords soon after Two letters was published. He went on to advise the king during the war, and he always chose the most risky and aggressive actions against Parliamentarians. For instance, he is considered responsible for the King's disastrous defeat at the battle of Naseby, which effectively turned the tide in the favor of Parliament. The DNB (V, pp. 957--965) names Digby as one of "English history's most dangerous men.".
method-draw-image (23)

L’Ornement polychrome cent planches en couleurs or et argent contenant environ 2,000 motifs de tus les styles art ancien et asiatique moyen age, renaissance, XVIIe et XVIIIe siècle

RACINET, A. [Auguste] Half-title and title in red and black. With a total of 220 chromolithograph plates highlighted in gold and silver. Contemporary calf-backed red cloth, spine labels, bound by Paul Belard-Relieur; other than 1 loose leaf in the first volume, interior excellent. First edition in book form of a monumental history of ornament. The first series (1869-1873) included one hundred chromolithograph plates in ten installments; it proved so popular that a second series (1885-1887) was issued which contained one hundred twenty plates. The imagery presented is drawn from a wide array of various mediums, including woodwork, metalwork, architecture, textiles, painting, and pottery, and from cultures all over the world. The elaborate and vibrant chromolithographs took a team of engravers to execute that included Durin, Pralon, Painlevè, Sanier, Picard, Daumont, Dufour, Launay, and Bauer. The text from Racinet accompanying each plate provides a brief history, cultural context, and description. In the first volume there is a general introduction that provides a chronological and geographical overview of the plates with additional figures in black and white. Although based on past masterpieces of design, the fantastic reproductions here can be considered works of art in their own right. Indeed, for Racinet, the purpose of compiling past design excellence was not only to celebrate the masters but also to inspire an improvement of decorative arts in his own day and age. This 1888 edition was issued as two, bound volumes and represents the culmination of his life's work. Racinet (1825-1893), himself an accomplished artist, is best known for publishing two major pictorial works on the history of design, this and Le costume historique (1888), while engraver and artistic director at the Parisian publisher Firmin Didot et Cie.
method-draw-image (23)

A collection of records of the great misfortunes that hath hapned unto Kings that have joyned themselves in a near allyance with forrein Princes, with the happy successe of those that have only held correspondency at home . . .

ANONYMOUS Title within decorative woodcut border, woodcut head- and tailpieces. Unbound with only some discoloration around margins. First and only edition of a rare Protestant and Parliamentarian pamphlet. Printed at the outset of the English Civil War, this brief text recounts the dangers that members of the British monarchy face when marrying foreign nobility. The anonymous author cites examples in which Protestant monarchs "joyned themselves in a neere allyance" with Catholic suitors to the detriment of the Protestant religion and their subjects, arguing that it should be "forbidden [that] the best People of the world to marry with a different Religion." He suggests that the king should rely on the support of the two houses of Parliament rather than on foreign alliances forged through marriage. Although he doesn't mention names explicitly due to fear of censure and libel, he is no doubt referencing King Charles's I marriage to Henrietta Maria, a French Roman-Catholic who was incredibly unpopular with the British people. Overall, this pamphlet provides insight into some of the religious tensions prevalent throughout Britain as well as glimpses of the xenophobia that shaped much of British policy during and after the Civil War.
method-draw-image (23)

The investigation of the charges brought against his Royal Highness the Duke of York, Commander in Chief . with the remarks of the members, and the whole of the evidence, official papers, &c. From the most authentic documents

WARDLE, G.L. [Gwyllym Lloyd] Engraved title in each volume, 16 engraved plates. Thin pebbled calf, gilt lettering on spine; red fore-edge, marbled endpapers; other than front hinge of Volume II starting, interiors very good. Nineteenth-century inscriptions on both fly-leaves. First edition describing the charges and ensuing trial of the commander-in-chief of British forces, Prince Frederick Augustus, Duke of York (1763-1852). In 1803, he began an affair with Mary Anne Thompson Clarke (1776-1852), a courtesan. Frederick supplied his mistress with a residence and gifts, but he was unable to sustain their lavish lifestyle. Supposedly, Mary Anne and Frederick began selling army commissions to acquire more funds. Hearing rumors about these scandals, Wardle (c. 1762-1833) a newly-elected Member of Parliament, brought forward a motion against the Duke in January 1809. As a result, Mary Anne testified to the House of Commons about the bribes, and even though Parliament acquitted him, Frederick was forced to resign from his position. However, a few years later in 1811, it was discovered that Mary Anne and Wardle had conspired against the Duke. Now fully exonerated, the Prince Regent reappointed Frederick commander-in-chief. The text provides a full account of these events, which captivated the British public over the course of a few years. The volumes also contain sixteen engraved portrait plates of all the individuals involved in the scandal and trial including Frederick and Mary Anne.
method-draw-image (23)

A retractive from the Romish religion: contayning thirteene forcible motives, disswading from communion with the Church of Rome: wherein is demonstratively proved, that the now Romish religion (so farre forth as it is Romish) is not the true Catholike religion of Christ, but the seduction of Antichrist .

BEARD, Thomas Woodcut headpieces and initials. Eighteenth century blind-tooled calf, spine in compartments with manuscript labels (title and shelfmark), red speckled fore-edge. From the library of John Marques of Tweeddale, Earle of Gifford Viscount Walden, Lord Hay of Yester &c. with the "Spare Nought" armorial bookplate. The Marquess of Tweedale was a family of Scottish nobles in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries led by John Hay, 1st Marquess of Tweedale (1625-1697) and his eldest son, John Hay, 2nd Marquess of Tweedale (1645-1713). First edition. Beard here vehemently attacks the Church of Rome writing that "She is the Whore of Babylon, with whome the Kings of the Earth have committed fornication, and who hath made drunke with the Wine of her fornications all the Inhabitants of Earth." Dedicated to Cromwell, there was a reissue in 1616 with a cancel title page and additional line regarding publication: "are to be sold by Henrie Fetherstone." Beard (d. 1632) was a Puritan Doctor of Divinity and Oliver Cromwell's schoolmaster at Huntingdon. He published several works during his lifetime all on the topic of theology with strong condemnation of Catholicism or what he described as the "Romish religion." This rare book is indicative of the religious tension and Puritan unrest in the decades leading up to the English Civil War.
method-draw-image (23)

Mr. Wallers speech in Parliament, at a conference of both Houses in the painted chamber. 6. Iuly 1641

WALLER, Edmunc Woodcut device on title, woodcut initials and headpieces. Half-morocco and pebbled boards, title in gilt on spine; other than browning on the fly-leaf, interior excellent. From the Markree Library with its small book label on the paste-down. First edition, first issue, with "Eagle" spelled correctly in the imprint. Waller (1606-1687) was a poet and politician. He was incredibly wealthy and much admired in the court of Charles I for his poetry. He served in Parliament up until his exile in 1645. In July 1641, soon after the Long Parliament was called into session, Waller spoke to both Houses calling for caution and class solidarity among his colleagues and constitutional moderation. He specifically discusses the impending impeachment of a Royalist judge, Sir Francis Crawley (1574/5-1650). Crawley had argued that Charles's implementation of taxes on ships was within the right of the king. However, the ship-money tax was a serious point of contention between Parliamentarians and Royalists, and Crawley was removed from his position. Waller, even though he supported the king, came out against the impeached judge stating that "he did not only only give as deepe a wound to the Commonwealth as any of the rest, but dipt his dart in such a poyson, that so farre as in him lay it might never receive a cure." Despite this, Waller was eventually exiled for his role in the so-called "Waller's Plot" that initially began as an act of passive resistance among the citizens of London but soon developed into a violent plan to raise an army for Charles I within the city.
method-draw-image (23)

L’Ornement polychrome cent planches en couleurs or et argent contenant environ 2,000 motifs de tus les styles art ancien et asiatique moyen age, renaissance, XVIIe et XVIIIe siècle

RACINET, A. [Auguste] Half-title and title printed in red and black. With a total of 100 chromolithograph plates highlighted in gold and silver. Contemporary half-morocco and marbled boards, spines in compartments with gilt lettering and decoration; interior in excellent condition. First edition of the original parts of a monumental history of ornament. Published in ten installments between 1869 and 1873, this first iteration of L'Ornement polychrome (color ornament) is a visual record in 100 plates of the decorative arts from antiquity to the eighteenth century. The imagery presented is drawn from a wide array of various mediums, including woodwork, metalwork, architecture, textiles, painting, and pottery, and from cultures all over the world. The elaborate and vibrant chromolithographs took a team of engravers to execute that included Durin, Pralon, Painlevè, Sanier, Picard, Daumont, Dufour, Launay, and Bauer. The text from Racinet accompanying each plate provides a brief history, cultural context, and description. In the first volume there is a general introduction that provides a chronological and geographical overview of the plates with additional figures in black and white. Although based on past masterpieces of design, the fantastic reproductions here can be considered works of art in their own right. Indeed, for Racinet, the purpose of compiling past design excellence was not only to celebrate the masters but also to inspire an improvement of decorative arts in his own day and age. The work was such a huge success that a second series of 120 plates was published between 1885 and 1887, updated to include designs of the nineteenth century. Racinet (1825-1893), himself an accomplished artist, is best known for publishing two major pictorial works on the history of design, this and Le costume historique (1888), while engraver and artistic director at the Parisian publisher Firmin Didot et Cie.
method-draw-image (23)

American entomology, or descriptions of the insects of North America. Illustrated by coloured figures from original drawings executed from nature

SAY, Thomas Extra engraved title page in Volume I. With 54 beautiful hand-colored plates, tissue guards present, each with accompanying text. Indexes follow each volume, and Explanation of terms used in Entomology at the rear. Half morocco and marbled boards, spine in compartments with morocco label; an excellent and very clean copy with the ownership signature of Joseph Sheppard of Chestnut Hill Philadelphia dated 1865 on both the fly-leaf and first title and small stamp of Dr. J. Sheppard of Bridgeton, N.J. at the top of third title. THE FATHER OF AMERICAN ENTOMOLOGY SAY, Thomas. American entomology, or descriptions of the insects of North America. Illustrated by coloured figures from original drawings executed from nature. Philadelphia Museum: Samuel Augustus Mitchell, 1824, 1825, 1828. Three volumes in one. 8vo. Extra engraved title page, 54 beautiful hand-colored plates, tissue guards present, each with accompanying text. Indexes follow each volume, and Explanation of terms used in Entomology at the rear. Half morocco and marbled boards. First edition of the first substantive North American book on insects, important for the author's brilliant observations and his descriptions of generic and specific characteristics. The illustrations are mainly based on observations taken from nature in the course of various expeditions to the South, the Rocky Mountains, the Minnesota River Basin, and Mexico. $ 5000.00.
method-draw-image (23)

Memoirs of John Evely, Esq. F.R.S. .

EVELYN, John Engraved frontispiece portraits in both volumes, double-page genealogical chart and 9 engraved plates. Contemporary half-calf and marbled boards, rebacked with the original backstrip laid down, boards worn; interior generally excellent with some staining at the end of the first volume. With the bookplates of Francis Robert Davies, C. Sewell Thomas and Marie Wade Thomas (motto "the poetry of Earth is never dead") and the Memorial Collection at the Regis College Library of Denver, Colorado. Second edition, edited by the English antiquary William Bray (1736-1832). The first volume consists of Evelyn's diary from the years 1620 to 1678; the second contains the final years of his diary through 1706, his epistolary correspondence and his private correspondence between King Charles I and Sir Edward Nicholas, the secretary of state, during the English Civil War. Evelyn's meticulously kept diary and correspondences form an invaluable source about seventeenth century England. He lived through one of the most tumultuous times in English history, and his writings include observations about the cultural, political, and religious life during the years leading up to the English Civil War, the years of the Civil War, the Restoration, and the Glorious Revolution. Evelyn (1620-1706) was an English author, diarist, and horticulturist. He worked as a public servant throughout his life, and wrote about thirty books about forestry, religion, and fine arts.
method-draw-image (23)

Aulicus coquinariæ: or a vindication in answer to a pamphlet, entituled The Court and Character of King James. Pretended to be penned by Sir A.W. and published since his death, 1650

SANDERSON, William Title within decorative woodcut border, woodcut printer's device, woodcut initials and headpieces. Contemporary speckled calf with blind tooling; first 2 blanks loose, and other than a very small tear to top edge of C5 (p. 25), interior in excellent condition. Two ownership inscriptions on title (F. Mason and Dan: Bursoon (?) in brown ink. First edition. Wing dates the pamphlet according to Lady Day dating giving the publication year as 1651. The work is anonymous, but Sir William Sanderson made himself known as the author in the preface to a later work. The pamphlet is a reply to The court and character of King James by Sir Anthony Weldon, a disillusioned and disaffected former courtier who wrote the memoir essentially as a critique of the Stuart monarchs. Sanderson here takes it upon himself to defend James against Weldon's condemnation of his person, court, and behavior point by point. He also frames his response as an attack against Weldon himself opening with the claim that "there are some men so delight in sinne, who rather than be idle from doing evil, will take much pains to scandal the dead." Ironically, Weldon passed away immediately before Sanderson issued this scathing response. Sanderson (c. 1586-1676) was a historian who sympathized with the Royalists during the English Civil War. He continued to write biographies and histories of the Stuart monarchs including an expanded memoir of James and another on Charles I. While Sanderson primarily attacked Parliamentarian historians, he was not above chastising his fellow Royalists for their mistreatment of the monarchy in their writings. John Evelyn likely put it best describing Sanderson as "author of two large but mean histories" referring to his works on King James and King Charles I, respectively.
method-draw-image (23)

The life of Edward Earl of Clarendon, Lord High Chancellor of England and Chancellor of the University of Oxford. Containing, I. An account of the Chancellor’s life from his birth to the Restoration in 1660. II. A continuation of the same, and his History of the Grand Rebellion, from the Restoration to his banishment in 1667

CLARENDON, Edward Hyde, Earl of Separate half-title for second part. Engraved frontispiece portrait signed by P. Lelij and R. White dated 1703, numerous engraved vignettes, historiated initials, head- and tailpieces. Contemporary calf, worn on the corners and edges, spine label; overall interior excellent. From the library of the Janus Foundation with its bookplate on the paste-down. First edition of Clarendon's autobiography. The Earl began writing his autobiography during his exile at Montpellier after his impeachment in 1667. He completed the first part of the text in August 1670 and later intended to merge it with his account the history of the civil wars. He was able to give his son, Laurence Hyde, the earl of Rochester, many of the original drafts of both works. Laurence was largely responsible for printing the first editions of his father's works. He was also careful to add defenses of Clarendon given the ever-changing political landscape of England. Importantly, Clarendon developed a secular royalist ideology that relied less on the concept of "divine right" of kings but rather the role of kings within laws and constitutions. In this way, Clarendon hoped to reconcile monarchial and parliamentarian rule. He did all this with minimal bias and in a distinctly stoic voice that has cemented his writings as invaluable historical resources. Of particular interest is Clarendon's description of his father's death. Henry Hyde "almost certainly suffered from, and died of, angina pectoris. If this is really so, it is the first recorded case" (Garrison & Morton, 2884. Clarendon (1609-1674), one of the first great English writers of history, held the offices of Lord High Chancellor of England and Chancellor of the University of Oxford. He was chief adviser to both Charles I during the English Civil War and thereafter to Charles II. After being falsely accused of treason he fled to France where he wrote his major works including his autobiography and History of the Grand Rebellion and Civil Wars in England (1702).
method-draw-image (23)

The history of the troubles and tryal of the most reverend father in God, and blessed martyr, William Laud, Lord Arch-Bishop of Canterbury. Wrote by himself, during his imprisonment in the tower

LAUD, William Half-title on recto of frontispiece portrait of Laud, title in red and black. Contemporary calf, Oxford-style ruled in blind; interior excellent. Ownership inscription of Tho. Stanton Teynham dated 1695 on title. First edition. Wharton (1664-1695), a writer and librarian, compiled Laud's writings for this work nearly fifty years after his death. The neatly arranged anthology includes Laud's autobiography, an account of his impeachment and trial, and reprints of his pamphlets. Laud wrote the majority of these texts while imprisoned in the Tower after the Grand Remonstrance of 1641. The Archbishop was detailed and incisive when describing his grievances, and his writings provide important insight into the crucial years leading up to the English Civil War. Laud (1573-1645) was a fervent supporter of King Charles I, whom he believed ruled by divine right. As the Archbishop of Canterbury and head of the Church of England, he intended to impose total uniformity on the Church. He felt threatened by the Puritan movement and was intolerant towards Presbyterians. The Long Parliament of 1640 accused him of treason, resulting in his imprisonment in the Tower of London, where he remained throughout the early stages of the Civil War. In the spring of 1644, he was brought to trial, but it ended without reaching a verdict. Parliament took up the issue, and eventually passed a bill of attainder under which he was beheaded on January 10, 1645, notwithstanding being granted a royal pardon.
method-draw-image (23)

A letter from General Ludlow to Dr. Hollingworth, their Majesties chaplain at St. Botolph-Aldgate. Defending his former letter to Sir E.S. which compared the tyranny of the first four years of King Charles the Martyr, with the tyranny of the four years of the late abdicated king .

LUDLOW, Edmund Half-calf and marbled boards, spine label; red fore-edge. Dated (1860) armorial bookplate of North Library (Earl of Macclesfield Library). First edition. This text is one of many in a "pamphlet war" between the author General Ludlow, a republican, and Dr. Richard Hollingwoth, a Royalist. Hollingwoth sought to defend the late King Charles I against those who criticized his reign. He also argued that Charles I was the true author of Eikon basilike (1649), a work published just before his execution which was the subject of great debate as to its authorship. Republicans like Ludlow agreed with John Milton and others who questioned the authenticity of the claim that Charles was the author, and furthermore viciously attacked not only Charles but the current monarch, James II. Ludlow published his first attack in 1691 in a pamphlet entitled A letter from Major-General Ludlow to Sir E.S. In response, Hollingworth issued A defence of King Charles I: occasion'd by the lyes and scandals of many bad men of this age (1691). This work is the rebuttal, in which Ludlow scathingly characterizes Hollingworth's pamphlets as "pieces of flattery compiled by a hungry Levite, gaping at a deanery or chaplainship at Whitehall." To add insult to injury, he amplifies his attack on the monarchy by including a critique of Charles II. Hollingworth continued to assail Ludlow in his writings. This back-and-forth demonstrates the continued importance of pamphlet wars in the decades after the English Civil War. The authorship of this work is dubious. The name "General Ludlow" was possibly a reference to Edmund Ludlow (1617?-1692), a radical republican and soldier who fought for Parliament against Charles I and the Royalists. In 1648, he assisted the Independents (radical Puritans) in ousting the Presbyterians (modern Purtians) from Parliament, and the following year was one of the judges against Charles I (and actually signed the warrant for his execution). However, when Oliver Cromwell declared himself Lord Protector in 1653, Ludlow openly opposed him. He continued to fight against the Protectorate until the Restoration in 1660 when he was forced to flee to Switzerland.
method-draw-image (23)

Canterburies doome. Or the first part of a compleat history of the commitment, charge, tryall, condemnation, execution of William Laud, late Arch-bishop of Canterbury. . .

PRYNNE, William Complete with all blanks. Text continuous despite pagination. Includes the cancel leaf O4 (p. 103) which is loose and as per the instructions printed at the recto bottom placed before signature P. Engraved portrait of Laud, engraved portrait of Prynne and engraving of the room setup, plus full-page engraving on p. 122 explaining where everyone was placed in the courtroom, plus woodcut headpieces and initials. Beautiful contemporary calf with paper spine label. Ownership stamp in black on flyleaf of a horned sheep under branches over the name Sheppard, some marginal notations throughout. An excellent copy. First edition. Canterburies doome was the culmination of Prynne's revenge against the Archbishop of Canterbury, William Laud (1573-1645). In 1632, Prynne, a staunch Puritan, published Histriomastix, in which he argued that stage plays of all kinds were affronts to Christianity. Unfortunately for Prynne, the Queen acted in a play soon after the publication, so his condemnation was construed as a critique of her. Prynne was jailed in the Tower, stripped of his degree, was fined and sentenced to lose his ears in the pillory. Earless and incensed, Prynne identified Laud, the King's religious advisor, as his chief persecutor. In 1640, King Charles I summoned the Long Parliament, and the newly installed legislature was quick to undermine the king's authority. They accused Laud of treason, and Prynne, seizing the opportunity, aggressively gathered evidence against the aging archbishop and managed the ensuing trial. Laud was executed in 1645, and the House of Commons tasked Prynne with publishing an account of the trial. Prynne (1600-1669) was a prolific pamphleteer and attorney who wrote on numerous subjects from theater to theology and published about 200 books and pamphlets during his lifetime.
method-draw-image (23)

Iter boreale, with large additions of several other poems being an exact collection of all hitherto extant. Never before published together .

WILD, Robert Later edition. Wild began printing Iter boreale in 1660 and published twelve more issues through 1668. The present copy was the first issue printed in 1670 followed by two more in 1671 and 1674. All editions printed before 1668 were quarto and those after 1670 were octavo. Moreover, nearly every issue has a different imprint. Wild continued to expand and add to each version. This copy begins with a very popular ode to George Monck, a key figure in the restoration of the monarchy, whom Wild praises as the savior of the nation. It also includes his poem "The Tragedy of Christopher Love" (1660) lamenting the Presbyterian minister's execution at the hands of Oliver Cromwell, and many other elegies and epitaphs. Wild also added "The Grateful Noncomformist" (1665), a scathing ridicule of Robert L'Estrange, the surveyor of the press who persecuted many Presbyterians. Following this are his two poems about the imprisonment and death of Edmund Calamy, also a Presbyterian. He also took the opportunity to profess his loyalty to the monarchy after the Restoration with "The Loyal Nonconformist" (1666). Throughout, he defends the nonconformists and here issues his response to critics with "The Fair Quarrel" (1666). Wild (1615-1679) was a satirical poet and nonconformist minister. He was largely supportive of Presbyterians, but as a nonconformist, a Protestant who did not adhere to the governance of the Church of England, he was against sectaries of any kind. He was highly critical of Cromwell and supported the monarchy after the Restoration as is evident in his poetry, the highlights of which are all included in this edition.
method-draw-image (23)

The Parliaments resolution, concerning the Kings most excellent Majesty, and the Lords and Commons, which have absented themselves from the said Houses, and are now at Yorke attending on His Maiestie . Whereunto is annexed severall reasons to prove that every man is bound to defend and uphold the Parliament and priviledges thereof against all opposers whatsoever

PARLIAMENT Title within ruled border, large oodcut initial and headpiece. Disbound; interior in very good condition. Rare second issue of first edition. Wing (E2145) lists a first issue with a different imprint ("by T.F. for N.R.") published the same year. Issued at the request of the Parliament and carried out by the clerk, John Browne, this pamphlet updates the English public on the current state of a nation on the brink of civil war. By mid-1642, as tensions grew and relations crumbled, the Parliamentarians and the Royalists began to arm themselves. This tract reveals Parliament's final attempts to negotiate with King Charles I to prevent an all-out war. However, it is certain that the Long Parliament was intent on removing Charles I from power given their hostility and legislative actions against the king in the early 1640's. The Parliaments resolution claims that they intend to preserve "religion, liberty, and publique safety" which are "like to be overwhelmed and lost in the generall confusion, and calamity of this distracted kingdom." For this reason among others, Parliament hoped that Charles I would consent to their requests, of course to no avail as war began in earnest during October of 1642.
method-draw-image (23)

A letter of a French Protestant to a Scotishman of the covenant. Wherein one of their chiefe pretences is removed, which is their conformitie with the French churches in points of discipline and obedience

DU MOULIN, Pierre Small woodcut device on title, woodcut headpiece and initial. Disbound; the first leaf (blank) before the title with hand-written title, year, and author in a contemporary hand, interior in excellent condition. First edition. This tract is Du Moulin's first entry into the debate concerning episcopacy. This system of church governance overseen by bishops was a crucial component in the Church of England. However, many viewed the episcopal system as a holdover from the Catholic Church and therefore antithetical to the Reformed religion. Du Moulin, a "Frenchman borne" but "happily engrafted into the body of the Church of England" argues in favor of the episcopacy. He here recognized the unity of doctrine within the reformed churches of France, Scotland, and England, as well as the necessity that some practices should differ according to circumstance. He states that in England, obedience to the king necessitated submission to the episcopacy that was desired by the monarchy. Overall, the pamphlet is an important contribution to the debate over religious governance on the eve of the English Civil War as well as the first publication from an significant religious figure. Du Moulin (1601-1684) was a clergyman in the Church of England and a religious controversialist. His father was a well-known Huguenot pastor, Pierre du Moulin, and the younger Pierre followed closely in the footsteps of his career and ideology. After A letter of a French Protestant, he continued to publish works during and after the Civil War, often anonymously, that on the whole supported the monarchy and protested the regicide of Charles I. After the Restoration in 1660, he found favor again and printed numerous works advocating the Church of England and condemning Catholicism.
method-draw-image (23)

Memoirs official and personal; with sketches of travels among the northern and southern Indians, and descriptions of scenes along the western borders; On the origin, history, charactyer, and the wrongs and rights of the Indians, with a plan for the preservation and happiness of the remnants of that persecuted race

MCKENNEY, Thomas L. With frontispiece portrait of the author in the first volume and colored frontispiece portrait of Pocahontas in the second, an additional 11 wood engravings, facsimile of a letter from Dolly Madison to the author. Publisher's cloth, spine with gilt title and decoration; interior with some foxing, otherwise a fine copy with the ownership signature of Henry A. Breed (1842-1914) on the title. Second edition, published the same year as the first, of McKenney's travels in the midwest and southern states. Memoirs describe the author's travels during September and October, 1827 by steamboat from St. Louis to Memphis, then overland into Northern Mississippi where he held a council with the Chickasaws, then through the Choctaw country, and back to Washington by way of Tuscaloosa, Montgomery and Alabama. McKenney's narrative of navigating the Mississippi River, as well as material relating to Native Americans (especially tribal leaders) are rich and descriptive. His stories of political life in Washington during the Monroe, Adams and Jackson administrations illustrate the corruption in government contracts, especially related to Native Americans. A plan for improving the situation of the Native Americans through education programs is outlined. The second part of the work contains lectures on Indian life. McKenney (1785-1859) served as the Superintendent of Indian Affairs between 1824 and 1830. He was known for his extensive knowledge and compassion for Native Americans, likey due to his Quaker beliefs. Even though he promoted the "civilization" program that removed Native Americans west of the Mississippi River, President Andrew Jackson eventually dismissed McKenney from his position because he held the opinion that Native Americans were the equals, morally and intellectually, to the white man.