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In memoriam: Harold Parry, Second Lieutenant, K.R.R.C.

PARRY, Harold First limited edition; 8vo; half cloth binding. Parry was born in 1896 in Bloxwich Staffordshire. He won a scholarship to Queen Mary's Grammar School in Walsall, and in 1915 he won an Open History Scholarship to Exeter College, Oxford. In January 1916 while at Oxford he volunteered for army service, and was commissioned as Second Lieutenant in the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry. After training at Rugeley he transferred to the 17th battalion of the King's Royal Rifle Corps. He served at the Somme in France, and in November 1916 moved with his battalion to the Ypres Salient in Flanders. He was killed on 6 May 1917, by shellfire on the Yser Canal section. He had written poetry before the war, and his experiences at the Somme and in Flanders led to his returning to poetry. After his death, In Memoriam was published and includes letters and poems by Parry compiled by Geoffrey Dennis. Some of his poems were published in the anthology Songs from the Heart of England (1920), edited by Alfred Moss and with a foreword by Jerome K. Jerome. Parry is buried in Vlamertinghe Military Cemetery, in West Flanders. The headstone bears the inscription "Death is the Gate To the High Road of Life And Love is the Way (Harold Parry)". There is a hand written note on the rear free end paper "Given to me by Daddy. This is one of 500 copies published & given by Victor Parry, brother to the author, to Daddy. Parry's photo - as appearing in the front of this book - is in the Boy's Hall - Queen Mary's Grammar School, Walsall. Remember? M. Bolland 10.10.44. Mary Bolland's ownership inscription to front free end paper. Near fine edges of boards a little tanned.
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Francis and Riversdale Grenfell: A Memoir

BUCHAN, John Second edition; 8vo; original boards; eight black and white photographs. A memoir of twin brothers who were both killed in 1915. They were educated at Eton College leaving in 1899 to pursue their separate careers - Francis as a soldier whilst Riversdale, became a banker. Before the War, Riversdale trained with Bucks Hussars and at the outbreak of war transferred to the 9th Lancers to join his brother. They embarked for France in August 1914 arriving near Mons. Three days later was to be the first day of the retreat from Mons. Francis offered to lead a volunteer group of officers and men to assist a field battery remove their guns under heavy fire, during which time he was wounded. For his action in organizing the saving of the guns and for his earlier bravery against the German machine guns he was awarded the Victoria Cross. Whilst Francis was recovering from his wounds in England, his brother was killed. He was buried in the cemetery at Vendresse. In October 1914 Francis returned to France and was wounded again and returned to England. He had been deeply affected by the death of his brother and many of their friends and before leaving for France again gave a small dinner party in London. The guests included Winston Churchill and John Buchaty. In April 1915 the regiment was involved in the Second Battle of Ypres where gas was used for the first time on the Western Front. During the battle on May 24th Francis was shot and died shortly afterwards. He was buried at Vlamertinghe. The twins are commemorated at Canterbury Cathedral and on a stained glass window at Beaconsfield parish church. Very good, pp231/232 with piece torn away from the edge with loss of text to seven lines on each page.
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The Life of Ronald Poulton

POULTON, Edward Bagnall Poulton First edition; 8vo; original cloth, top edge gilt. Ronald 'Ronnie' William Poulton (12 September 1889 – 5 May 1915) was an rugby union footballer, who captained England. He was killed in the First World War. Poulton played for Balliol College, Oxford University RFC, Harlequins and Liverpool F.C. Poulton is one of three men to score a hat-trick of tries in The Varsity Match – he scored five, still the individual record. He captained England during the 1913–14 unbeaten season, scoring four tries against France in 1914. Poulton was commissioned into 1st/4th Battalion Princess Charlotte of Wales's (Royal Berkshire Regiment) in 1913. At the outbreak of the First World War Poulton volunteered for overseas service. His Battalion was sent to the Western Front in March 1915 On the morning of 5 May 1915, Poulton was involved in repairing a trench, in the vicinity of Ploegsteert Wood in Belgium, when he was shot by an enemy sniper. Captain Jack Conybeare, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, a school friend, wrote : "I was talking to one of the Berks' officers this morning. He told me that Ronald was far and away the most popular officer in the battalion, both among officers and men. Apparently he was standing on top of the parapet last night, directing a working party, when he was hit. Of course, by day, anyone who shows his head above the parapet is courting disaster; in fact if one is caught doing so one is threatened with court-martial. At night, on the other hand, we perpetually have working parties of one kind or another out, either wiring, repairing the parapet, or doing something which involves coming from under cover, and one simply takes the risk of stray bullets." His grave is in Hyde Park Corner Cemetery, near Ploegsteert, Belgium. Twenty seven England international rugby players were killed in World War I of a total international toll of one hundred and thirty. One of the most notable was Poulton who was considered by many contemporary observers as perhaps the greatest-ever attacking rugby union threequarter. Poulton was inducted into the World Rugby Hall of Fame on 20 September 2015. Very good a little rubbed and bumped, lower cover slightly stained.
Genesis: Twelve Woodcuts by Paul Nash with the First Chapter of Genesis in the Authorised Version.

Genesis: Twelve Woodcuts by Paul Nash with the First Chapter of Genesis in the Authorised Version.

NASH, Paul Limited edition of 375, this being number 44. Printed by the Curwen Press on Zanders hand-made paper, cream laid with the Curwen Press watermark, the pages French folded, untrimmed. Original black boards inscribed in gold Genesis on the spine and top of front board. Original orange/red dust jacket. 4to. Twelve wood engravings in black and white by Nash, with the text printed in Rudolph Kochs Neuland type. Desmond Coke's copy with a letter from Nash concerning proofs for 'Genesis' tipped in on the front free end paper. Desmond Coke (1879-1931), schoolmaster and author was obviously a close friend of Nash's and owned several of his paintings and other works. The letter from Nash accompanied 3 proofs from Genesis sent as a birthday present (not included here) ".my signed proofs are few and only for a select number of special friends.You will come to the show Desmond - I've sweated to get what is there.". Genesis is considered to contain some of Nash's finest engravings and marks the beginning of his association with the Curwen Press. This was John Carter's copy with his signature in red ink and note on one of the proofs on front free endpaper. John Waynflete Carter (1905-1975) was an English author, diplomat, bibliographer, book-collector, antiquarian bookseller and Vice-President of the Bibliographical Society of London. Loosely inserted is an invitation to a private view of the Paul Nash Memorial Exhibition. A fine copy with slight wear to the foot of the spine and corners bumped. The dust jacket is very good, a few short tears, slight loss to the foot of the spine which is also faded. This one of the most collected of Nonesuch Press items, particularly scarce with the notoriously fragile dust-jacket, which survives particularly well here.
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Suez Crisis 1956: A Midshipman’s Journal of Service on H.M.S Bulwark

CORKILL, J.E. Midshipman's Journal; small folio; original quarter cloth binding. 170 manuscript pages, several drawings of planes, hand drawn maps and diagrams numerous documents pasted in. The Journal of Midshipman J.E. Corkill, onboard the aircraft carrier H.M.S. Bulwark from 5th January 1956 to 22nd November 1956. The catalyst for the joint Israeli-British-French attack on Egypt was the nationalisation of the Suez Canal by Egyptian leader Gamal Abdel Nasser in July 1956. The situation had been brewing for some time. Two years earlier, the Egyptian military had begun pressuring the British to end their military presence (which had been granted in the 1936 Anglo-Egyptian Treaty) in the canal zone. Nasser's armed forces also engaged in sporadic battles with Israeli soldiers along the border between the two countries, and the Egyptian leader did nothing to conceal his antipathy toward the Zionist nation. On October 29, 1956, Israeli armed forces pushed into Egypt toward the Suez Canal and soon were joined by French and British forces, which nearly brought the Soviet Union into the conflict, and damaged their relationships with the United States. In the end, the British, French and Israeli governments withdrew their troops in late 1956 and early 1957, largely because they failed to carry the support of American President Eisenhower. Corkill provides a lively account of life on board ship as well as running commentary on the political situation in Britain and internationally, particularly on Soviet problems in Poland and Hungary. Sunday 28th July 1956: "On return from leave we were informed that we were sailing for Portsmouth at 0500 on Sunday. We realised what this was for because the newspapers had announced that Colonel Nasser had decided to nationalise the Suez Canal. This is of course came as a great shock to the western world and this move can be taken as being one of the most dangerous moves designed to end world peace for some years." Monday 5th November 1956: "Another Wyvern was forced to ditch, after being on fire but the pilot was rescued by Eagle's chopper. We had a few wounded on board at the end of the day." Wednesday 7th November 1956: I believe this last week has done Britain a lot of good and we must not back down, apologetically now and whatever happens the United States must not be allowed to dominate us again, after their performance over the past few months." A fascinating read of the views of young officer who was actually there - with a view of this war which has not be shared by history. Interestingly the Journal ends abruptly and the last document is a roster of when he was due to be a watch the - 22nd November for which the entry is blank. I have not be able to trace any record of him after this date.
The Kon-Tiki Expedition: By Raft Across the South Seas

The Kon-Tiki Expedition: By Raft Across the South Seas

HEYERDAHL, Thor First English edition; 8vo original cloth boards and dust jacket. Translated by F.K. Lyon. Signed by the author on the front free end paper. In 1947, Heyerdahl and five companions sailed from Peru to the Tuamotu Islands, French Polynesia in a raft constructed from balsa wood. The Kon-Tiki expedition was inspired by reports made by the Spanish Conquistadors of Inca rafts, and by native legends and archaeological evidence suggesting contact between South America and Polynesia. Kon-Tiki reached the Tuamotu Islands, on August 7, 1947, after a 101-day, 4,300-nautical-mile journey across the Pacific Ocean. Kon-Tiki demonstrated that it was possible for a primitive raft to sail the Pacific with relative ease and safety, especially to the west (with the trade winds). The raft proved to be highly manoeuvrable, and fish congregated between the nine balsa logs in such numbers that aancient sailors could have possibly relied on fish for hydration in the absence of other sources of fresh water. Other rafts have repeated the voyage, inspired by Kon-Tiki. However anthropologists continue to believe that Polynesia was settled from west to east, based on linguistic, physical, and genetic evidence, migration having begun from the Asian mainland. There are indications, though, of some sort of South American/Polynesian contact, most notably in the fact that the South American sweet potato is served as a dietary staple throughout much of Polynesia. Blood samples from Easter Islanders without external descent were analysed in a 2011 study, which concluded that the evidence supported some aspects of Heyerdahl's hypothesis. Heyerdahl attempted to counter the linguistic argument with the analogy that he would prefer to believe that African-Americans came from Africa, judging from their skin colour, and not from England, judging from their speech. A near fine copy with a little foxing to endpapers and a little wear to the extremities. The dust jacket is very good with a little wear to the extremities, a few short tears, slight loss to head and foot of spine and some foxing to the verso. Scarce signed.
The White Star Royal Mail Steamship Teutonic" (HM Armed Cruiser) at the Naval Review

The White Star Royal Mail Steamship Teutonic” (HM Armed Cruiser) at the Naval Review, Spithead, June 26, 1897 in Commemoration of the Sixtieth Year of the Reign of Her Majesty Queen Victoria.Diamond Jubilee at Spithead review.

The White Star Line Album; 480mm by 370mm; original sheepskin with gilt titles; 156pp. 48 Collotypes, 285mm x 225mm. Photographed, engraved and printed by Stas, Walery and Company, 15 Cecil Court, London. Printed for private circulation only. Inscribed on the front free end paper "To Thomas Andrews Esq with kind regards from Thomas Ismay, December 1898". In the late 1880s the White Star decided to order two ships from Harland and Wolff that would be capable of winning the Blue Riband for crossing the Atlantic. Construction of Teutonic and her sister ship the Majestic began in 1887. The Teutonic was launched on January 19, 1889, and participated in the Spithead Naval Review on August 5 and 6, in conjunction with the state visit of Kaiser Wilhelm II. The Kaiser was given a two-hour tour of the Teutonic hosted by the Prince of Wales. During the tour, Wilhelm is reputed to have stated that "We must have some of these ." The Kaiser's reaction is generally credited as the impetus for the creation of Germany's four funnel liners known as the Kaiser Class. Eight years later, Teutonic participated in the 1897 Spithead Naval Review honoring Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee, the subject of this album. Teutonic was built under the British Auxiliary Armed Cruiser Agreement, and was Britain's first armed merchant cruiser, sporting eight 4.7" guns. The guns were removed after the military reviews, and on August 7, 1889, she left on her maiden voyage to New York City. In 1891, Teutonic took the Blue Riband from her sister ship the Majestic with an average crossing speed of 20.25 knots. Teutonic and Majestic were known as the first modern liners because of their passenger accommodation. Both ships were built with the three-classes of accommodation. Teutonic had rooms for 300 First Class passengers in spacious cabins situated on her uppermost three decks. Many of the cabins were inter-connecting for family travel. Second Class, also known as Cabin Class was meant for the middle class. Teutonic could carry 190 Second Class passengers in comfortable rooms on the second highest deck, further aft towards the stern. Third Class, commonly known as steerage, was built for immigrants and lower class travelers. During the Boer War she served as a troop transport. In 1911, she was replaced in the White Star lineup by the new Olympic and transferred to sister company Dominion Line for Canadian service. In 1914, Teutonic became a merchant cruiser once again. In 1916, she was refitted with 6" guns, and served as a convoy escort ship as well as being used for troop transport. Thomas Henry Ismay (1837 1899) was the founder of the White Star Line. His son was Joseph Bruce Ismay, who travelled on (and survived) the maiden voyage of the Titanic, in 1912. At the age of 16 Thomas left school and started an apprentice with a shipbrokers in Liverpool. Upon completion of the apprenticeship he ravelled extensively to gain business experience. In 1867 Ismay acquired the flag of the White Star Line and was its president until his death in 1899. He developed a unique partnership with shipbuilders Harland and Wolff who built all the White Star liners. Thomas Andrews, Jr. (7 February 1873 15 April 1912) was a British businessman and shipbuilder. He worked his way up Harland and Wolff eventually becoming managing director and head of the drafting department. As the naval architect in charge of the plans for the Titanic, he was travelling on board during her maiden voyage and perished along with more than 1,500 others. His body was never recovered. In 1889 he began an aprenticeship at Harland and Wolff where his uncle, the Viscount Pirrie, was part owner. He spent three months in the joiners' shop, followed by a month in the cabinetmakers' and then a further two months working on the ships. The last eighteen months of his five-year apprenticeship were spent in the drawing office. In 1907, Andrews was appointed the managing director and head of the drafting department and began to oversee the the plans for a new superliner, the RMS Olympic for the White Star Line. The Olympic and its sister ship the Titanic, which began construction in 1909, were designed by William Pirrie and general manager Alexander Carlisle along with Andrews. As he had done for the other ships he had overseen, Andrews familiarised himself with every detail of the Olympic and Titanic. Andrews's suggestions that the ship have 46 lifeboats (instead of the 20 it ended up with) as well as a double hull and watertight bulkheads that went up to B deck, were overruled. Andrews headed a group of workers who went on the maiden voyage, to observe ship operations and spot any necessary improvements. Early on 14 April, Andrews remarked to a friend that Titanic was "as nearly perfect as human brains can make her." At 11:40 PM on the same day, the Titanic struck an iceberg. Andrews had been in his stateroom, and barely noticed the collision. Captain Edward J. Smith had Andrews summoned to help examine the damage, he determined that five of the ship's watertight compartments were rapidly flooding and that if more than four flooded, it would inevitably sink. He relayed this information to Captain Smith, stating that it was a 'mathematical certainty', and adding that in his opinion, the vessel had only about an hour before it sank. He also told Smith of the severe shortage of lifeboats. As the evacuation began, Andrews tirelessly searched staterooms telling the passengers to put on lifebelts and go up on deck. Several survivors testified to have met or spotted Andrews several times. Fully aware of the short time the ship had left and of the lack of lifeboat space for all passengers and crew, he continued to urge reluctant people into the lifeboats in the hope of filling them with as many people as possible. Andrews was reportedly last seen by John Stewart, a steward on the ship, at approximately 2:10 a.m., ten minutes before the Titanic sank. Andrews was standing alone in the first-class smoking room s