York Modern Books

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A sketchbook, with twenty six watercolour, pen and ink and pencil sketches, pencil notes and a poem

Jones, Barbara A Winsor and Newton sketchbook; 25.5 x 20.5cm; original card covers; sixty eight pages. Twenty six watercolour, pen and ink and pencil sketches, with pencil notes and a poem, some pages blank. Barbara Jones was born in Croydon, Surrey. Her father had a saddlery and harness business at a time when Croydon was still a rural suburb. Her first sketchbooks were filled with horses and farm machinery. This current book has a number of sketches of farm animals, including a superb water colour of a bull. Between 1931 and 1933 she attended Croydon Art School and went on to the Department of Engraving at the Royal College of Art and later transferred to the Department of Mural Decoration. She was taught by Eric Ravilious and Edward Bawden and graduated in 1937. During World War II Jones was associated with the Recording Britain project of the Pilgrim Trust while the War Artists' Advisory Committee also purchased a work by her. The Architectural Press commissioned her to illustrate a booklet, Bombed Churches as War Memorials (1945). It is interesting to note that loosely inserted in this album is an ink sketch of a woman to the reverse of which are a series of notes relating to the Bombed churches project. After the war, Jones created murals for the 1946 Britain Can Make It exhibition, and the 1947 Enterprise Scotland exhibition. She also worked for P&O, creating murals for a number of passenger liner ships, as well as for hotels, restaurants, exhibitions and schools. She also worked on the children's television series The Woodentops. Most of the works, because of the nature of where they were created, have now disappeared. In 1951 Jones co-curated Black Eyes and Lemonade, an exhibition of craft, folk, and popular objects at the Whitechapel Gallery. Jones put folk art in dialogue with consumer objects—some of which were mass-produced—to explore the "bold and fizzy" characteristics of contemporary popular art in Britain. Jones, made public many of the ideas that would later become important for the emergence of pop art. Objects displayed in the exhibition included horse brasses, corn dollies, canal boat artwork, ship's figureheads, and the outfits of Pearly Kings and Queens, alongside more contemporary cultural artefacts including the Idris Talking Lemon, beer mats, pest control adverts and shop posters. It is difficult to date the current sketchbook but one page is headed Sheriff Road, in Hampstead where she lived after the War, but it likely that sketches are from an earlier period and she later used it as note book for ideas and poems. Pages loose and covers worn with use, internally fine.
The Poisoned Kiss or The Empress and the Necromancer. A Romantic Extravaganza written by Evelyn Sharp

The Poisoned Kiss or The Empress and the Necromancer. A Romantic Extravaganza written by Evelyn Sharp

VAUGHAN WILLIAMS, Ralph Two volumes 4to; original paper covers. The vocal score and the chorus score, together with the programme for the World Premiere of 'The Poisoned Kiss' at the Arts Theatre of Cambridge, Tuesday, May 12th, 1936. The chorus score is annotated heavily in pencil, indicating the cuts the composer introduced immediately before the performance. Vaughan Williams had significant concerns about the dramatic structure of the piece as the background story is narrated twice and he was also worried that the explanatory passages about poisons were too long. Accordingly, he cut about twenty minutes of music and a good deal of dialogue. This volume is also heavily annotated with notes on the text to the inside front cover and the last page. The inside of the rear cover has the score and text of the Blue Larkspur written out in pencil. The programme is signed on the title-page by Ralph Vaughan Williams, Cyril Rootham (Conductor) and Camille Prior (Producer). Gwen Raverat (Designer) has signed on the inside front cover and the cast has signed on the back and inside cover, including the leading cast Margaret Field-Hyde, Meriel St. Clair, Trefor Jones, Mabel Ritchie, Geoffrey Dunn and Frederick Woodhouse. Also included is a black and white photograph of a scene from the performance. All formerly the property of Jean Aikman a member of the chorus at the premier, she has signed her name in pencil to the front covers of the programme and chorus score. Good, covers worn and creased, consistent with use. Foxing to the cover of the chorus score and Vaughan Williams commemorative postage stamp stuck to inside cover of the programme.
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In memoriam: Harold Parry, Second Lieutenant, K.R.R.C.

PARRY, Harold First limited edition; 8vo; half cloth binding. Parry was born in 1896 in Bloxwich Staffordshire. He won a scholarship to Queen Mary's Grammar School in Walsall, and in 1915 he won an Open History Scholarship to Exeter College, Oxford. In January 1916 while at Oxford he volunteered for army service, and was commissioned as Second Lieutenant in the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry. After training at Rugeley he transferred to the 17th battalion of the King's Royal Rifle Corps. He served at the Somme in France, and in November 1916 moved with his battalion to the Ypres Salient in Flanders. He was killed on 6 May 1917, by shellfire on the Yser Canal section. He had written poetry before the war, and his experiences at the Somme and in Flanders led to his returning to poetry. After his death, In Memoriam was published and includes letters and poems by Parry compiled by Geoffrey Dennis. Some of his poems were published in the anthology Songs from the Heart of England (1920), edited by Alfred Moss and with a foreword by Jerome K. Jerome. Parry is buried in Vlamertinghe Military Cemetery, in West Flanders. The headstone bears the inscription "Death is the Gate To the High Road of Life And Love is the Way (Harold Parry)". There is a hand written note on the rear free end paper "Given to me by Daddy. This is one of 500 copies published & given by Victor Parry, brother to the author, to Daddy. Parry's photo - as appearing in the front of this book - is in the Boy's Hall - Queen Mary's Grammar School, Walsall. Remember? M. Bolland 10.10.44. Mary Bolland's ownership inscription to front free end paper. Near fine edges of boards a little tanned.
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Francis and Riversdale Grenfell: A Memoir

BUCHAN, John Second edition; 8vo; original boards; eight black and white photographs. A memoir of twin brothers who were both killed in 1915. They were educated at Eton College leaving in 1899 to pursue their separate careers - Francis as a soldier whilst Riversdale, became a banker. Before the War, Riversdale trained with Bucks Hussars and at the outbreak of war transferred to the 9th Lancers to join his brother. They embarked for France in August 1914 arriving near Mons. Three days later was to be the first day of the retreat from Mons. Francis offered to lead a volunteer group of officers and men to assist a field battery remove their guns under heavy fire, during which time he was wounded. For his action in organizing the saving of the guns and for his earlier bravery against the German machine guns he was awarded the Victoria Cross. Whilst Francis was recovering from his wounds in England, his brother was killed. He was buried in the cemetery at Vendresse. In October 1914 Francis returned to France and was wounded again and returned to England. He had been deeply affected by the death of his brother and many of their friends and before leaving for France again gave a small dinner party in London. The guests included Winston Churchill and John Buchaty. In April 1915 the regiment was involved in the Second Battle of Ypres where gas was used for the first time on the Western Front. During the battle on May 24th Francis was shot and died shortly afterwards. He was buried at Vlamertinghe. The twins are commemorated at Canterbury Cathedral and on a stained glass window at Beaconsfield parish church. Very good, pp231/232 with piece torn away from the edge with loss of text to seven lines on each page.
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The Life of Ronald Poulton

POULTON, Edward Bagnall Poulton First edition; 8vo; original cloth, top edge gilt. Ronald 'Ronnie' William Poulton (12 September 1889 – 5 May 1915) was an rugby union footballer, who captained England. He was killed in the First World War. Poulton played for Balliol College, Oxford University RFC, Harlequins and Liverpool F.C. Poulton is one of three men to score a hat-trick of tries in The Varsity Match – he scored five, still the individual record. He captained England during the 1913–14 unbeaten season, scoring four tries against France in 1914. Poulton was commissioned into 1st/4th Battalion Princess Charlotte of Wales's (Royal Berkshire Regiment) in 1913. At the outbreak of the First World War Poulton volunteered for overseas service. His Battalion was sent to the Western Front in March 1915 On the morning of 5 May 1915, Poulton was involved in repairing a trench, in the vicinity of Ploegsteert Wood in Belgium, when he was shot by an enemy sniper. Captain Jack Conybeare, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, a school friend, wrote : "I was talking to one of the Berks' officers this morning. He told me that Ronald was far and away the most popular officer in the battalion, both among officers and men. Apparently he was standing on top of the parapet last night, directing a working party, when he was hit. Of course, by day, anyone who shows his head above the parapet is courting disaster; in fact if one is caught doing so one is threatened with court-martial. At night, on the other hand, we perpetually have working parties of one kind or another out, either wiring, repairing the parapet, or doing something which involves coming from under cover, and one simply takes the risk of stray bullets." His grave is in Hyde Park Corner Cemetery, near Ploegsteert, Belgium. Twenty seven England international rugby players were killed in World War I of a total international toll of one hundred and thirty. One of the most notable was Poulton who was considered by many contemporary observers as perhaps the greatest-ever attacking rugby union threequarter. Poulton was inducted into the World Rugby Hall of Fame on 20 September 2015. Very good a little rubbed and bumped, lower cover slightly stained.
Genesis: Twelve Woodcuts by Paul Nash with the First Chapter of Genesis in the Authorised Version.

Genesis: Twelve Woodcuts by Paul Nash with the First Chapter of Genesis in the Authorised Version.

NASH, Paul Limited edition of 375, this being number 44. Printed by the Curwen Press on Zanders hand-made paper, cream laid with the Curwen Press watermark, the pages French folded, untrimmed. Original black boards inscribed in gold Genesis on the spine and top of front board. Original orange/red dust jacket. 4to. Twelve wood engravings in black and white by Nash, with the text printed in Rudolph Kochs Neuland type. Desmond Coke's copy with a letter from Nash concerning proofs for 'Genesis' tipped in on the front free end paper. Desmond Coke (1879-1931), schoolmaster and author was obviously a close friend of Nash's and owned several of his paintings and other works. The letter from Nash accompanied 3 proofs from Genesis sent as a birthday present (not included here) ".my signed proofs are few and only for a select number of special friends.You will come to the show Desmond - I've sweated to get what is there.". Genesis is considered to contain some of Nash's finest engravings and marks the beginning of his association with the Curwen Press. This was John Carter's copy with his signature in red ink and note on one of the proofs on front free endpaper. John Waynflete Carter (1905-1975) was an English author, diplomat, bibliographer, book-collector, antiquarian bookseller and Vice-President of the Bibliographical Society of London. Loosely inserted is an invitation to a private view of the Paul Nash Memorial Exhibition. A fine copy with slight wear to the foot of the spine and corners bumped. The dust jacket is very good, a few short tears, slight loss to the foot of the spine which is also faded. This one of the most collected of Nonesuch Press items, particularly scarce with the notoriously fragile dust-jacket, which survives particularly well here.
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Suez Crisis 1956: A Midshipman’s Journal of Service on H.M.S Bulwark

CORKILL, J.E. Midshipman's Journal; small folio; original quarter cloth binding. 170 manuscript pages, several drawings of planes, hand drawn maps and diagrams numerous documents pasted in. The Journal of Midshipman J.E. Corkill, onboard the aircraft carrier H.M.S. Bulwark from 5th January 1956 to 22nd November 1956. The catalyst for the joint Israeli-British-French attack on Egypt was the nationalisation of the Suez Canal by Egyptian leader Gamal Abdel Nasser in July 1956. The situation had been brewing for some time. Two years earlier, the Egyptian military had begun pressuring the British to end their military presence (which had been granted in the 1936 Anglo-Egyptian Treaty) in the canal zone. Nasser's armed forces also engaged in sporadic battles with Israeli soldiers along the border between the two countries, and the Egyptian leader did nothing to conceal his antipathy toward the Zionist nation. On October 29, 1956, Israeli armed forces pushed into Egypt toward the Suez Canal and soon were joined by French and British forces, which nearly brought the Soviet Union into the conflict, and damaged their relationships with the United States. In the end, the British, French and Israeli governments withdrew their troops in late 1956 and early 1957, largely because they failed to carry the support of American President Eisenhower. Corkill provides a lively account of life on board ship as well as running commentary on the political situation in Britain and internationally, particularly on Soviet problems in Poland and Hungary. Sunday 28th July 1956: "On return from leave we were informed that we were sailing for Portsmouth at 0500 on Sunday. We realised what this was for because the newspapers had announced that Colonel Nasser had decided to nationalise the Suez Canal. This is of course came as a great shock to the western world and this move can be taken as being one of the most dangerous moves designed to end world peace for some years." Monday 5th November 1956: "Another Wyvern was forced to ditch, after being on fire but the pilot was rescued by Eagle's chopper. We had a few wounded on board at the end of the day." Wednesday 7th November 1956: I believe this last week has done Britain a lot of good and we must not back down, apologetically now and whatever happens the United States must not be allowed to dominate us again, after their performance over the past few months." A fascinating read of the views of young officer who was actually there - with a view of this war which has not be shared by history. Interestingly the Journal ends abruptly and the last document is a roster of when he was due to be a watch the - 22nd November for which the entry is blank. I have not be able to trace any record of him after this date.