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B & B Rare Books, Ltd.

The Old Man and the Sea

The Old Man and the Sea

Hemingway, Ernest First edition, first printing. Publisher's light blue cloth lettered in metallic silver to spine and blind-stamped with author's signature to front board, Scribner's "A" and press device to copyright page; in the original unclipped dust jacket with illustration by "A.", blue-tinted portrait of author Lee Samuels to rear panel and no mention of Nobel Prize to rear flap. About near fine with a touch of wear the extremities and small former signature to the front endpaper; in a bright unclipped dust jacket, which as a result of a misprinting the lettering appears blurry as it double-stamped. The jacket shows some light wear and a couple minor nicks to the spine ends and at folds, else about near fine. Hanneman A24. The Old Man and the Sea is one of Hemingway's most popular and widely acclaimed novels and the winner of the 1953 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. Additionally, The Old Man and the Sea is accredited with being a major contributor to Hemingway's 1954 awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize in Literature. The plot tells of elderly protagonist Santiago, a fisherman, and his struggle with a giant Marlin off the coast of Havana, Cuba. Metaphorically, it is the story of Hemingway's own struggle to continue to write and preserve his art in spite of his fame and the cost it has taken on his mental and physical health; like Santiago who had not caught a fish in months, Hemingway had not written a novel since over a decade prior. This award-winning novel was Hemingway's last significant piece of writing before his death in 1961.
The Lord Of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring

The Lord Of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers, and The Return of The King

Tolkien, J. R. R. (John Ronald Reuel) First editions, twelfth printing of The Fellowship of the Ring, ninth printing of The Two Towers, ninth printing of The Return of the King, with the terminal fold-out maps tipped in to each volume. Publisher's red cloth, spines lettered in gilt, red topstains; in the original pictorial dust jackets, with illustrations of the Eye of Sauron, the One Ring and its Elvish inscription to the front panels. About fine with only light soiling to top edges and a few small spots; unclipped dust jackets, with some light soiling, light wear and a few nicks to the extremities, spines lightly, Return of the King with a small stain and a tear to the spine. A very attractive and completely unsophisticated set. The Lord of the Rings is a fantasy trilogy, written as the sequel to Tolkien's 1937 novel The Hobbit. It tells the story of the second attempt of the men, elves, and dwarves of Middle Earth to destroy the Dark Lord Sauron, the "Lord of the Rings." In The Hobbit, set almost 2,000 years after Sauron was initially vanquished, Hobbit Bilbo Baggins discovers Sauron's lost ring, which he used to control the inhabitants of Middle Earth vis-à-vis corrupt leaders whom he gave lesser rings to in order to gain power over them. In The Fellowship of the Ring, Bilbo leaves the ring to his nephew Frodo, who joins with a group of men, hobbits, dwarves, and elves on a quest to destroy it. In The Two Towers, Frodo and Sam continue alone on their increasingly perilous journey to destroy the ring while the remaining members of the Fellowship try to protect the realms of Middle Earth from the troops of Sauron, who continues to gain strength as Frodo brings the Ring closer. The Return of the King concludes the trilogy with the final destruction of Sauron and the reestablishment of proper order in the worlds of men and hobbits. Each volume is divided into two books and contains chapters narrated by different characters.
Goldfinger

Goldfinger

Fleming, Ian First edition, first impression, first issue, first state (with the 3mm. diagonal line detail in the upper left area of the skull stamped to the front board). Publisher's black cloth stamped in blind to front board with a line-drawing of a human skull with fifty-dollar gold pieces to each eye socket, lettered in gilt to spine; in the original pictorial dust jacket designed by Richard Chopping with the illustration of a human skull with gold coins in the eye sockets and a single red rose held between its teeth. About fine with a slight bump to one corner; in an extremely bright and unclipped dust jacket with only some very minor wear at the corners, a tiny tear and a few small creases to the upper rear panel, else fine. A very bright and attractive example. Gilbert A7a (1.1). Goldfinger features the villain Auric Goldfinger, the richest man in England whose wealth is stored in his namesake mineral- gold. Indeed, the symbol of gold plays an important role throughout the text; the name "Auric" comes from the chemical element symbol for gold "Au," and Goldfinger murders his ex-girlfriend by covering her body completely in gold. In this novel, Bond must stop Goldfinger from completing Operation Grand Slam, a gold-smuggling plot that would cripple the world economy and give the Russian spy organization SMERSH total power over the West. Goldfinger also introduces one of the most memorable villainous sidekicks, Oddjob, whose deadly aim and razor-edged bowler hat make him a force to be reckoned with.
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Goldfinger

Fleming, Ian First edition, first impression, first issue, second state (second state lacks the 3mm. diagonal line detail in the upper left area of the skull stamped to the front board, else identical to first state). Publisher's black cloth stamped in blind to front board with a line-drawing of a human skull with fifty-dollar gold pieces to each eye socket, lettered in gilt to spine; in the original pictorial dust jacket designed by Richard Chopping with the illustration of a human skull with gold coins in the eye sockets and a single red rose held between its teeth. About fine, spine ends very lightly bumped and with a few tiny spots to top edge of text block; in a near fine price-clipped dust jacket with light wear to top edge and spine foot, a few shallow nicks to corners, else bright and clean. Gilbert A7a (1.2). Goldfinger features the villain Auric Goldfinger, the richest man in England whose wealth is stored in his namesake mineral- gold. Indeed, the symbol of gold plays an important role throughout the text; the name "Auric" comes from the chemical element symbol for gold "Au," and Goldfinger murders his ex-girlfriend by covering her body completely in gold. In this novel, Bond must stop Goldfinger from completing Operation Grand Slam, a gold-smuggling plot that would cripple the world economy and give the Russian spy organization SMERSH total power over the West. Goldfinger also introduces one of the most memorable villainous sidekicks, Oddjob, whose deadly aim and razor-edged bowler hat make him a force to be reckoned with.
Roger Maris Baseball Inscribed to a New York Yankees Team Photographer [with] Roger Maris' Batting Secrets

Roger Maris Baseball Inscribed to a New York Yankees Team Photographer [with] Roger Maris’ Batting Secrets

Maris, Roger; Blumenthal, David Signed and inscribed by Roger Maris to Yankees 1961 team photographer, David Blumenthal: "To Dave Blumenthal/ My Best Regards/ Roger Maris." In excellent condition with some very light soiling and a few minor smudges. [with] Blumenthal, David. Roger Maris' Batting Secrets. White Plains, NY: David Blumenthal Associates, Inc., 1961. First edition. 24pp., each leaf with a photograph of Maris in one of several stages performing a swing. A fine copy. Roger Maris played 12 seasons of Major League Baseball from 1957-1968 with 4 different teams, most notably the New York Yankees. Maris is most remembered for his historic 1961 season where he broke Babe Ruth's single season home run record with 61 home runs, which came in the fourth inning of the last game of the season on October 1, 1961. Maris also led the New York Yankees to a World Series Title that same year. Maris is a 7x All-Star, 3x World Series Champion in 1961, 1962, and 1967, 2x A.L. MVP in 1960 & 1961, & 1960 Gold Glove Winner. Maris's number '9' was officially retired by the New York Yankees in 1984. The recipient of the baseball, David Blumenthal, worked as the sports photographer for the New York Yankees and New York Jets. Most notably, Blumenthal was responsible for photographing Maris' historic 1961 season doing slow motion studies of batters and opposing pitchers. Roger Maris' Batting Secrets demonstrates Blumenthal's slow motion study of Maris' swing with Maris' commentary and tips for hitting success. Some of Blumenthal's other work for the Yankees include Babe Ruth's farewell speech ("Babe Ruth Day") in 1948.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Twain, Mark (Clemens, Samuel) Illustrated by Edward Windsor Kemble. First edition, first issue, with the following first issue points: cancel title leaf with the copyright notice dated 1884 (indicative of second state), p. 9 with "Decided", p. 13 with the illustration "Him and Another Man" listed as page 88 (BAL's first state), p. 57 with "with the was" (first state), p. 283 with a straight fly on a cancel leaf (third state), p. 155 with the final '5' lacking (first state), p. 161 lacking the signature mark, leaf 238 present as final blank, frontispiece in first state with tablecloth clearly visible and Heliotype Printing Company imprint. Original publisher's decorative green cloth, with an illustration of Huck Finn to the front panel in black and gilt, lettered in black and gilt, pale peach endpapers. A very good copy with wear and some fraying to the extremities and corners, a few small spots and small stain to the lower rear board; internally, generally very clean, front hinge repaired, a few small chips to frontis' outer edge and contemporary former owner inscription from 1885 to the first blank. Overall, a handsome copy with the first issue. BAL 3415. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a pseudo companion novel to Twain's highly successful The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876); although both are set in the antebellum South, Tom Sawyer is the tale of a young boy's mischievous adventures, while Huckleberry Finn involves a disenfranchised youth's moral dilemmas about social conflict. Specifically, Huckleberry Finn runs away from his alcoholic father and befriends Jim, a run-away African-American slave seeking freedom in the North. The dialog of the text features local dialects drawn from Twain's experiences living in the South. When it was first published in the United States in 1885, Huckleberry Finn was highly scrutinized and was banned by several libraries. Interestingly, the text was banned not for its saturation of racist vocabulary and prejudiced world-views, but for its depiction of criminal, lower class white Americans. Although it continued to be challenged in the 20th century for its depiction and treatment of African-Americans, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn remains one of the Great American Novels. Indeed, Ernest Hemingway proclaimed that it was the beginning of American literature: "There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since."
Uncle Tom's Cabin; or

Uncle Tom’s Cabin; or, Life Among the Lowly

Stowe, Harriet Beecher Two volumes. First edition, first printing. One of 5,000 copies. Bound in the original publisher's brown extra gilt S cloth binding. A very good copy with some wear and chipping to the spine ends, corners worn and some fading to cloth with a small patch of discoloration to the rear board of volume II, small former owner signature to front endpapers, some light scattered foxing and spots, but generally very clean. BAL 19343. Originally published serially from June 5, 1851-April 1, 1852 in the American abolitionist periodical The National Era, Uncle Tom's Cabin is an anti-slavery novel about the human cost of slavery in the American South. Inspired by the increased stringency of the Fugitive Slave Law after the Compromise of 1850, the novel features two African-American slaves trying to preserve their families in spite of their abusive oppression. Tom, the title character, is a religious man and chooses to work within the slavery system to ensure his family's protection. Alternately, the other main character, Eliza Harris, chooses to flee slavery and escape to freedom in Canada. Throughout the text, Stowe preaches her own Christian beliefs as a means to abolishing slavery, encouraging compassion, mercy, and forgiveness as solutions. Published in book form on March 20, 1852, Uncle Tom's Cabin was an instant bestseller, with 300,000 copies sold in the United States and 1.5 million copies sold in Great Britain within the first year. Due to its immediate popularity, Uncle Tom's Cabin has a complicated printing history in Great Britain, where it was pirated multiple times before authorized publication.