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Blackwell's Rare Books

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The Art of Angling . In two parts. I. Containing an account of fish, and fish-ponds: a new art of fly-making: the new laws that concern angling: the secret ways of catching fish by ointments, pastes, and other arts: directions how to procure baits, and for making all sorts of fish-tackle, with the surest method of finding sport, &c. II. Of the great whale, and whale fishery; the devouring shark; the amphibious turtle; the luscious turbot and sole; with flying fish, sea-devil, and other extraordinary productions of the sea. Likewise a natural history of the inhabitants of the salt water, and the various methods of rock and sea-fishing. Illustrated with one hundred and thirty-five cuts, exactly describing the different kinds of fish that are found in the fresh or salt waters. The whole forming a sportsman’s magazine; and comprizing all that is curious and valuable in the art of angling. The fourth edition, with great improvements.

Brookes (Richard) engraved frontispiece, and numerous woodcut illustrations in the text, small original paper flaw tear to D7 (no loss), frontispiece offset onto title, minor browning, pp. viii, 304, 12mo, original sheep, rebacked (not recently), corners rather worn, annotated by perhaps more than one generation of anglers (see below), and with an unrecorded broadside ballad . The title-page is misleading. Essentially this 'The Angler's Dictionary', alphabetically arranged, including fish (each illustrated), tackle - including a long enrty on flies - and such things as Fishes Food, and technical terms: a long entry for whales is naturally towards the end (so the title has all the right notes, but not necessarily in the right order). The long entry on Flies (occupying over thirty pages), and is copiously annotated in ink by a dedicated early nineteenth-century fly-tier, possibly a Yorkshireman, but with an evident wide circle of aquaintance in the fishing world: given that the dates run up till 1830, there is perhaps more than one generation involved. His notes on the subject also fill two preliminary blank pages, and there are occasional marginalia in his hand elsewhere in the volume giving the dates fish were caught, where, and by whom. A folding MS sheet, copying an article about flies from an 1819 issue of Blackwood's Magazine, is bound in: this furnishes a pretty good guide to the angling shops in Edinburgh. Also bound in, thanks to which we owe its preservation, is an unrecorded printing of a broadside ballad: The Yorkshire Concert. Printed and Sold by J. Pitts No 14 Great St Andrew Street Seven Dials. It dates from around 1819 and is very fragile. Worldcat records one copy only of this broadside by a different printer, also undated, at the National Library of Scotland, though the song itself, by Charles Dibdin, had appeared in numerous collections. Regarding lobsters: 'The best tasted Lobsters are caught of the Isle of Wight; but those being few in Quantity, the London Markets are chiefly supplied from Norway and the Orkney Isles.' What evidence there may have been to the original owner's identity was perhaps lost when the book was rebacked and recased: this may have taken place c. 1964, as there is a cost code at the end in that year. (Westwood & Satchell p. 42)
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The Rudiments of Grammar for the English-Saxon Tongue, first given in English: with an Apology For the Study of Northern Antiquities. Being very useful towards the understanding our ancient English poets, and other Writers.

Elstob (Elizabeth) FIRST EDITION, THICK (or LARGE) PAPER COPY, title printed in red and black, 2 engraved head-pieces, one incorporating a portrait of Caroline of Ansbach (newly become Princess of Wales), 2 engraved initials, the second of which incorporates a portrait of the authoress (reproduced in ODNB), the 3rd opening of the volume a bit dust-stained pp. [viii], xxxv, 70, 4to, contemporary panelled calf, spine plain, some wear but still a good, solid, handsome copy, bookplate of Eric Gerard Stalney. 'In 1715 Elizabeth Elstob published her last book, The Rudiments of Grammar for the English-Saxon Tongue - the first grammar of Old English to be published in English. It is based, principally but not exclusively, on Hickes's authoritative grammar in the first volume of his Linguarum veterum septentrionalium thesaurus grammatico-criticus et archaeologicus (1703) and on the abridged version extracted from it by Edward Thwaites (1711), both of which are written in Latin. She prefaced The Rudiments with a passionate but well-documented apologia for Anglo-Saxon studies, directing her remarks against the indifference towards the subject as evidenced in the writings of Jonathan Swift, who sought to establish a language academy in England on the model of the Académie Française. Though small in size and only partly available in print Elizabeth Elstob's scholarly œuvre is on a par with the best work produced in Anglo-Saxon studies at the beginning of the eighteenth century' (ODNB). We have seen reference to Large Paper copies, but this copy, which is definitely on thick paper, is a little bit smaller than the ordinary paper copy we happen to have at the same time. The lower outer corner of A2 verso (one of the dust-soiled pages) has slip of paper folded over, which escaped the binder's knife. This indicates that, uncut, the leaf would be 2 cms wider: we can't tell how much height has been sacrificed. At some point collated by Richard Linenthal for Quaritch. (ESTC T72424; Alston iii 18; Maslen & Lancaster, Bowyer Ledgers, 234)
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The Rudiments of Grammar for the English-Saxon Tongue, first given in English: with an Apology For the Study of Northern Antiquities. Being very useful towards the understanding our ancient English poets, and other Writers.

Elstob (Elizabeth) FIRST EDITION, title printed in red and black, 2 engraved head-pieces, one incorporating a portrait of Caroline of Ansbach (newly become Princess of Wales), 2 engraved initials, the second of which incorporates a portrait of the authoress (reproduced in ODNB), a trifle browned in places, a few scattered spots, pp. [viii], xxxv, 70, 4to, contemporary speckled calf, gilt roll tooled borders on sides, neatly rebacked preserving original red lettering piece, engraved armorial bookplate of William Peters of Newcastle upon Tyne, pencil signature of Irvine Masson above. 'In 1715 Elizabeth Elstob published her last book, The Rudiments of Grammar for the English-Saxon Tongue - the first grammar of Old English to be published in English. It is based, principally but not exclusively, on Hickes's authoritative grammar in the first volume of his Linguarum veterum septentrionalium thesaurus grammatico-criticus et archaeologicus (1703) and on the abridged version extracted from it by Edward Thwaites (1711), both of which are written in Latin. She prefaced The Rudiments with a passionate but well-documented apologia for Anglo-Saxon studies, directing her remarks against the indifference towards the subject as evidenced in the writings of Jonathan Swift, who sought to establish a language academy in England on the model of the Académie Française. Though small in size and only partly available in print Elizabeth Elstob's scholarly œuvre is on a par with the best work produced in Anglo-Saxon studies at the beginning of the eighteenth century' (ODNB). William Peters was an attorney, who died in 1807 aged 75. Sir James Irvine Orme Masson (1887-1962), was a chemist, and vice-chancellor of the University of Sheffield. He was interested in the history of chemistry, and in bibliography, publishing Three Centuries of Chemistry (1925), and The Mainz Psalters and Canon Missae, 1954. (ESTC T72424; Alston iii 18; Maslen & Lancaster, Bowyer Ledgers, 234)
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Rural Love, a Tale. In the Scotish [sic] Dialect. To which is added a Glossary, or alphabetical explanation of the Scotish [sic] Words and Phrases.

Douglas (Francis)] FIRST EDITION, a bit of dust-soiling and minor foxing, pp. 27, [5], 8vo, uncut in late 19th- or early 20th-century half red calf, lettered in gilt on spine, unevenly faded, cracking at foot of spine, bookplate of Eric Gerard Stanley. First, and only separate, edition (it was included in later collections). Douglas was born near Aberdeen (bap. 1719). 'He was apprenticed to a baker in Aberdeen and after the completion of his training in the late 1730s he went to London to practise his trade. During this time he wrote Rural Love, a Tale in the Scotish Dialect that he printed in Aberdeen in 1759 . From 1743 he was back in Aberdeen and became a baker in the Netherkirkgate . In 1748 Douglas started book selling' (ODNB), and this shortly became his main occupation, as well as writing. The poem is set in the time of 'merry Charles' in rural Aberdeenshire. It recounts the suits of local contenders for the hand of the 'ae lass bairn' of a widower. In sketching the background of one of them, we have a snapshot of the battle of Alford, 1645, which Montrose won for the King: Douglas was a Jacobite. The Glossary includes an entry for 'To come ben', which draws the note that 'In low farm houses of two rooms, the one is called the But, and the other the Ben, tho' for what reason I know not.' 'From 1759 to 1771, John Coote was a familiar publisher on the London scene. His ambition to succeed in the book trade led him to hazard his money on promising new works that he probably commissioned, and on new periodicals. However, his decision to hide his proprietorships succeeded beyond his expectations: his name had become obscure even before his death' (ODNB). (ESTC T72251)
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Popular Ballads and Songs, from Tradition, Manuscripts, and Scarce Editions; with Translations of Similar Pieces from the Ancient Danish Languiage, and a few Originals by the Author. Vol. I [-II].

Jamieson (Robert) FIRST EDITION, 2 vols., with half-titles, pp. [vi], ii, xix, 352; [iv], iii, 409, 8vo, contemporary polished calf, double gilt fillets on sides enclosing a roll tooled border in blind, spines gilt in compartments, lettered in gilt direct, spines very slightly faded, extremities rubbed, some surface scratches, small defect to headcap of vol. ii, contemporary printed bookplate of David Moore of Thame in both vols., and that of Eric Gerard Stanley, and that of Norman and Janey Buch in vol. ii, good. 'Sir Walter Scott, who held a high opinion of Jamieson, emphasized in his 1830 essay on popular poetry prefaced to later editions of his Border Minstrelsy Jamieson's discovery of the undoubted kinship between Scandinavian and Scottish ballads, 'a circumstance which no antiquary had before so much as suspected'. Jamieson owed this discovery to the Icelandic antiquary G. J. Thorkelin's gift to him of Kaempe viser (ed. Peder Syv, Copenhagen, 1695), a volume of Danish heroic ballads. His long letter to Scott on the subject, which forms an essay on comparative literature unparalleled at the time in this field, is included in the second volume of his Popular Ballads and Songs. Like Scott's Border Minstrelsy (1802–3), many of Jamieson's Ballads derive from manuscript transcripts made by Mrs Brown, widow of the minister of Falkland, Fife. They are annotated with scholarship and taste; and in the original section Jamieson's own lyrics 'The Quern Lilt' and 'My Wife's a Winsome Wee Thing' secure for him a place among minor Scottish singers' (ODNB). Not mentioned on the title-page is the interesting 19-page Glossay at the end of vol. ii. David Moore of Thame seems to have been an antiquary: we find mention of him excavating mammoth bones, and having a collection of fossils. The Buchan's were a Glasgow political family (Labour, initially YCL), heavily involved in the arts, and book collectors (on Janey's death some 9,000 were given to Scottish universities, including The Janey Buchan Political Song Collection at the University of Glasgow).
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Lucan’s Pharsalia. Translated into English Verse by Nicholas Rowe, Esq; Servant to His Majesty. In Two Volumes. The Second Edition.

Lucanus (Marcus Annaeus) engraved frontispiece, and folding map, woodcut headpieces, pp. [vi], lxiv, 287; 310, [2, ads], 12mo, contemporary panelled calf, trifling wear to binding, a lovely copy. Rowe's masterpiece, posthumously published, the Dedication signed by his widow, Anne, first published in folio in 1718, and 2 8vo editions in the interval (Dublin, and The Hague). Dr. Johnson wrote: 'The version of Lucan is one of the greatest productions of English poetry; for there is perhaps none that so completely exhibits the genius and spirit of the original. Lucan is distinguished by a kind of dictatorial or philosophic dignity rather declamatory than poetical; full of ambitious morality and pointed sentences, comprised in vigorous and animated lines. This character Rowe has very diligently and successfully preserved. His versification seldom wants either melody or force. His author's sense is sometimes a little diluted by additional infusions, and sometimes weakened by too much expansion. But such faults are to be expected in all translations, from the constraint of measures and dissimilitude of languages. The Pharsalia of Rowe deserves more notice than it obtains, and as it is more read will be more esteemed . His inimitable manner of diverting and enlivening the company made it impossible for any one to be out of humour when he was in it.' (Foxon ESTC T113675)
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The Heroic Deeds of the Scots. A Poem, in four volumes; from Fergus I. down to the present Time. To which are added, Poems on several occasions . Volume I [all published].

Carruthers (John) FIRST (ONLY) EDITION, a few spots, uncut edges a little dust-stained and frayed, pp. vii, [8-] 84, small 8vo, original blue paper wrappers, upper cover detached, lower nearly so. The Carruthers are more or less synonymous with Dumfries, and Annandale, and are closely associated with clan Bruce. We are not sure exactly who our John was, but he was clearly a scion of that house, as well as an ardent patriot. The prefatory Address is to The Inhabitants of Annandale, 'the principal bulwark of the nation [against invasion].' The text begins with the mythic origins of the Scots, and closes with the death of The Bruce. The second volume was promised to be shorter, with only nine reigns down to James VI, but no more seems ever to appeared. The work is dedicated to the Earl of Errol, commemorating the Battle of Luncarty. Such a booklet is understandably rare. ESTC records just 4 copies: NLS, BL, Cornell, and the Hornel copy, in the Museum and Library at Kirkcudbright. Hornel was one of the 'Glasgow Boys', and did very well for himself. His wealth allowed him to collect a library of some 15,000 volumes, mainly local works, and above all Robert Burns - Burns spent the last few years of his life in Dumfries, and died there in the year that this poem was printed. (ESTC T198507; not in Johnson)
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Manuscript travel journal.

Harper (Mary, Mrs Ernest Stewart Roberts) written predominantly in black ink with some use of pencil in final passages, pp. [81 + blanks], crown 8vo, original Swiss notebook of quarter black cloth and matching boards, some minor wear, ownership inscription of 'Mary Harper, July 4th 1885, Lucerne' to front pastedown, good . Mary Roberts, née Mary Harper, was the wife of eminent Cambridge academic Ernest Stewart Roberts, Master at Gonville and Caius College (and subsequently Vice-Chancellor of the University); her father was Hugo Daniel Harper, who built up Sherborne School in his time as Headmaster, and then became Principal of his alma mater Jesus College, Oxford. This, her diary for the second half of 1885, describes in its latter part life in Oxford as the daughter of a prominent academic, but is in the main an account of a family holiday in the Swiss Alps. In her published memoir, Sherborne, Oxford and Cambridge: Recollections of Mrs Ernest Stewart Roberts, which bore an Introduction from her friend Rose Macaulay, she recounts that 'in 1885 we went abroad again for about a month of the vacation [.] we went to Switzerland, and I shall never forget the first impressions of that journey and our travels there' (pp. 102-3) – in fact, as we learn in this diary, her time there became memorable for an altogether different, and unexpected reason. The journal begins, 'We started from Oxford on Monday June 29th', in an entry located at the Schwan Hôtel in Lucerne at the beginning of the following month. Soon after, on 11th July, she recounts her first meeting with her future-husband, whom she encounters in Engleberg: there were '2 gentlemen [.] one of whom came and shook hands with Papa. He was a Mr Roberts, a fellow of Caius Cambridge', followed by a 'long talk' the next day – they, Roberts and his friend Mr Boyd, are recurrent companions from that point; on the 18th Roberts gives her a dictionary, in which 'he has scratched out his name and written mine' – and we might regard the courtship to have begun in earnest (ahem). When back at home at the beginning of August, visits in both directions – he to Jesus College, she to Caius – follow, along with correspondence, including the sending of photographs of Caius and Cambridge in what seems a subtle brand of inducement. The final, brief entry on December 30th reads only – in a rather shaky hand – 'he asked me to marry him yesterday!'. What begins as a travel journal, interesting in its own way as a record of the itinerary of a notable Oxford academic family, becomes an engrossing account of an Oxford-Cambridge courtship in the setting of the Alps, all growing from a chance encounter with an academic acquaintance of her father – his most striking charactersitic at first his shyness. The coverage of the journal is, with only a few gaps, daily, and there is much of incidental interest besides what emerges as the central narrative; that it breaks off so dramatically at the close itself indicates the momentous nature of the final event in the context of her life – an event whose prelude is related in full here. [With:] The busy social diary of the same, from April 1879 to January 1888, a vellum-bound notebook with marbled edges and clasps, with lists of both invitations accepted and declined – consisting of various lunchtime and evening engagements around the Colleges, and including mentions of Mark Pattison, A.H. Bullen, Elizabeth Wordsworth, et al. There is the gap we might expect in July 1885, where – travelling – she records a sole engagement (declined). In her memoir, Roberts decribes her acquaintance with both Lewis Carroll and Oscar Wilde whilst in Oxford – they are not mentioned here, but the social engagements at which she met them, her encounters with Wilde mostly in the form of dancing, likely are. [And:] Roberts (Mrs Ernest Stewart [née Mary Harper]), Sherborne, Oxford and Cambridge. With an Introduction by Rose Macaulay. Martin Hopkinson, 1934, FIRST EDITION, frontispiece portrait of the author and plates of her father and husband, pp. 232, crown 8vo, original pale yellow cloth, publisher device in blind to lower board, backstrip lettered in gilt, tail edge roughtrimmed, dustjacket, very good
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Typescript:] ‘Two Years Ago’, unpublished first-hand account of the D-Day landings.

World War Two.) HUTCHINSON (George) original typescript with some manuscript corrections in ink and pencil, the first and last passages cut and laid down to a second sheet, pp. [6], 4to, sometime folded for sending, a little corner creasing, some rust from original paperclip, good condition. An inside account of one of the defining episodes of the War, its power deriving from an understated tone: George Hutchinson narrates his part in history in a clear, unfussy fashion – providing sufficient detail to be literary, and with a measure of wit, but with no attempt, and no need, to create artificial drama. Hutchinson describes the reaction of the men, one of simultaneous pragmatism and trepidation as the 'Second Front' mooted for so long became a reality, as well as their equipment – both military and personal ('the little things sailors hope they'll save') – and how events unfolded. What is striking is the level of obscurity regarding the operation, even with regard to those directly involved and extending up the ranks – 'the Captain spoke to us [.] he himself didn't know just where we were going'. Evidently taken from a longer memoir – the laid-down passages and alterations to the page-numbers evidence of this – Hutchinson's account remains unpublished: it is accompanied here by a letter covering its return from Kaye Webb, later the editor at Puffin Books and the wife of Ronald Searle, but here the Assistant Editor at Lilliput magazine – where it has arrived 'too late for our June number [.] We hope that you will manage to place it somewhere else'.