Blackwell's Rare Books

  • Showing all 25 results

book (2)

Typescript and manuscript extracts from:] Claude Monet, les Nymphéas.

Monet.) CLEMENCEAU (Georges) 8pp. typescript with frequent holograph corrections and additions, and a 2pp. manuscript headed 'Conclusion', pp. 8; [2], 4to, the manuscript sheets slightly browned, a couple of very fant spots to edge, very good . These extracts represent two key passages from the French statesman's memoir of his close friend. The typed extract offers a lyrical passage that begins 'L'eau attirait la brosse de Monet', the opening of the work's fourth chapter ('Le Jardin de Monet') – though it follows a similar course to the published work, there are substantial differences, offering variant readings in both the typed and the manuscript material; there is extensive drafting, showing the labour of the author in trying to capture the talent and inspiration of his subject. Similarly, in the manuscript fragment of the 'Conclusion', we have a striking opening that is recognisable in relation to the finished work (though it is not identical) –though it is not identical, asking 'Est-il nécessaire de conclure?', rather than stating that 'Il n'est peut-être pas nécessaire de conclure' – and has many passages in common with its published counterpart. Georges Clemenceau was a politician and journalist, alternating between the roles in the course of his life, during an eventful period in both his native France and the United States – where he spent the latter half of the 1860s, covering the aftermath of the Civil War for 'Le Temps', whilst also teaching and running a medical practice. He returned to France, with his American wife Mary Plummer, at the beginning of the next decade, mediating – in his role as Mayor of the XVIIIe arrondissement – between the Commune and the Government, following the fall of the Second Empire. By the end of the century he had fallen out of favour in political circles, but maintained his activism through his journalism – it was his paper, L'Aurore, that first published Zola's incendiary 'J'Accuse' during the Dreyfus Affair. Returning to politics, he rose to the position of Prime Minister in 1906-1909, and then took the same office in 1917-1919 – playing a key role in the allied victory, and in the Treaty of Versailles that followed. Though his political activities account for the largest part of his reputation, his friendship with Monet is an important aspect of the biographies of both men – it was Clemenceau who convinced Monet to endure cataract surgery in order to retain his sight, and who prevailed upon him to donate 'Les Nymphéas' to the state (additionally insisting, as President of the Council, that they should reside in the Musée de l'Orangerie).
book (2)

Our Marie” (Marie Lloyd). A Censored Anthology. With 20 Illustrations.

Jacob (Naomi) FIRST EDITION, frontispiece and 15 plates, some light foxing to prelims and around plates within, pp. 287, [24, ads], 8vo, original black cloth, backstrip lettered in gilt, worn and soiled, the dustjacket front panel laid down to flyleaf, fair. An interesting copy of this memoir of the popular music-hall entertainer, by her friend - the novelist Naomi Jacob (also known as Ellington Gray). This was the author's personal copy: laid in, some interleaved, are numerous relevant clippings, transcriptions, and 7 pieces of correspondence to her (in the main addressed by her nickname, 'Mickie'), most referring to the book, its subject, or evoking the world of the music-hall more generally – a couple, from Godfrey Clarke, and 'Frank', sent by old entertainers with, like the author, some level of personal acquaintance with the great lady. Born in Ripon, Jacob lived for the latter part of her life on the shores of Lake Garda, in a house known as 'Casa Mickie' (some of the correspondence is thus addressed) – a member of the WSPU and the Labour Party, she spent time on the stage and acted in films (including 'The Ringer' with John Gielgud) before her writing career took over. Her appearance was flamboyantly masculine, and her partners female – as well as Lloyd, among the friends gathered in her varied career were Radclyffe Hall and Una Troubridge, and she appeared for the defence of Hall's novel 'The Well of Loneliness' in 1928.
book (2)

Manuscript essay:] ‘Les Prisonniers alsaciens’.

Clemenceau (Georges) manuscript in black ink, some late drafting throughout but generally legible, pp. [5], folio, the sheets, most in sections, tipped to card backing, good . An important essay, the opening salvo of Clemenceau's newspaper 'L'Homme enchaîné' – the retitled version of 'L'Homme libre', which had suffered at the hands of Government censorship. It discusses one of his principal causes – the reannexation of the region of Alsace, as desired, he argues, by its people. His unequivocal advocacy of this policy was popular, and at odds with the stance of the French Government; it in part led to his return to power, for a second term as Prime Minister beginning in 1917, where his role in the outcome of the War conferred on him the title of 'Père la Victoire' and the measures following, culminating in the Treaty of Versailles, achieved his popular aim in respect of Alsace. Clemenceau was a politician and journalist, alternating between the roles in the course of his life, during an eventful period in both his native France and the United States – where he spent the latter half of the 1860s, covering the aftermath of the Civil War for 'Le Temps', whilst also teaching and running a medical practice. He returned to France, with his American wife Mary Plummer, at the beginning of the next decade, mediating – in his role as Mayor of the XVIIIe arrondissement – between the Commune and the Government, following the fall of the Second Empire. By the end of the century he had fallen out of favour in political circles, but maintained his activism through his journalism – it was his paper, L'Aurore, that first published Zola's incendiary 'J'Accuse' during the Dreyfus Affair. Returning to politics, he rose to the position of Prime Minister in 1906-1909, and then took the same office in 1917-1919.
book (2)

Programme for:] A Celebrity Gala in aid of the Oxford Samuel Beckett Theatre Appeal [.] on Sunday, March 8th, 1970, at 8.30 p.m.

Beckett (Samuel)] facsimiles of letters from Beckett and Buckminster Fuller regarding the proposed theatre, wishes of support from OUP, Blackwell's, the Holywell Press and John Calder printed against a gold background, very faint vertical crease throughout, pp. [8], 4to, original stapled wrappers with photos of Beckett and Buckminster Fuller to front and rear respectively, very minor rubbing and bottom corner a little creased, sliver of adhesive residue to margin of front, very good . Scarce. A glimpse at what might have been – an ambitious proposal for an experimental theatre in Oxford to be named after Samuel Beckett and designed by R. Buckminster Fuller, the project conceived in 1967 by Francis Warner of St Peter's College (in whose grounds the theatre was to be situated). This 'Beckett Evening' is produced by Warner, with appearances by Patrick Magee, Richard Harris, Huw Wheldon, Wolf Mankowitz, et al. – with Buckminster Fuller present, but Beckett himself not. The evening featured the UK premiere of his play 'Breath', a screening of 'Film', and various pieces relating to Beckett's life and work – including nods to Joyce (Siobhan McKenna performs as Molly Bloom) and Yeats. Despite the consent of Beckett and the support of various eminent figures, both literary and from the wider cultural sphere, the project now exists only in the form of a Trust to promote innovation in the field of the dramatic arts.