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Moby Dick [Moby-Dick]

FIRST TRADE EDITION OF ROCKWELL KENT'S ILLUSTRATED MOBY DICK - THE EDITION THAT MADE MOBY DICK FAMOUS. It may be hard to believe, but for many decades Moby Dick was largely ignored by the public. That began to change in the 1920s, when literary critics began reappraising Melville's work of genius. But the true turning point came in 1926, when Thomas Donnelly of Lakeside Press announced the Four American Books campaign, meant to showcase American writing and printing. William Kittridge, head of design and typography, reached out to Rockwell Kent and asked him to illustrate Richard Henry Dana's Two Years Before the Mast. Kent suggested Moby Dick instead, and the rest was history. In the words of Kittridge, the result was "the greatest book done in this generation" and "the greatest illustrated book ever done in America." Kent's illustrations came out in a large, three-volume limited edition for Lakeside Press, as well as a trade edition for Random House. It was this trade edition that rocketed Moby Dick to fame, and introduced the public to one of the greatest matches between illustrator and subject matter in the history of printing. Kent saw his ink and wash illustrations as "literary woodcutting," jet-black doorways into the "midnight darkness enveloping human existence, the darkness of the human soul, the abyss, - such is the mood of Moby-Dick." Although the two never met, Kent and Melville had a great deal in common. Both were deeply influenced by transcendentalist thinkers like Emerson; both were adventurers who voyaged to exotic lands and chronicled their travels. Perhaps it was this kinship that explains the success of Kent's illustrations. Less bulky than the limited edition, the beautifully designed 1930 Random House trade edition offered people an eminently readable way to experience this remarkable union of literary and artistic genius. New York: Random House, 1930. Thick octavo, original decorated cloth, original dust jacket. Book fine, with cloth exceptionally bright; dust jacket with very minor tape reinforcement to two spots on verso of rear panel, with crease visible on recto; light general wear and a few very faint spots of dampstaining on front panel. An exceptionally beautiful copy of a book that is notoriously difficult to find in good condition. Original cloth, original dust jacket
  • $3,200
  • $3,200
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Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions

RARE FIRST EDITION OF ABBOTT'S CLASSIC. "Edwin Abbott's Flatland may be one of the most unclassifiable works of literature ever published. While it is acknowledged to be a classic of early science fiction, a work of Victorian social satire, and a religious allegory, it also presents, through its introduction to higher dimensions, an important contribution to the development of an area of mathematics that was eventually merged into non-Euclidean geometry. Flatland is an unusually effective work that spans disciplines and challenges divisional categories. Since its publication in 1884, the book's popularity has continued today as its readers have embraced it as science fiction, popular science, and metaphysics. Working from the groundwork of philosophical issues raised by Plato's Republic, Flatland merges social satire and geometry to produce a novel situated in two-dimensional space, a believable world populated by memorable inhabitants whose geometric shapes designate their positions in a complex social structure, one that bears some resemblance to the Victorian class structure" (Lila Marz Harper, Flatland). Published pseudonymously by Abbott as "A Square". London: Seeley & Co., 1884. Octavo, original paper wrappers with illustrated vellum jacket. Custom box. Some toning to wrappers; heavy chipping to spine, front joint reinforced; some foxing to endpapers; text very clean. A RARE SURVIVAL: Because of the fragile nature of the format, first editions of Flatland in original condition have become notoriously rare.
  • $5,000
  • $5,000
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Report on the Relativity Theory of Gravitation

THE FIRST INTRODUCTION OF EINSTEIN'S GENERAL RELATIVITY TO THE ENGLISH-SPEAKING WORLD. The groundbreaking first edition (1918), with the second edition (1920), containing the account of Eddington's 1919 expedition proving Einstein's theory, both in original wrappers. "Einstein's discovery of the General Theory of Relativity was communicated to the Berlin Academy of Sciences in 1915. Because of the First World War, direct communication with physicists in Germany was not possible, but the papers were forwarded to Eddington, who was then Secretary of the Royal Astronomical Society, by Willem de Sitter, a personal friend of Eddington's in neutral Holland. The theory is of considerable mathematical complexity, but, as Einstein stated in the last paragraph of his paper, 'scarcely anyone who has fully understood this theory can escape from its magic'. Eddington was the ideal expositor of these ideas in English and within 2 years had written his Report on the Relativity Theory of Gravitation for the Physical Society of London" (Malcolm Longair, "Bending Space-time"). The second edition is notable for containing a new preface that discusses the results of the "eclipse expedition" led by Eddington that verified General Relativity and catapulted Einstein into world-wide fame. This preface precedes Eddington's full report in the Philosophical Transactions. Provenance: Almost certainly Nobel Prize winning physicist's Charles Glover Barkla's copy of the 1918 report, with an original 1918 receipt in Barkla's name laid in. Barkla won the 1917 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his discovery of the characteristic Röntgen radiation of the elements". London: Fleetway Press for The Physical Society of London, 1918 and 1920. Octavo, original wrappers; custom box. General light wear to wrappers. Beautiful copies. RARE.
  • $15,000
  • $15,000
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A Determination of the Deflection of Light by the Sun’s Gravitational Field, from Observations Made at the Total Eclipse of May 29, 1919

SCARCE FIRST EDITION IN ORIGINAL WRAPPERS OF ARTHUR EDDINGTON'S REPORT CONFIRMING EINSTEIN'S GENERAL THEORY OF RELATIVITY. "On November 7, 1919, the Einstein legend began," for on that day the London Times boldly reported in a triple-headline:††REVOLUTIONS IN SCIENCE†NEW THEORY OF THE UNIVERSE NEWTONIAN IDEAS OVERTHROWN What the Times was reporting were the results, delivered the previous day at a joint meeting of the Royal Society and the Royal Astronomical Society, of the expedition led by Englishman Arthur Eddington to prove the validity of Einstein's General Theory of Relativity. Einstein's theory (originally published in full in 1916) proposed that gravity resulted from the curvature of spacetime by mass. It predicted precisely how light rays would bend as they traveled along the curvature. Eddington tested Einstein's theory by measuring the deflection of starlight by the Sun's gravity during a total solar eclipse. He compared the apparent positions of stars near the Sun (visible in the daytime because of the eclipse) to their positions as determined at night (when their light does not pass by the Sun). Einstein's theory predicted that light would be deflected twice the amount predicted by Newton's law of universal gravitation. Eddington's measurements proved Einstein's prediction, not Newton's, to be correct. When the results were announced on November 7, 1919, Einstein became an instant international celebrity.††The offered publication is Eddington's full report as presented to the Royal Society on November 6, 1919. Complete with a magnificent large half-tone reproduction of one of the negatives taken through the telescope of the eclipse.††Note: The paper also appeared in the Memoirs of the Royal Astronomical Society, but that is just a re-printing of the paper as printed here in the Philosophical Transactions. ††IN: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series A, 220, pp.291-333. London: Printed and Published for the Royal Society, 1920. Complete with plate and rare errata slip; custom box. Tall quarto (approx. 9x11.5 in.) original wrappers rebacked. Label at top right of front cover (Jacques Alkan); otherwise fine. RARE.
  • $16,000
  • $16,000
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Fumifugium: or, The inconveniencie of the aer and smoak of London dissipated together with some remedies humbly proposed by J.E. esq. to His Sacred Majestie, and to the Parliament now assembled

1661 FIRST EDITION OF THE WHAT IS GENERALLY CONSIDERED THE WORLD'S FIRST BOOK ON AIR POLLUTION; A PROPHETIC LANDMARK WORK OF SCIENCE, ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY, AND URBAN PLANNING. Widely recognized by scholars as one of the earliest and most important books in the history of environmentalism, Fumifugium lays out in excruciating detail the terrible effects of London's factories on air quality, along with the consequences for human health and the environment. It has been described as "the most extensive, sophisticated, and ambitious analysis of urban air pollution produced anywhere during the early modern period." The author, John Evelyn, was an avid gardener and a founding member of the Royal Society of London, the world's oldest scientific academy. His solutions to the problem involved relocating factories and planting trees to create urban green spaces, a strategy that remains influential today. Written 300 years before Rachel Carson's environmental classic Silent Spring, Evelyn's work is a chilling reminder that the problems facing humanity today have been long known to us. He describes environmental threats and health consequences that are all too familiar: coal burning chimneys that belch smoke "from their sooty jaws," city inhabitants who "are never free from Coughs." A frightening book, but also an optimistic one, as the third part of Fumifugium describes a brighter future for London, free from factories and filled with parks and trees, "rendred one of the most pleasant and agreeable places in the world." First issue: with "Published by His Majesties Command' on title". London: Printed by W. Godbid for Gabriel Bedel, and Thomas Collins, 1661. Small quarto (150x193mm), late nineteenth century three-quarter calf over marbled boards. [xii; 1-26]. Bookplate ("Henry Davies") on front pastedown. Very faint dampstaining to margins of first and last few leaves; soiling to title; small wormholes on a1,a2 ("To the Reader"); occasionally closely cropped. A MILESTONE OF SCIENCE THAT IS KEENLY RELEVANT TODAY.
  • $8,500
  • $8,500
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An Agricultural Testament

FIRST EDITION IN VERY RARE DUST JACKET OF THE FOUNDATIONAL WORK ON ORGANIC FARMING AND AGRICULTURE. "Since the Industrial Revolution the processes of growth have been speeded up to produce the food and raw materials needed by the population and the factory. Nothing effective has been done to replace the loss of fertility involved in this vast increase in crop and animal production. The consequences have been disastrous. Agriculture has become unbalanced: the land is in revolt: diseases of all kinds are on the increase: in many parts of the world Nature is removing the worn-out soil by means of erosion. "The purpose of this book is to draw attention to the destruction of the earth's capital -the soil; to indicate some of the consequences of this; and to suggest methods by which lost fertility can be restored and maintained." -Preface An Agricultural Testament is among the most influential books in the history of farming, responsible for an explosion of interest in organic farming techniques that has fundamentally changed modern agriculture. At a time when monoculture and chemical fertilizers dominated Western farming practices, Sir Albert Howard drew on the traditional knowledge of Indian farmers to push back on the status quo. As Imperial Economic Botanist to the Government of India, he discovered that Indian methods were far better for soil fertility and crop health than those of his home country. Techniques now familiar to home gardeners - composting, the use of mycorrhiza (fungi) - owe their popularity to his painstaking research and tireless efforts to change how Westerners thought about farming. Howard was astonishingly ahead of his time, and foresaw many problems with industrial farming that are now all too obvious. As the great farmer, poet, and essayist Wendell Berry wrote in his introduction to the 2003 reprint of An Agricultural Testament: "It is remarkable that Howard came quietly, by thought and work, to these realizations a half century and more before they were forced upon us by the ecological and economic failures of industrial agriculture." London: Oxford University Press, 1940. Octavo, original green cloth, original dust jacket. A few spots of foxing to endpapers and text block edges; cloth extremely clean and fresh. Rare dust jacket with mild toning to spine and edges, splits at spine ends, scattered spots of soiling, and a little bit of edgewear. AN ESSENTIAL WORK FOR THE ORGANIC FARMING MOVEMENT. RARE. original cloth, original dust jacket
  • $2,500
  • $2,500
Ballet

Ballet

FIRST EDITION of Brodovitch's masterpiece; of profound influence in the history of photography and photobooks. With extremely rare original slipcase. "Although known primarily as a mentor and patron of photographers, due in large part to his position as art director and graphic designer at Harper's Bazaar, Alexey Brodovitch also made a legendary photobook of his own. Ballet, published in 1945 by J J Augustin in New York, has become a photobook legend for two reasons. Firstly, only a few hundred copies were printed, so the book is more talked about than actually seen. Secondly, the volume was extremely radical, both in terms of the images themselves and their incorporation into the design and layout. "The 104 pictures in Ballet had been taken by Brodovitch between 1935 and 1937. He photographed ballet companies visiting New York, including the Ballets Russes de Monte Carlo, with whom he worked in Paris in the 1920s. Brodovitch shot the photographs with a 35 mm Contax camera, during both rehearsals and performances, by available light, hand-held, and using shutter speeds as slow as a fifth of a second or more. This resulted in blurred images of the moving dancers and in high-contrast, grainy negatives exhibiting burnt-out areas of flare from the stage lighting. These pictures totally violated the accepted conventions of good photographic technique, which demanded a sharp rendition of the subject and a wide, smooth tonal scale. Far from trying to mitigate these shortcomings, Brodovitch deliberately exaggerated them. He printed on high-contrast paper, bleached areas with the chemical ferricyanide to create more contrast, and enlarged tiny portions of the negative to increase grain - familiar strategies in the 1950s and 60s, but not in the 1940s. "Brodovitch's layout was as radical as his pictures. He divided the book into eleven segments, each corresponding to a ballet. Every section was laid out in a continuous strip, each image bled across its own page, so that a double-page spread can often be read as a single panorama, and the whole section like a strip of movie film. This gives the book a vibrancy and a fluidity that perfectly captures the motion of the dance. Ballet is one of the most successful attempts at suggesting motion in photography, and certainly one of the most cinematic and dynamic photobooks ever published" (Parr/Badger, Vol 1; 240-1). Roth 101. Housed in a spectacular custom box by noted book artist Sjoerd Hofstra. New York: J J Augustin, 1945. Text by Edwin Denby. 104 black and white photographs. Oblong folio (8 3/4 x 11 x 1/4 in), original boards, original French fold dust jacket; original slipcase with side missing; custom half-leather box. Dust jacket with a few small spots of soiling and light wear to spine ends; interior fine. The original slipcase is legendarily rare - this example has tape securing the label and is missing the side panel - but it is remarkable it has survived at all. An outstanding copy of one of the most beautiful and important books in the history of photography.
  • $7,500
  • $7,500
Photograph Signed

Photograph Signed

EXTREMELY RARE AND BEAUTIFUL SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH OF EINSTEIN BY FREDERICK PLAUT. SIGNED ON THE IMAGE BY EINSTEIN: "A. Einstein 54". A fine photograph of Einstein in 1954, a year before his death, sitting in his Princeton home surrounded by books and holding his pipe, gazing slightly away from the camera. In his 1964 collection of photographs, The Unguarded Moment, the photographer Frederick Plaut explains the circumstances of his evocative photo of the elderly Einstein: "There must be a moment in every professional photographer's life when he is so in awe of his subject that he can scarcely focus his camera. That moment for me was when I met Albert Einstein at his home in Princeton. Certainly the great man was not formidable; he greeted my wife and me graciously, and proceeded to chat with her while I went to work. I remember that she asked him about his music and when he told her that he no longer played his violin she murmured, 'That's too bad.' He smiled, 'Ah, no. It would have been too bad if I went on.' In the final moments of our visit, Einstein looked at me very seriously. 'I hope,' he said, 'you can sell these pictures for a good price.' Astounded, I blurted out: 'Oh, no, Sir. I have nothing to sell. I just wanted to photograph you.' His face clouded. 'Not sell them? If I had known that I never would have let you take them.' After we left, I realized the significant of a delightful remark attributed to Mrs. Einstein. Someone once asked Mrs. Einstein whether she understood Professor Einstein's theory of relativity. She answered without hesitation, 'No, but I understand Professor Einstein'" (Frederick Plaut, The Unguarded Moment, A Photographic Interpretation). The photographer Frederick Plaut moved to the United States from Europe in 1940. After being "discovered" by the legendary photographer Edward Steichen, Plaut soon was invited to exhibit in numerous exhibitions. "At the Museum of Modern Art his photographs have been shown in many exhibitions including: 'The Family of Man,' 'Music and Musicians,' 'The Exact Instant' and others. Plaut's work has appeared in Time, Life, Esquire, Look, Saturday Review, Vogue, U.S. Camera, Modern and Popular Photography, andRealities, et al" (The Unguarded Moment). Provenance: Acquired directly from the family of the original recipient, Arthur Klein, with the original mailing envelope (stamped "Jan 27 '54") from The Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, where Einstein was working at the time. Arthur Klein is primarily known for founding with his wife Luce, Spoken Arts, a highly influential company formed in the 1950s that created and distributed recordings of the works of famous writers and artists, usually reading from their own works. Princeton, NJ: 1954. Silver gelatin print, approximately 4.75 x 6.75 inches. With Plaut's studio stamp on verso. Fine condition with Einstein signature - nicely centered at the base of the photograph - particularly strong. As Plaut mentioned in his account of the photographic session, he never intended to sell this photograph and it is likely very few of these photos were printed and distributed. EXTREMELY RARE: WE CAN FIND NO OTHER EXAMPLE OF THIS PHOTOGRAPH SIGNED BY EINSTEIN.
  • $22,000
  • $22,000
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The Odyssey of Homer

A MASTERPIECE OF BOOK DESIGN: T.E. LAWRENCE'S TRANSLATION OF THE ODYSSEY, DESIGNED BY BRUCE ROGERS. LIMITED EDITION, ONE OF ONLY 530 COPIES. IN MAGNIFICENT CUSTOM BOX BY ZAEHNSDORF WITH BEAUTIFUL 1928 PHOTOGRAPH OF LAWRENCE IN THE RAF. Contracted by Bruce Rogers in 1928 to create a prose translation of The Odyssey, Lawrence struggled with the text for four years while still working for the RAF. The result, however, was worth the wait, for ultimately the completed book was a huge success and is now recognized as one of the most elegantly printed books of the century. "The limited edition Odyssey, issued in November 1932, is one of Rogers's most beautiful books. The pages have a clean, classical appearance and each chapter opens with Greek vase figures printed on a thick gold and black roundel. Joseph Blumenthal, who was responsible for the 1972 Pierpont Morgan Library exhibition 'Art of the Printed Book: 1455-1955,' states: 'During the several years spent in selecting the 112 books finally shown, I handled every title reputed. to be among the finest volumes made. since Gutenberg. I believe that the Bruce Rogers Odyssey is indisputably among the most beautiful books ever produced.'" (Orlans). This copy is bound in the original black morocco by W.H. Smith and Son and housed in a spectacular full heavily-gilt morocco folding silk-lined case by the legendary bindery Zaehnsdorf. The inside of the case houses a wonderful photograph of Lawrence from 1928 taken by Flight Lieutenant Smetham on the aerodrome at Miranshah Fort in Waziristan, British India during his service in the Royal Air Force. (The photograph has not been examined outside its casing in the box but appears to be vintage.) With elegant leather bookplate with the initials "GNR" above the photo. This GNR bookplate is found in many fine books and is possibly the bookplate for the collection of the Great Northern Railroad. Homer. The Odyssey. English translation by T. E. Lawrence. Designed and printed by Bruce Rogers. London: Sir Emery Walker, Wilfred Merton and Bruce Rogers, 1932. Limited edition, one of 530 copies. Tall quarto (290x200 mm), original black morocco by W. H. Smith & Son, gilt-lettered spine. Without original slipcase (but now housed in Zaehnsdorf box). Printed in Rogers's Centaur type on light grey Barcham Green paper. Gold leaf roundels on title-page and on 25 headpieces. Just a few superficial scuffs to binding. A spectacular copy. References: -Joseph Blumenthal, Bruce Rogers: A Life in Letters, 1989. -Harold Orlans, T.E. Lawrence: Biography of a Broken Hero, 2002.
  • $11,500
  • $11,500
Sinfonie mit Schluss-Chor uber Schillers Ode

Sinfonie mit Schluss-Chor uber Schillers Ode, An die Freude fur grosses Orchester [THE NINTH SYMPHONY]

BEETHOVEN, LUDWIG VAN A MAGNIFICENT COPY OF THE FIRST EDITION, FIRST ISSUE, OF BEETHOVEN'S NINTH, ONE OF THE CROWNING ACHIEVEMENTS OF WESTERN MUSIC. "Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 was ultimately more than three decades in the making. Schiller's popular 'Ode to Joy' was published in 1785, and it is possible that Beethoven made his first of multiple attempts to set it to music in the early 1790s. He clearly revisited the poem in 1808 and 1811, as his notebooks include numerous remarks regarding possible settings. In 1812 Beethoven determined to place his setting of 'Ode to Joy' within a grand symphony. "Ten more years passed before that symphony's completion, and during that time Beethoven agonized over the composition's every note. His notebooks indicate that he considered and rejected more than 200 different versions of the 'Ode to Joy' theme alone. When he finally finished the work, he offered to the public a radically new creation that was part symphony and part oratorio - a hybrid that proved puzzling to less-adventuresome listeners. "The story of the premiere of Symphony No. 9 is widely told and disputed. Beethoven had steadily lost his hearing during the course of the symphony's composition, and by the time of its premiere he was profoundly deaf. Although he appeared onstage as the general director of the performance, kapellmeister Michael Umlauf actually led the orchestra with the conductor's baton, taking tempo cues from Beethoven. According to one account of the event, the audience applauded thunderously at the conclusion of the performance, but Beethoven, unable to hear the response, continued to face the chorus and orchestra; a singer finally turned him around so that he could see evidence of the affirmation that resounded throughout the hall. Other accounts maintain that the dramatic incident occurred at the end of the second movement scherzo. (At the time, it was common for audiences to applaud between movements.) Whenever the applause occurred, that it passed unnoticed by Beethoven makes clear that he never heard a note of his magnificent composition outside his own imagination" (Betsy Schwarm, Britannica). This first edition of the score was published in August 1826, and Beethoven himself died shortly thereafter, on March 26, 1827. The printing of the score is itself a work of art: 226 stunning folio engraved pages on thick paper. This copy is exceptionally large with wide margins and nearly spotless. Complete with the printed subscriber's list, and the first issue points (no metronome marks and plate number 2322). Provenance: With the notations of legendary dealer, collector, and expert on musical manuscripts Albi Rosenthal (1914-2004) on the verso of the front free endpaper calling this copy "an unusually fine copy." With exceptionally rare original blue front wrapper bound-in. Sinfonie mit Schluss-Chor uber Schillers Ode: "An die Freude" fur grosses Orchester, 4 Solo- und 4 Chor-Stimmen componirt.von Ludwig van Beethoven. 125tes. Werk [full score], Mainz and Paris: B. Schotts Söhnen; Antwerp: A. Schott, [1826]. Folio (329x255 mm), contemporary half calf, with leather spine labels, marbled endpapers, edges dyed green. Some scuffs to binding, text exceptionally clean. A BEAUTIFUL COPY OF THE VERY RARE FIRST EDITION OF ARGUABLY THE GREATEST WORK OF CLASSICAL MUSIC.
  • $65,000
  • $65,000
Über quantentheoretische Umdeutung kinematischer und mechanischer Beziehungen [On the quantum-theoretical reinterpretation of kinematical and mechanical relationships]

Über quantentheoretische Umdeutung kinematischer und mechanischer Beziehungen [On the quantum-theoretical reinterpretation of kinematical and mechanical relationships]

Heisenberg, Werner FIRST EDITION IN ORIGINAL WRAPPERS of Heisenberg's critically important paper marking the foundation of quantum mechanics; Heisenberg was awarded the 1932 Nobel prize in physics "for the creation of quantum mechanics." "In June 1925, while recuperating from an attack of hay fever on Helgoland, an island in the North Sea, Heisenberg solved a major physical problem-how to account for the stationary (discrete) energy states of an anharmonic oscillator. His solution, because it was analogous to that of a simple planetary atom, launched the program for the development of the quantum mechanics of atomic systems. Heisenberg published his results some months later in the Zeitschrift für Physik under the title "Über quantentheoretische Umdeutung kinematischer und mechanischer Beziehungen" ["On the quantum-theoretical reinterpretation of kinematical and mechanical relationships"]. In this article he proposed a reinterpretation of the basic concepts of mechanics. "Heisenberg's treatment of the problem departed from Bohr's as much as Bohr's had from 19th-century tenets. Heisenberg was willing to sacrifice the idea of discrete particles moving in prescribed paths (neither particles nor paths could be observed) in exchange for a theory that would deal directly with experimental facts and lead to the quantum conditions as consequences of the theory rather than ad hoc stipulations. Physical variables were to be represented by arrays of numbers; under the influence of Einstein's paper on relativity (1905), he took the variables to represent not hidden, inaccessible structures but 'observable' (i.e., measurable) quantities" (Britannica). "Heisenberg's name will always be associated with his theory of quantum mechanics, published in 1925, when he was only 23 years old. For this theory and the applications of it which resulted especially in the discovery of allotropic forms of hydrogen, Heisenberg was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics for 1932. His new theory was based only on what can be observed, that is to say, on the radiation emitted by the atom. We cannot, he said, always assign to an electron a position in space at a given time, nor follow it in its orbit, so that we cannot assume that the planetary orbits postulated by Niels Bohr actually exist. Mechanical quantities, such as position, velocity, etc. should be represented, not by ordinary numbers, but by abstract mathematical structures called 'matrices' and he formulated his new theory in terms of matrix equations." (Nobel Lectures, Physics 1922-41). Heisenberg's landmark paper inspired his colleagues Max Born and Pasqual Jordan to develop the rigorous matrix formalism necessary to mathematically complete Heisenberg's model, publishing a joint paper later in 1925 (exploring systems with one degree of freedom) and, with Heisenberg, a subsequent paper in 1926 (concerning systems with multiple degrees of freedom). Particle Physics, One Hundred Years of Discovery, 43: "Foundation of quantum mechanics, Heisenberg approach. Nobel prize to W. Heisenberg awarded in 1932 'for the creation of quantum mechanics.'" ). In: Zeitschrift für Physik, Vol. 33. Berlin: Julius Springer, 1925. Octavo, original wrappers. Light soiling to wrappers, a little wear to spine ends. Faint pencil notation at top of front wrapper; "Printed in Germany" stamps on rear wrapper. The foundational document for quantum mechanics, rare in original wrappers and without any institutional stamps.
  • $16,000
  • $16,000
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Zur Quantenmechanik II [On Quantum Mechanics II]

BORN, MAX; HEISENBERG, WERNER; JORDAN, PASCUAL FIRST EDITION IN ORIGINAL WRAPPERS of the famous "three-man paper," the first, complete, self-consistent description of quantum mechanics. "In 1925, after an extended visit to Bohr's Institute of Theoretical Physics at the University of Copenhagen, Heisenberg tackled the problem of spectrum intensities of the electron taken as an anharmonic oscillator (a one-dimensional vibrating system). His position that the theory should be based only on observable quantities was central to his paper of July 1925, "Über quantentheoretische Umdeutung kinematischer und mechanischer Beziehungen" ("Quantum-Theoretical Reinterpretation of Kinematic and Mechanical Relations"). Heisenberg's formalism rested upon noncommutative multiplication; Born, together with his new assistant Pascual Jordan, realized that this could be expressed using matrix algebra, which they used in a paper submitted for publication in September as "Zur Quantenmechanik" ("On Quantum Mechanics"). By November, Born, Heisenberg, and Jordan had completed "Zur Quantenmechanik II" ("On Quantum Mechanics II"), colloquially known as the "three-man paper," which is regarded as the foundational document of a new quantum mechanics" (Britannica's Guide to the Nobel Prizes). Particle Physics: One Hundred Years of Discoveries: "Development of matrix formalism for the Heisenberg quantum mechanics. Systems with arbitrary many degrees of freedom." IN: Zeitschrift für Physik, Band 35, February 1926, pp. 557-615. Berlin: Julius Springer, 1926. Octavo, original wrappers. Small chip at base of spine. "Born, Heisenberg 35" in pencil on spine. Volume/issue number written in ink at top of front wrapper. One of the foundational papers in quantum mechanics, rare in original wrappers.
  • $9,500
  • $9,500
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. [Alice in Wonderland]. WITH: Original Large Ink Drawing Signed of the Gryphon by Rackham

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. [Alice in Wonderland]. WITH: Original Large Ink Drawing Signed of the Gryphon by Rackham

CARROLL, LEWIS; RACKHAM, ARTHUR DELUXE LIMITED EDITION in exceedingly rare original slipcase. WITH: RACKHAM INK DRAWING of the Gryphon. The book: "Rackham embarked on his new edition of Alice in Wonderland, with illustrations to rival John Tenniel's, when the book came out of copyright in 1907. Rackham's advantage over Tenniel was that now he could introduce colour; also his pen line would not be reproduced by wood-engraving. This gave him some new freedoms for invention, but his amendments to the ingrained image of Alice were not only technical. Rackham's Alice was very much a fleshly Edwardian child who would question the status quo of Wonderland. Her courtesy carried an undercurrent of insistent argument. A contemporary critic observed 'a tender, flickering light of imagination in [Alice's] eyes' (Daily Telegraph, 27 Nov 1907). (Dictionary of National Biography). This deluxe limited edition is number 1030 of 1130 copies, unsigned as issued. (Rackham was out of the country when the book was published and did not sign the edition.) Complete with thirteen large tipped-in color plates and many black and white drawings. In the exceedingly rare original "windowed" slipcase: We can only find records of very few references to the original slipcase, although numerous copies exhibit the patch of rectangular discoloration corresponding to the cut-out opening of the slipcase, designed to display the gilt title and the gilt cover illustrations of the turtle and gryphon. The drawing: Laid-in is a large pen and ink drawing of the gryphon, signed by Rackham ("ARackham") and dated ("07") the same year as the book. The drawing is similar to the one on page 119 of the text, but is larger and with much more detail. Size: sheet = 7 1/4x9 (184x228 mm); image = approx. 5 1/2x7 in (136x180 mm). London and New York: William Heinemann and Doubleday, Page, & Co., 1907.Quarto, original white buckram gilt, original marbled slipcase with morocco edges and cutout displaying the title and illustrations on the front panel. Drawing laid-in. Book with mild rectangular "ghosting" from where the cloth was exposed when in the slipcase; mild toning to spine and a few stray spots but cloth exceptionally clean and bright. Corners a little bumped. Slipcase with general rubbing to marbled paper and chips around the frame of the cutout. Matte for one plate with small abrasions at gutter. Text and plates nearly pristine. Drawing was previously framed, resulting in toning to paper where it was exposed (ink crisp and fine). A beautiful copy of a Rackham classic, complete with the very rare slipcase and a unique Rackham ink drawing.
  • $9,500
  • $9,500
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Typed Letter Signed [TLS]

FITZGERALD, F. SCOTT IMPORTANT AND REVEALING LETTER BY F. SCOTT FITZGERALD ON HIS LITERARY INFLUENCES AND GROWTH AS A WRITER. It is rare that we get to read first hand about a writer's influences, especially during the formative years, but in answer to a letter from the scholar Egbert S. Oliver, Fitzgerald - with his characteristic wit -offers us details about his early literary education. The letter, partially quoted in Matthew Bruccoli's definitive biography, Some Sort of Epic Grandeur, reads in full: 1307 Park Avenue Baltimore, Maryland January 7, 1934 Mr. Egbert S. Oliver Willamette University Salem Oregon Dear Mr. Oliver: The first help I ever had in writing in my life was from my father who read an utterly imitative Sherlock Holmes story of mine and pretended to like it. But after that I received the most invaluable aid from Mr. C. N. B. Wheeler then headmaster of the St. Paul Academy now the St. Paul Country Day School in St. Paul, Minnesota. 2. From [a] Mr. Hume, then co-headmaster of the Newman School and now headmaster of the Canterbury School. 3. From Courtland Van Winkle in freshman year at Princeton - now professor of literature at Yale (he gave us the book of Job to read and I don't think any of our preceptorial group ever quite recovered from it.) After that comes a lapse. Most of the professors seemed to me old and uninspired, or perhaps it was just that I was getting under way in my own field. I think this answers your question. This is also my permission to make full use of it with or without my name. Sorry I am unable from circumstances of time and pressure to go into it further. Sincerely, [signed] F. Scott Fitzgerald Fitzgerald attended the St. Paul Academy from 1908 - 1911 (from the ages of 12 to 16) and Broccoli underscores the influence in particular of C.N.B. Wheeler on Fitzgerald, noting that he was the only one of his teachers who encouraged him to write. (Fitzgerald published his first work of fiction in the school newspaper.) Fitzgerald's note that after Courtland Van Winkle in his freshman year at Princeton he "was getting under way in my own field" was certainly true, for it was shortly after his class with Van Winkle that Fitzgerald began work on what would become his sparkling debut novel, This Side of Paradise. The "circumstances of time and pressure" Fitzgerald mentions at the end of the letter were very real. This letter was written in January 1934 just as Tender is the Night was beginning to appear serially in Scribner's Magazine, and then in book form on April 12, 1934. The letters surrounding the Oliver letter in Fitzgerald's collected letters are frantic letters to his editor Max Perkins working out details for the first edition of Tender is the Night. The recipient, Egbert S. Oliver, was a prominent scholar of American literature. He was Professor of American Literature at Willamette University and Portland State University and wrote numerous books on American literature and American life. The Egbert S. Oliver papers now reside at the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Duke University. Provenance: Listed in F. Scott Fitzgerald in the Marketplace (Bruccoli and Baughman, 2009, p.31) as having been sold at Charles Hamilton Auction, 14 September, 1972. Typed letter signed with two hand-corrections in ink. Baltimore, Maryland, 1934. Two pages, 8.5'' x 11'' each; attractively matted and framed alongside a photo of Fitzgerald to an overall size of 32'' x 17.5''. Usual folds, paperclip imprint at top left of first page; otherwise fine. References: -Matthew J. Bruccoli, Some Sort of Epic Grandeur: The Life of F. Scott Fitzgerald, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1981. - Matthew J. Bruccoli, ed. F. Scott Fitzgerald, A Life in Letters, Scribner, 2010. (Published in full). -Matthew J. Bruccoli and Judith S. Baughman, editors. F. Scott Fitzgerald in the Marketplace, University of South Carolina Press, 2009.
  • $35,000
  • $35,000
Autograph Letter Signed [ALS]

Autograph Letter Signed [ALS]

LEWIS, C.S. [CLIVE STAPLES] WONDERFUL C.S. LEWIS LETTER RESPONDING TO A YOUNG FAN ABOUT THE NARNIA SERIES. Dated October 26, 1955, and written on Lewis's Magdalene College stationery, the letter reads in full: Dear -- Thank you for your nice letter. I am so glad you like the books. There will be one more, and that will be the last. Seven is a good number. The The M's Nephew of course ought to have come first, but one doesn't always write things in the proper order. With Love Yours [signed]C.S. Lewis This letter was acquired directly from the original recipient, who provided the background story: "This is why C.S. Lewis wrote to me: One day, when I was a child, I wrote a letter to him (on my clown stationary), because I loved his books and was hoping he'd write another one. Being 10, I told him what I hoped he would include in his next book, and also informed him that his 6th book in the Narnia series should have come first. I've treasured that letter all my life. He was nice enough to take the time to write back to me in such a kind way." Note: As the letter indicates, The Magician's Nephew, published on May 2, 1955, was the sixth book in the series (as published) but the first chronologically in terms of the world of Narnia. Autograph Letter Signed [ALS]. 5x8 in (128x204 mm). On Lewis's Magdalene College, Cambridge stationery. With original mailing envelope. Housed in custom presentation folder. Center mailing fold, otherwise fine.
  • $7,800
  • $7,800
Can Quantum-Mechanical Description of Physical Reality Be Considered Complete? [Einstein

Can Quantum-Mechanical Description of Physical Reality Be Considered Complete? [Einstein, Podolsky, Rosen] WITH: Can Quantum-Mechanical Description of Physical Reality Be Considered Complete? [BOHR]

EINSTEIN, ALBERT; PODOLSKY, BORIS; ROSEN, NATHAN; BOHR, NIELS FIRST EDITION of the famous "EPR" paper, one of the most discussed and debated papers of modern physics. WITH: Bohr's response. "In the May 15, 1935 issue of Physical Review Albert Einstein co-authored a paper with his two postdoctoral research associates at the Institute for Advanced Study, Boris Podolsky and Nathan Rosen. The article was entitled 'Can Quantum Mechanical Description of Physical Reality Be Considered Complete?' [.] Generally referred to as EPR, this paper quickly became a centerpiece in debates over the interpretation of quantum theory, debates that continue today. Ranked by impact, EPR is among the top ten of all papers ever published in Physical Review journals." (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy). Indeed, like the verification of Einstein's earlier prediction of the gravitational deflection of light, EPR even got attention in the popular press. Eleven days before the paper was published: "The New York Times carried an extensive report under the provocative headline 'Einstein Attacks Quantum Theory,' which was summarized by the sentences: 'Professor Einstein will attack science's important theory of quantum mechanics, a theory of which he was sort of grandfather. He concluded that while it [the quantum mechanics], is "correct" it is not "complete."'" (Mehra and Rechenberg, p. 724-25). In essence, Einstein and his collaborators devised a thought-experiment involving two physical systems (say, A and B) with necessarily-correlated physical properties, that were widely separated in space. (For example, the two systems might have equal and opposite momenta and positions dictated by physical conservation laws.) From the perspective of quantum theory, the two systems could be described by a single wave function, or state vector. A measurement performed on A could precisely determine its position, which would also fix a precise position for B. The momenta of A and B could be determined in the same way. The central insight of EPR was that either the position and momentum of A and B were real, determinate and fixed prior to the measurement of A, or else B only took on a fixed and determinate value when A was measured. But the latter interpretation implied that the measurement event at A had somehow instantaneously fixed the (previously indeterminate) properties of B, despite the spatial separation between A and B, which could be made as great as one wished. Einstein argued that this implied one of two things: either that the quantum description of A and B was incomplete, in that each of them had a fixed, determinate position and momentum at all times; or that nature permitted actions such as measurement to have "nonlocal" influences on distant systems. Leon Rosenfeld, who was in Copenhagen at the time, remembered the fallout of these developments vividly: "This onslaught came down upon as a bolt from the blue [.] As soon as Bohr heard my report of Einstein's argument, everything else was abandoned: we had to clear up such a misunderstanding at once." (Pais, 430). According to Rosenfeld, the next day Bohr was heard muttering "Podolski, Opodolski, Iopodolski," etc. By mocking Podolsky-who was, after all, only a postdoctoral student and the second-named author of EPR-Bohr presumably was, even in his anger, avoiding saying anything that might be interpreted as a direct attack on Einstein. Bohr's argument proceeded with what some might describe as his characteristic lack of explanatory clarity. Indeed, in revisiting EPR fifteen years later, Bohr himself would admit, "[r]ereading these passages, I am deeply aware of the inefficiency of expression which must have made it very difficult to appreciate the trend of the argumentation" (Schilpp, p. 234; see also Lehner, p. 331, who describes Bohr's rebuttal of EPR as "obscure in content but confident in tone."). Generally speaking, however, Bohr's approach seems to boil down to a willingness to accept non-local or "contextual" theory of measurement interactions. In any event,
  • $8,900
  • $8,900
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Dutch Details

RUSCHA, ED FIRST EDITION OF THE RAREST RUSCHA BOOK; ONE OF ONLY AN ESTIMATED 200 COPIES. IN OUTSTANDING CONDITION. "In December 1970, Ruscha was invited to produce a photobook in conjunction with the Sonsbeek 71 exhibition in the Netherlands. Wim Beeren, the commissioner of the international festival, chose the location (Stadskanaal-a village in Groningen built along both sides of a straight canal) for the commission, but left the specifics of the project up to Ruscha. Once on site, Ruscha began photographing the facades of the houses along the canal, undoubtedly informed by his panorama of Los Angeles, Every Building on the Sunset Strip (1966). The topography of the Dutch village led Ruscha to a different approach, however, and the book is conceptually more performative than the earlier work, inasmuch as it directly encompasses a site-specific action: the artist's journey back and forth across the bridges of the canal, with each trip documented by six photographs, which progress from a distant view to a close-up detail of the house directly across both sides of a given bridge. The oversized horizontal format of the book, with each leaf a gatefold representing the two sequences of photographs made on a single bridge, is also unique in Ruscha's oeuvre. Although the book was supposed to have an open edition, available by mail order, it did not sell well and the printer removed and disposed all extra copies from its warehouse. Dutch Details is thus the rarest of Ruscha's books" with an estimated 200 copies in existence. (The Metropolitan Museum of Art (NY) collection website). Deventer: The Octopus Foundation and Sonsbeek 71, 1971. Oblong folio (approx. 4 1/2 x 15 in / 112 x 380mm), original white card covers printed in black; custom box. Complete with 116 black and white photographs on 10 fold-out leaves. Some spots of foxing on extreme edges, but otherwise fine; most importantly without the band of toning of the front cover evident in so many copies. By far, the nicest copy we've handled. RARE.
  • $20,000
  • $20,000
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The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. WITH: The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes

DOYLE, ARTHUR CONAN FIRST EDITIONS OF TWO MASTERPIECES OF ENGLISH LITERATURE. The story of Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes, and Strand Magazine began in April, 1891, when Doyle sent three stories, "A Case of Identity," "The Red-Headed League," and The Boscombe Valley Mystery" to The Strand for publication in their issues. Doyle had imagined a creating a series of stories centered around his detective Sherlock Holmes, but with each one self-contained in case a reader missed an issue. The series, however, was intended to be limited, but the editor of The Strand kept asking for more. As Doyle later explained, "The more he asked for the more I turned out until I had a dozen. That dozen stories being finished I determined they should be the end of all Sherlock's doings." (Green and Gibson, A10). After appearing in magazine form, those original twelve stories were collected together in book form as The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. "The proprietor of the magazine published the book himself using the same presses and many of the same materials as the magazine and was printed on thick cheap paper which was too heavy for the binding." (Green and Gibson). This heavy paper has been a source of frustration to collectors, since the weight of the text has destroyed so many of the original bindings over the years. The volume was published on 14 October 1892, and sold out quickly. Doyle had earlier threatened to kill off Sherlock Holmes (apparently he was persuaded not to by his mother) but now, in the next series of stories he was determined to do so. "If I don't [kill Sherlock Holmes]," Doyle announced, "he'll kill me." The second series, The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes contains many of Doyle's most famous stories, before concluding, famously, with "The Final Problem," where Holmes apparently plummets to his death at Reichenbach Falls while wrestling Professor Moriarty. (Years later Doyle would, of course, succumb to the demands of a grieving public -and hefty payments from The Strand - to "resurrect" Holmes in "The Adventure of the Empty House".) Both volumes are the correct first editions, first printings: Adventures with the correct first printing points: "Miss Violent Hunter" on p. 317 and the blank street sign in the cover vignette; there are no comparable points for Memoirs. With wonderful illustrations throughout by Sidney Paget. London: George Newnes, 1892, 1894. Tall octavo, original publisher's decorated cloth gilt, patterned endpapers, all edges gilt. Housed in custom box. Adventures with light, general soiling and wear to cloth, some rubbing to gilt; front free endpaper with old newspaper clipping about the death of Sherlock Holmes neatly pasted on recto and owner signatures on verso. An excellent copy of a book that is notoriously difficult to find in collectible condition. Memoirs in outstanding condition with clean cloth and very bright gilt on front panel. Spine gilt with a touch of rubbing. Front free endpaper with small embossed stamp of the London bookseller "W.H. Smith"; mild toning on both front and rear endpapers. A beautiful set. References: Green and Gibson, A Bibliography of A. Conan Doyle, A10; A14.
  • $11,500
  • $11,500
As We May Think

As We May Think

BUSH, VANNEVAR FIRST EDITION of Vannevar Bush's landmark paper credited for originating the idea of hypertext and, by extension, providing many of the theoretical underpinnings for the world wide web. "In a 1945 article entitled "As We May Think," published in the Atlantic Monthly, Bush proposed a device that he called the Memex-an indexed, archival, microfilm machine for cross-referencing and retrieving information. For Bush, this article was an extension of his work in analog computing and microfilm technology. To the modern reader it portends the creation of hypertext and the World Wide Web" (Britannica). "Different people place the origins of the Internet at different times. The earliest accounts put it in the mind of Vannevar Bush, as long ago as 1945. Bush, the man who had played such a prominent role in the building of the atomic bomb, envisaged a machine that would allow the entire compendium of human knowledge to be 'accessed'" (Peter Watson, The Modern Mind). Bush's Memex device for storing and accessing vast quantities of information was the direct influence and inspiration for the later invention of hypertext by Ted Nelson and Douglas Engelbart (see Engelbart's classic 1962 paper, Augmenting Human Intellect). IN: The Atlantic Monthly 176, no. 1 (July 1945), pp. 101-8. Rumsford Press, Concord, N.H., 1945. Quarto, original wrappers.The subscription issue (as opposed to the newstand issue). The subscription issue has several additional pages of ads, and an additional five pages of short reviews of new books and is presumed to have been issued before the newsstand issue. (The Bush article is identical in each issue.) Light, general wear. An outstanding copy. RARE.
  • $2,900
  • $2,900
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Museum of Modern [F]art: Yoko Ono-one woman show, Dec. 1st – Dec. 15th

FIRST EDITION OF THE CATALOG FOR ONO'S FICTITIOUS ART SHOW, SIGNED BY ONO AND LENNON, AND WITH A CARICATURE DRAWING BY LENNON. Inscribed on the cover in Ono's hand: "To Jonas / Peace & Love, Yoko" and in Lennon's hand "+ John" and with a caricature of both his and Ono's faces. The recipient, Jonas Mekas (1922-2019) was the internationally renown Lithuanian-born but New York-based filmmaker, poet and artist, known as "the godfather of American avant-garde cinema." One can view this ironic and subversive work by Yoko Ono as an embodiment of the Fluxus art movement. Fluxus projects were wide-ranging works that drew upon chance, audience participation, humor, and collaboration. In this way they paved the way for future generations of performance, video, and conceptual artists. Early works by Yoko Ono were often based on instructions that the artist communicated to viewers in verbal or written form. For example, in one of her most well known works, Cut Piece (1964) she invited members of the audience to cut away a portion of her clothing. At turns poetic, humorous, and unsettling the piece relies on audience participation, demonstrating Ono's embrace of the idea that art is live rather than static. When Ono married John Lennon in 1968 she was catapulted onto the world stage, entering a world of unparalleled fame and public scrutiny. She faced the considerable challenge of remaining visible as an artist, not just a rock star's wife. But she hewed to her craft and had her first museum exhibition, often a turning point in any artist's career, in October 1971 at the Everson Museum of Art in Syracuse, New York. The New York Times covered the exhibition, writing Is Syracuse ready for Yoko Ono and John Lennon? That was the question here yesterday as the Everson Museum, which sees itself as a bastion of the avant‐garde set down in a cultural wasteland, opened the world's first museum show of Miss Ono's "conceptual" pieces, with her husband, the former Beatle, and others, as guest artists. One might wonder what role the Everson show played in the development of Ono's one-woman "exhibition" at MoMA, which she staged a few months later in December of 1971. By the early 1970's MoMA rarely showed art by either women or Asian artists, and in Museum of Modern [F]art Ono famously claimed the museum space for herself. It is a multifaceted work. Ono first took out an ad in The Village Voice promoting a one-woman show at MoMA running December 1 - 15, 1971. She then produced a film during which pedestrians are interviewed in the street and asked whether they had seen Ono's exhibition at the MoMA, to which most respond with something like "no, but I plan to". The subversive action continued when Ono purportedly released her body weight in flies into the Museum of Modern Art. In this, the accompanying exhibition catalog, she designed 138 postcards of various locations around New York City, each featuring a large arrow indicating the location of a fly, with a thumbnail close-up of the insect on the other side. The reader is invited to cut the postcards out and send them to friends. Other images include a photograph of Lennon, an advertisement for the nonexistent show torn from a newspaper and displayed at the MoMA ticket counter, maps and more. At first glance Museum of Modern [F]art is a light and humorous piece. But in reality it carries quite a bit of weight. It speaks to the representation of women and Asian artists within the art world establishment while also demonstrating key aspects of Fluxus like instructions, audience participation, and humor. It was also prescient. In 2015 MoMA held a one-woman show, Yoko Ono: One Woman Show from 1960 - 1971 that uses the 1971 piece as a departure point for exploring Yoko Ono's performance, film, and written works. Artist's book in the form of an exhibition catalogue. [New York]. Published by Yoko Ono, 1971. Quarto (305x305 mm, 12x12 in.), original wrappers; custom box. Illustrated with photographs by Iain McMillan and Ono; without the copyright stamp found in some copies. Light toning, chipping to top right of wrappers. This is the only example we have found that has been on the market signed by both Ono and Lennon.
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DADA 1916-1923: Catalog of the Exhibition

DUCHAMP'S FAMOUS "CATALOG" FOR THE CELEBRATED 1953 DADA RETROSPECTIVE. "Duchamp planned, organized, and installed a major historical show of international Dada at the Janis Gallery in 1953. More than two hundred works of art and documents were on view, each one identified in a Duchamp-designed 'catalog' that was itself pure Dada -a tissue-thin broadsheet with written texts (by Jean Arp, Richard Huelsenbeck, Jacques-Henri Lévesque, and Tristan Tzara) in contrasting typefaces, set in narrow columns that ran diagonally down the page. When the sheets were delivered to the gallery, Duchamp took one, crumpled it up into a ball, and told Janis to mail it as it was, and Janis did so, to the confusion of numerous art lovers who wondered why they were being mailed trash. (A wicker basket of crumpled catalogs stood beside the gallery door at the opening.) "Duchamp was represented in Janis's Dada show by four works: Tu m', his last painting on canvas; To Be Looked at (from the Other Side of the Glass) with One Eye, Close to, for Almost an Hour, the glass study he had done in Argentina; the ready-made Fresh Widow; and Janis's replica of Fountain, installed over the door at the entrance, with a sprig of mistletoe dangling from its inverted bowl." (Calvin Tomkins, Duchamp: A Biography, 378-9).†With text by Hans Arp, Richard Huelsenbeck, Jacques-Henry Lévesque, Tristan Tzara; Arp's and Tzara's texts were translated by Duchamp. Ref. Schwarz 543. New York: Sidney Janis Gallery, 1953. Single sheet of thin tissue-like paper, 25x38 inches (96.5x63.5 cm). It's possible this example was crumpled, but it clearly has been stored flat and folded now for some time. With closed tear at center (with no loss); a few tiny tears at folds and edges. Housed in custom cloth box. Rare in such good condition. AN ESSENTIAL PIECE OF DADA HISTORY.
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Poems by Emily Dickinson. Second Series

FIRST EDITION, one of only 960 copies printed. A beautiful copy. When Emily Dickinson died in 1886, very few people knew of the existence of her poetry. After her death, however, her sister Lavinia discovered a box of manuscript poems by Dickinson and immediately recognized their value. Determined that the public should not be deprived of Dickinson's poetry, Lavinia enlisted the help of her sister's friends, the literary scholar Thomas Wentworth Higginson and Mabel Loomis Todd (her brother's mistress) to edit and publish the poems. The first volume, Poems, appeared in 1890 in an extremely limited run of only 500 copies. It was received favorably, encouraging Higginson and Todd to prepare more works for publication. As Todd explains in the Preface to this, the first edition of the "Second Series" of poems: "The eagerness with which the first volume of Emily Dickinson's poems has been read shows very clearly that all our alleged modern artificiality does not prevent a prompt appreciation of the qualities of directness and simplicity in approaching the greatest themes,-life and love and death. That 'irresistible needle-touch,' as one of her best critics has called it, piercing at once the very core of a thought, has found a response as wide and sympathetic as it has been unexpected even to those who knew best her compelling power. This second volume, while open to the same criticism as to form with its predecessor, shows also the same shining beauties." Poems: Second Series was published in November 1891, a year after the first volume. It had a print run of 960, still very limited, but nearly double that of Poems. It contains 166 poems, including many of her most famous, such as "I'm nobody! Who are you?", "Wild nights! Wild nights!", "Hope is the thing with feathers", and many, many others. A third volume (Poems: Third Series) followed in 1896. Boston: Roberts Brothers, 1891. Octavo, original decorated olive cloth; custom chemise and slipcase. Note: There were two bindings for the first edition, first printing (this one, in olive decorated cloth, and one in two-tone cloth, no priority established). Binding with only the slightest wear; text nearly immaculate. An outstanding copy - the finest we've handled - of a book particularly prone to wear.