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The Burns Mantle Best Plays of 1947-48 and the Year Book of the Drama in America

Tennessee Williams] Chapman, John [Editor] Octavo (8 1/8 x 5 5/8 inches; 217 x 145 mm), viii, [2], 494 pages, black cloth, paper titles to upper board and spine. Lacking the scarce dust jacket. INSCRIBED by Tennessee Williams on the front end paper: "To Aiden- / best /Tennessee Williams." A compilation of the best plays of the 1947-48 theatre season, notably featuring an excerpt from Williams's "A Streetcar Named Desire." This is the play's first appearance in an anthology, published one year after the original book by New Directions. Directed by Elia Kazan, the play's first Broadway production starred Marlon Brando, Jessica Tandy, Kim Hunter, and Karl Malden and won the 1948 Pulitzer Prize for Drama. Kazan also directed a 1951 Academy Award-winning film adaptation of the play starring Brando, Malden, Hunter, and Vivien Leigh (as Blanche). The other plays appearing in this volume include: "Mister Roberts" by Thomas Heggen and Joshua Logan, "Command Decision" by William Wister Haines, "The Winslow Boy" by Terence Rattigan, "The Heiress" by Ruth and Augustus Goetz, "Allegro" by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, "Eastward in Eden" by Dorothy Gardner, "Skipper Next to God" by Jan de Hartog, "An Inspector Calls" by J.B. Priestley, and "Me and Molly" by Gertrude Berg. The book also includes overviews of the theatre seasons in New York, Chicago, San Francisco, and Southern California. There is also detailed information about the plays and the actors as well as overviews of Off Broadway and Dance Drama. A good reference work for the 1947-48 theatre season. Signed copies of this volume are scarce, especially those signed by Tennessee Williams. SCARCE. CONDITION: Top edge a bit dusty, rubbing to cloth, especially lower corners, where the cloth has been rubbed away, some fraying to spine ends, spine label toned, paper of rear paste down split at hinge. Internally, page edges lightly toned, with some small stains on a couple of pages. About Very Good overall and lacking the scarce dust jacket.
Sketchbook of an Ocean Voyage and Stay in France]

Sketchbook of an Ocean Voyage and Stay in France]

Stark, Margaret Black leather sketchbook measuring 11 x 8 1/2 inches (278 x 213 mm), about 120 leaves. Sketchbook of original ink drawings documenting an ocean voyage and stay in France by Margaret Stark (1915-1988), an Indiana-born artist who had been living in New York. The sketchbook covers the period from September 1948, when she embarked on her voyage, through at least July 1949 while she lived in France. At first, she sketches her fellow passengers on her voyage across the Atlantic. But most of the sketches are from her stay in Paris at an exciting time when the City of Light attracted many expat American artists and writers. The sketchbook features scenes from restaurants, cafes, clubs, and museums. There are also plenty of self-portraits, depictions of street life, and models in various poses. While many sketches appear quickly drawn, others have a more finished quality (see photos). The sketches frequently contain brief descriptions as well as the dates Stark drew the scenes. As might be expected of an American visiting Paris for the first time, there are sketches of the Champs-Élysées, Harry's New York Bar, the Louvre, the Palace of Versailles, and the Château de Fontainebleau. There are also sketches from the window of her hotel room (actually, rooms plural, since she seems to have changed hotels after she arrived in Paris). Stark also shows her progress in the French language, writing "frog: une grenouille" on one leaf and the lyrics of "La Mer" by Charles Trenet on another leaf. Eventually, she settles in the Paris suburb of Saint-Cloud and depicts some scenes of her house. There's a shopping list for a neighbor, Madame Bruyant, as well as sketches of Madame Bruyant. While living in the Paris area, Stark was able to travel a bit. There are sketches of Nice, St. Jean Cap Ferrat, Geneva, Zurich, and Venice. Stark was an accomplished artist who had studied with Hans Hofmann and had a number of solo shows in New York, Boston, Indianapolis, and elsewhere prior to her trip to France. Stark was also part of numerous group shows, such as at the Whitney Museum, New York, 1944-45, and the Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1944-46. After successful shows in New York, Stark decided to head for Paris, leaving in early September 1948. While there she met George Stave, an American artist. They married in autumn 1949. Among their circle in Paris were Saul Steinberg, the New Yorker cartoonist, and Saul Bellow, the author. Indeed, Bellow praised her work in an announcement for Stark's solo show at Galerie R. Creuze in Paris in October 1949. A photocopy of the announcement is included with the sketchbook. The young married couple returned to the U.S. shortly after the closing of Stark's show at Galerie R. Creuze. Back in New York, Stark taught at Teachers College of Columbia University and at the Museum of Modern Art. And, of course, she continued to paint and exhibited her paintings in galleries and museums around the U.S. and in Paris, Brussels, and Mallorca. She and George Stave divorced in 1954. In 1959 she married the musician Walter Trampler; they divorced in the mid-1960s. (These biographical details appear in an excellent book: Judith Vale Newton and Carol Ann Weiss, Skirting the Issue: Stories of Indiana's Historical Women Artists. Indiana Historical Society Press, 2004). This sketchbook has been owned by the same family for nearly 70 years. An altogether charming group of sketches by a talented young artist documenting her life in Paris in 1948-49. CONDITION: Upper board nearly detached, heavy rubbing to boards and fraying of spine. Some soiling and staining to edges of text block. Internally, pastedowns a bit loose, with some scattered foxing and some leaves folded in two. Poor externally but much better internally. Overall, About Good.
book (2)

The Doctrine of Life-Annuities and Assurances, Analytically Investigated and Explained. Together With Several Useful Tables Connected With the Subject; And a Variety of Practical Rules for the Illustration of the Same

Baily, Francis 8vo (8 5/8 x 5 3/8 inches; 220 x 135 mm), xli, [3], 621, [1 errata], [2 adverts], in contemporary speckled calf, spine gilt with red morocco label. An important early work on life insurance, annuities, and endowments by London stockbroker Francis Baily (1774-1844). He gives practical advice on how to value an insurance policy or annuity, answers numerous hypothetical questions, and provides 59 tables on mortality, the value of policies, etc. What's especially interesting in this book is his discussion of assurance companies (see pages 479-520) in which he seems to imply that some of them were engaged in fraudulent practices.This book became a standard reference for the insurance industry, along with his earlier book, "The Doctrine of Interest and Annuities." (1808). But he was interested in more than finance: He was a co-founder of what became the Royal Astronomical Society and took part in scientific experiments. Baily was also an adventurer; in 1796 he embarked on a tour of North America, keeping detailed accounts of his travels. His book, "Journal of a Tour in Unsettled Parts of North America in 1796 and 1797," was published in 1856, 12 years after his death.OCLC shows numerous institutional holdings of this book, but they appear to be almost entirely in electronic form. COPAC shows 10 holdings in the U.K. and Ireland. Moreover, there were no other copies in commerce as of early March 2020. SCARCE. CONDITION: Some rubbing to boards, toning and foxing throughout, a few small stains to top and bottom edges, early ownership signature to front end paper. Overall, a Very Good copy.
Letter to supporters about a neo-Nazi group]

Letter to supporters about a neo-Nazi group]

Sheldon, James H. Two mimeographed leaves, measuring 11 x 8 1/2 inches (278 x 215 mm), bound with paper clip, and signed in ink by James Sheldon at end. Letter concerning trial and conviction of leaders of a white-supremacist, neo-Nazi group in Atlanta, the Columbians. Professor James H. Sheldon, administrative chairman of the Anti-Nazi League, has signed the letter in ink and says he is going to Atlanta to assist in the trial of Ira Jett, a leader of the Columbians. This group wanted to rid the country of blacks and Jews and favored violence to achieve those goals. In his letter, Sheldon says Homer Loomis Jr. and Emory Burke, two other leaders, "have already been sentenced to the chain gang." Georgia authorities had arrested Loomis and Burke on charges that included incitement to riot and possessing explosives. During their trial, Loomis's father, Homer Loomis Sr., a New York attorney, told the court: "Every Jew from New York to Jerusalem today is praying that you twelve good men and true, will stamp the brand of criminal upon this young man's noble Anglo-Saxon brow." The Anti-Nazi League had great success in going after the Columbians. But, Sheldon says, the League "has only barely touched the surface of this cancerous growth of un-American propaganda and religious and racial bigotry, which has fastened itself upon the American people since the end of the war." He says a new pro-Nazi underground movement has sprung up, especially among certain Americans of German descent. He ends the letter by appealing for donations to keep battling the Columbians and other right-wing hate groups. The letter is written on rectos of two pages, while the verso of the first page features a collage of newspaper clippings about the Anti-Nazi League and testaments to the group's importance in fighting hate groups. The League had battled Nazi propaganda and called for boycotts of Nazi Germany before World War II. After the war the League began investigating white-supremacist and other hate groups in the United States. It terminated operations in 1975 following Sheldon's death. OCLC shows no institutional holdings of this letter. No were there any copies in commerce as of February 2020. An interesting look at the fight against a neo-Nazi group in Atlanta. RARE. Further reading: Steven E. Atkins, "Encyclopedia of Right-Wing Extremism in Modern American History." (ABC-Clio, 2011). CONDITION: Toning to leaves, creasing and handling wear, rusting from old paper clip (replaced). About Good.
Prometheus Bound: Vatican Radio broadcast on the case of Ezra Pound

Prometheus Bound: Vatican Radio broadcast on the case of Ezra Pound

Pound, Ezra] Montalegre, Duarte de 8vo (8 1/2 x 6 1/4 inches; 215 x 160 mm), 12 pages, in brown stapled wrappers. Transcript of a Vatican Radio broadcast by Portuguese poet and academic José V. de Piña Martins appealing for the release of Ezra Pound from incarceration in the United States. Piña Martins, using the pseudonym Duarte de Montalegre, maintains that Pound is not anti-American or anti-Semitic. Vatican Radio broadcast the talk on March 30, 1954, while Italian Radio rebroadcast it later that evening. "A sustained campaign of articles, editorials, and letters followed in the Italian press," according to Pound's biographer, A. David Moody. "Many of these articles were aimed at, or were brought to the attention of, Clare Boothe Luce, the American ambassador in Rome, who would as a matter of course pass them on to the State Department in Washington." (See A. David Moody, Ezra Pound: Poet. A Portrait of the Man and His Work, Vol. III, page 337). Pound's friend and correspondent, Olivia Rossetti Agresti, translated the talk into English for this publication. She was active in the international campaign to free Pound, which culminated in his release from a mental hospital in 1958. Foreword by Leo Magnino. This pamphlet is scarce. While OCLC shows about two dozen institutional holdings, there were no other copies in commerce as of February 9, 2020. SCARCE. CONDITION: Some sunning to wrapper edges, light vertical creases to wrappers and internal pages. Overall, a Very Good or better copy.