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Discours prononcé par le Gouverneur pour le Roi

Discours prononcé par le Gouverneur pour le Roi, en Séance publique du Conseil privé. à l’occasion de la remise des Médailles d’or, encouragement accordé aux grands perfectionnements agricoles

FREYCINET, Henri de Quarto, 4 pp; stitched in original plain green wrapper. Rare printing of a speech by Henri de Freycinet as governor of French Guiana, the French possession on the north Atlantic coast of South America perhaps most famous today for its penal colony of Devil's Island. Freycinet, a career diplomat at this stage of his life, had been moved from the governorship of Ile Bourbon to the governorship of Guyane in January 1826. Here, a year later, in the capital Cayenne, he is implicitly endorsing the extensive use of slave labour by presenting gold medal awards to Thomas Ferdinand Ronmy and his colleague M. Bernard for their achievements in the development of the sugar industry along the banks of the Torcy canal. Originally envisaged as a key to the development of the French colony, this would become "a series of misplaced hopes, mistakes, and disappointments. By the end of the July Monarchy the plantations along its shores were facing stagnation and inexorable decline. This in turn led to abandonment after the reorientation of Guianese priorities, the decline of sugar prices in the late 1830s and especially in the 1840s, and the abolition of slavery in 1848. In many ways the Torcy Canal epitomized the plight of French Guiana as a whole in the early nineteenth century. Faced with the vicissitudes of nature, inadequate government funding, erratic planning, unfavourable economic forces, and unmitigated demographic decline after the banning of the slave trade, both the Torcy and the colony as a whole contended with nearly insurmountable difficulties on their path to development. Lacking resources and an adequate supply of labour, both struggled to advance and prosper." (Jennings). below not relevant delete We have previously handled the original manuscript text for this speech by the governor, which had the same provenance as the present printed version. We catalogued it as "6 pages manuscript; folio; secured with green ribbon; archive stamp. The text is in a clerical hand but the title (as transcribed above) written crosswise in Freycinet's clumsy left hand" (he had lost the use of his right arm in earlier naval combat). . Provenance: Freycinet family archives at the Château d'Age, with the red "Archives de Laage" stamp; private collection (Sydney).
  • $1,521
  • $1,521
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The Memoirs of James Hardy Vaux, Written by himself

VAUX, James Hardy Two volumes, duodecimo; a fine and large copy, half-titles discarded, edges uncut, in an attractive early binding by Morrell of half polished calf, spines gilt with double labels. The first full length autobiography written in Australia, and an uncensored picture of criminal life in London and the convict system in Australia. Vaux was sentenced to transportation at the age of eighteen in 1800, and eventually returned to London as a free man in 1807, on the same ship as Marsden and Governor King, who employed him as an official secretary. Nevertheless, he ended up back in Sydney as a convict in 1810. After more trouble in the colony he was sent to Newcastle, where he completed a slang dictionary for the use of magistrates. Judge Barron Field edited his memoirs and arranged for their publication in this form, with a preface and including (as eighty-one pages in the second volume) Vaux's "New and Comprehensive Vocabulary of the Flash Language". A contemporary English magazine described the work as "one of the most singular that ever issued from the press". Vaux was still leading a life of crime when he was last heard of in Sydney in 1841. An abridged edition of his book was published in 1827, and later editions appeared in 1829 and 1830. A good piece by Stephanie Ryan on Vaux's very mixed life appears online at www.slq.qld.gov.au/blog/colourful-convict-and-moreton-bay-james-hardy-vaux. . Provenance: From the superb collection of Henry L. White (with his Belltrees bookplates); probably bought from A.H. Spencer in Melbourne (with his booktickets); binder's stamp of Morrell in both volumes.
  • $2,940
  • $2,940
The Voyage of Governor Phillip to Botany Bay; with an Account of the Establishment of the Colonies of Port Jackson & Norfolk Island; compiled from Authentic Papers

The Voyage of Governor Phillip to Botany Bay; with an Account of the Establishment of the Colonies of Port Jackson & Norfolk Island; compiled from Authentic Papers, which have been obtained from the several Departments, to which are added, The Journals of Lieuts. Shortland, Watts, Ball, & Capt. Marshall; with an Account of their New Discoveries. [Edited by John Stockdale]

PHILLIP, Governor Arthur Quarto, portrait and engraved title, seven folding engraved charts and 46 engraved plates; bound with the final leaf of advertisements; title-page with a single name on the medallion; page 122 with the uncorrected mis-numbering 221, early state of the 'Kangooroo' plate at p. 106 (later changed to 'Kanguroo'); in a smart 1970s binding of half red morocco, spine with gilt ship ornaments between raised bands. A handsome and fine copy of the first edition: the foundation book of European settlement in Australia. Based on the governor's journals and despatches and assembled into book form by the London publisher Stockdale, this is - as the official account of the first settlement - the single most important book to describe the journey to Botany Bay and the foundations of modern Australia. It describes the events from March 1787, just before the First Fleet sailed from the Isle of Wight, up to September 1788. There is a chapter dealing with the fauna of New South Wales, appendices detailing the routes of various ships to Botany Bay, from Botany Bay to Norfolk Island and from Port Jackson to various other ports, and finally a list of convicts sent to New South Wales. The book also contains some excellent maps by John Hunter and William Dawes, including the first of the Sydney Cove settlement, which shows in detail the buildings and "progress" which had been made by July 1788. Davidson summarises the importance of this volume: 'Being the authentic record of first settlement the work's importance cannot be over-emphasised, and no collection [of Australiana] can be complete without a copy', and Wantrup notes that 'as a detailed and officially sanctioned account of the new colony, the first edition of Stockdale's Phillip is a key work and essential to any serious collection of Australian books'. .
  • $6,658
  • $6,658
A Narrative of the Expedition to Botany Bay; with an Account of New South Wales

A Narrative of the Expedition to Botany Bay; with an Account of New South Wales, its productions, inhabitants, &c. To which is subjoined, A List of the Civil and Military Establishments at Port Jackson. Third edition, to which is now first added, A Postscript dated Sydney Cove, October 1, 1788

TENCH, Watkin Octavo; with the half-title, no advertisement leaf; early half calf and marbled boards, spine with double labels and gilt ornaments in compartments between raised bands. Tench's first work on the colony at Port Jackson, in the important third edition, the first to include his new Postscript, printing a letter from Sydney Cove dated 1 October 1788. This closely-printed letter (pp. 147-8) reports further activity since July and, despite the growing difficulties faced by the settlers, strikes the bright and optimistic note characteristic of the author. The letter is particularly interesting regarding the early settlement at Norfolk Island, and includes the ominous aside that the Norfolk settlers have made every attempt to 'find a landing-place, whence it might be practicable to ship off the timber growing there, but hitherto none has been discovered.' Just six months after the time of writing the Sirius would be wrecked trying to anchor there. 'In Port Jackson,' the letter continues, 'all is quiet and stupid as could be wished.' Everyone is well, Tench comments, and the detachment for Parramatta is about to be sent up river. The Sirius is about to be dispatched for the Cape of Good Hope in an attempt to purchase much needed supplies, and it is on this ship that the present letter will be sent. Tench's work was the earliest authentic account of New South Wales, and the fact that it had run to a third edition within the year is testament to its popularity. Tench joined the marine corps in 1776 seeing action in the American War of Independence, including being a prisoner for three months in 1782. In 1786 he volunteered for a tour of service in the proposed settlement in New South Wales, sailing aboard the Charlotte as captain-lieutenant of marines under the command of the Lieutenant-Governor, Major Robert Ross. Tench was well-liked and a perceptive observer, and his polished and shrewd account is considered the most readable of all of the First Fleet books. . Provenance: David G.L. Worland (with book-ticket). A lovely copy in very good condition.
  • $5,306
  • $5,306
Notices of the Indian Archipelago

Notices of the Indian Archipelago, and adjacent countries, being a collection of papers relating to Borneo, Celebes, Bali, Java, Sumatra, Nias, the Philippine Islands, Sulus, Siam, Cochin China, Malayan Peninsula, &c. Accompanied by an Index and Six Maps, viz. 1.The Town and Suburbs of Singapore. 2. The Indian Archipelago, including Siam and Cochin-China. 3. River Coti in Borneo. 4. Malacca and Naning. 5. Chart of Singapore Strait &c. 6. Penang and Province Wellesley. Part First

MOOR, John Henry Quarto, with a large folding handcoloured frontispiece map and five folding maps (all but one handcoloured), in original binding of marbled boards with a backstrip of fine linen, remains of printed paper label. First edition: a great Singapore rarity, one of the first books to be published there, and including the earliest detailed map of Singapore Town and its surroundings, "The Town and environs of Singapore", based on a survey by G.D. Coleman. Published just after the island had become the capital of the Straits Settlements, it marks the beginning of the colony's enormous growth as a regional trading hub and the centre of the rubber industry. John Henry Moor moved to Singapore from Malacca in 1830 and became editor of the Singapore Chronicle, Singapore's first newspaper, in 1831. The book is mainly composed of his articles written for the Chronicle between 1824 and 1834. "Notices has claimed its place in history as a valuable record of Singapore's early years and is one of the first books published on the island. It curates studies on the Indian archipelago - present-day Indonesia, East Malaysia, Brunei, the Philippines, East Timor and Singapore - that were republished from newspapers or journals, including many from Singapore Chronicle, Singapore's first English newspaper. of which no known copies from 1824 to 1826 remain; his publishing project therefore preserved some precious articles that would otherwise have been lost forever. "One such article is an account of John Crawfurd's formal possession of Singapore and its adjacent islands in 1825. Crawfurd, who was appointed Resident of Singapore in 1823, set off in August 1825 on a 10-day journey around Singapore on his ship the Malabar and landed at Pulau Ubin. There, the British flag was hoisted and the 21-gun salute fired as part of the ceremonial proceedings. The account also includes Crawfurd's notes on Singapore's outlying islands and Bukit Timah Hill; these are all documented in "Journal of a Voyage Round the Island of Singapore", one of six articles in the volume of direct relevance to Singapore" (National Library, Singapore, online article "The Book that almost didn't happen"). Moor, who later moved to the Singapore Free Press, was the first headmaster of the Raffles Institution from 1834, and established the first free library in Singapore, which subsequently became Singapore's National Library. The technology to print the maps was not available in Singapore at the time and Moor arranged for them to be printed at the Oriental Lithographic Press in Calcutta, set up by the French émigré Jean-Baptiste Tassin to print government maps, which helped to cause a near two-year delay in the publication. This and other problems with the production led to the abandonment of an originally planned second volume. . Provenance: Ink inscription on title-page presenting the book to an indecipherable name "A Present from Dr Martin 13 Aug 1845". This may feasibly have been M.J. Martin, the doctor who owned the Singapore Dispensary, an advertiser in the Singapore Chronicle from 1832. Occasional spotting due to paper type, neatly repaired tears to frontispiece map and another two folding maps; oxidisation to some colour outlining on all maps; joints of the binding neatly repaired; generally extremely good.
  • $31,432
  • $31,432
View of Elizabeth Bay

View of Elizabeth Bay, Elizabeth Bay House and Sydney from Darling Point

MARTENS, Conrad Original watercolour and pencil with gum arabic on paper, 310 x 500 mm; signed lower right C. Martens; in handsome nineteenth century frame; gold slip. A superb Sydney Harbour scene, sweeping from Elizabeth Bay House in the middle-ground around to the lower north shore, showcasing Martens's remarkable talent at capturing the shimmering waters and the intense light of the city. Martens has chosen his viewpoint, the ridge at Darling Point looking back across Elizabeth Bay towards the city, with great care, giving full rein to his skill as a landscape artist while also allowing him to devote his typical care to the foliage in the foreground: his informal scientific training meant that he was one of the few colonial artists to really master the distinctive look of the Australian Bush, and he took unusual care to be botanically accurate. More, in the present picture he has purposefully set out to minimise the built landscape by positioning the central tree in just such a way as to mask most of the city apart from the imposing Stables for Government House (now the Conservatorium of Music). Conrad Martens (1801-1878) was one of the greatest early Sydney artists and probably now the best known of all colonial artists, who made his name sketching on the Beagle with Fitzroy and Darwin in South America. After arriving here in April 1835, Sydney became his great subject. As the present painting fully attests, he was particularly drawn to the glittering waters east of the city through Woolloomooloo, Point Piper and Rose Bay. Soon after his arrival in Sydney Martens had made a series of forays along this southern shore of the harbour, with a number of his earliest views being made along the road which led to Macquarie's lighthouse. Martens had found his métier and some instant success, which very quickly brought him to the attention of Alexander Macleay, who was then building his famous Elizabeth Bay House, considered the "ultimate trophy home" and still one of the most beautiful colonial buildings in Sydney (MHNSW). Macleay, a prominent natural historian and friend to grand figures in Britain including Sir James Edward Smith and Robert Brown, had needed some convincing to take up the position of Colonial Secretary to NSW in 1825, but quickly became a mainstay of Sydney politics and culture. Immensely friendly with Governor Darling, he was granted an imposing acreage at Elizabeth Bay and soon appointed the architect John Verge to build a magnificent stuccoed Greek-revival building, surrounded by a garden "famous for its rare plants" (ADB). The house was of the greatest significance to Martens. The artist is known to have taken a series of pencil sketches of the house as it was being built by Verge, Macleay personally acquiring a view before the building was finished (in 1836) for three guineas, and definitely executing a small watercolour when it was finished. Most significantly, Martens then took a "stack of commissions to paint the house from suitors for Macleay's six beautiful daughters" (de Vries-Evans). Martens learnt the technique of watercolour, especially a particular knack at depicting the effects of weather, from his teacher Copley Fielding; and the skills of strict topographical accuracy, infused with a particular interest in botany and cloud formations, while on the survey vessels Hyacinth (Capt. Blackwood) and especially the Beagle (Capt. Fitzroy) in the early 1830s. Throughout his career he could effectively draw on the two techniques at will and to great effect, as the current work shows very clearly. These uncommon abilities stood him in good stead, his works greatly appreciated by any number of important critics: Darwin kept two of his old shipmate's sketches on the walls of his study and it is notable how many of the colonial scientists such as the Franklins and Sir Thomas Mitchell patronised him as well, quite apart from a rollcall of pastoralists and government officials. This painting is considered to have been done by Martens in the mid-1840s, part of the series of Elizabeth Bay House commissions he took around this time. It is a particularly good example of his more atmospheric style, well-suited to a work which so vividly evokes the beauty of the harbour shoreline. . Provenance: Private collection, Melbourne; thence by descent. Bright condition, sealed repaired tear in sky.
  • $46,471
  • $46,471
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Letter of Marque issued to George Garnett Huske Munnings, Captain of the Courier, “for the said Schooner against France”

Manuscript on vellum, approximately 555 x 650 mm., engraved decorative border at head including a portrait of George III within its large initial letter; attached blue paper seal, remnants of paper wafer seal attached at base. An excellent and interesting example of the privatisation of war during the age of sail. A Letter of Marque was a document that authorised its recipient to attack enemy shipping on a private (hence 'privateer') basis. Munnings is here authorised to attack French shipping at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. He has 'equipped furnished and victualled a Ship called the Courier (a Schooner) of the Burthen of about One hundred and Fifty Tons, foreign built Square Stern no Head and two Masts mounted with Six Cannonades carrying Shot of Six Pounds weight and no Swivel guns and navigated with Fifteen Men.' and is authorised 'to set forth in a warlike manner' and 'by force of arms to apprehend, seize and take ships, vessels and goods' belonging to the Fourth Republic of France. The Courier evidently got busy, as in 1812 we can see Munnings being sued in the High Court of Appeals for Prizes by a ship broker, Thomas Baker, and Jacob Brandon, a merchant, for the Courier having taken the Debora, a Prussian ship, and her cargo (source: "Making of modern law. Trials, 1600-1926"). Presumably his offence was that he had attacked a ship of a nationality for which he had not been authorised. Munnings had had similar Letters of Marque aboard his smaller ship the Repulse in 1793, 1794 and 1795. He was also associated with the transportation of convicts to New South Wales, his ship the Indian, for example, having brought out 200 convicts in 1819, one of whom was James Hardy Vaux on his second time round. This evocative document dates from almost exactly the period in which Patrick O'Brian set his great novel The Letter of Marque (1988), the twelfth historical novel in the superb Aubrey-Maturin series. . Slight discolouration and loss at the old folds, endorsement panel on verso browned.
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Three finely hand coloured engraved plates with their descriptive text 270 x 200 mm. Superb hand coloured engravings by James Sowerby prepared for A Specimen of the Botany of New Holland (1793) by James Smith. This landmark work included the first illustrations of a number of Australian species, including the three offered here: Embothrium sericeum, Embothrium buxifolium and Pimelea linifolia. According to a note in the preface of the full published work, the drawings on which the fine hand-coloured plates were based were done in the colony by John White, the Surgeon-General, who was a keen amateur natural history artist and collector. The period of European settlement in Australia was also a time of fine book production in Europe; the wide public interest in natural sciences meant that the illustrated books published during the period were not only factual but often exceptionally beautiful. In the Preface to smith he states that this work is "An Attempt to make the Public acquainted with some of the productions of a country of which they have lately heard so much, and in which they are now so deeply interested. The illustrations were prepared not only from drawings supplied from Sydney but also from the "most copious and finely preserved collection of dried specimens." that came with them from New South Wales. James Edward Smith was one of the leading naturalists in England and the author of several outstanding botanical books. In 1788 he founded, and was the first President of, the Linnean Society which became a meeting place for botanists and a significant reference source as Smith had, for the Society, acquired the collections and library of the famous Swedish naturalist, Linnaeus. Sir Joseph Banks was a close colleague of Smith, and James Sowerby (1740-1803), the artist of these superb plates, was one of the foremost botanical artists, who exhibited frequently at the Royal Academy. The collaboration between these great naturalists ensured that Australia's first illustrations of our unique flora were among the finest of the late eighteenth century. .
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Narrative of the Surveying Voyage of H.M.S. Fly

Two volumes, octavo, 17 plates and two folding maps, illustrated; in attractive old pale tan half calf, double labels. First edition of this important account of the Fly's surveying voyage of coastal Australia. Jukes' account is particularly significant for his description of the Queensland coast, the Great Barrier Reef, and the Torres Strait, and includes an impressively detailed map of the north-east coast from Endeavour River north to New Guinea. Numerous encounters with native peoples, particularly in the Torres Strait are described in the text and illustrated in the splendid plates, mostly by Harden S. Melville, who who published his own illustrated work on the voyage (Sketches in Australia and the Adjacent Islands, 1849). The Fly, Captain Blackwood, sailed from Falmouth on 11 April 1842 with the cutter Bramble. Jukes sailed as naturalist to the expedition, and with his captain's consent wrote the official narrative. The survey of Torres Strait and of the Great Barrier Reef, as well as the various New Guinea explorations, were all of great importance. The proper scientific understanding of the Barrier Reef could not begin until the completion of the survey, which Jukes charted for the first time in detail. Jukes' own close examination of the Reef was also significant, and his chapter on the subject 'is an invaluable record. His observations strongly supported Darwin's theory of the formation of coral reefs.' (Davidson). Indeed, Jukes' interest in coral formation is neatly summarised by the account's terrific opening line, 'I landed for the first time in my life on a coral island.' Ingleton notes: 'the Admiralty decided in 1841 to have the Great Barrier Reefs explored and to have the gaps surveyed in order that some means might be devised for marking the most eligible of these openings, in order that they could be recognised in due time and passed through in comparative safety. The expedition was noteworthy for being the first to be despatched to Australia on a purely surveying mission.' (Charting a Continent, pp. 61-66). . Provenance: Patrick Dudgeon of Cargen FRSE (1817-1895; British landowner, mineralogist and meteorologist; with his armorial bookplate in each volume).
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Olympia, Pythia, Nemea, Isthmia [in Greek]

Quarto, [480] pp., Greek types, printed in black and red; complete with the two blank leaves; woodcut devices of a caduceus and Kallierges's double-headed eagle on the title, eagle device repeated on final leaf; modern binding of period style. Produced in Rome by Zacharias Kallierges, a native Cretan, Renaissance humanist and scholar, who had set up the first Greek-owned printing press in Venice in 1499, subsequently moving to Rome to set up his press there. Pindar, the classical ancient Greek lyric poet, was a perfect choice for Kallierges to put into print: the first Greek poet to reflect on the nature of poetry and on the poet's role, he was hugely prized by later writers, not least the Latin poet Horace who admiringly compared the vigour of his writing to the "uncontrollable momentum of a river that has burst its banks". Pindar's four books of epinikia or "victory odes" represent one of "the great monuments of Greek lyric" (Mathiesen). The tradition of epinikia, written to honour victorious athletes at the games, dates back to at least the 6th century BCE with verses by Simonides of Ceos surviving in fragments. Pindar's four books, which were written between about 520 and 460 BCE, are associated with the four major festivals of the Panhellenic Games: Olympian, Pythian, Isthmian, and Nemean. Thomas Mathiesen has demonstrated how many of the odes can be identified by event, champion, and year. Kallierges, a native Cretan, had already established two presses at Venice before he arrived in Rome to teach under Lascaris at the newly founded Greek Gymnasium, an academy created at the behest of Pope Leo X. When working in Venice he was not only a contemporary of but also must have been close to Aldus Manutius, who played the critical role in the publication of classical texts from surviving manuscript sources. Aldus's edition of Pindar of two years earlier, the editio princeps, had offered a text of the odes alone, without the comparatively huge apparatus of scholia which appear in Kallierges' printing for the first time, and which were crucial to the scholarly understanding of Pindar throughout the centuries to come. Their extent can be seen on every page where the comparatively small printing of text is surrounded by the extensive annotations and explanations. Kallierges' edition "has always been acknowledged as textually superior" (The Greek Book, 5). . A little occasional very light foxing; a very good clean copy with good margins.
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Narrative and Successful Result of a Voyage in the South Seas, performed by order of the Government of British India, to ascertain the actual fate of La Perouse’s Expedition, interspersed with accounts of the religion, manners, customs and cannibal practices of the South Sea Islanders

Two volumes, octavo, plates (two folding, one coloured), and a folding map; plates crisp, in half green morocco by Sangorski & Sutcliffe, spine banded and gilt. First edition. Forty years after the French explorer first disappeared, Peter Dillon, a sandalwood trader, called at the Solomons; when a silver sword guard was shown to him, he suspected that he might have accidentally discovered the solution of a mystery that had tormented the French for so long. He returned to India and persuaded the government of Bengal to sponsor an expedition. At Vanikoro he found many relics including a portion of the stern of the Boussole, ships' bells stamped 'Bazin m'a fait', monogrammed silver, metal fragments and mill stones known to have been aboard. One native had a glass piece from a thermometer in his nose. Dillon was made a Chevalier of the Legion d'Honneur, his expenses defrayed and granted a pension. His book was commercially successful, appearing in English and French editions promptly and eventually in a number of translations. Although Captain Peter Dillon is best known for his role in finding the wreck of La Pérouse's two vessels, the account also shows a passing interest in the voyages of the Bounty, and of the Pandora, and, especially in the region of the island of Rothuma, and gives detailed notes on the charting done by Captain Edwards and published on an Arrowsmith chart. .
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Narrative of a Voyage Round the World, in the Uranie and Physicienne Corvettes, commanded by Captain Freycinet, during the years 1817, 1818, 1819 and 1820

Quarto, two parts in one, with a folding frontispiece map and 25 lithograph plates, very occasional spotting to plates; modern polished calf, gilt. The first edition in English of this informal narrative of the Freycinet voyage, the great French expedition to Australia and the Pacific commanded by Louis de Freycinet; it is also the first appearance in English of any account of the expedition. Arago was the official artist on the voyage, and the lithograph plates here are all after his own drawings. His narrative is highly readable, not least because he entirely avoids the conventional forms of the voyage narrative, ignoring the "eternal repetition of winds, currents, longitude and lattitude". Full of wry humour, it takes the form of a series of letters to a friend. Long portions relate to Australia, with descriptions of Sydney, the Blue Mountains, and of meetings with Governor Macquarie and John Oxley. There is also a long account (almost 100 pages) of their stay in Hawaii at a crucial period in the history of the islands. Despite the clear evidence of the 'Directions for placing the Plates' present here, there has been some unnecessary confusion about the collation of this book. Ferguson omitted the map from his plate count, while Hill erroneously called for a map and 26 plates. This copy, with the map and 25 plates is complete. .
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Discoveries in Australia; with an account of the Coasts and Rivers explored and surveyed during the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle, in the years 1837-38-39-40-41-42-43. Also a Narrative of Captain Owen Stanley’s visits to the islands in the Arafura Sea

Two volumes, octavo, with 26 engraved plates (including frontispieces) and eight folding charts (6 loose and 2 tipped in, as usual), some occasional light spotting in the margins of plates but generally a good untrimmed set, all of the many advertising pages and slips noted by Wantrup present as per first issue; modern blue calf. First edition, and a major work of Australian voyaging and exploration, often considered the last major voyage of Australian discovery. This work recounts the third and final circumnavigation of HMS Beagle, dispatched by the Admiralty to complete the mapping of the remote coasts of New Holland, in particular the north-west coast and the Torres Strait. The work was written by John Lort Stokes, who joined the Beagle in 1824 and served on all three circumnavigations, working up from a midshipman to be the final commander, a position he was given in Sydney in 1841. He had been the companion, that is, of everyone from Darwin to Phillip Parker King, and was easily the longest-serving officer on the famous ship. Discoveries in Australia recounts the third voyage of HMS Beagle from 1837 to 1843 under Wickham and Stokes, when the ship was in Australian waters. "Stokes is noted as an engaging, vivacious and entertaining writer. As the official account of the last major expedition of Australian discovery, his book is essential to a collection relating to coastal voyages. It is also of considerable interest to collectors of inland exploration journals, since Stokes and the crew of the Beagle undertook many expeditions inland from the coast which are recorded in his book. It is a scarce book and is eagerly sought by collectors." (Wantrup). .
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Discoveries of the French in 1768 & 1769, to the South-East of New Guinea, with the subsequent visits to the same lands by English Navigators, who gave them new names. To which is prefixed, an historical abridgment of the voyages and discoveries of the Spaniards in the same seas

Quarto, with 12 folding charts; in contemporary polished half calf, marbled boards. The first English edition of the great work on the French discovery of the Solomon Islands. Fleurieu, the leading light in the early history of French exploration in the South Seas, gives accounts of the voyages of Mendaña, Quirós, Carteret, Bougainville, Cook and others. The maps are based on actual discoveries, and used to illustrate Fleurieu's theories, most of which were ultimately proved correct. Fleurieu's important book was also a direct result of the voyage of the First Fleet to New South Wales: Phillip's Voyage, first published in 1789, had included the journal of Lieutenant Shortland on his return voyage in the Alexander transport from Botany Bay to England, during which he coasted along a group of large islands which he named "New Georgia". Fleurieu, writing in a period of intense international rivalry over Pacific discoveries, denies that discovery and promotes those of Louis de Bougainville and Jean de Surville. He draws on unpublished manuscripts as well as the printed narratives of Cook, Quirós, and other explorers. This was published by John Stockdale, publisher of Governor Phillip's Voyage to Botany Bay and of many other works on New South Wales and the First Fleet. There are also interesting comments on the La Pérouse voyage. Fleurieu announces the receipt of journals from as far as Botany Bay, and in discussing the Great Ocean Chart (a fragment of which is published here), says publication is to be delayed until his later discoveries can be inserted. . Provenance: Rollo Hammet (Melbourne collector, with his small bookticket). Spine a bit rubbed, joints wearing but firm.
Album Polynésien de M. C. Noury

Album Polynésien de M. C. Noury, Capitaine de Vaisseau

Folio (390 x 260 mm), 17 leaves in all, untrimmed and unbound as issued, with lithographed title-page and single sheet of description, and 15 lithographed plates,seven of which are coloured and eight in black on a tinted background, on paper watermarked either "Rives" or "D & C Blauw"; in a modern full morocco fitted case. Exceptionally uncommon and most beautiful work on tattooing, ethnography, and decorative carving in the Marquesas; 'd'un grand intérêt ethnographique' (O'Reilly), this is a remarkable collection of images of actual objects and original personal observation made during the early period of French influence in Nuku Hiva. The quality of the illustrated plates is outstanding, and the delicate lithography is a marvellous medium for conveying the immediacy of the original sketches; this very rare work is an important record of French Polynesia in the South Pacific, and is almost unknown on the market. Published by a tiny lithographic press in the author's hometown of Nantes on the French Atlantic coast, the signatures of three artists appear on the various lithographic plates: B. de Girardot, Bourgerel and Alfred Clericeau. Clericeau is also credited as printer of some of the plates, most of which were printed by Olivier Merson in Nantes, who is listed as publisher of the work on the title-page. Baron Girardot Of the three artists, Auguste Théodore, baron de Girardot (1815-1883) was responsible for plates 1-2, 5 and 7-9. He was an archaeologist and antiquary in Nantes, with prolific publications to his name, including numerous lithographs of archaeological objects in similar style to the present work. We speculate that he may have been the overall creator of the work and that the wording of the title, somewhat ambiguous, may refer to the collection of M. Noury rather than crediting the work to him. As Anna Andruszkiewicz's study of Girardot shows, several of Girardot's publications were, like the present work, produced on Olivier Merson's press. Certainly, his involvement in the publication was close: the copy of this work in the Mitchell Library, for example, has a presentation inscription from him. Charles Noury Charles-Gaëtan Noury (1809-1869) was a French naval officer born in Nantes (he was also titled: his father Gabriel Noury was the first Baron Noury). He was promoted capitaine de corvette and second-in-command of the Sirène in 1846, bound for the Pacific. The ship arrived at Papeete in May 1847 where captain Lavaud took over the shore command, leaving Noury in command of the Sirène. Shortly after Noury served for a year as the commandant of Nuku Hiva, the main French settlement in the Marquesas, where he became a student of local customs, researching especially tattooing, cannibalism, and language and evidently a keen collector. An 1849 letter from him preserved in the Mitchell Library discusses his records of the ritual chants sung at human sacrifices, for example, while a collection of more than 1200 shells from Tahiti and the Marquesas was donated by his descendants to the Nantes Museum in 1904. The Sirène returned to France after four years, and Noury continued to serve in the French Navy until 1864, retiring to Nantes. In his retirement he worked on Polynesian natural history and linguistics, and took stock of his collection of South Sea curiosities: given the date of publication here, and the fact that the lithographs are based on sketches by artists other than Noury, it is probably fair to assume that the illustrations depict items in his collection (where are they now?). Noury is not a well-known figure, but there is a helpful potted biography in Father O'Reilly's Tahitiens (1975). Noury also left a manuscript journal illustrated with watercolours devoted to the natural history of Tahiti and the Marquesas which, rediscovered in modern times, was finally published 160 years after its creation by the Royal Academy of Belgium as Voyage en Polynésie (1847-1850). Le bestiaire oublié du capitaine Noury, ed. M. Jangoux (2017). Marquesan artefacts, and the queen's tattooed hand The illustrations in the work show an extraordinary array of Marquesan artefacts, including native surgical instruments, instruments for making tapa, a coconut shell fashioned into a cover for the wound left by the practice of trepanning, designs carved into whale teeth, idols (including one meant to be suspended from canoe prows), as well as ornaments, pipes, jewellery including necklaces and bracelets, puzzles, hooks, decorative clubs, a "war conch" and other sculptures. The most beautiful of the images is that of the tattooed hand which, particularly graceful and beautiful, has spawned a small literature of its own since it depicts the famous tattoos of Queen Vaekehu (1823-1901). In 1886 Albert Davin spoke with the queen and learned more about her tattooing: he quotes her (in 50,000 milles dans l'ocean Pacifique, 1886) as saying, through her interpreter: "Oh I suffered cruelly. I cried much. For several days my hands stayed large as breadfruits. It was in vain that I asked my mother to put an end to my suffering. All was useless. It was necessary that the tattooing of my hands and arms to my shoulders, of the feet and the knees, of the mouth and the ears, reveal my noble origin.". Davin noted that the tattoos were by different artists from the island of Ua Pou (home of the best tattooists in the archipelago at that time) but done so well and so similarly that they appeared the work of one. (Quoted by Carol S. Ivory, Vaekehu, The Life of a 19th-century Marquesan Queen in Turbulent Times, Journal of the Polynesian Society 123(2): 113-128). Karl von den Steinen, who met the queen when he visited the islands in 1897, used this Noury/Girardot image of her hand to illustrate his account (Reise nach den Marquesas, 1897). Nuku Hiva Nuku Hiva was first visited by the American Joseph Ingraham on the Hope as early as 1791, and the Marquesan group was claimed for the United States in 1813 by Commodore
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Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World. In Four Parts, By Lemuel Gulliver, first a Surgeon, and then a Captain of Several Ships

Four parts in two volumes, octavo; portrait of Gulliver by John Sturt engraved by Robert Sheppard and six engraved plates, five of them maps, by H. Moll; 19th-century polished calf gilt, spine gilt between raised bands, green lettering pieces, triple fillet border on sides, marbled endpapers with gilt dentelle borders, gilt edges; binding by Francis Bedford with his stamp. First edition, first issue (Teerink "A"), with the portrait in second state as is more usual. This is a fine copy of one of the greatest of all works of English (and travel) literature. From its first publication the success of Gulliver was immediate and sustained, its influence enormous. Gove knows of over one hundred eighteenth century editions and there have been countless since. Although it had its famous detractors (notably Samuel Johnson's famously dismissive 'When once you have thought of the big men and little men, it is very easy to do all the rest') it has become one of the best loved and most immediately recognizable works of fiction. No one was more surprised by this than Swift himself, who had said to Pope that the satire would never be published until 'a printer shall be found brave enough to venture his ears'. "Gulliver's Travels has given Swift an immortality beyond Temporary Fame" (Printing and the Mind of Man). Gulliver is one of the most famous English books of all time, and also the greatest work of literature associated with Australia. It is a crucial work in the Imaginary Voyage tradition, particularly for its use of a series of realistic framing devices which include maps, an editorial comment that the work has been greatly reduced by the omission of most of the material relating to winds and tides, and reference to genuine sailors such as Dampier or their props, such as Sanson's Atlas. Gulliver, who is made a cousin of William Dampier, comments at one point that he was 'coasting New Holland', and at another that he has been 'driven by a violent storm to the north-west of Van Diemen's Land' -- in the very year (1699) that Dampier was in fact exploring the Australian northwest. Gulliver is quite precise in his mapping of the lands he visits, and as Davidson notes, 'With a latitude given as 30°2' south, the imaginary Lilliput. is placed somewhere in South Australia, probably near the isles of St Francis and St Peter at the eastern end of the Great Australian Bight'. The frontispiece portrait of Gulliver here is in the second, more frequently found, of two states (with the inscription "Captain Lemuel Gulliver of Redriff. Ætat. suæ LVIII." around the oval and the tablet bearing a Latin inscription, printed on paper with vertical chain-lines). It is uncertain when exactly Swift (1667-1745) started writing Gulliver's Travels, but some sources suggest as early as 1713 when Swift, Gay, Pope, Arbuthnot and others formed the Scriblerus Club, with the aim of satirising popular literary genres. Swift, runs the theory, was charged with writing the memoirs of the club's imaginary author, Martinus Scriblerus, and also with satirising the "travellers' tales" literary sub-genre. It is known from Swift's correspondence that the composition proper began in 1720 with the mirror- themed parts I and II written first, Part IV following in 1723 and Part III in 1724; but amendments were made even while Swift was writing Drapier's Letters. By August 1725 the book was complete; and as Gulliver's Travels was a transparently anti-Whig satire, it is likely that Swift had the manuscript copied so that his handwriting could not be used as evidence if a prosecution should arise, as had happened in the case of his Irish pamphlets. In March 1726 Swift travelled to London to have his work published; the manuscript was secretly delivered to the publisher Benjamin Motte, who used five printing houses to speed production and avoid piracy. Motte, recognising a best-seller but fearing prosecution, cut or altered the worst offending passages (such as the descriptions of the court contests in Lilliput and the rebellion of Lindalino), added some material in defence of Queen Anne to book II, and published it. The first edition was released in two volumes on 28 October 1726, priced at 8s. 6d. The book was an instant sensation and sold out its first run in less than a week. It was immediately acclaimed, and it has been widely read ever since, both as a bitter satire and as a fantasy for children. Of his many publications, all but one published anonymously, Gulliver's Travels was the only one for which the author received any payment. Although at first castigated, and revealed as a misanthropic narrator, Gulliver was recast as a parody after critics surmised the source of his name - a portmanteau word, or merger of "gullible" and "traveller". Achieving what the "gullible traveller" assumes to be utopia in the horse-land of the Houyhnhnms, Gulliver loses his objectivity, deserts his family, and moves into the stable to live with horses, whom his distorted value system now prefers as superior to humanity. The novel's striking success is testified by a letter of 17 November 1726 by John Gay (Correspondence vol. III, p. 182): "About ten days ago a Book was published here of the Travels of one Gulliver, which hath been the conversation of the whole town . From the highest to the lowest it is universally read, from the Cabinet-council to the Nursery". Gulliver's Travels has ascended to the final apotheosis of a satirical fable, but it has also become a timeless tale for children. . Provenance: Ralph Clutton (died 1888, bookplate).
Discoveries in Australia; with an Account of the Coasts and Rivers Explored and Surveyed during the Voyage of H.M.S. Beagle

Discoveries in Australia; with an Account of the Coasts and Rivers Explored and Surveyed during the Voyage of H.M.S. Beagle, in the Years 1837-38-39-40-41-42-43. By command of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty. Also A Narrative of Captain Owen Stanley’s Visits to the Islands in the Arafura Sea

STOKES, John Lort Two volumes, octavo, complete with 26 plates and eight folding charts, line drawings within the text; a fine crisp copy in a beautiful late nineteenth-century binding of half tan calf with double labels, spine ornately gilt in compartments. First edition: a most attractive copy of this account of the Beagle's great Australian survey voyage, the last great voyage of Australian coastal discovery. John Lort Stokes, who joined the Beagle in 1824, served on her for eighteen years, starting as a midshipman and sailing with Darwin, Fitzroy, P.P. King, and Wickham, whom he eventually replaced as commander in 1841. From 1837 to 1843 the Beagle was in Australian waters, her personnel completing the survey of the northwest coast, and charting rivers and exploring inland where appropriate. It was Stokes who charted and named Victoria River and Port Darwin, the latter in commemoration of his former shipmate. Stokes time in command of the Beagle confirmed his reputation as a fine marine surveyor, and many of his charts of the northern Australia coast remained in use for over a century. 'Stokes is noted as an engaging, vivacious and entertaining writer. As the official account of the last major expedition of Australian discovery, his book is essential to a collection relating to coastal voyages. It is also of considerable interest to collectors of inland exploration journals, since Stokes and the crew of the Beagle undertook many expeditions inland from the coast which are recorded in his book.' (Wantrup). With a bookseller's blind-stamp showing that this was sold by William Piddington, the Sydney bookseller who opened his George Street premises in 1844 but by the 1850s had begun a political career that would include two terms as Colonial Treasurer of New South Wales. . Provenance: W.R. Piddington (Sydney bookseller, his blind-stamp on flyleaf).
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Report made to the Special General Meeting of the Van Diemen’s Land Company, held at the Company’s Office, in Old Broad Street, the 31st October, 1833

Octavo, 8 pp., unbound as issued, top edges unopened. Not originally noted by Ferguson, who did record the report of the eighth "Yearly General Meeting" that had taken place in March of the same year. The Ferguson Addenda volume locates two Tasmanian institutional copies and another in South Australia. The Van Diemen's Land Company, major land-owner and farming corporation in Tasmania, is still in business today if considerably reduced in size, and is "widely believed to be the last Australian chartered company still operating". It was founded in 1825 by a group of London merchants who planned a wool growing venture to supply the needs of the British industry and markets. Edward Curr was appointed as their chief agent, arriving back in Hobart in 1826. Large scale plans were put into place for sheep-rearing on the Company's huge grant at Surrey Hills, but the attempts failed over the first years of the 1830s with cold weather and disease combining with the unanticipated poverty of the land. "After the disastrous loss of the valuable sheep, it became necessary to reconsider the company's programme, and Curr sailed for England in April 1833 with his wife and six children to discuss it with the directors. It was decided to abandon large scale sheep-rearing.". This report details the decision to close down the project and instead to concentrate on the Company's holdings at Circular Head and Woolnorth. .
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Essays In Three Books. With Notes and Quotations. And an Account of the Author’s Life. With a Short Character of the Author and Translator, by the Late Marquiss of Hallifax. Translated by Charles Cotton, Esq.

Three volumes, octavo, contemporary dark marbled calf, spines with raised bands, lettered in blind (labels replaced), front covers lettered "Wakefield" in gilt capitals. The sixth edition, "corrected and amended", of Charles Cotton's translation. Cotton (1630-1687), English poet and writer, contributor to The Compleat Angler, is best known for his version of Montaigne, "among the acknowledged masterpieces of translation" (DNB). In contrast to Florio's extravagant Elizabethan prose of 1603/1613, Cotton's version was in turn suited to his age with a markedly dryer and plainer English. Cotton's translation holds significant importance in the literary and philosophical realms, having helped spread Montaigne's profound and influential ideas to the English-speaking world. The "Essays" are a collection of personal reflections and philosophical musings, covering a wide range of topics such as human nature, morality, education, and the nature of knowledge. Cotton's translation not only preserved the essence of Montaigne's original work but also rendered it accessible to a broader audience, enabling English readers to engage with Montaigne's profound insights. Cotton's efforts contributed to the spread and popularization of the essay as a literary genre, shaping the development of English literature and thought. Moreover, the translation acted as a conduit for the exchange of ideas between France and England during the Enlightenment, fostering intellectual and cultural dialogue. . Provenance: Hugh Cleghorn (1752-1837), colonial administrator, "child of the Scottish Enlightenment" and a beneficiary in Adam Smith's will; from his library at Wakefield House, Strathivie, in Fife, near St. Andrews, with front covers boldly stamped in gilt "WAKEFIELD". The bindings lightly rubbed but a very pleasant set; the labels, though replaced, quite appropriate.