Garrett Scott, Bookseller Archives - Rare Book Insider

Garrett Scott, Bookseller

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The Wanderer: A Tale of Life's Vicissitudes.

The Wanderer: A Tale of Life’s Vicissitudes.

[Maitland, James Alexander]. New York: E. D. Long, Successor to H. Long and Brother, 121 Nassau-Street, (1856). First edition. Spine faded to tan, some light rubbing and bumping; a little foxed and stained; a good to very good copy. 8vo (7.63 x 5.25 inches), original blind-stamped brown-lilac cloth, gilt pictorial spine, 377, [7] pages. Title page woodcut vignette. "He resolved to satisfy himself, and walking into the store, asked for a copy of Irving's Knickerbocker. 'I have not got it in store, sir,' replied a grey-headed spectacled old gentleman, who was seated at a desk on the farther end of the store, and who came forward as he spoke. 'You will find it at Mr. Irving's publisher, Mr. Putnam.' . . . Seeing that the old gentleman was inclined to be chatty, Gerald, after having purchased and paid for a couple of volumes, continued in the conversation, by asking the bookseller if he had been long in the business. 'More than thirty-five years,' he replied. 'I am getting very old now, and merely remain in business, for the sake of amusement. I sell but little and publish nothing at all. Young houses have sprung up into collossal [sic] magnitude, that were unheard of when I commenced business. There is the Harpersí establishment, twenty years ago it did not existónow, more books are published by that firm, than are published by any other house in America, and few in Europe exceed them in the number and variety of their publications. If they go on thus much longer, they will be the greatest publishers in the world. I could name many others. It is a sad state of things, sir, a sad state of things.' " One of several American urban novels from the 1850s by the English sailor turned American journalist Maitland, this seemingly something of a David Copperfield-inflected bildungsroman of the son of an idealistic English emigre newspaper editor who makes his fortune in London in the Indian trade and comes back to contemporary Manhattan, where he observes plenty of street life and colorful characters. (The appearance of Amos Biggin -- former publisher of The Trumpeter of Freedom newspaper -- at the Office of the Gift Penwiper Society in the Bowery is of a piece with much of the novel.) With attractive illustrated publisher's ads in the rear. Wright II, 1662.
  • $50
Spermatorrhoea: Its Causes

Spermatorrhoea: Its Causes, Symptoms, Results, and Treatment.

Bartholow, Roberts. New York: William Wood & Co., 1870. Third edition, substantially revised. Spine and portions of the boards slightly sunned, some light bumping at the head and foot of the spine; the slightest hint of cracking to the coated paper along the front hinge, but quite sound; in very good condition. 12mo (7.5 x 5 inches), original purple cloth, gilt lettering, 120 pages, title stamped in gilt on the upper board but no notice of the edition. No evidence of a frontispiece. No copyright notice on the verso of the title page. "The vice of masturbation is undoubtedly the chief cause. The growth of the sexual apparatus at the period of puberty is accompanied by abundant secretion of the seminal fluid, which accumulates in the reservoirs. The sexual instinct, then fully developed, exerts a powerful influence over the mind, whilst the reason is not in a sufficiently matured state to correct the mirages of the imagination. An accidental friction of the erect organ in these moments of delirium makes the unfortunate youth acquainted with a new and voluptuous sensation. Ignorant of the dreadful consequences which must ensure from the repeated perpetration of this act, the youth perseveres in his secret pleasures until arrested by realizing some of the sad effects upon the mind and body which follow." First published in 1866 and here substantially revised (this copy includes a "Preface to the Third Edition," which notes, "the material has been rearranged, and in large part rewritten"), a serious medical work on the psychosomatic perils of seminal loss, on a sound medical basis, from the physician and surgeon known for his pioneering work in cortical stimulation. Bartholow suggests the malady has suffered from polite neglect, pushing sufferers into "the hands of advertising specialists, who excite the worst apprehensions for a mercenary purpose," and further notes in the preface to this edition, "I am, indeed, more than ever confirmed in the view that it is a neurosis, and that the treatment, to be successful, must be founded on this pathological basis." With related case studies on impotence, the risks of insanity, treatments, etc.
  • $125
Selections from the Writings of the Late Thomas Hedges Genin. With a Biographical Sketch. A Memorial Work.

Selections from the Writings of the Late Thomas Hedges Genin. With a Biographical Sketch. A Memorial Work.

Genin, Thomas Hedges. New York: Edward O. Jenkins, Printer, 1869. First edition. Light damp-stain along the upper edge of the frontispiece and text block; some general wear and soiling; in good condition. 8vo (9/38 x 6.25 inches), original blind-stamped brown cloth neatly rebacked with the original spine laid down, gilt lettering, [i-ii], [1-4], [3]-615, [1] pages. Lithograph frontis portrait, inserted engraved plate. Midland Notes 96: "He arrived in St Clairsville, Ohio, in 1817, and became closely associated with Benjamin Lundy, in the Union Humane Society; one of the country's first anti-slavery societies; later giving financial support to Lundy's Genuis of Universal Emancipation." The biographical sketch here includes much on Genin's abolitionist efforts. This volume also collects Genin's early poetical work, the Napolead--a blank-verse epic which, in the words of William Cooper Howells (father of the novelist Wm. Dean Howells) was published because Genin "had money enough to spare in printing a book that was never to be sold." (The elder Howells was an apprentice in the St. Clairsville print shop with the original edition of the Napolead was produced.) Lib. Company. Afro-Americana 4065; Sabin 26944. With an ink presentation inscription on the front free endpaper from John N. Genin (son of the subject) on the front free endpaper. An ex-library copy, with the early label of the City of Lowell library (stamped withdrawn) on the front pastedown and their stamps and notations in the prelims, on the verso of the title page, and in the rear, with evidence of a removed circulation pocket and slip in the rear endpapers. Small shelfmark label to the spine.
  • $75
Selections from the Writings of the Late Thomas Hedges Genin. With a Biographical Sketch. A Memorial Work.

Selections from the Writings of the Late Thomas Hedges Genin. With a Biographical Sketch. A Memorial Work.

Genin, Thomas Hedges. New York: Edward O. Jenkins, Printer, 1869. First edition. A little rubbed and bumped, with the head of the spine a little frayed; in very good condition. 8vo (9/38 x 6.25 inches), original blind-stamped brown cloth, gilt lettering, [i-ii], [1-4], [3]-615, [1] pages. Lithograph frontis portrait, inserted engraved plate. Midland Notes 96: "He arrived in St Clairsville, Ohio, in 1817, and became closely associated with Benjamin Lundy, in the Union Humane Society; one of the country's first anti-slavery societies; later giving financial support to Lundy's Genuis of Universal Emancipation." The biographical sketch here includes much on Genin's abolitionist efforts. This volume also collects Genin's early poetical work, the Napolead--a blank-verse epic which, in the words of William Cooper Howells (father of the novelist Wm. Dean Howells) was published because Genin "had money enough to spare in printing a book that was never to be sold." (The elder Howells was an apprentice in the St. Clairsville print shop with the original edition of the Napolead was produced.) Lib. Company. Afro-Americana 4065; Sabin 26944. An ex-library copy, with the small Middlebury College label on the front pastedown (stamped withdrawn) and their early ink autograph accession note on the front free endpaper opposite. Shelfmark numbers added to the spine in white ink, with traces of adhesive residue, and an old circulation slip and paper strip in the rear endpapers.
  • $200
Key to the Western Practical Arithmetic . . Containing a Solution of the Questions. Accompanied with Explanations and Illustrations

Key to the Western Practical Arithmetic . . Containing a Solution of the Questions. Accompanied with Explanations and Illustrations, for the Benefit of Young Teachers and Private Students by the Author. Stereotyped by J. A. James.

Talbott, John L. Cincinnati: Published by Ephraim Morgan and Son, 1838. First edition. Boards somewhat rubbed; slight, approx. two inch crack at the head of the front joint; a very good copy of a cheap sheep binding. 12mo, contemporary (likely original) sheep, gilt rules and gilt lettering, 196 pages. Illus. An uncommon cheat book for underprepared teachers, the solutions presumably to Joseph Stockton's popular Western Calculator; besides a key to the answers, Talbott provides occasional annotation or clarification. A nice example of the sort of popular work one might expect from Ephraim Morgan (and his later firm as here, which took his son James into partnership in 1837), who was an important early Cincinnati bookseller and publisher; the firm also later picked up the slack in the stereotyping business from J. A. James, noted by Sutton as one of "the most important Cincinnati stereotypers" (Sutton 73). Morgan and Son seems to have increased its margin by hewing to passable standards of cheap and hasty production, as here: the lower margins are trimmed closely, with loss to the occasional signature mark; the cheap sheep binding has its own rough-hewn charm, in part because of the ungainly and oversized fore-edges of the boards. Early ink annotation to the front free endpaper and pencil ownership inscription. Walter Sutton, The Western Book Trade. Columbus [O.], 1961. Morgan 3535; American Imprints 53196.
  • $75