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Incomincia el prohemio della arte del ben morire.

Incomincia el prohemio della arte del ben morire.

(Capranica, Domenico: 6 nn. Bll (von 22). Mit 5 Textholzschnitten (1 wiederholt) und 9 figürl. Holzschnitt-Vignetten (2 wiederholt). Kl.4° (18,5 x 13 cm). Dunkelbrauner Maroquinband des frühen 20. Jhdts mit goldgepr. Rücken- und Deckeltitel, signiert "K A" (d. i. Katherine Adams). Leider nur ein Fragment mit den letzten 6 Bll. (= Lage c; hier händisch in "a" geändert); Papier gebräunt und gering fleckig; erstes und letztes Bl. im Bund fast unsichtbar hinterlegt. Provenienz: aus der Sammlung Dyson Perrins mit seinem Exlibis und Nummern-Schildchen (208) auf vorderem Spiegel. "Charles William Dyson Perrins (25 May 1864 29 January 1958) was an English businessman, bibliophile, and philanthropist. He was born in Claines, near Worcester, the son of James Dyson Perrins" (vgl. Wikipedia; dort auch ausführlich zu K. Adams), und höchst erfolgreicher Produzent von Worcester-Sauce, der sein Vermögen in Büchern und bibliophilen Stiftungen anlegte. K. Adams arbeitete u. a. auch für das engl. Königshaus. Der Einband ist ein Beleg für die Anschauung, dass Eleganz aus der stilsicheren Vermählung von Schlichtheit mit edlem Material resultiert. D. Capranica (1400-56/8?; vgl. Jöcher I, 1652), Jurist, Theologe, Bibliophiler, Gouverneur zu Imola und Kardinal, schrieb seine Ars moriendi 1453; ein 1. Druck erfolgte 1476. Kein Exemplar vorliegender Edition im worldcat oder im Handel: selten. IT Explicit (auf c6v): "1513 / Finito dellibro ben morire tucto storiato Deo gratias."
  • $1,323
  • $1,323
An Address Delivered before the American Statistical Association

An Address Delivered before the American Statistical Association, Boston, Oct. 16, 1891.

(Hollerith) Porter, Robert P. (Hollerith) Porter, Robert P. (Superintendent of Census). An Address Delivered before the American Statistical Association, Boston, Oct. 16, 1891. New York Engraving and Printing Company, 1891. 9"x 5.5", 64pp. Original wrappers, flat-backed spine. The wrappers are nearly off the text block, and there is chipping along the edges of the wrappers. A GOOD copy (say, 4-5/10) only. I am offering another, nicer, copy elsewhere on ABE. [++] Aside from the general business and performance of conducting the census, the piece of essential interest here is Porter's discussion of the new method of tabulation this of course is the revolutionary card tabulator system of Herman Hollerith (though his name is mentioned only twice)--and the differences between the new and old methods of calculation at the Census Office. The discussion ranges from pp 17-24, with the most interesting quotes on the machine and process coming from "Mr. Wines" (Frederick Howard Wines, who wrote the 400-page "Report On Crime Pauperism And Benevolence" in 1896 as part of the 1890 Census): "The essential difference between the Eleventh Census and that which preceded it was the adoption of the card system for the tallying of results and the use of the newly invented Hollerith electrical machine for counting the cards. Too much can scarcely be said in praise of this machine, which has enabled us to compute results with much greater rapidity than the old method of tallying." (pp 12-20). ALSO: "The first advantage of the Hollerith system is the more than stenographic celerity with which the record of each individual enumerated is transferred from the original schedule to the cards for tallying. Instead of the multiplied motions required in transcription by the ordinary process of writing, one turn of the wrist suffices for the recording of each reported fact. If some time is lost in placing the cards in position in the punching machine, on the other hand the record does not require so many independent physical movements as are necessary even in stenographic writing, where each line represents a sound." AND also: "After this, the 63,000,000 cards with their thousand million statements must each pass through the tabulating machine five times." pg 18. Tabulating cards are also discussed on pp 4, 11, 12, 14, 17-22. There was a lot more discussion and explanation of the tabulating system than I expected in this short work
  • $150
Sagan om den stora datamaskinen. AND (in translation) The End of Man.

Sagan om den stora datamaskinen. AND (in translation) The End of Man.

Johannesson, Olof (Hannes Alfven) Johannesson, Olof (Hannes Alfven) Sagan om den stora datamaskinen. Stockholm, 1966, Albert Bonnier Verlag, 143pp. Original wrappers. First edition. VG copy. AND with an English translation, "The End of Man", Award Books, 1969 ("First award Books edition"). VG copy. (The English translation originally appeared as "The Tale of the Big Computer".) Nobelist Alfven wrote this under the pseudonym of Olof Johannesson, perhaps as a result of Alfven's (evidently) own distrust of our digital friend. This is an odd and interesting and somewhat prescient science fiction tale about humankind and the computer, the failure of the all-encompassing human-computer grid/interface, and the ultimate victory of humans as they emerge from their devastating reliance on the computer and the lives cost when computers failed. You see the computer becomes integrated into every aspect of life in this tale of the future that we are already a part of, even to the point of relieving people of the task of face-to-face communication, replacing it with some sort of computer interface. And so on. Anyway it is a pretty good story about the effects of heavy/ultimate reliance on computers and what happens when the grid fails. The editors could've done a better job naming this work. About the author: Hannes Alfven, EE, astrophysicist, and father of plasma phys, Nobel Prize in Physics 1970, "for fundamental work and discoveries in magnetohydro-dynamics with fruitful applications in different parts of plasma physics". "Alfvén developed a theory about aurora borealis, which led to magneto-hydrodynamics; the theory of the relationships between a plasma's movements, electric currents and fields, and magnetic fields."--Nobel Prize Foundation. In addition to numerous papers Alfven wrote  Cosmical Electrodynamics (1950), On the Origin of the Solar System (1954), Worlds-Antiworlds (1966), and Cosmic Plasma (1981).
  • $550
Two copies. "The Idea of a World Encyclopedia" in "Nature" and another copy in "Harper's Weekly"

Two copies. “The Idea of a World Encyclopedia” in “Nature” and another copy in “Harper’s Weekly”, 1936 and 1937.

H.G. Wells. ++The World Encyclopedia: the World Brain, Pre-MEMEX, Pre-WWW, Pre-Interweb, 1936/7++ WELLS, H.G. "The Idea of a World Encyclopedia" in Nature, Supplement, vol 138 no. 3500, 28 November 1936, pp 917-924. Fine copy. Offered with: WELLS, H.G. "The Idea of a World Encyclopedia", in Harper's Magazine, vol 174, April 1937, pp 472-482 in the monthly issue of pp (30), 459-560, (28)pp. Original wrappers; Very Good copy. [++] This is a very personal, well-thought approach by Wells to the distribution of all human knowledge, to, well, everyone and everywhere. The first appearance of the paper appears un the journal NATURE, which basically reached professional or enthusiastic amateur science folks and was not intended to reach the general reader. The mass distribution of the idea (so to speak) occurred with the article appearing in "Harper's Magazine"--the article is reprinted in Harper's nearly verbatim from Nature. (There are several exceptions of editorial corrections and such but the changes are extremely minor for all intents and purposes the appearance in "Harper's" is identical to "Nature".) [++] This is some very good thinking by Wells, coming before the scifi meditations on early transworld compsci adventures. It is also eight years before Vannevar Bush's "As We May Think", which outlined his idea for a hypertext device he called the Memex ( memory and index ), which compressed and organized all that its user could remember and whatever information would be obtained in the future via electromechanical apparatuses, and available with associative tracking between the microtext frames.  It was this article that enlightened some to refer to Bush as the grandfather of the internet--anyway it is Bush's name that comes up far more regularly in this area than Wells, though as I said this was some pretty good thinking on Wells' part, introducing his own idea of the World Brain, fueled mainly by microfilm. [++] Wells writes: "There is no practical obstacle whatever now to the creation of an efficient index to all human knowledge, ideas and achievements, to the creation, that is, of a complete planetary memory for all mankind. And not simply an index; the direct reproduction of the thing itself can be summoned to any properly prepared spot. A microfilm, coloured where necessary, occupying an inch or so of space and weighing little more than a letter, can be duplicated from the records and sent anywhere, and thrown enlarged upon the screen so that the student may study it in every detail."
  • $1,000
  • $1,000
"Atomic Theory of the [Lambda] Transition in Liquid Helium"

“Atomic Theory of the [Lambda] Transition in Liquid Helium”, in Physical Review, 1953, 15 Septmber 1953, vol 91, pp 1291-1301. BOUND WITH: “Atomic Theory of Liquid Helium Near Absolute Zero” in the same issue.

FEYNMAN, R.P. **Two papers** FEYNMAN, R.P. "Atomic Theory of the [Lambda] Transition in Liquid Helium", in Physical Review, 1953, 15 September 1953, vol 91, pp 1291-1301. BOUND WITH: "Atomic Theory of Liquid Helium Near Absolute Zero" in the same issue, vol 91, pp 1301-1308. [++] The two Feynman papers appear in the same issue of the Physical Review, the full issue being newly and finely rebound in cloth-backed linen boards with a paper title label on the front cover. The text is as-new and the binding as I said is new.[++] "The problems that Feynman worked on came from solid-state theory. He became especially interested in liquid helium. At ordinary temperatures and pressures, helium exists as a gas; but at extremely low temperatures (a few degrees above absolute zero), helium becomes a liquid indeed, a liquid with strange properties. Liquid helium displays superfluidity, that is, it flows with no viscosity or friction at all (unlike ordinary liquids). The phenomenon had been discovered experimentally during the 1930s, and the great Russian theorist Lev Landau had provided a successful phenomenological description during the 1940s. Feynman brought his newest tools to bear on the problem path integrals and Feynman diagrams to explain superfluidity on a rigorously quantum-mechanical basis. In addition to the particle-like quantum excitations that had been studied, Feynman realized that a new quantum effect also played a role: the formation of quantum vortices. Once again his intuitive, pictorial approach proved successful." --Kaiser, David. "Feynman, Richard Phillips." Complete Dictionary of Scientific Biography, (online) vol. 21, Charles Scribner's Sons, 2008, pp. 18-26. 400.00
  • $400
Years of Grace

Years of Grace

BARNES, Margaret Ayer Illustrations by Ben S. Wohlberg. Small 4to. Full tan calf with raised bands and elaborate gilt lettering and decorative rules and devices. 563pp. All edges gilt. Frontispiece, illustrations, brown moire silk endpapers, sewn-in brown satin page marker. Fine. Pristine, tight limited (unspecified) first of this edition, Barnes' first novel (published 1930) and winner of the 1931 Pulitzer Prize. Tipped to inner flyleaf is a delightful partly-printed Typed Document Signed from Barnes: 1p, 7" X 10½", Chicago, IL, 8 July 1937. Near fine. Two original folds. Biographical update form for the 1938-39 edition of "Who's Who in America," printed on orange stock -- a mini-biography of sorts. Barnes' printed biographical entry from the previous edition (about 2" X 2") is affixed to the large blank center area, below which she types: "The only addition I have to make is an honorary degree that was given me -- Lit. D. Oglethorpe University, 1936. I am working on a novel, but it will not be published until next next [sic] year," below which she signs boldly in full in black ink. At lower left, she inks in her Chicago home address. Smattering of green ink editorial corrections throughout. The novel she mentions working on would be her 1938 fiction "Wisdom's Gate." Barnes (1886-1967) was an American playwright, short story writer and novelist. A lovely copy of her only Pulitzer Prize winner with an exceptional document. Book is housed in the Franklin Library's thin card stock slipcase with gold foil label.
  • $195
Memorial Addresses on the Life and Character of John Alexander Logan. Delivered in the Senate and House of Representatives

Memorial Addresses on the Life and Character of John Alexander Logan. Delivered in the Senate and House of Representatives, February 9 and 16, 1887.

(LOGAN, John A.) 4to. Black cloth with ornate silver front board lettering, rules and decorations. 213pp. Tissue-guarded frontispiece. Near fine. Exceptionally, unusually pristine first edition of a title invariably found in worn condition with cracked hinges. This superb contributor's copy, bright and lovely, was sent by one of its Congressional speechifiers (David B. Henderson, 1840-1906, ten-term Iowa congressman and Speaker of the House from 1899 to 1903) to his hometown. Tipped to front flyleaf is the 10" X 7" portion of the original mailing envelope, with printed upper left corner noting its contents: "Public Document. / House of Representatives U.S. / Memorial Addresses / on the Life and Character of / John Alexander Logan, / A Senator from Illinois. / 1887 / FREE." Henderson's huge, bold franking signature appears at upper right (alongside printed "M.C."), and near center he addresses it large and bold to Dr. H.P. Dickinson of the Hyde Clark Post G.A.R. in Dubuque, Iowa. Very good. Mildly soiled. This G.A.R. post's name/address inkstamp appears on the front pastedown, below which is noted in black ink: "Rec'd from Comrade / D.B. Henderson M.C. / Jan. 28/90." Henderson was among the legislators whose tributes to their deceased Congressional colleague are gathered in this volume; his comments appear on pages 98-100. After a distinguished military career in the Mexican-American War and the Civil War, John A. Logan (1826-86) went from Illinois state legislator to Congress, serving as representative and senator; he was unsuccessful vice presidential candidate in 1884 and was named 3rd Commander-in-Chief of the Grand Army of the Republic. An outstanding and unusual presentation copy of a contributor's copy.
  • $250
Papers in Illinois History and Transactions for the Year 1940

Papers in Illinois History and Transactions for the Year 1940

ANGLE, Paul M. (editor) Small 4to. Dark grey cloth. ix, 217pp. Illustrations, foldout map. Near fine. Tight, attractive first edition of the fourth volume in this annual series. Of greatest interest is that this was the copy of Adlai E. Stevenson II (1900-65), Illinois governor and twice Democratic presidential candidate, and after him son Adlai E. Stevenson III (1930-2021), U.S. senator from Illinois (1969-81). The lenghiest contribution by far (120 pages' worth) is H.A. Musham's "The Great Chicago Fire, October 8-10, 1871" and the foldout map depicts "Map Showing Progress of the Fire." Also of interest is a Typed Note Signed from editor Angle facing the title page -- a unique frontispiece of sorts. 1p, 8½" X 11", Springfield, IL, 14 March 1941. Addressed to Ralph G. Newman (1911-98, founder of Chicago's noted Abraham Lincoln Book Shop). Near fine. Two-hole punched at top. On "Illinois Historical Library" letterhead citing him as "Librarian," Angle chitchats with his bookseller friend: "The Biennial Register is available in our neighing [sic] institution, the Illinois State Library and, therefore, I shall not buy the volume which you are listing. Incidentally, an earlier volume in this series shows Lincoln's annual compensation -- probably for the year 1834 -- to have been almost $60.00. He was paid on a fee basis so the amount varies from year to year." Boldly signed in full. In 1946 the Chicago Historical Society published Angle's "The Great Chicago Fire: Described in Seven Letters by Men and Women Who Experienced Its Horrors, and Now Published in Commemoration of the Seventy-Fifth Anniversary of the Catastrophe" -- a volume in which Musham's account no doubt played a part. Could Newman at some point have gifted this copy to his good friend the governor? Other contents include Barbara Burr Hubbs' "Rivers That Meet in Egypt," James Alton James' "Robert Kennicott -- Pioneer Illinois Natural Scientist and Arctic Explorer," G.W. Smith's "Egypt's Cultural Contribution" and C.H. Cramer's "Robert Green Ingersoll." This odd variant edition, unlike other copies, bears no gilt lettering whatsoever on spine or front board -- publisher's error? A fascinating copy, in any case.
  • $100
La fille du capitaine

La fille du capitaine

Pouchkine Ensemble 3 ouvrages en 1 volume in-12 de (2) ff., (2) pp., 180 pp., (1) p., (2) ff., (2) pp., 62 pp., (1) p., VII et 66 pp., (1) p. Demi-veau vert, dos lisse orné de filets dorés, titre doré, tranches jaspées. Reliure de l'époque. 164 X 105 mm. RARE EDITION ORIGINALE FRANÇAISE DE « La fille du capitaine » D'ALEXANDRE POUCHKINE. La littérature russe se fait connaître en France dans la première moitié du XIXe siècle par ses poètes. « L'Hymne à Dieu » de Gavril Derjavine acquit une grande célébrité en Europe et connut trois traductions françaises entre 1811 et 1822. Une nouvelle période s'ouvre avec la traduction par Louis Viardot des « Nouvelles » de Gogol, en 1845. La traduction de « La Fille du capitaine » de Pouchkine en 1853 par Viardot connait un succès extraordinaire. Viardot-Tourgueniev et Mérimée sont dans ces années les principales figures de la traduction des auteurs russes. Roman historique d'Alexandre Pouchkine (1799-1837) « La Fille du capitaine » avait pris forme à l'occasion des travaux entrepris par le poète aux archives de l'Etat à Saint-Pétersbourg. Pouchkine préparait une « Histoire de la révolte de Pougatchev », uvre demeurée inachevée. C'est le règne de l'impératrice Catherine II qui fournit le cadre historique du récit. Les aventures du jeune officier Grinev et de son domestique Savéllitch constituent l'aimable prétexte qui permet à Pouchkine de dérouler devant nous les splendeurs de sa prose concise et fastueuse. Nous assistons au départ du lieutenant et de son fidèle compagnon de la maison paternelle pour la forteresse lointaine de Bélogorsk où Grinev doit faire son service. Puis, c'est la rencontre avec Maria Mironova, la fille du commandant de la forteresse ; le duel avec un rival, le siège et l'occupation de la forteresse par le rebelle Pougatchev. C'est ensuite l'arrestation de Grinev, accusé de haute trahison pour avoir eu, involontairement, contact avec les rebelles et, enfin, la grâce impériale obtenue en sa faveur par Maria. Dans le cadre d'une lointaine province russe au XVIIIe siècle, l'action est évoquée par Grinev lui-même, ce qui donne au roman le caractère d'une chronique familiale. « La trame est tissée de main de maître avec des éclairs d'une si puissante vitalité que le problème de la concordance avec la réalité historique ne se pose point, les figures de Catherine II et de Pougatchev étant désormais entrées dans la réalité magique que tout génie confère à son uvre. Le succès du roman fut grand. Son influence fut certaine sur toutes les chroniques familiales écrites sous forme de roman » (Dictionnaire des uvres). « Selon l'expression consacrée, Alexandre Pouchkine aurait été le « père fondateur » de la langue et de la littérature russes modernes. Il est sans doute l'écrivain qui a le plus contribué à la création du nouvel idiome littéraire, synthèse entre la langue parlée et la langue écrite » (Jean-Paul Polet). « Poète lyrique et épique, dramaturge, romancier en vers et en prose, historien, critique, Alexandre Pouchkine (1799-1837) est non seulement le plus grand des écrivains russes mais l'incarnation même du génie national. De son vivant, il a eu une influence déterminante sur ses contemporains : il a été l'étincelle qui a suscité une pléiade de poètes et d'écrivains. L'homme et la nature sont représentés chez lui dans toute leur étendue » (Nikita Struve, Dictionnaire des auteurs). SEDUISANT EXEMPLAIRE, TRES PUR, CONSERVE DANS SA RELIURE DE L'EPOQUE.
  • $4,189
  • $4,189
NOUVELLES CHOISIES d'Edgar Poe. Le scarabée d'or. L'aéronaute hollandais.

NOUVELLES CHOISIES d’Edgar Poe. Le scarabée d’or. L’aéronaute hollandais.

Poe, Edgar In-12 de (2) ff., V et 148 pp. Brochure jaune de l'éditeur, qq. pales rousseurs éparses, pages de garde tachées. Bel exemplaire non rogné. 178 x 111 mm. TRES RARE EDITION ORIGINALE FRANÇAISE DU SCARABEE D'OR ET DES PREMIERES NOUVELLES DE POE EN VOLUME. Traduction d'Amédé Pichot. Le Scarabée d'or est la nouvelle d'Edgar Poe la plus célèbre et la plus lue du vivant de son auteur, et, avec Double assassinat dans la rue Morgue, le plus grand succès de l'auteur. « Gentleman du Sud ayant subi des revers de fortune, William Legrand vit en reclus avec Jupiter, son fidèle serviteur, sur l'île de Sullivan. Un jour, il recueille dans un vieux bout de parchemin un magnifique scarabée. Ces deux éléments vont conduire Legrand, Jupiter et un ami de passage, dans une folle course au trésor. Celui du fameux capitaine Kidd qui a jadis tracé un code secret à l'encre sympathique sur l'ancien parchemin. Terrible pirate et tête de mort forment le mystère du scarabée d'or. Ecrit en 1842 à l'occasion d'un concours organisé par le Dollar Newspaper, ce récit valut à Edgar Allan Poe le premier prix, doté de cent dollars. Une somme coquette pour l'époque et la plus élevée qu'ait perçue Poe pour une nouvelle. *Le scarabée d'or * fut adapté au théâtre à Philadelphie deux mois après sa parution et connut quantité de publications pirates à partir de 1846. Dans sa postface à la première édition de L'île au trésor (1883), Robert Louis Stevenson reconnut bien volontiers l'influence de la nouvelle sur son roman. » (X. Mauméjean). Edgar Allan Poe was the creator, in prose and poetry, of an eerie, highly wrought chamber music, different in both sound and sense from the compositions of his nineteenth-century literary contemporaries. Poe's writings orchestrate effects with such cunning that they hold readers in a singularly sensational spell: we remember what Poe's work feels like there is nothing else quite like it. L'une des premières traductions d'Edgar Poe, l'un des plus grands succès de l'auteur, excessivement rare en brochure d'éditeur. BEL EXEMPLAIRE CONSERVE DANS SON ECLATANTE BROCHURE JAUNE D'EDITEUR.
  • $1,984
  • $1,984
LETTRES DE S. AUGUSTIN

LETTRES DE S. AUGUSTIN

Saint-Augustin 6 volumes in-8. Maroquin rouge, armes poussées au centre des plats, triple filet doré en encadrement, dos à nerfs orné de fers dorés, pièces de titre et de tomaison de maroquin olive, tranches dorées. Reliure du XVIIIe siècle. 182 x 120 mm. EDITION EN PARTIE ORIGINALE DES LETTRES DE SAINT-AUGUSTIN « augmentée de quelques lettres qui n avaient pas encore paru ». De l'énorme correspondance de Saint-Augustin il ne nous reste plus que 230 lettres adressées à plus de 53 correspondants. « Cette correspondance est du plus grand secours pour pénétrer dans les méandres de la vie et de l esprit de cette haute personnalité ; en outre elle confirme son influence et ses doctrines ». Toutes les lettres sont imprégnées de la même ardeur dans la recherche de la vérité et dans l exhortation à la perfection ; d autres sont de véritables traités. Dans une des lettres l auteur exprime sa théorie sur la nature des rêves. Dans une autre Saint-Augustin dissuade Jérôme d'une nouvelle traduction de l'original hébreu de l'Ancien Testament. Dans une lettre à Donat, proconsul d Afrique il l exhorte à réprimer les Donatistes, mais non à les tuer. Une partie de la correspondance est adressée au Pape Innocent pour obtenir la condamnation de Pélage, à Boniface, grand guerrier de l'époque. Dans une autre lettre Saint-Augustin aborde la discussion de l'origine de l'âme. SOMPTUEUX EXEMPLAIRE REVETU D UN MAROQUIN ROUGE AUX ARMES DE LA COMTESSE DE PROVENCE (1753-1810). « Marie-Joséphine-Louise-Bénédicte de Savoie, seconde fille de Victor-Amédée III, duc de Savoie et roi de Sardaigne, et de Marie-Antoinette-Ferdinande, infante d Espagne, née à Turin le 2 septembre 1753, épousa le 14 mai 1771 Louis-Stanislas-Xavier, comte de Provence, plus tard Louis XVIII, dont elle n eut pas d enfant. Elle prit en émigration le titre de comtesse de Lille et mourut à Hartwell, en Angleterre, le 13 novembre 1810 ». « La comtesse de Provence eut, à l exemple de son époux, qui se piquait fort de littérature et cultivait les muses, le goût des Lettres et des Arts. Sa bibliothèque, dont le catalogue manuscrit est à l Arsenal, avait été composée avec beaucoup d intelligence ».
  • $16,535
  • $16,535
DECLARATION OF THE INDEPENDENT STATE OF ISRAEL. Iton Rishmi

DECLARATION OF THE INDEPENDENT STATE OF ISRAEL. Iton Rishmi

Folio. (4) pp. Unbound as issued, text in Hebrew, in near perfect condition. Very rare first edition first issue of the Israeli Declaration of Independence printed on the first day of the birth of Israel. This was the first publication rescinding the British White Paper. With the names of all of the signatories, headed by David Ben-Gurion, this document heralded the end of British involvement in Palestine, and the start of unrestricted immigration into the new Jewish state. It publishes for the very first time the full declaration as read out by Ben-Gurion at 4pm on Friday 14 May 1948 in the Tel-Aviv Museum. It announced that the National Council was to become the Provisional Government of Israel until a Constituent Assembly was formed on 1 October 1948. Iton Rishmi records all the decrees, ordinances and notices of the Israeli government, as well as the appointments of all government officials. Scarce first printing of the Israeli Declaration of Independence, the seminal historical document that establishes the first Jewish State in 2000 years. Contained in the first issue of the Official Gazette of the Israeli provisional government, this landmark publication was printed on the first day of the birth of Israel. Formally entitled the Declaration of the Establishment of the State of Israel, the Israeli Declaration of Independence was proclaimed on May 14 1948, by David Ben-Gurion, the executive head of the World Zionist Organization, chairman of the Jewish Agency for Palestine, and, shortly after, the first Prime minister of Israel. It declared the establishment of a Jewish state in Eretz-Israel, to be known as the State of Israel. "The Land of Israel was the birthplace of the Jewish people. Here, their spiritual, religious, and national identity was formed. Here, they achieved independence and created a culture of national and universal significance. Here, they wrote and gave the Bible to the world. Exiled from Palestine, the Jewish people remained faithful to it in all the countries of their dispersion, never ceasing to pray and hope for their return and the restoration of their national freedom." Immediately following the British army withdrawal earlier on May 14, war broke out between Jews and Arabs. Egypt launched an air assault against Israel that same evening. Despite a blackout in Tel Aviv-and the expected Arab invasion-Jews celebrated the birth of their new nation, especially after word was received that the United States had recognized the Jewish state. At midnight, the State of Israel officially came into being upon termination of the British mandate in Palestine. "Using the American Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution as philosophical frameworks, a small group of attorneys and politicians pieced together Israel's Declaration of Independence. On Friday, May 14, the National Council, established to oversee the political needs of the Jewish community in Palestine, voted to accept the final text of the Declaration. That afternoon at 4 pm, David Ben-Gurion, head of the National Council, read the Declaration at the Tel Aviv Museum. The Declaration was divided into four parts: 1) a biblical, historical, and international legal case for the existence of a Jewish state in the Land of Israel" 2) the self-evident right of the Jewish people to claim statehood 3) the actual declaration of statehood" and 4) statements about how the state would operate, including an enumeration of citizen rights. Very rare and sought-after first edition first issue of this seminal historical document that establishes the birth of the Jewish State. Very rare and sought-after.
  • $9,701
  • $9,701
The new Jamaica Almanack

The new Jamaica Almanack, and register, Calculated to the Meridian of the Island for the Year of our Lord 1794. Being the Second after Bissextile or Leap Year. [Second Edition – Carefully Corrected]

[JAMAICA] 146pp, [14]. With two hand-coloured engraved leaves of plates depicting 'Signals for distinguishing the Several Packets on the Falmouth Station' bound in before title. Variously interleaved at front, with numerous blanks at end inserted, some of which removed. Contemporary, perhaps original gilt-tooled wallet-format calf over card boards, the fold-over flap missing, but with an open fore-edge to upper board with marbled paper-lined pocket. Rubbed and marked, with some occasional staining, sometimes rather unsightly, to text, childish pen and pencil trials to endpapers, engraved signals (largely erased), and some blank- interleaving or areas of text. Occasional manuscript correction to text. Bifolium G3-4 detached from the binding. A rare Jamaican-printed almanac - with the original engraved signals leaves apparently issued only in this edition - featuring an early example of West-Indian Hebrew printing. Almanacs were apparently first issued in Jamaica during the 1760s, printed by Weatherby & McCann, Walker & Strupar, Douglass and Aikman, and later Alexander Aikman alone, at Kingston. The rival New Jamaica Almanack and Register first appeared in the same city in 1788, printed by Bennett and Dickson, for the stationer Thomas Stevenson of King Street. From 1791 this same title was printed by David Dickson alone at Spanish Town (Saint Jago de la Vega). This is definitely not the second appearance of a Dickson printed almanac either printed at Kingston or Spanish Town (editions for 1791, 1792 and 1793 are known, for example, with the Saint Jago de la Vega imprint), despite the title designation. In addition to providing a calendar specifically for use in the colony, noting for example the dates of various Jamaican assizes, these eighteenth-century almanacks are perhaps best known for their inclusion of some of the earliest examples of printing with Hebrew type - specifically produced for the use of the largest Jewish community in the Atlantic outside of London - in the Western hemisphere, significantly predating any American-printed Hebrew calendar. This is displayed in this edition as a final calendar leaf headed 'Of Months, Sabbaths, and Holidays, which the Hebrews or Jews observe and keep, for the Years 5554 an 5555 of the Creation'. Whilst much of the remainder of the first half of the volume relates to British government and administration, the first 30pp of the second half includes a description of the geography and history of Jamaica, and excerpts various commercial treaties applicable, including the 'Act for regulating the Commerce with America', and notes the duties due to the Receiver-General for landing traded goods. Rather disturbingly, this includes the government duty of £2 'per head' imposed upon the importers of enslaved Africans. Fully 44 further pages, headed 'Jamaica Lists', relate to the civil administration and military establishments of the colony, including lists of officials and appointees, headed by the then Lt.-Governor Major General Adam Williamson. Included in this section are extensive details on the economic output of the plantations of the island, grouped by parish within different counties, often revealing the extent of enslavement. Thus, St. George is noted as housing '19 Sugar Works, and 5 more settling, 90 other Settlements, 7000 Slaves, and 4500 Cattle', whilst Trewlawny housed '86 Sugar Works, 126 other Settlements, 27000 Slaves, and 15000 Cattle'. Copies of the Dickson-printed almanacks printed during the final decade of the eighteenth- century are known with and without maps. There is none present here, but equally there is no obvious absence of such. However, the only reference we can find to any edition of an almanac with engravings of signals flags, as here, is in the 1794 edition; indeed, the foot of the first of the two engraved leaves notes that it was 'Engraved for the New Jamaica Almanac, 1794'. Given the increasingly visible presence of Royal Naval ships in the West Indies due to action taken against French colonies in the War of the First Coalition, it is entirely possible that the signals were placed in some copies of the 1794 New Jamaican Almanack instead of the map. OCLC locates three copies worldwide (Temple, with a map, and two at Yale, one without a map or signals, wanting pp81-102, and possibly pp.145-6; and another without map but with the signals). ESTC N67930. Size: 12mo in 6s
  • $8,165
  • $8,165
Report from the committee on the commercial state of the west indian colonies

Report from the committee on the commercial state of the west indian colonies

[WEST-INDIES] 85pp, [3]. Docket title to verso of terminal leaf. Apparently unrecorded. [Bound with:] Report from the committee on the distillation of sugar and molasses. [London?] [s.n.], [1808]. 317pp, [1]. [And:] Second report from the committee on the distillation of sugar and molasses. [London?] [s.n.], [1808]. 319-341pp, [5]. Docket title to verso of terminal leaf. [And:] Third report from the committee on the distillation of sugar and molasses. [London?] [s.n.], [1808]. 343-388pp, [2]. Docket title to verso of terminal leaf. [And:] [Drop-head title:] House of assembly, Veneris, 23o die Novembris, 1804. [Report of a committee on the abolition of the slave trade.] [Spainish Town, Jamaica?]. [Alexander Aikin, Jun., Printer to the Honourable Assembly], [1804]. 40pp. With two folding tables. OCLC and COPAC together record copies at only two locations (LoC and Wales). [And:] [Drop-head title:] House of assembly, Veneris, 13o die Novembris, 1807. [Report of a committee to enquire into the consequences of imposing duties on sugar.] [s.i., Jamaica?] [s.n.], [1807]. 8pp. Apparently unrecorded. [And:] [Drop-head title:] At a Meeting of the West India Association of Planters and Merchants in Glasgow, held for the purpose of considering the proper remedies for relief of the West India Colonial Trade, on the 8th January, 1808. [Glasgow], [S. Hunter], [1808]. 2pp, [2]. Docket title to verso of terminal leaf. Apparently unrecorded. [And:] [Drop-head title:] Unto the right honourable, the lords commissioners of his majesty's treasury the memorial of the importers, dealers, and others, interested in the Sale of Rum at the Ports of Clyde. [Glasgow]. [Mennons & Co.], [1804]. 2pp. Single sheet, printed on both sides. Apparently unrecorded. [And:] [Drop-head title:] Sugar trade of great britain, From 1808 to 1821, Collected from returns to the House of Commons, ordered to be printed 19th April, and 28th May, 1821. [Glasgow]. [s.n.], [1821]. Apparently unrecorded. Dimensions 390 x 330 mm. Single leaf broadside, pasted to recto of initial leaf of next bound work: [Accounts relating to sugar.] [London?] [s.n.], [1821]. 7pp, [1]. Docket title to verso of terminal leaf. Folio and quarto. Contemporary gilt-ruled calf, contrasting black morocco lettering-piece. Rubbed and marked, joints starting. Very occasional light spotting. Contemporary inked ownership inscription of James Ewing to FEP, with detailed manuscript notes on British commerce between 1793 and 1827 in his hand beneath. A coherent sammelband of rare and important publications, several unrecorded, relating to British commerce, in particular the sugar trade of the West Indies, from the library of Scottish merchant, plantation owner, slave-holder, and sometime politician James Ewing of Strathleven (1775-1853). Ewing founded the Glasgow-West India merchant firm James Ewing & Co. around 1803. The company imported sugar and cotton and profited from commission. In addition, Ewing exported goods, including textiles and foodstuffs, to slave plantation owners in Jamaica. In 1807, he was one of the leading influences behind the establishment of the Glasgow West India Association, the primary pro-slavery lobbying group outside of London. There is no record of Ewing ever visiting Jamaica, later came to hold significant interests on the island. In 1832 he took ownership of Taylor Caymanas plantation and its enslaved workers in St Catherine. He also held security over those on other plantations. Following the emancipation of enslaved people in British colonies in 1834, Ewing claimed over £9,000 in compensation. The documents collected here are a testament to Ewing's heavy involvement in the sugar trade, his primary source of income in the early nineteenth century, and the profiteering from slavery which would provide the foundation for his expansion into other lucrative enterprises. Of particular importance within this largely commercially orientated volume is a Jamaica- printed report of an 1804 House of Assembly committee on the effects that an abolition of the slave trade would bring, freely admitting that it would be disastrous for the West Indian colonies, and threaten the cultivation of sugar - a development that Ewing would most surely have been fearful of. The highly detailed study includes a wealth of statistical information regarding the economic situation of the West Indies, including two appendixed folding tables, and blames diminishing economic circumstances squarely on 'laws and regulations, withholding from the West- India colonies a necessary supply of labourers, giving undue encouragement to rival settlements, and heaping upon their staples exorbitant and oppressive imposts'. It also reveals the visceral fears held by the representatives of the slave- owning class of Jamaica, in both their future economic prospects and physical safety, suggesting that West Indian developments post- abolition would reveal to its strongest advocates that: 'They will soon see that the situation in which the island is placed invites them to assist the wishes of their friends, before the delusions shall vanish; and, in such circumstances, the struggle will not be long though the catastrophe will be terrible'. The two unrecorded Scottish-printed documents, produced on behalf of merchants there with interest in the West Indies, provide yet further detailed economic analysis of the changing nature of trade between Great Britain and those areas which had long relied so heavily upon the slave trade. As a whole this volumes presents a fascinating insight into the business interests of an important figure in the transatlantic sugar trade in the age of abolition, and as such surely a remarkable research opportunity.
  • $16,330
  • $16,330
The Recruiting Officer

The Recruiting Officer

FARQUHAR, George 144pp. Original publisher's red cloth, lettered in gilt, with original publisher's pictorial dustwrapper. Wrapper a trifle faded with minor losses and fading, unclipped. Bright and clean save a little water damage to the top right of text-block, Inscribed to FFEP: 'To The Boss - With My Best - Ken, 1965'. Kenneth Tynan (1927-1980) was an influential - and groundbreaking - English theatre critic and writer, who rose to prominence during the 'Angry Young Man' movement that promoted theatrical realism. Despite being critical of Olivier's tenure at Chichester Festival Theatre, Tynan nonetheless recommended himself as Literary Director of the National Theatre. Olivier's wife, Joan, had to convince her husband to accept - a decision that would cement both his and Tynan's reputations internationally. This is the first edition of the companion volume to one of Tynan's National productions that starred Olivier, which Tynan explains in the introduction 'is a detailed illustrated account of a production that did for an English classic the kind of service a National Theatre exists to provide â" that of cleaning away the accretions of dust and overprinting with which time has disfigured the textâ. From the library of Laurence Olivier, to whom many books were gifted over the length of his illustrious, industrious, and enduring career as one of the most important figures of stage and screen in the 20th century. Size: Large 8vo
  • $392
Sister carrie

Sister carrie

DREISER, Theodore [4], xvi, [1], 387pp, [1]. Original publisher's beige cloth-backed brown cloth boards, title label to spine lettered gilt, T.E.G., fore-edge untrimmed. Title label slightly chipped, corners bumped. Internally bright and clean except evidence of a bookplate removed from the front pastedown. Inscribed to the FFEP: 'For Laurence Olivier, With admiration and appreciation - Mrs Theodore Dreiser. Hollywood, August 29, 1950.' Signed and numbered by illustrator Reginald Marsh to the colophon. Bookseller label of Philip C. Duschnes, New York, to rear pastedown. Theodore Dreiser (1871-1945) was an American journalist and novelist, who's first novel, Sister Carrie, has been adapted for opera twice, film once, and ranked at number 33 on the Modern Library's list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century. While the initial print run of a little over 1000 sold only 456 copies, this early naturalist novel remains an important study in social commentary. Inscribed by Dreiserâs widow, Helen, who had convinced Olivier to play the tragic figure of Hurstwood in the 1952 film adaptation opposite Jennifer Jones. The film was nominated for two Academy Awards in Costume Design and Art Direction. From the library of Laurence Olivier, to whom many books were gifted over the length of his illustrious, industrious, and enduring career as one of the most important figures of stage and screen in the 20th century. Size: Large 8vo Limited third edition, number 994 of 1500.
  • $261
Critical dissertations on the origin

Critical dissertations on the origin, antiquities, language, government, manners, and religion, of the ancient caledonians, their posterity the picts, and the british and irish scots

MACPHERSON, John xxiv, [2], 382pp. Contemporary gilt-tooled tan half-calf, marbled boards. Marbled edges. A trifle rubbed and marked, bumping to corners. Occasional marginal browning, else fine. Presentation copy, inscribed 'To Nathanial Wraall Esqr. from Sir John Macpherson, Brompton 10 August 1810' to head of title. A choice copy of the most significant work of Church of Scotland minister on Skye and antiquary John Macpherson (1713-1765), published posthumously, inscribed by the son of the author to the English travel writer, Sir Nathaniel William Wraxall (1751-1831). The author Sir John Macpherson (1744-1821) of Brompton Grove had sold his fatherâs manuscript of 'the production of the leisure hours in one of the remotest of the Scottish isles' in 1767, and wrote the dedication (to Charles Greville) which appears on the second leaf, before sailing for India, where he commenced a long and tumultuous association with the East India Company which included his sometime dismissal from the service by the Madras Council, his appointment as agent to Nawab Muhammed Ali, and his eventual succession as Governor- General of India on the resignation of Warren Hastings. His friendship with English travel writer and memoirist travel writer, Sir Nathaniel William Wraxall (1751-1831), himself sometime agent to Muhammad Ali, and to whom he inscribed this copy, is the source of much of his biography in relation to India. ESTC T96376. Size: Quarto
  • $1,960
  • $1,960
Beating the Invader An original

Beating the Invader An original, early Second World War leaflet issued by the British Government in anticipation of England’s invasion by Nazi Germany

Winston S. Churchill "If invasion comes, everyone - young or old, men and women - will be eager to play their part worthily." This original leaflet issued by the British Government early during the Second World War testifies to the very real peril faced by Britain during the first year of Winston S. Churchill's wartime premiership. The war's outcome is now long-settled history, making it perhaps difficult to viscerally understand the credible, imminent threat of Nazi invasion at the time.Beating the INVADER was issued in May 1941, one year after Churchill became wartime Prime Minister (on 10 May 1940). The document is printed on both sides of a thin sheet of newsprint-quality paper, measuring approximately 11 inches by 8.25 inches (27.9 x 21 cm). Condition approaches very good, particularly considering the ephemeral nature of the publication and the inherent perishability of the format. There is a single horizontal and a single vertical fold, ostensibly from original mailing. The leaflet is surprisingly clean; there is no reportable soiling or spotting and inevitable age-toning is mild and uniform. There are various creases and light wear to extremities, including a few tiny closed tears, but only fractional loss, confined to the blank margin edges. This leaflet is quite suitable for framing.When Churchill became Prime Minister on 10 May 1940, the war for Britain was not so much a struggle for victory as a struggle to survive. Churchill's first year in office saw, among other near-calamities, the Battle of the Atlantic, the fall of France, evacuation at Dunkirk, and the Battle of Britain. Hitler intended the massive, sustained attacks by his Luftwaffe to achieve air superiority preparatory to an invasion of England. Sapping Britain's Air Force and war-making capacity was of course a goal. But so to was the simple goal of terrorizing Britons and eroding their will to fight. In May 1941, Churchill's Britain had held on for a perilous year with remarkable resolve and resourcefulness, but her position remained tenuous. The United States was still seven months from entering the war and had only recently approved the Lend-Lease Act.Beating the Invader is a fascinating encapsulation of Britain's imperiled resolve at the end of Churchill's first year as wartime leader. The leaflet was prepared by the Ministry of Information and forwarded to Churchill on 7 March 1941. Churchill dictated his introduction on 25 March. After sober consideration of the timing and effect of such a message to the British people, the War Cabinet decided on April 24, 1941 to print more than 14 million copies and distribute the leaflet to all British households. Bibliographer Ronald Cohen writes: "The huge print run might leave one with the impression that the leaflet would be commonly found today. It was, however, only a leaflet anticipating an event that never came to pass. Few copies have survived."The format is noteworthy. Churchill's introduction to this leaflet takes up two-thirds of the first page, headed "A MESSAGE FROM THE PRIME MINISTER and terminating with his facsimile signature. Though the tone remains stern and the situation dire, the message beginning with the title of the leaflet is subtly as resolute as it is dire. Fourteen numbered points in Q & A format calmly and soberly provide granular guidance about what to do in various conditions incident to invasion. One gets the feeling that much had been weathered and learned since the war began in September 1939, and that a firm, composed hand was is now on the tiller. A closing trio of exhortations clearly convey the exigency of the hour: "Do not tell the enemy anything; Do not give him anything; Do not help him in any way". But above this trio in all caps is the more affirmative exhortation: "GIVE ALL THE HELP YOU CAN TO OUR TROOPS". The bottom left verso margin features the print history, including the date "5/41".Reference: Cohen B76, Woods A69.
  • $450