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The Breviary Treasures

The Breviary Treasures

Aurelius, Virgil, Epictetus,Romanorum, Anacreon, Horace,Homer,Aristophanes, Lucian,Pindar,Aristophanes. Boston Nathan Haskell Dole 1904 Handsomely bound in gilt ruled 3/4 brown Levant Morocco and linen covered boards. Elaborate gilt tooled spine compartments with gilt scored raised bands.Gilt titles. Top Edges Gilded. Tall 8vo. 6.5"x9". The Adelphi Edition. Number 171 of an Edition Limited to 475 copies, printed upon French Handmade paper. Illustrated by monochrome frontispieces and elaborate border decorations to each page of text. Sets is comprised by- The Wisdom of Marcus Aurelius. Translated by Jeremy Collier; The Ecolgues of Vergil. Translated by Baron Bowen; Sayings of Epictetus. Translated by T.W. Rolleston; Selections from Gesta Romanorum. Translated by Rev. Charles Small; Odes of Anacreon Anacreontics and Other Selections from the Greek Anthology. Translated by n/a ; The Satires of Horace. Translated by Various Hands; The Story of Odysseus in the Land of the Phæacians, Being the Sixth and a Part of the Seventh Book of the Odyssey. Translated by Andrew Lang and Prof. Butcher; Selections from Aristophanes and Lucian. Translated by F.A. Paley; The Olympic and Pythian Odes of Pindar. Translated by Abraham Moore; Selections from the Koran of Mohammed. Translated by George Sale. Various very mild rubbing to covers.Several extremely mild chips to several caps. Small scuffs to several spines,including a short vertical streak to Koran spine. Some corners gently bumped. A gleaming, crisp and clean Fine set.
  • $2,700
  • $2,700
Pilot's Flight Operation Instructions for the P-51D Airplane

Pilot's Flight Operation Instructions for the P-51D Airplane

North American Aviation, Inc. 1944. Bound in stiff pictorial wrappers. Thin 4to. Classified "Restricted" and marked as such on each page. Report No. NA-5864. Profusely illustrated with photographs, drawings, maps, diagrams, charts, etc. The P-51 Mustang was,with little argument, the single greatest American Fighter Aircraft of World War 2. The sleek, low winged Mustang was among the very first to use a laminar-flow wing, which resulted in far less drag. Also, the P-51 had its wingtips, rudder, and elevators with square-cut ends, unlike almost every other aircraft at the time. It paid off, as the P-51 could reach 380mph while the lighter Spitfire, with half as much fuel weight, could not get within 15mph of that figure. The P-51 Mustang, designed in 1940 after Great Britain requested that North American build P-40 Warhawks for the Royal Air Force, was at first ignored by U. S. officials. However, the design showed such promise that in 1941 the Army Air Forces took delivery of P-51A's powered by the Allison V-1710 engine. These early Mustangs were restricted to reconnaissance and ground attack due to the limited performance of the Allison engines. Tests in 1942 with the Roll-Royce "Merlin" engine showed a marked increase in performance. By the end of 1943, Merlin powered P-51Bs entered combat with the 354th Fighter Group in England. Eighth Air Force Mustangs provided long range escort to B-17s and B-24s and scored heavily over German interceptors. By the war's end, P-51s had destroyed 4,950 enemy aircraft in the air, more than any other U. S. fighter in Europe. Mustangs served in nearly every active combat zone, including the Pacific where they escorted B-29s from Iwo Jima to Japan. Between 1941 and 1945, the Army Air Force ordered 14,855 Mustangs. During the Korean Conflict, P-51's were used primarily for close support of ground forces until withdrawn from combat in 1953. P-51s served with Reserve and National Guard units until 1957. Small blemish to front cover. Front and rear covers present various usual creasing and wear to edges. A patch or two of foxing to inside front cover.Small binding crease at top of gutter throughout. Several scattered annotations. A tad musty. A sound, crisp very rare wartime issue.
  • $1,250
  • $1,250
Pilot Training Manual for the A-26 Invader

Pilot Training Manual for the A-26 Invader

Washington D. C. Headquarters-U.S. Army Air Forces. 1945. Punch and clipbound in stylized titled coloured pictorial wrappers. Thin 4to. Classified "Restricted" and marked as such on each page.The January 1945 issue. Profusely illustrated with photographs, drawings, maps, diagrams, charts, etc. The A-26, the last aircraft designated as an "attack bomber," was designed to replace the Douglas A-20 Havoc/Boston. It incorporated many improvements over the earlier Douglas designs. The first three XA-26 prototypes first flew in July 1942, and each was configured differently: Number One as a daylight bomber with a glass nose, Number Two as a gun-laden night-fighter, and Number Three as a ground-attack platform, with a 75-millimeter cannon in the nose. This final variant, eventually called the A-26B, was chosen for production. Upon its delivery to the 9th Air Force in Europe in November 1944 (and the Pacific Theater shortly thereafter), the A-26 became the fastest US bomber of WWII. The A-26C, with slightly-modified armament, was introduced in 1945. The A-26s combat career was cut short by the end of the war, and because no other use could be found for them, many A-26s were converted to JD-1 target tugs for the US Navy. A strange aircraft-designation swap occurred in 1948, when the Martin B-26 Marauder was deactivated and the Douglas A-26 was re-designated the B-26. (It kept this designation until 1962.) B-26s went on to serve extensively in both the Korean and Vietnam wars. In Vietnam, they were commonly used in the Counter-Insurgency (COIN) role, with very heavy armament and extra power. This version, the B-26K, was based in Thailand and was, to confuse things further, called the A-26 for political reasons. B-26s were also used for training, VIP transport, cargo, night reconnaissance, missile guidance and tracking, and as drone-control platforms. Post-war uses of the airplane included luxurious executive transport (Smith Tempo I; Tempo II and Biscayne 26; LAS Super-26; Berry Silver-Sixty; Monarch-26; On-Mark Marketeer/Marksman), aerial surveying and, most notably, firefighting, a role in which it is still occasionally used today. - warbirdalley Owners ink signature to front cover. Ink stamp of Salem Army Airdrome HQ dated 1945 to title Page and inside rear cover. Usual rust offset from metal binding pins to front and rear inside covers.2" shallow chip to fore-edge of front cover.An extremely bright and crisp, Near Fine copy of this original Second World War rarity.
  • $600
Pilot Training Manual for the P-47 Thunderbolt

Pilot Training Manual for the P-47 Thunderbolt

Washington D. C. Headquarters-U.S. Army Air Forces. 1945. Punch and clipbound in stylized titled coloured pictorial wrappers. Thin 4to. Classified "Restricted" and marked as such on each page.The March 1945 issue.Laid-into this manual are two Fine pamphlets: 1. The Thunderbolt Pilot Speaks. Published by the A.C. of S.,A-2 Fighter Command. Marked "confidential".Undated but c. 1944. 2. Notes on the Use of Oxygen Equipment for Fighter Pilots -With Special Reference to the P-47. 46th Altitude Training Unit. Printed by the 1st Airborne EAUTC Reproduction Section. Undated, but c.1944. Profusely illustrated with photographs, drawings, maps, diagrams, charts, etc. The Thunderbolt was the most famous of all the Republic aircraft in WWII. First flown on 6 May 1941, the P-47 was designed as a (then) large, high-performance fighter/bomber, utilizing the large Pratt and Whitney R-2800 Double Wasp engine to give it excellent performance and a large load-carrying capability. The first deliveries of the P-47 took place in June 1942, when the US Army Air Corps began flying it in the European Theater. Though it was an excellent airplane, several improvements were made as production continued, with each improvement adding power, maneuverability and range. As the war progressed, the Thunderbolt, or "Jug," as it was affectionately called, gained a reputation as a reliable and extremely tough airplane, able to take incredible amounts of damage and still return its pilot home safely. P-47s logged almost 2 million flight hours during the war, during which they were responsible for the destruction of over 7,000 enemy aircraft in the air and on the ground in the European Theater alone. Later in the war, Jugs served as escort fighters for B-29 bombers in the Pacific. Mostly, though, they excelled in the ground-attack role, strafing and bombing their way across the battlefields of Europe. Early versions of the P-47 had "razorback" fuselages, but later models (beginning near the middle of the P-47D production run) featured a bubble canopy which gave the pilot increased rearward visibility. P-47s were also used during the war by the air forces of Brazil, England, France, Mexico and the Soviet Union. Following the war, the Jug served for nine more years in the US, flown by the Air National Guard. It continued to serve for many additional years with the air forces of over 15 nations around the world.- warbirdalley Owners ink signature to front cover. Ink stamp of Salem Army Airdrome HQ dated 1945 to title Page and inside rear cover. Usual protrusion of metal binding pins to front and rear inside covers. 2" chip to bottom corner of front cover. A 3.5" x .5" piece of front cover's bottom edge apparently was lacking and repair was conducted at sometime using a "filler" of like coloured card stock (which may be seen on the inside front cover). Spine and Edges sporadically and mildly worn.Small, mild stain to bottom of Title Page.Else, a crisp, bright Very Good copy.
  • $1,500
  • $1,500
Pilot Training Manual for the B-17 Flying Fortress

Pilot Training Manual for the B-17 Flying Fortress

Army Air Force Headquarters-U.S. Army Air Forces. Revised May 1945. Punch and clipbound in stylized titled coloured pictorial wrappers. Small 4to. Classified "Restricted" and marked as such on each page. Introduction by General Hap Arnold , Commanding General of the Army Air Forces Profusely illustrated with photographs, drawings, schematics, diagrams ( some fold-out ), cutaways, etc. Arguably the most famous aircraft of the Second World War the Boeing B-17 ( Flying Fortress ) was the spearhead of the American daylight bombing offensive in Europe from beginning to end , as well as serving in every other theatre of war. No single aircraft type contributed more to the defeat of the Luftwaffe, which enabled tangible expression to be given to the controversial U. S. policy for the strategic assault of Germany by day in the face of formidable political argument as well as desperate enemy opposition. Few other aircraft of the war gained the universal affection of their aircrew over so long an operational periods did the B-17 ( Green ). This manual served the dual purpose of training checklist and working handbook for B-17 pilot airplane commanders. Graphically intensive, the manual covers all aspects of the Flying Fortress from operational duties and command to construction, flight, navigation, weaponry, emergencies, etc. A very rare, highly prized memento of aviation and military. history Owners ink signature to front cover. Ink stamp of Salem Army Airdrome HQ dated 1945 to title Page and inside rear cover. Usual rust offset from metal binding pins to front and rear inside covers.Binding pin protruding slightly onto front cover. Mild sporadic soiling to rear cover.Light wear to edges. A crisp, bright Very Good copy of this original, rare relic of Aviation History.
  • $1,250
  • $1,250
Pilot Training Manual for the P-51 Mustang

Pilot Training Manual for the P-51 Mustang

Washington D. C. Headquarters-U.S. Army Air Forces. 1944. Punch and clipbound in stylized titled coloured pictorial wrappers. Thin 4to. Classified "Restricted" and marked as such on each page.This manual is for the P51-B and C, with several pages at end detailing the "Teardrop" D type - which was still in production at the time this manual was produced. Profusely illustrated with photographs, drawings, maps, diagrams, charts, etc. The P-51 Mustang was,with little argument, the single greatest American Fighter Aircraft of World War 2. The sleek, low winged Mustang was among the very first to use a laminar-flow wing, which resulted in far less drag. Also, the P-51 had its wingtips, rudder, and elevators with square-cut ends, unlike almost every other aircraft at the time. It paid off, as the P-51 could reach 380mph while the lighter Spitfire, with half as much fuel weight, could not get within 15mph of that figure. The P-51 Mustang, designed in 1940 after Great Britain requested that North American build P-40 Warhawks for the Royal Air Force, was at first ignored by U. S. officials. However, the design showed such promise that in 1941 the Army Air Forces took delivery of P-51A's powered by the Allison V-1710 engine. These early Mustangs were restricted to reconnaissance and ground attack due to the limited performance of the Allison engines. Tests in 1942 with the Roll-Royce "Merlin" engine showed a marked increase in performance. By the end of 1943, Merlin powered P-51Bs entered combat with the 354th Fighter Group in England. Eighth Air Force Mustangs provided long range escort to B-17s and B-24s and scored heavily over German interceptors. By the war's end, P-51s had destroyed 4,950 enemy aircraft in the air, more than any other U. S. fighter in Europe. Mustangs served in nearly every active combat zone, including the Pacific where they escorted B-29s from Iwo Jima to Japan. Between 1941 and 1945, the Army Air Force ordered 14,855 Mustangs. During the Korean Conflict, P-51's were used primarily for close support of ground forces until withdrawn from combat in 1953. P-51s served with Reserve and National Guard units until 1957. Ink stamp of Salem Army Airdrome HQ dated 1945 to title Page and inside rear cover. Tiny tear to top edge of cover. Owners name in ink to front cover.Small chip to top of spine.Various small stains at spine on rear cover. Usual rust offset from metal binding pins to front and rear inside covers. to front and rear inside covers. A remarkably preserved, clean and crisp copy of this most rare and desirable relic.
  • $2,500
  • $2,500
Pilot Training Manual for the P-38 Lightning

Pilot Training Manual for the P-38 Lightning

Washington D. C. Headquarters-U.S. Army Air Forces. 1944. Punch and clipbound in stylized titled coloured pictorial wrappers. Thin 4to. Classified "Restricted" and marked as such on each page. The December 1944, Original "Brown Cover" issue. Profusely illustrated with photographs, drawings, maps, diagrams, charts, etc. During its time, the Lockheed P-38 Lightning was considered the most sophisticated aircraft Lockheed had ever built. In February 1937, the U.S. Army Air Corps released Specification X-608, a daunting requirement that called for speed, range, and climb capabilities impossible to achieve at that time with a single-engine aircraft. In Burbank, California, a Lockheed design team led by Hall Hibbard, and assisted by a young engineer named Clarence "Kelly" Johnson, immediately began a series of designs that would culminate in the contract-winning XP-38. Jim Gerschler became project engineer on the aircraft. The XP-38 (it was many months before it was called the Lightning) was of an extraordinarily advanced conception, an all-metal, midwing monoplane with twin Allison engines using General Electric turbo-superchargers, a central nacelle for the pilot and armament, contra-rotating propellers, twin-booms and rudders, and a tricycle landing gear. Nothing like it had ever been seen before, and it would be the only single-seat, twin-engine aircraft to reach mass production status during World War II. The distinctive sight and sound of the Lockheed P-38 Lightning would make it one of the best-known aircraft of the war. First flown on January 27, 1939, by one of its staunchest advocates, Air Corps 1st Lieutenant Ben Kelsey, the prototype XP-38 made national headlines when it crashed on a transcontinental record-setting attempt. Nevertheless, imminent war in Europe accentuated the need for the Lockheed P-38 Lightning, and production orders began to flow in. By war's end, a total of 10,037 P-38s had been built. As it was much more modern than the Curtiss P-40, there was a great demand in every theater of war for the twin-engine fighter. The big Lockheed P-38 Lightning had its greatest successes in the Pacific Theater, where the two leading aces, Majors Richard I. Bong and Thomas B. McGuire, scored 40 and 38 victories, respectively, using only the Lightning. The Lightning was also the only plane capable of carrying out the extraordinary 800-mile mission that climaxed with the shoot-down of the Mitsubishi "Betty" carrying Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto on April 18, 1943. Not as maneuverable as the Japanese fighters, the Lockheed P-38 Lightnings used dive and zoom tactics and their formidable center-line firepower of four .50-inch machine guns and a single 20-mm cannon to gain victories. It gave its pilots confidence on the daily long-distance flights over water, for if one engine was lost to combat or accident, the Lightning was able to limp home on the other. The Lockheed P-38 Lightning was less at home in Europe, where its large size made it less maneuverable than the German fighters it faced. Further, its Allison engines didn't operate as well at the high altitudes and cold temperatures of the European Theater. It became a workhorse nonetheless, doing duty in bomber escort, reconnaissance, and bombing, carrying as much as 4000 pounds of bombs in the latter role. One version of the P-38 was modified with a "droop-snoot" and carried a bombardier and either a Norden bombsight or a radar set. About 1,400 Lockheed P-38 Lightnings were completed as F-4 and F-5 reconnaissance planes, which were flown, unarmed and unafraid, deep within enemy territory. There were more Lightning reconnaissance planes than any other type in the USAAF. The Lockheed P-38 Lightning set many records. It was the only USAAF fighter to be in production prior to the start of the war and still in production on VJ-Day, August 15, 1945. It was the first fighter with sufficient range to make ferry flights across the Atlantic. It was also the first fighter for which compressibility problems were forecast, and among the first to experience compressibility. The P-38 was the first fighter to use power-boosted flight controls as well as the first to have a tricycle landing gear. Curiously, Lockheed did not have much luck in creating advanced versions of the Lightning. The more powerful XP-49 and XP-58 took too long to mature, and neither was successful. It really didn't matter, for the Lockheed P-38 Lightning was capable of doing all that was required of it. -The Editors of Publications International, Ltd. Several small splits to spine. Several tiny chips/creases to to fore-edge of front cover. Very mild Usual mild wear from metal binding pins to front and rear inside covers. A sensational, well preserved, clean copy.
  • $3,000
  • $3,000
In Evil Hour.

In Evil Hour.

Garcia Marquez, Gabriel First edition of "this fascinating novel of a Colombian river town possessed by evil points to the author's later flowering and greatness" (Boston Globe). Octavo, original cloth. Association copy, inscribed by the author to his legendary literary agent on the second title page, "Para Carmen, Eres mi todo. Gabo Rome 17 Oct. 1979." The recipient, Carmen Balcells was a literary agent of Spanish-language authors from Spain and Latin America, including six Nobel Prizeâ€"winning authors. She led her agency from 1956 to 2000, during which time she was one of the driving forces behind the 1960s boom of Latin American literature. ÂAuthors who have published with Balcells have dedicated novels to her and included her as characters in her work; she is praised as "one of the most powerful and influential women in Spanish letters" long list of prominent authors such as Gabriel GarcÃa Márquez, Pablo Neruda Mario Vargas Llosa, Julio Cortázar, Clarice Lispector, Nà lida Piñon, Miguel Delibes, Alvaro Mutis, Camilo Josà Cela, Vicente Aleixandre, Gonzalo Torrente Ballester, Manuel Vázquez Montalbán, Jose Luis Sampedro, Terenci Moix, Juan Carlos Onetti, Jaime Gil de Biedma, Carlos Barral, Josep Maria Castellet, Juan Goytisolo, Alfredo Bryce Echenique, Juan Marsà , Eduardo Mendoza, Isabel Allende, Rosa Montero, Gustavo Martin Garzo, Nà lida Pinõn. Fine in a fine dust jacket. Jacket design by Guy Fleming. Translated from the Spanish by Gregory Rabassa. An exceptional association. "An openly political novel posing the people of the land against the forces of oppression. . . it has the virtues of wit and compassion and reveals the foundation upon which the later novels were constructed" (Jonathan Yardley, Washington Post Book World).
  • $8,500
  • $8,500
In Evil Hour.

In Evil Hour.

Garcia Marquez, Gabriel First edition of "this fascinating novel of a Colombian river town possessed by evil points to the author's later flowering and greatness" (Boston Globe). Octavo, original cloth. Association copy, inscribed by the author to his legendary literary agent on the second title page, "Para Carmen, Eres mi todo. Gabo Rome 17 Oct. 1979." The recipient, Carmen Balcells was a literary agent of Spanish-language authors from Spain and Latin America, including six Nobel Prizeâ€"winning authors. She led her agency from 1956 to 2000, during which time she was one of the driving forces behind the 1960s boom of Latin American literature. ÂAuthors who have published with Balcells have dedicated novels to her and included her as characters in her work; she is praised as "one of the most powerful and influential women in Spanish letters" long list of prominent authors such as Gabriel GarcÃa Márquez, Pablo Neruda Mario Vargas Llosa, Julio Cortázar, Clarice Lispector, Nà lida Piñon, Miguel Delibes, Alvaro Mutis, Camilo Josà Cela, Vicente Aleixandre, Gonzalo Torrente Ballester, Manuel Vázquez Montalbán, Jose Luis Sampedro, Terenci Moix, Juan Carlos Onetti, Jaime Gil de Biedma, Carlos Barral, Josep Maria Castellet, Juan Goytisolo, Alfredo Bryce Echenique, Juan Marsà , Eduardo Mendoza, Isabel Allende, Rosa Montero, Gustavo Martin Garzo, Nà lida Pinõn. Fine in a fine dust jacket. Jacket design by Guy Fleming. Translated from the Spanish by Gregory Rabassa. An exceptional association. "An openly political novel posing the people of the land against the forces of oppression. . . it has the virtues of wit and compassion and reveals the foundation upon which the later novels were constructed" (Jonathan Yardley, Washington Post Book World).
  • $8,500
  • $8,500
High Adventure.

High Adventure.

Hillary, Edmund First British edition of Hillary's account of his ascent of Everest. Octavo, with maps by A. Sparks and sketches by George Djurkouic, bound in full morocco by the Harcourt Bindery, gilt titles and tooling to the spine in six compartments within raised gilt bands, gilt ruling to the front and rear panels, gilt inner dentelles stamp-signed by the Harcourt Bindery, marbled endpapers, all edges gilt. An exceptional presentation. In 1953, Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay stared into its dark eye and did not waver. On May 29, they pushed spent bodies and aching lungs past the achievable to pursue the impossible. At a terminal altitude of 29,028 feet, they stood triumphant atop the highest peak in the world. With nimble words and a straightforward style, New Zealand mountaineering legend Hillary recollects the bravery and frustration, the agony and glory that marked his Everest odyssey. From the 1951 expedition that led to the discovery of the Southern Route, through the grueling Himalayan training of 1952, and on to the successful 1953 expedition led by Colonel John Hunt, Hillary conveys in precise language the mountain's unforgiving conditions. In explicit detail he recalls an Everest where chaotic icefalls force costly detours, unstable snow ledges promise to avalanche at the slightest misstep, and brutal weather shifts from pulse-stopping cold to fiendish heat in mere minutes. In defiance of these torturous conditions, Hillary remains enthusiastic and never hesitates in his quest for the summit. Despite the enormity of his and Norgay's achievement, he regards himself, Norgay, and the other members of his expedition as hardworking men, not heroes. And while he never would have reached the top without practiced skill and technical competence, his thrilling memoir speaks first to his admiration of the human drive to explore, to understand, to risk, and to conquer.
  • $1,200
  • $1,200
The Dice Man.

The Dice Man.

Rhinehart, Luke [George Cockcroft] First edition of this cult classic. Octavo, original cloth. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the title page, "For Andy 'A lake is a pond is a river.' Luke Rhinehart." Fine in a near fine dust jacket with a touch of rubbing. Jacket design by Lawrence Ratzkin. The Dice Man is a novel published in 1971 by George Cockcroft under the pen name Luke Rhinehart and tells the story of a psychiatrist who begins making life decisions based on the casting of dice. Cockcroft wrote the book based on his own experiences of using dice to make decisions while studying psychology. The novel is noted for its subversion, anti-psychiatry sentiments and for reflecting moods of the early 1970s. Due to its subversive nature and chapters concerned with controversial issues such as rape, murder and sexual experimentation, it was banned in several countries. Upon its initial publication, the cover bore the confident subheader, "Few novels can change your life. This one will" and quickly became a modern cult classic. The book went through a number of republishings; in the United States it acquired the even more confident subheader "This book will change your life", in spite of its being a highly edited version of the original. In 1995, the BBC called it "one of the fifty most influential books of the last half of the twentieth century," and in 1999 Loaded magazine named it "Novel of the Century". In 2013, the Telegraph listed it as one of the 50 great cult books of the last hundred years. It has enjoyed a 21st-century renaissance, being published or republished in more than 60 countries and translated into 26 languages.
  • $1,850
  • $1,850
Orwell's Revenge: The 1984 Palimpsest.

Orwell’s Revenge: The 1984 Palimpsest.

Huber, Peter [William Safire] First edition of this work in which Huber discusses the compelling vision of Orwell's 1984. Octavo, original half cloth. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the title page, "To Bill Safire Peter Huber." Also laid in is a letter from The Manhattan Institute to William Safire. The recipient, William Safire, was an important American author, columnist, journalist, and presidential speechwriter. He joined Nixon’s campaign for the 1960 Presidential race, and again in 1968. After Nixon’s 1968 victory, Safire served as a speechwriter for him and Spiro Agnew. He authored several political columns in addition to his weekly column “On Language” in The New York Times Magazine from 1979 until the month of his death and authored two books on grammar and linguistics: The New Language of Politics (1968) and what Zimmer called Safire’s “magnum opus,” Safire’s Political Dictionary. Safire later served as a member of the Pulitzer Prize Board from 1995 to 2004 and in 2006 was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President George W. Bush.ÂNear fine in a near fine dust jacket. Jacket design by Robert Korn. In George Orwell's dystopian novel 1984, the telescreen-which spies on its captive audience members and fills their minds with propaganda-is the instrument that makes possible the totalitarian state's absolute control. Huber (Galileo's Revenge) believes Orwell was fundamentally wrong in assuming that electronic media would facilitate mind control. On the contrary, he argues, today's telecommunications world-spanning cable television, personal computer networks, cellular phones and so forth-offers a multiplicity of choices in information and fosters the exchange of ideas. In alternating chapters, Huber splices a belabored critique of Orwell's prophecies with an experimental fiction, closely based on 1984, but with Eric Blair (i.e., Orwell under his real name) as the protagonist. The fictional chapters interpolate real-life figures such as spy Guy Burgess, Orwell's colleague at the BBC, and Vaughan Wilkes, Orwell's sadistic schoolmaster. Concluding with a handy capsule history of telecommunications, Huber provocatively predicts the convergence of computing, television and the telephone in a myriad of mixed-media networks.
  • $200
The Karla Trilogy] Tinker

The Karla Trilogy] Tinker, Tailor, Soldier Spy; The Honourable Schoolboy; Smiley’s People.

le Carre, John First editions of each title in the author's acclaimed Karla Trilogy. Octavo, original cloth, 3 volumes. Each volume is signed by John le Carre on a bookplate attached to the title page and actor Alec Guiness, who played George Smiley in the Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy series. He has signed on a slip of paper attached opposite to the title page. Each is near fine in near fine dust jackets. An exceptional set, uncommon in this condition and signed. Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy garnered instant praise for Le Carre as "[t]he premier spy novelist of his time. Perhaps of all time" (Time). "Le Carre is simply the world's greatest fictional spymaster" (Newsweek). Le Carre’s inspiration drew from his experience of the revealing of the Cambridge Five traitors in the 1950s and ‘60s (Anthony, 2009), and the novel’s popularity can be seen in relation to those shocking events. In 2011, the novel was adapted into a successful film, starring Gary Oldman and Colin Firth, and it received three nominations at the 84th Academy Awards for Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Original Score, and Best Actor. This successful production is but one of Le Carre’s numerous accolades in espionage fiction. He was awarded both the Helmerich Award and the Goethe Medal, and, in 2008, The Times ranked Le Carré 22nd on its list of "The 50 greatest British writers since 1945."
  • $5,500
  • $5,500
The Hound of the Baskervilles

The Hound of the Baskervilles, Another Adventure of Sherlock Holmes.

Conan Doyle, Sir Arthur First edition, first issue of the third Sherlock Holmes novel, and widely considered as the best of the series. Octavo, original black and gilt stamped pictorial red cloth, illustrated by Sidney Paget. In near fine condition. Although Conan Doyle killed off his most famous character by sending Holmes over the Reichenbach Falls in a struggle with Professor Moriarty in “The Final Problem” (December 1893), readers demanded the sleuth’s return. The author obliged with this, the thirdâ€" and still considered by many the bestâ€" Sherlock Holmes novel, carefully positioned on the title page as “another adventure” of Holmes. “But,” as Howard Haycraft notes, “the seed of doubt was planted”; while the novel proved an immediate success, readers pressed for more. Conan Doyle finally relented and engineered Holmes’ “resurrection” in 1903. The Hound of the Baskervilles remains “one of the most gripping books in the language” (Crime & Mystery 100 Best). “The supernatural is handled with great effect and no letdown. The plot and subplots are thoroughly integrated and the false clues put in and removed with a master hand. The criminal is superb… and the secondary figures each contribute to the total effect of brilliancy and grandeur combined. One wishes one could be reading it for the first time” (Barzun & Taylor 1142).
  • $4,000
  • $4,000