Nigel Phillips

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The Anatomical Exercises?concerning the motion of the Heart and Blood. With the Preface of Zachariah Wood Physician of Rotterdam. To which is added Dr. James De Back his discourse of the Heart?

HARVEY, William. 3 parts in 1 volume, 8vo, 20 leaves (including the first blank), 111 pages; 10 leaves, 123 pages; 1 leaf, 86 pages. Title is a cancel as in most copies, divisional titles to the second and third parts. Upper corner of the front free endpaper and the first blank leaf torn away, some very minor worming in upper inner corner towards the end touching a few letters, some light foxing and minor soiling. Original publisher?s sheep, a little cracked and marked (spine neatly repaired), two small lacunae in the leather of the lower cover and tip of one corner worn. Early signature of Robert Apsley at top of title. FIRST EDITION IN ENGLISH of the Exercitatio Anatomica De Motu Cordis (1628). ?The most important book in the history of medicine. Harvey proved experimentally that in animals the blood is impelled in a circle by the beat of the heart, passing from arteries to veins through pores (i.e. the capillaries, seen by Malpighi with the microscope in 1660)? (G&M). It should also be regarded as ?the first record of a complete biological investigation, giving a clear and accurate description of the methods employed to recognise the laws governing an important vital process, a knowledge of which had till then been befogged by mistaken conceptions?? (H.P. Bayon in Keynes). This is an unusually tall copy (158 mm.). In most copies the headlines, and sometimes even the top lines of the text, are shaved. In this copy none of the headlines is shaved, and on some leaves the lower edge is uncut. This copy has 11 of the 13 misprints listed by Keynes that were corrected as the book passed through the press. In addition, F3 is mis-signed F5. It is complete with the first blank leaf. Wing H1083. See G&M 759, Printing and the Mind of Man 127, etc. (the first edition of 1628). Keynes, Bibliography, 19.
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Two Treatises. In the one of which, the Nature of Bodies; in the other, the Nature of Man?s Soule; is looked into: in way of discovery, of the immortality of reasonable soules.

DIGBY, Sir Kenelm.] Large folio (41 x 27.6 cm.), pp. (xliv), 466. Without the final blank leaf Nnn4 (as usual). Woodcut ornament on title, woodcut head- and tailpieces. Faint dampstain in upper margin throughout, occasional very faint dampstain in lower margin, a few tiny wormholes in gathering A. Contemporary red morocco (ends of spine rubbed, corners a little worn, a few small repairs, some dark stains and small scratch marks on upper cover), gilt borders and panels on sides, spine richly and delicately gilt in compartments, inner gilt dentelles, endpapers replaced probably in the early 20th century, gilt edges, armorial bookplate. An impressive copy. Inscribed by Digby at the foot of the title-page ?for my Lord Digby? (Digby?s cousin John Digby, earl of Bristol). FIRST EDITION, presentation copy to a close relative (the book is dedicated to Digby?s son) on large paper, in contemporary red morocco. This introduction by Digby of Gassendian and Cartesian atomism into England provided Boyle and Newton with the foundations for their achievements in chemistry and physics. ?Digby?s Two Treatises is a landmark work in several fields of early science. It is the first fully developed expression of atomism or corpuscular theory; the first important defence of Harvey on the circulation in English; a modern presentation of the nervous system predating Descartes; and a ground-breaking work in embryology. It also contains the first recorded patch-test for allergy; the fullest early account in English of teaching lip-reading; and material on conditioning anticipating Pavlov? (Rubin). Of the 38 chapters, Digby devotes six to light and colours, three to magnetism and three to generation and physiology. Wing D1448. Duveen pp. 171?172. Thorndike VII, pp. 498?502. Needham, History of embryology, pp. 102?107. Keynes, Bibliography of?Harvey, p. 121. Rubin, D., Sir Kenelm Digby F.R.S. 1603?1665. A bibliography based on the collection of K. Garth Huston, Sr., M.D. (1991) for Jeremy Norman & Co, pp. 12?15, expanding on the summary quoted above.
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Programmes ou Résumés des Leçons du Cours de Construction, avec des applications tirées principalement de l?Art de l?Ingénieur des Ponts et Chaussées, conformément au Programme adopté par le Conseil de Perfectionnement, de l?an 1806. Seconde édition.

SGANZIN, Joseph Mathieu. 4to, pp. vi, (7)?296, and 9 engraved plates (5 folding, the last plate unnumbered). Half-title. Three small lacunae in fore-edge margin of half-title and title. Contemporary speckled boards (slightly rubbed at a few points), spine ruled in gilt and with green morocco label, uncut. A nice, clean copy. Small stamp of Victor Froussard at top of title, and his neat signature on half-title and title. Second edition, but apparently the first available, of Sganzin?s classic textbook of civil engineering, stemming from his course of lectures at the École Polytechnique. ?This work is intended to convey the essentials of the art of construction, and is structured in the form of thirty lessons. The first part discusses the materials used in building: aggregate, brick, rammed earth, the various sorts of rock and mortar, as well as wood and iron, and gives test results on their strength and resistance. In the second part the construction of roads and bridges is discussed, and in the third part that of canals, reservoirs, aqueducts, and sea works? (Roberts & Trent, Bibliotheca mechanica, 1821 edition). This was the basic text for several generations of engineers, being reprinted and expanded throughout the nineteenth century. In America, Sganzin's influence was spread in part by Benoit Claudius Crozet, a French civil engineer who used Sganzin's work in his engineering instruction at the U.S. Military Academy, West Point. The first edition of 1807 (according to the Deutsches Museum) has not been traced. The brief Wikipédia article on him gives the date of the present edition and there is no earlier edition in CCfr.
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To Sir Watkin Williams Wynne Bart. This View of Pontcysyllte Aqueduct, North Wales is respectfully inscribed?

PARRY, Jonathan. Engraving and aquatint (48 x 60.5 cm) by F. Jukes from an original drawing by J. Parry. Slight dust soiling overall, single tiny hole near the top edge neatly repaired. ?Telford's engineering career developed from 1793 on his appointment as ?General Agent, Surveyor, Engineer, Architect and Overlooker? (Gibb, 28) to the important 68-mile Ellesmere Canal, joining the rivers Mersey, Dee, and Severn. The canal, now a thriving leisure facility, still makes use of many buildings and structures designed and built under Telford?s direction. The most remarkable is Pontcysyllte cast-iron aqueduct over the Dee, based on his embryo sketch design of March 1794, except for the piers, but not developed until after the iron trough concept had been proved operationally at Longdon-on-Tern aqueduct on the Shrewsbury Canal in 1795?6. At Pontcysyllte, with the support and approval of William Jessop, Telford deviated from traditional bulky masonry construction by building eighteen upright masonry piers and forming nineteen arches with cast-iron ribs supporting an iron trough with 1 in. thick sides, 1007 ft. long and 126 ft. high. The ironwork was made and erected by William Hazledine, the masonry was built by John Simpson, and the whole supervised by Matthew Davidson. The result, the supreme engineering achievement of the canal age, was still in service in 2003. Sir Walter Scott thought it ?the most impressive work of art he had ever seen? (ibid., 35) (ODNB). It is still the longest navigable aqueduct in Britain. Skempton does not list any work on the Pontcysyllte aqueduct. This fine and large engraving is probably therefore the first and best contemporary illustration of this pioneering structure. It includes a summary of the construction details in the lower right corner.
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Report from the Committee on Madhouses in England.

MADHOUSES. Folio, pp. 7, (3), 129, (3), 131?152, (2), 153?182, (2), 183?214, and 8 engraved plates (6 double-page) of designs for the West Riding, Bethlem, and other asylums. Early manuscript pagination in upper corner of rectos and plates. Foxing on the plates, otherwise a clean copy. Original blue boards (corners a little worn), new paper spine with printed paper label, new endpapers. FIRST EDITION of the four Reports for 1815, one of the most important documents in the history of psychiatry. The actual report of the committee comprises the first 7 pages, the four Reports themselves containing the Minutes of Evidence, taken from some of the leading figures in psychiatry of the time. There were four Reports in 1815, published between 25 May and 26 June, and a further three in 1816. ?Together they were a survey of the conditions and treatment of the insane wherever they were confined? A revelation to all but a few when they appeared, they are today a historical source of the first importance containing information nowhere else to be found about how the insane actually fared as opposed to what was written about insanity in books, a disparity between theory and practice which emerges glaringly. Next to them the two earlier Parliamentary enquiries?appear almost insignificant. In contrast the 1815/16 Committee?s Minutes of evidence is a monumental documentary?with plans of asylums, covering all aspects of asylum life?? (Hunter & Macalpine, pp. 696?703). COPAC has one entry but gives full pagination, recording 2 copies.
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The Scriptural History of the Earth and of Mankind, compared with the cosmogonies, chronologies, and original traditions of ancient nations; an abstract and review of several modern systems?

HOWARD, Philip. 4to, pp. vi, (ii), 602, 1 leaf (errata). Half-title (?Thoughts on the Structure of this Globe?). Contemporary tree calf, gilt borders on sides, spine gilt in compartments and with red morocco label (very slightly worn at head), inner gilt dentelles with Greek key pattern, marbled endpapers. Armorial bookplate of Le Gendre Pierce Starkie. A lovely copy. FIRST EDITION. Written at a pivotal point in the history of geology, after the publication of Hutton?s Theory of the Earth (1795) but before Playfair?s Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth (1802), that is, at a time when no theory had been generally accepted and Biblical theories were still widely current, Howard?s substantial book is a review of some current theories and the exposition of his own. The theories that he reviews are those of Bailly, Buffon, Wallerius and Hutton, in fact this is the first book to discuss Hutton?s fuller theory. His own theory, while based on science, is Mosaical and is intended to be perfectly consistent with the scriptures. Howard?s theory of geology is one of nineteen reviewed Accum (A system of theoretical and practical chemistry, 1807), who devotes an entire page to it. Howard (d. 1810) was of the prominent Roman Catholic family of Howards from Corby Castle in Yorkshire. This work grew out of two letters which he published in French occasioned by a difference of opinion between him and his friend the Marquis de Montegny relative to the causes of the formation of mountains.
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Cyclopædia of Useful Arts, mechanical and chemical, manufactures, mining, and engineering. Edited by?

TOMLINSON, Charles. Large 8vo, 2 volumes bound in 9 ?Divisions? with continuous pagination: pp. xvi, 832; iv, clx, 1052, 2 engraved title-pages, 1 engraved frontispiece, 40 engraved plates, and 1 folding plan. Plus 16 pp. of adverts inserted at the end. With over 2400 woodcuts in the text. Printed titles and prelims bound in Division 9, other prelims in Divisions 3, 4 and 5. Foxing on the tissue guards with some offsetting and foxing on the plates, otherwise a very clean set. Original red cloth, spines gilt and with gilt pictorial device on upper covers, uncut and a few gatherings unopened, slight soiling and slight wear to ends of spines but a lovely, bright set. FIRST EDITION (1854 issue) of one of the principal unofficial works associated with the Great Exhibition of 1851. ?This work, in addition to its general information on every topic connected with the mechanical arts and manufacturing ingenuity, contains beautifully executed views of the Great Industrial Exhibition of 1851?rendering the work a permanent record of the most valuable productions of the mechanical and scientific genius of every country in the civilised world? (advertisement). The book was issued in monthly parts beginning in 1852, in 9 ?Divisions? (as here), and in two volumes (with title-pages dated either 1853 or 1854), the form now most commonly seen by far but owing to their thickness and weight are usually either rather worn or rebound.
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The Discourse made before the Royal Society the 26. of November 1674. Concerning the Use of Duplicate Proportion in sundry important particulars: together with a new hypothesis of springing or elastique motions.

PETTY, Sir William. 12mo, pp. (xxxi), 135. Including the imprimatur and errata leaves (A1 and a4). Title within double-ruled border. Contemporary panelled calf, rebacked preserving the original backstrip (tips of lower corners worn, old stains on lower cover, final gathering a little loose and sprung), no pastedown endpapers.Provenance: manuscript ex libris of Maurice Wheeler (1647/8?1727, clergyman and amateur horologist), 1675, on recto of imprimatur, doubtless this copy?s first owner; engraved bookplate c. 1760 of George Paton (1721?1807, Scottish antiquary and bibliographer) on verso of title; 19th century book label of John T. Rose of Leith inside front cover; early inscription in Greek in upper margin of title. FIRST EDITION. Read at a meeting of the Royal Society, this remarkable and far-seeing little book is a cry for the scientific use of mathematics and the application of mathematics to human affairs, written ?in a way which the meanest Member of adult Mankind is capable of understanding? (p. viii). Actually two works in one, the first is concerned with the quadratic relationship which was proposed by Galileo to determine the flexure of a beam such that flexural resistance is proportional to the width of the section, to the square of its depth and inversely to its length. He also gives a discussion of models and modelling theory and its application to the size of ships and their sails, which again owes its allegiance to Galileo who discussed model theory in the first day of the Discorsi. Petty then applies ?duplicate proportion? to determine the power of mills and pumps, the distance that sounds may be heard, smells detected and objects seen, the price of commodities, and on pp. 82?88, ?The Life of Man, and its Duration.? This is the first of Petty?s books in which he uses the term ?political arithmetic? (on p. xx). In the second part Petty discusses the nature of elastic bodies. ?Noteworthy as the first English hypothesis regarding elasticity and the nature of elastic bodies, in it he proposes that matter is composed of corpuscules which were then made up of atoms. The atoms were held to have both magnetic properties and sexual characteristics? (M. Purver, The Royal Society: concept and creation, Cambridge, 1967, pp. 157?158, quoted by Roberts & Trent). Wing P1919. Keynes 16. Roberts & Trent, Bibliotheca mechanica, pp. 250?251. See also DSB, 10, p. 565b. This was the only edition.
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De Succo Pancreatico: Or, a physical and anatomical treatise of the nature and office of the Pancreatick Juice; shewing its generation in the body, what diseases arise by its vitiation; from whence in particular, by plain and familiar examples, is accurately demonstrated, the causes and cures of agues, or intermitting feavers, hitherto so difficult and uncertain: with sundry other things worthy of note. Written by D. Reg. de Graaf, physician of Delph, and translated by Christopher Pack, Med. Lond.

GRAAF, Regnier de. 8vo, 12 leaves, pp. 151, (17), and 3 engraved plates (2 folding). Title within double ruled border with publisher?s woodcut device. Folding plates somewhat soiled and creased. Contemporary panelled calf, nicely rebacked, gilt edges (tips of corners worn). Manuscript ex libris of Thomas Lucas, 1727, on front pastedown and with his initials in blind on both covers. FIRST EDITION IN ENGLISH. See G&M 974 (the first, exceedingly rare, edition of 1664). The first canalisation of the pancreatic duct. De Graaf was one of the earliest investigators of the pancreatic secretion. He collected the pancreatic juice of dogs by means of introducing a temporary cannula, made from the quill of a duck, into the pancreatic duct of a living dog. He studied the liquid so obtained, commenting on the small quantity secreted and on its apparent properties. He discusses the uses of this juice in digestion. He compared it with human pancreatic juice and found the two to have identical properties. ?De Graaf?s account of his unsuccessful attempts to collect pancreatic juice, followed by his eventual success, is one of the most interesting passages in the history of the experimental method?? (Foster). Wing G1463. Foster, Lectures on the history of physiology, pp. 153?157, and Selected Readings in the History of Physiology, pp. 166?168. Russell, British anatomy, 329. Norman catalogue 924 (this copy). This was the only English edition, and while not as difficult to find as the first edition, it is still of considerable rarity.
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Collection de Mémoires et Plans relatifs au port de Dieppe. A Dieppe: De l?imprimerie de Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Dubuc? 1789. [And:]LAMBLARDIE, [Jacques Élie de]. Mémoire sur les Côtes de la haute Normandie, comprises entre l?embouchure de la Seine & celle de la Somme, considérées relativement au galet qui remplit les ports situés dans cette partie de la Manche.

DIEPPE. 2 volumes, 4to, pp. xvi, 31, 95, and 4 large folding engraved plans; 61 pages, 1 leaf (blank), and 2 folding engraved plans. Collection: later half calf and marbled paper boards, plates a little browned in the margins and with faint dampstain, armorial bookplate of the Comte d?Armaille. Lamblardie: modern half calf and marbled paper sides, upper border of second plate just shaved, both plates with stain at foot. FIRST EDITION. In 1776 a new channel or fairway was proposed into the port of Dieppe, and the plan was approved by a committee which included Perronet. In 1787 detailed plans were drawn up and approved by a committee, this time not including Perronet who was unwell. Before long the plan ran into trouble, not least with the problem of moving shingle. In 1789 the present Collection de Mémoires was published, illustrated with some very large engraved plans, pointing out the problems with the old jetties and the advantages of the new channel. This project was part of the plan to construct a major port in the English Channel, first promoted in the 17th century by Louis XIV. Dieppe had always been an important port, but eventually it was the comparatively minor port of Cherbourg that was developed as the major Channel port at the beginning of the 19th century. Lamblardie?s Mémoire was supposed to have been included in the Collection (it is listed in the table of contents, albeit with a slightly different title), but it was omitted. Instead Lamblardie had it published at Le Havre as a separate work, and for self-evident reasons the two are rarely found together. The two copies of the Collection in the Bibliothèque nationale collate as the present copy (but both have only three plates). CCfr gives the author as François Laurent Lamandé, or in one entry as R.-F. Chaubry. It was reprinted at Rouen in 1790, again without Lamblardie?s Mémoire.
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Profil de la Machine de Marly coupé selon sa largeur.

INSELIN, Charles. Engraving, 268 x 342 mm. across the platemark, on laid paper with watermark of grapes (sheet size 405 x 530 mm.). Some small handling creases but in very good state. Louis XIV had the Machine de Marly constructed to bring a large water supply to his fountains at his chateaux at Versailles and Marly. This engraving shows the machine in section. Based on a prototype at Modave Castle, it consisted of fourteen gigantic water wheels, each roughly 11.5 metres in diameter, which powered more than 250 pumps to bring water 162 metres up a hillside from the Seine to the Louveciennes aqueduct. Louis XIV had countless schemes and inventions that were supposed to bring water to his fountains but the Machine de Marly was by far the most extensive and costly. It was engineered by Arnold de Ville and built by Rennequin Sualem, both of whom had experience in pumping water from coal mines in the region of Liège. It is thought to have been the largest system of integrated machinery ever assembled at the time. After years in construction, it was completed in 1684 and despite frequent breakdowns remained in use until 1817, after which it was rebuilt and modified. Before the Machine de Marly was built, the amount of water delivered to Versailles already exceeded that used by the city of Paris, but was still insufficient. However, even if all the water pumped at Marly (an average of 3,200 cubic metres per day) had been supplied to Versailles, it still would not have been enough. Charles Inselin (b. 1673) describes himself as a ?Geographe? on the engraving and is best known for his engravings of maps and town plans.
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The Art of Dying Wool, Silk, and Cotton. Translated from the French of?

HELLOT, [Jean], [Pierre-Joseph] MACQUER, & LE PILEUR D?APLIGNY. 8vo, pp. x, (vii), 206, 209?508, (4) adverts, and 6 engraved plates. Contemporary red morocco (joints and ends of spine very neatly repaired), flat spine richly gilt and with green morocco label, sides with rope-twist borders, marbled endpapers. Second edition in English (but see below) of this collection, consisting of three separate works: Jean Hellot?s L?art de la teinture des laines (1750), Pierre-Joseph Macquer?s L?art de la teinture en soie (1763), and Le Pileur d?Apligny?s L?art de la teinture des fils et étoffes de coton (1776). These are three of the thirteen key works in the history of dyeing published before 1856 (Edelstein), and ?the major importance of [Hellot?s] book lay in the careful discussion of techniques which made it a standard work for the remainder of the century? (DSB). The anonymous translator evidently considered the French dyers of the period, who were subject to regulation and inspection, to be superior to those in England, to whom these authoritative works were unknown. Only the work by Hellot had been translated before (Dublin, 1767), but the present translator considered that translation very inferior. The book is dedicated to the Society of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce. This collection was first published in Paris in 1785, but that edition is very rare, ESTC recording only 2 copies. It is possible that the sheets of the two editions are the same. Cole 615. Neville I, p. 607 (lacking the final advert leaves). Edelstein, Historical notes on the wet-processing industry, pp. 83?85.
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De Re Militari libri quatuor. Sexti Julii Frontini de Strategematis libri totidem. Aeliani de instruendis aciebus liber unus. Modesti de vocablis rei militaris liber unus. Item picturae bellicae CXX passim Vegetio adiectae. Collata sunt omnia ad antiquos codices, maximè Budaei, quod testabitur Aelianus.

VEGETIUS, Flavius Renatus. Folio, pp. (viii), 279, (1). With 122 full-page woodcuts (including one repeated twice), one half-page woodcut and typographical diagrams. Wechel?s woodcut device on title-page and final page. Contemporary limp vellum, lettered in manuscript on spine, remains of green silk ties, endpapers replaced at an early date. Armorial bookplate of Alfred Manser. This book represents a printed version of the first Western work on technology. The four works from ancient Rome on military matters, here edited by the great French scholar Guillaume Budé, which comprise the text are quite unconnected with the full-page woodcuts (which depict firearms). They have their origins instead in Conrad Kyeser?s Bellifortis, a manuscript completed in 1405 consisting of full-page illustrations of military devices, which is generally regarded as the beginning of technological writing in the West. It was frequently copied throughout the fifteenth century but never appeared in print (until the facsimile edition of the original manuscript in 1967). However, more than 100 woodcuts from this manuscript were printed in eight editions of Vegetius? book published between 1511 and 1555, of which the present is the seventh chronologically (it is not known from which copy of the manuscript they were taken). These illustrations were twice recut during this period, those in the four editions by Wechel being rather more finely done. The Roman texts were the only printed works on military tactics and manoeuvres that were available at the time, but those, combined with these fine woodcuts which depict all manner of devices, make up a handsome and more complete work on practical military matters. Phillips, Diving, pp. 76?83 and 831.
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Report concerning the different lines surveyed by Messrs. John Ainslie & Robert Whitworth, Jun. for a Canal, proposed to be made between the cities of Edinburgh and Glasgow, and intended to communicate with the Frith[!] of Forth at Leith, and the river Clyde at the Broomie Law; with an account of a running level, taken for a new line by Linlithgow and Falkirk, by John Rennie, Civil Engineer, and F.R.S. Edin. [No place or printer,] 1797. [Bound with:]RENNIE, John. Report concerning the practicability and expence of the lines surveyed by Messrs. John Ainslie & Robert Whitworth, Jun. for a Canal, proposed to be made between the cities of Edinburgh and Glasgow?with the improvements that have been made on these lines; and also concerning the practicability and expence of a new line?

RENNIE, John. 2 works in 1 volume, 4to, 1 leaf + 12 pages; 1 leaf + 27 pages, 1 large folding and partly hand-coloured plan on two joined sheets (ruled border cropped along bottom edge). Modern marbled boards. SOLE EDITIONS. ?The scheme to build a canal between Edinburgh and Glasgow, which was intended primarily to supply Edinburgh?s growing population with further coal supplies, began in the last decade of the eighteenth century. Ainslie and Whitworth prepared the first survey, producing four possible routes?? In this report, Rennie meticulously describes each route, suggesting improvements and commenting on water supply, locks, etc. He himself then puts forward a fifth route, described in detail in his report of 1798. ?However, with the outbreak of the Napoleonic Wars the whole project was shelved until 1814? (Weinreb catalogue 50). Skempton 1145 and 1146.
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Extrait des Lecons de Monsieur Petit Docteur Regent de la faculté de Paris. [Followed by:] Notes sur les Maladies des trois premiers Mois de la Grossesse. [Followed by:] Cours de Physiologie par Monsieur Antoine Petit Docteur Regent de la Faculté de Paris commencé le Sept 8bre Anno 1765.

PETIT, Antoine. 4to 244 [i.e. 243] pages, 266 pages, 176 [i.e. 175] pages. Pp. 81?84 in the first part missing, pp. 240?243 in the first part loose but present. Contemporary calf, spine gilt in compartments (ends of spine very worn, label missing), two old paper library labels (one chipped) on spine. Corners of front endpapers and first leaf worn away, diminishing wormtrack in lower blank corner of some 20 leaves towards the end. Pencilled ex libris of William O?Grady, Ireland 1819 on rear endpaper. MANUSCRIPT in three parts in a very legible hand, probably a fair copy although the first and third sections end in the middle of a sentence (there are no blank leaves). The first and second parts are on obstetrics and the third is on physiology. The first begins with female anatomy, and progress to generation, the signs of pregnancy. The greater part is on the illnesses during the first three months of pregnancy, the middle of pregnancy, and the last three months, followed by illnesses of the foetus in the womb. The second part begins with the same three periods of pregnancy and then progresses to natural birth and assisted birth. With the fortieth lecture begins a section on abnormal conditions of the child and the mother, including hernia and caesarean section, etc. The last part of this section is on the care and cure of abnormal conditions of the infant. The third section, on physiology, includes lectures on the choice of food and drink, digestion, bile, chyle, blood vessels, the function of the heart, the pulse and the blood (a long section), secretion, etc. etc. According to Hirsch, the lectures of Antoine Petit (1722?1794) on anatomy, surgery, medicine and especially obstetrics were very well attended and he himself was one of the most respected and beloved practitioners in Paris. In 1746 he became regent and in 1760 member of the Académie des Sciences (although he is still described as Régent in this manuscript dated 1765). Later he was appointed to the chair of anatomy at the Jardin du Roi.
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Results of Astronomical Observations made during the years 1834, 5, 6, 7, 8, at the Cape of Good Hope; being the completion of a telescopic survey of the whole surface of the visible heavens, commenced in 1825?

HERSCHEL, Sir John F.W. Large 4to, 3 leaves, pp. (v?xx), 452, (2) errata, (2) adverts, lithographed frontispiece of the telescope and 17 engraved or lithographed plates (4 folding) mostly from drawings by the author. Original green blindstamped cloth, t.e.g. Half-title and final advert leaf browned, otherwise a fine and clean copy. FIRST EDITION of Herschel?s monumental survey of the stars of the southern hemisphere, completing the task begun by his father William, who fifty years earlier had catalogued the northern celestial hemisphere. Herschel selected the Cape of Good Hope for the site of this project, and spent five years there. Using a 20-foot reflecting telescope brought from England, he swept the whole of the southern sky. By the time he left in 1838 he had catalogued 1,707 nebulae and clusters, and listed 2,102 pairs of binary stars. He carried out star counts, on William Herschel?s plan, of 68,948 stars in 3,000 sky areas. He produced detailed sketches and maps of several objects, including the Orion region, the Eta Carinae nebula, and the Megallanic Clouds, and extremely accurate drawings of many extragalactic and planetary nebulae. He recorded in detail the brightening behaviour of Eta Carinae in December 1837. Herschel invented a device called an astrometer, and with it introduced numerical measurements into stellar photometry. See DSB 6, p. 326 and ODNB for long accounts of Herschel?s time in South Africa. Norman catalogue 1056. This was Herschel?s magnum opus.