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Glee Plays The Game; a three act play with women characters only

Gerstenberg, Alice New York: Samuel French. Good. (c.1934, 1933). French's Standard Library Edition. Softcover. (printed wrappers) [Good only, with some damage to spine at both ends, bumping and some paper loss at lower right corner (no loss of text), general age-toning (but not brittle)]. (stage diagram) A comedy with thirteen speaking roles for women and girls, about a "little debutante daughter" (the title character) who "plays the social game to please her ambitious sisters who cannot endure with grace the loss of the family fortune," the salvation of which apparently involves Glee marrying well. Per a prefatory note: "Though no men appear in the cast, the plot so cleverly includes them that they become distinct personalities, living through the emotions of the women whom they influence." (Shades of Clare Boothe's "The Women," which would light up Broadway and then the movies just a few years hence!) The Chicago-born and bred author (1885-1972) was a prolific novelist and playwright, and a mainstay of that city's Little Theatre Movement throughout her adult life. Per Wikipedia, the majority of her plays (many of them one-acters) "demonstrate her feminist tendencies [by] critiquing the social roles and decision which constrained women of the time." To judge from the several pages of critical comments excerpted in the back of this volume, the play was popular among little theatre groups and women's clubs, especially in the Midwest. It was first produced at DePaul University in 1933, under the title "Deep Desire." .
  • $50
book (2)

Seastrom and Stiller in Hollywood: Two Swedish Directors in Silent American Films 1923-1930

Pensel, Hans New York: Vantage Press. Very Good+ in Very Good dj. (c.1969). First Edition. Hardcover. (price-clipped) [modest bumping to lower corners, otherwise a nice clean book; the jacket is lightly soiled, and a bit faded along the spine]. (B&W photographs) Uncommon vanity-press-issued study of "two all-time film greats, Victor Seastrom and Mauritz Stiller, directors, who came to Hollywood during a crucial time in the American film industry." Per the jacket blurb, between them the two directed thirteen films in America -- but that's a little misleading, for Seastrom (Sjöström) fared considerably better than Stiller, directing nine of those thirteen. (Although admittedly Stiller was at a bit of a disadvantage, since he died in 1928.) By the time he returned to Sweden in 1930, Seastrom was about at the end of his directorial career; he made just three more films, two in Sweden and one in England, before resuming his earlier career as a stage and film actor. He made the most of his time in Hollywood, though, turning out several bona fide silent classics: HE WHO GETS SLAPPED (1924, starring Lon Chaney), THE SCARLET LETTER (1926) and THE WIND (1928), the latter pair featuring two of Lillian Gish's greatest performances. Stiller, by contrast, definitely got the short end of the stick: although he brought Garbo to America, he was replaced as director of her second American film and went on to helm several Pola Negri vehicles at Paramount before returning to Sweden, where he died at the age of 45. .
  • $50
Birds of Britain

Birds of Britain

Green, John d; introduction and captions by Anthony Haden-Guest New York: The Macmillan Company. Very Good. 1967. First Edition. Hardcover. (no dust jacket) [light wear to extremities, spine slightly turned, a 1/2"-3/4" strip of fading at the perimeter of the front cover]. (B&W photographs) First off: "Birds," in this usage, is the British slang term for young women -- in particular the sort of young and very attractive women (many of them actresses or models) on which the photographer turned his admiring lens, and whose images are featured throughout the book. This was, of course, the Swingin' Sixties in London, and the book's subjects include many of Britain's brightest and most beautiful women of that era, among them: Charlotte Rampling (here called "Charly," hard to believe); Susannah York; Julie Christie; Sarah Miles; Jane Asher; Mary Quant; Marianne Faithfull; Lulu; Martine Beswick; Hayley Mills; Dusty Springfield; and others (many of which you will not have heard of) -- but, rather surprisingly, not Twiggy. Each of the photo layouts (sometimes several pages in length, with some shots printed double-size, on adjoining pages) is accompanied by a brief, pithy commentary on the character or accomplishments of the bird on display. There is very little nudity on display, by the way, and what little there is is quite demure. ****NOTE that additional postage charges will be assessed for international shipping of this large heavy book; if this concerns you, please contact us for a shipping quote before placing your order.**** .
  • $50
The Art of Ballets Russes: The Serge Lifar Collection of Theater Designs

The Art of Ballets Russes: The Serge Lifar Collection of Theater Designs, Costumes, and Paintings at the Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, Connecticut

Schouvaloff, Alexander New Haven/London: Yale University Press, in association with the Wadsworth Atheneum. Very Good+ in Very Good+ dj. (c.1997). First Edition. Hardcover. [a good sound clean copy, but both endpapers are of a 2-ply construction, and the two layers of the front endpaper are separating, plus there is some staining around the edges of both endpapers; the jacket is lightly edge- and surface-worn, with a tiny tear at the lower rear foldover and an associated horizontal along the bottom edge of the rear panel]. (color photographs and facsimiles) An elaborate catalogue produced in conjunction with an exhibition of the Serge Lifar Collection at the Wadsworth Atheneum and two venues in Japan during 1997 and 1998. Lifar, "the last great protégé of famed Russian ballet producer Serge Diaghilev, collected paintings, set designs, and costume designs from Diaghilev's Ballets Russes and from his own later productions at the Paris Opéra," and sold his collection to the Wadsworth Antheneum in 1933 (in order to be able to pay for the return tickets for his troupe after a financially disastrous U.S. tour) for the then-outrageous sum of $10,000 -- which in retrospect seems an incredible bargain for what is regarded as "unrivaled as a comprehensive documentation of the Ballets Russes." In addition to reproducing the 188 works of art and the 32 costumes that comprise the collection, this volume "provides notes about each production and the corresponding items in the collection, as well as a new assessment of the immediate impact and lasting influence" of this renowned ballet company. ****NOTE that additional postage charges will be assessed for international shipping of this large and heavy volumes; if this concerns you, please contact us for a shipping quote before placing your order.**** .
  • $50
The Architectural Digest: A Pictorial Digest of California's Best  Architecture - Volume VII

The Architectural Digest: A Pictorial Digest of California's Best Architecture – Volume VII, Number 2 (1929) [featuring the Greystone Mansion, Beverly Hills]

Los Angeles: John C. Brasfield. Fair. (c.1929). (Vol. VII, No. 2). Periodical. [moderate external wear, some damage to binding at both ends of spine, numerous short tears in edges of covers (due to overlaping the text block by about 1/4"); also NOTE that two pages have had photos cut out]. (B&W photographs, drawings) There's no doubt about the "star" of this issue: it's Greystone, the mansion built on the expansive estate of Edward L. Doheny, Jr. in Beverly Hills. It's featured on the front cover, and in nearly three dozen photographs of the house (exterior and interior) and grounds that comprise the first section of the journal. (NOTE that one of the pages in this section has been cut, with about half the page missing, affecting two of the photos.) Designed by Gordon B. Kaufmann and completed in 1928, Greystone had only been occupied for four months in February 1929, when Ned Doheny and his secretary Hugh Plunkett died in what is generally accepted to have been a murder-suicide (although there has always been some lingering doubt about just who killed who, and why); given the prominence of the Doheny family in the culture and politics of Southern California, there was much about the deaths of the two men that was kept from public knowledge with the collusion of the ever-compliant BHPD. Although it's not clear exactly when this issue was printed and distributed, I suspect it was relatively early in 1929, before the mansion had been forever tainted by this tragic event. And it's not just the front section that's a paean to the Doheny manse: many of the advertisements in the back of the issue were taken by firms who had contributed to one feature or another of the design and construction of the house (the garden designers; the suppliers of the marble, tile, and brick; etc.). Some of these ads feature additional photos of various features of the house and grounds. But wait, there's more, much more! The 194-page issue features photographs of numerous other notable houses in various parts of California (although the preponderance are in the Los Angeles area, it seems) -- including one other iconic L.A. residence, that of William Andrews Clark Jr., which after his death in 1934 became the UCLA-owned library that now holds his rare book collection and bears his name. (There are four shots of the interior of the house, on pages 66-69.) Flipping through this issue naturally makes one wonder how many of these lovely homes are still extant today; without actually doing the research, my guess would be "most of them." ****NOTE that additional postage charges will be assessed for international shipping of this oversize, heavy volume; if this concerns you, please contact us for a shipping quote before placing your order.**** .
  • $250
The Lark [*SIGNED* by Boris Karloff]

The Lark [*SIGNED* by Boris Karloff]

Anouilh, Jean; adapted by Lillian Hellman New York: Random House. Near Fine in Very Good dj. (c.1956). 1st printing. Hardcover. [light shelfwear to bottom edge, no other significant wear to book; the jacket shows some wear at edges and extremities, most notably surrounding the top of the spine (with a very tiny nicks and tears and some wrinkling), a small chip at the top edge of the rear panel and a 1.5" closed tear at the bottom edge of the rear panel]. (B&W photo frontispiece) SIGNED on the front endpaper by legendary actor Boris Karloff, who co-starred as "Cauchon" in the original Broadway production of this play-within-a-play about the trial, condemnation, and execution of Joan of Arc. (Pierre Cauchon was the Catholic prelate who was the primary judge at Joan's trial.) The play, starring Julie Harris as Joan, opened on November 17, 1955, and ran for the remainder of the season (229 performances); also in the cast were Christopher Plummer, Joseph Wiseman, and Theodore Bikel, and the original music for the production was by Leonard Bernstein. A TV adaptation was broadcast as a "Hallmark Hall of Fame" presentation on February 10, 1957, with Harris and Karloff reprising their roles. Written and originally performed in French (the Paris premiere was in October 1953), the drama was staged in numerous venues in England earlier in 1955, in a translation by Christopher Fry; whether Hellman's adaptation was based on Fry's translation, I can't say, although I note that Fry's name is nowhere mentioned in this volume. Signed by Associated .
  • $100
Theatre World: Season 1949-50

Theatre World: Season 1949-50

Blum, Daniel, ed. New York: Greenberg: Publisher. Fair. (c.1950). (Volume VI). Softcover. [heavily external wear (especially along the spine, which has sustained some damage but is still holding together), including a long diagonal crease in the front cover; internally clean, and complete]. Trade PB (B&W photographs) A review of the theatre season from June 1, 1949 through June 1, 1950 -- not just Broadway, but also covering many important regional theatres, national touring companies, off-Broadway, plays that opened out of town and never made it to Broadway, etc. As with all volumes in this series, it's entertaining to flip through, as well as being an invaluable reference work. Among this season's openings: "Lost in the Stars" (adapted by Maxwell Anderson from the novel "Cry, the Beloved Country," with music by Kurt Weill); "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" (book by Joseph Fields and Anita Loos, based on the latter's novel); "Caesar and Cleopatra" by George Bernard Shaw; "The Member of the Wedding" (by Carson McCullers, based on her novel); "Come Back, Little Sheba" (starring Shirley Booth in the role she would reprise for the movie version a few years later); "Peter Pan" (starring the then-pushing-50 Jean Arthur as Pan). Among the big hits that were still playing during the season were: "Mister Roberts," starring Henry Fonda; "Kiss Me, Kate"; "Death of a Salesman"; "Detective Story"; and "South Pacific." If you're a movie or theatre fan, I can guarantee that flipping through this volume will provide hours of solid entertainment and frequent delight -- and an intense wish that somebody would invent a time machine. This year's "Gallery of Portraits of Promising Personalities" included Charlton Heston, Grace Kelly, and Lydia Clarke (who became Mrs. Heston) -- and more than a few performers whose promise, shall we say, didn't pan out. This year's volume also marked the third installment of the strange (and creepy) "Portrait Dolls" feature, in this instance a full-page photograph of truly awful-looking doll versions (in costume) of Helen Hayes, Katharine Hepburn, Carol Channing (looking particularly zombie-like) and Grace George, rendered by "Mary Green, New York Artist." Honestly, the only good use for these things would be as voodoo dolls, to be utilized by these actors' rivals -- or perhaps their overly-ambitious understudies. The volume also includes brief biographies of numerous actors, obituaries of those who died that year, a full name and title index, and more! .
  • $25