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James Pepper Rare Books

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IÕll Always Have Paris!

BUCHWALD, ART (JACK VALENTI) First Edition. Signed by the author, journalist, and humorist Art Buchwald to film executive Jack Valenti and his wife on a special label from the publisher affixed to the half-title: ÒTo Jack and Mary Margaret, Love, Art BuchwaldÓ. From the library of Hollywood executive Jack Valenti with a Certificate of Authenticity. Fine copy in a fine bright dust jacket. From the rear cover by author William Styron: ÒThis is a compelling memoir, told with BuchwaldÕs inimitable drollery, but deepened by moments of poignancy and wise reflection. It is also a brilliant self-portrait of the writer as a young man during a colorful and turbulent time.Ó Pulitzer Prize winner Art Buchwald (1925 - 2007) had a rare gift of combining wit, humor, and serious journalism, with his work regularly appearing in his column in The Washington Post. Jack Valenti (1921-2007) is best known in his long-time role as President of the Motion Picture Association of America from 1966 to 2004. During his 38 year position in the MPAA, Valenti created the MPAA film rating system which is still used today. In 1963, Valenti was in the John F. Kennedy motorcade in Dallas, and he is seen in the famous photograph of Lyndon Johnson being sworn in as President on Air Force One. Valenti flew back to Washington with Johnson and literally lived in the White House for two months helping Johnson take the reins of the presidency. He was the first special assistant to President Johnson and served at JohnsonÕs direction as a liaison to the Republican Congressional leadership. Hollywood mogul and Democratic fundraiser Lew Wasserman pressured Lyndon Johnson to let Valenti leave in 1966 to run the MPAA. A striking and articulate man who easily made friends, Valenti became a figure of considerable influence in both Hollywood and Washington. Few people have known as many famous and powerful people as Valenti.
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An Empire of Their Own: How the Jews Invented Hollywood

GABLER, NEAL (JACK VALENTI) First Edition. Uncorrected proof copy in printed yellow wrappers. Paperbound. From the library of Hollywood executive Jack Valenti with a Certificate of Authenticity. With some notations and corrections to the text. Lightly handled copy with some dampstaining to the covers and minor foxing to the edges. From the rear cover: ÒA provocative and richly entertaining group biography of the Jews who created and came to dominate the American film industry, and an examination of the enduring imprint they made on our culture. Jack Valenti (1921-2007) is best known in his long-time role as President of the Motion Picture Association of America from 1966 to 2004. During his 38 year position in the MPAA, Valenti created the MPAA film rating system which is still used today. In 1963, Valenti was in the John F. Kennedy motorcade in Dallas, and he is seen in the famous photograph of Lyndon Johnson being sworn in as President on Air Force One. Valenti flew back to Washington with Johnson and literally lived in the White House for two months helping Johnson take the reins of the presidency. He was the first special assistant to President Johnson and served at JohnsonÕs direction as a liaison to the Republican Congressional leadership. Hollywood mogul and Democratic fundraiser Lew Wasserman pressured Lyndon Johnson to let Valenti leave in 1966 to run the MPAA. A striking and articulate man who easily made friends, Valenti became a figure of considerable influence in both Hollywood and Washington. Few people have known as many famous and powerful people as Valenti.
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A Collection of Five Presidential Addresses Made by Lyndon B. Johnson in 1965. With a Foreword by Then Secretary of Labor W. Willard Wirtz

JOHNSON, LYNDON B. (JACK VALENTI) First Editions. Paperbound. A collection of five Presidential Addresses made by Lyndon B. Johnson in 1965, each is a staple-bound pamphlet and all are enclosed in the original slipcase with the official Seal of the President of the United States gilt-stamped on the front. The addresses are comprised of the State of the Union Message by the President of the United States to a Joint Session of Congress dated January 4, 1965, The Inaugural Address of President Lyndon Baines Johnson dated January 20, 1965, Remarks of the President at National Cathedral School Washington D.C. dated June 1, 1965, The Vital Alliance: Remarks of the President at the Ceremony Commemorating the Fourth Anniversary of the Alliance for Progress dated August 17, 1965, and The Noble Adventure: Remarks of the President at the Smithsonian Bicentennial Celebration dated September 16, 1965. From the single sheet, folded foreword by then Secretary of Labor W. Willard Wirtz: ÒTo read again some of the major Presidential addresses of 1965 is the see, in full illumination, the story and the ferment of a nation caught up in the adventure of an upward march toward a reachable greatness.In these messages is written democracyÕs inner balance of power; between the strength of ideas, the force of words, and the authority of action.Ó From the library of film executive Jack Valenti with a Certificate of Authenticity. Jack Valenti (1921-2007) is best known in his long-time role as President of the Motion Picture Association of America from 1966 to 2004. During his 38 year position in the MPAA, Valenti created the MPAA film rating system which is still used today. In 1963, Valenti was in the John F. Kennedy motorcade in Dallas, and he is seen in the famous photograph of Lyndon Johnson being sworn in as President on Air Force One. Valenti flew back to Washington with Johnson and literally lived in the White House for two months helping Johnson take the reins of the presidency. He was the first special assistant to President Johnson and served at JohnsonÕs direction as a liaison to the Republican Congressional leadership. Hollywood mogul and Democratic fundraiser Lew Wasserman pressured Lyndon Johnson to let Valenti leave in 1966 to run the MPAA. A striking and articulate man who easily made friends, Valenti became a figure of considerable influence in both Hollywood and Washington. Few people have known as many famous and powerful people as Valenti. Art Buchwald (1925 - 2007) is best known for his regular column in The Washington Post.
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Original Jack ValentiÕs Briefcase Used in Hollywood & Washington in ValentiÕs Role as President of the Motion Picture Association of America

VALENTI, JACK - MOTION PICTURE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA Original black leather briefcase that belonged to Jack Valenti. Near the handle is stamped in gold his initials J.V.Ó The case has two combination locks and the combination numbers to unlock will be provided to the purchaser. 17 1/2 inches wide, 13 inches tall, 4 1/2 inches thick. Very good condition. From ValentiÕs estate with a Certificate of Authenticity. Jack Valenti (1921-2007) is best known in his long-time role as President of the Motion Picture Association of America from 1966 to 2004. During his 38 year position in the MPAA, Valenti created the MPAA film rating system which is still used today. In 1963, Valenti was in the John F. Kennedy motorcade in Dallas, and he is seen in the famous photograph of Lyndon Johnson being sworn in as President on Air Force One. Valenti flew back to Washington with Johnson and literally lived in the White House for two months helping Johnson take the reins of the presidency. He was the first special assistant to President Johnson and served at JohnsonÕs direction as a liaison to the Republican Congressional leadership. Hollywood mogul and Democratic fundraiser Lew Wasserman pressured Lyndon Johnson to let Valenti leave in 1966 to run the MPAA. A striking and articulate man who easily made friends, Valenti became a figure of considerable influence in both Hollywood and Washington. Few people have known as many famous and powerful people as Valenti.
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Original Lyndon Johnson Era White House Briefcase Issued to Jack Valenti – First Special Assistant to President Johnson

JOHNSON, LYNDON B. & JACK VALENTI Original tan leather government issued briefcase issued to Jack Valenti. Near the handle is a plastic label that states: ÒJACK VALENTI - THE WHITE HOUSE. The case has two locks which are locked in the open position. 17 1/2 inches wide, 12 inches tall, 4 inches thick. Very good condition. From ValentiÕs estate with a Certificate of Authenticity. Jack Valenti (1921-2007) met Lyndon Johnson in 1956. In 1963, Valenti was in the John F. Kennedy motorcade in Dallas, and he is seen in the famous photograph of Lyndon Johnson being sworn in as President on Air Force One. Valenti flew back to Washington with Johnson and literally lived in the White House for two months helping Johnson take the reins of the presidency. He was the First Special Assistant to President Johnson and served at JohnsonÕs direction as a liaison to the Republican Congressional leadership. Valenti went on to become one of JohnsonÕs most trusted advisors. Hollywood mogul and Democratic fundraiser Lew Wasserman pressured Lyndon Johnson to let Valenti leave in 1966 to become President of the Motion Picture Association of America from 1966 to 2004. During his 38 year position in the MPAA, Valenti created the MPAA film rating system which is still used today. A striking and articulate man who easily made friends, Valenti became a figure of considerable influence in both Hollywood and Washington. Few people have known as many famous and powerful people as Valenti.
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WeÕll Laugh Again

BUCHWALD, ART (JACK VALENTI) First Edition. Signed and inscribed by the author, journalist, and humorist Art Buchwald to film executive Jack Valenti and his wife on a special label from the publisher affixed to the half-title. Inscribed: ÒTo Jack and Mary Margaret, Read between the lines, Art Buchwald, Aug 2002Ó. From the library of Hollywood executive Jack Valenti with a Certificate of Authenticity. Fine copy in a fine bright dust jacket. Pulitzer Prize winner Art Buchwald (1925 - 2007) had a rare gift of combining wit, humor, and serious journalism, with his work regularly appearing in his column in The Washington Post. Jack Valenti (1921-2007) is best known in his long-time role as President of the Motion Picture Association of America from 1966 to 2004. During his 38 year position in the MPAA, Valenti created the MPAA film rating system which is still used today. In 1963, Valenti was in the John F. Kennedy motorcade in Dallas, and he is seen in the famous photograph of Lyndon Johnson being sworn in as President on Air Force One. Valenti flew back to Washington with Johnson and literally lived in the White House for two months helping Johnson take the reins of the presidency. He was the first special assistant to President Johnson and served at JohnsonÕs direction as a liaison to the Republican Congressional leadership. Hollywood mogul and Democratic fundraiser Lew Wasserman pressured Lyndon Johnson to let Valenti leave in 1966 to run the MPAA. A striking and articulate man who easily made friends, Valenti became a figure of considerable influence in both Hollywood and Washington. Few people have known as many famous and powerful people as Valenti.Art Buchwald (1925 - 2007) is best known for his regular column in The Washington Post.
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Too Soon to Say Goodbye

BUCHWALD, ART (JACK VALENTI) First Edition. Signed and inscribed by the author, journalist, and humorist Art Buchwald to film executive Jack Valenti and his wife on the title page. Inscribed: ÒTo Jack and Mary, We have been friends long before I Died 01. Love, Art BuchwaldÓ. From the library of Hollywood executive Jack Valenti with a Certificate of Authenticity. Fine copy in a fine bright dust jacket. A poignant memoir relating BuchwaldÕs experiences following a diagnosis of kidney failure, with this by him from the rear cover: ÒI am in a hospice and I have this recurring dream. I am at Dulles airport and I have a reservation to go to heaven. I go into the terminal and look at the list of flights. Heaven is at the last gate.Ó Pulitzer Prize winner Art Buchwald (1925 - 2007) had a rare gift of combining wit, humor, and serious journalism, with his work regularly appearing in his column in The Washington Post. Jack Valenti (1921-2007) is best known in his long-time role as President of the Motion Picture Association of America from 1966 to 2004. During his 38 year position in the MPAA, Valenti created the MPAA film rating system which is still used today. In 1963, Valenti was in the John F. Kennedy motorcade in Dallas, and he is seen in the famous photograph of Lyndon Johnson being sworn in as President on Air Force One. Valenti flew back to Washington with Johnson and literally lived in the White House for two months helping Johnson take the reins of the presidency. He was the first special assistant to President Johnson and served at JohnsonÕs direction as a liaison to the Republican Congressional leadership. Hollywood mogul and Democratic fundraiser Lew Wasserman pressured Lyndon Johnson to let Valenti leave in 1966 to run the MPAA. A striking and articulate man who easily made friends, Valenti became a figure of considerable influence in both Hollywood and Washington. Few people have known as many famous and powerful people as Valenti.