[TOBACCO] "Ottoman". Tabachnaia fabrika [i.e. A Tobacco Factory 'Ottoman'] - Rare Book Insider
[TOBACCO] "Ottoman". Tabachnaia fabrika [i.e. A Tobacco Factory 'Ottoman']

[TOBACCO] “Ottoman”. Tabachnaia fabrika [i.e. A Tobacco Factory ‘Ottoman’]

  • $950
Saint Petersburg, [early 20th century]. 28Ñ18,5 cm. Corners restored, otherwise mint.â â Rare. A lithographic advertisement for a well-known tobacco factory 'Ottoman', which was founded by Yakov Egiz in 1882 and was nationalized in 1918. In the Russian Empire, it was the first company to release "exclusively Turkish tobacco". The enterprise produced cigarettes "Royal", "Count", "Bijou". These cigarettes soon became popular and stores of the Ottoman factory opened in St. Petersburg, Moscow and Riga. Turning around, the company drew attention to impecunious smokers, releasing cigarettes "Beneficial" for them. By the early 20th century, St. Petersburg didn't see more popular cigarettes than Bijou, due to their high quality but lower price. Cigarettes "Tsarskie" [Royal] were the first product and were depicted in the advertisement.
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[THE FIRST BOOK BY OSIP MANDELSTAM] Kamen’: Stikhi [i.e. A Stone: Verses]

St. Petersburg: Akme [printed at the author's expense by Iu. Mansfeld], 1913. ††[2], 34 pp. 21x14 cm. In original publisher's illustrated wrappers. Spine restored, some pale stains on the covers, few pencil marks, otherwise very good. ††A very good copy of the first edition of the first book by one of the greatest Russian poets Osip Mandelstam (1891-1938). The publication represents a great rarity in terms of both its low print run (300 copies) and the fact that after Mandelstam's arrest in 1938, his works were confiscated and vigorously destroyed in the USSR. †Published in 1913 at the author's own expense, this collection of poems marked Osip Mandelstam's debut and immediately established him in the upper echelon of Russian poets. The book contains 23 verses composed by the author in the period from 1908 to 1913, during his studies at Heidelberg, the Sorbonne, and St. Petersburg. †Mandelstam's brother, Evgeny: "I remember the day when Osip and I went to the printing house on Mokhovaya Street and received a finished print run. The author took one pack, and I took the other. Our task was to sell the books. After long deliberation, we handed over the entire circulation to the large bookstore of Popov-Yasny. From time to time my brother sent me to find out how many copies had been sold, and when I reported that forty-two books had already been sold out, our whole family celebrated. This sounded like the first recognition of the poet by readers." †During the era when Stone was first published, Symbolism was the dominant form of poetic expression among Russian poets. Like Mayakovsky and Khlebnikov, Mandelstam departed from this obsolete mode of expression in favor of a more direct treatment of thoughts. As a result, Stone established Osip as one of the foremost representatives of the Acmeist school. †Stone was the only collection of Mandelstam's poems that was republished twice (1916; 1923) during the lifetime of the author. In total, Osip managed to issue 4 collections of poems, Stone (1913; 1916; 1923); Tristia (1922), Vtoraya kniga [i.e. The Second Book] (1923), Stikhotvoreniya [i.e. Poems] (1928), and 4 poetry books for children, Dva tramvaya [i.e. Two Trams] (1925), Primus (1925), Shari [i.e. Balloons] (1926), Kukhnya [i.e. A Kitchen] (1926). Although from the 1930s to the end of the 1980s, Mandelstam's poems were banned and withdrawn from circulation, his works were still actively distributed in samizdat.
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[TRAM FROM ANOTHER CITY] Vsia staia krome tramvaia [i.e. The Whole Pack, Except for the Tram]

Shestakov, N. [16] pp.: ill. 27,5Ñ22 cm. In original illustrated wrappers. Spine and edges of covers restored, small stains occasionally. First edition. One of 8000 copies. This early Soviet children's book introduces all types of transport, except for the tram (as it is stated in the title). The verses tell about animals domesticated for transport (horse, ox, camel, deer, sledge dog) and mechanical transport: railway, car, steamship, airplane. Later, some words were changed for a new design. Compared with a 1929 edition of the State publishing house, this layout resembles more a poster than a book. The Raduga publishing house entrusted this project to its regular contributor, artist Alexei Efimov. In his work, all pages were equipped with a heading, some of them are underlined. Headlines, their typeface and lack of background color create together an image tending to constructivist posters. The book was written by Nikolai Shestakov (1894-1974). In 1914-1918, he studied at Kazan University and made his literary debut in a Kazan periodical. During the Civil war, the poet lived in Kolchak-controlled Omsk, worked for the periodical 'Our Newspaper' and actively contributed to White press. In 1921, he moved to Moscow and collaborated with Soviet periodicals. In the mid-1920s, Shestakov turned to children's poetry and soon gained fame as a playwright for Soviet theater of young spectators. His plays were staged in theaters across the country. Also, he became the author of the first anthem of the Artek pioneers' camp. Worldcat shows the only copy located in Princeton University.
  • $1,500
  • $1,500
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[THE VERY FIRST MASTER AND MARGARITA] Master i Margarita. Roman // Moskva #11, 1966; #1, 1967 [i.e. Master and Margarita: A Novel // Moscow #11, 1966; #1, 1967]

Bulgakov, M. Pp. 6-127 (#11, 1966), pp.56-144 pp. (#1, 1967). 24,9x16 cm. In two issues, both in original wrappers with letterpress design. Covers and spines restored. No.11: lower corner of pages restored, light water stains on lower edge. Otherwise very good. Scarce on the market. The first printed appearance of one of the most influential novels of the 20th century. Mikhail Bulgakov (1891-1940) started to work on his novel in 1928 but stopped writing four weeks before his death, leaving the novel with some unfinished sentences and loose ends. His wife made several attempts to publish the novel but was able to do it only during Khrushchev's Thaw. For the first time the novel was printed in the magazine «Moskva» (i.e. Moscow) with a preface by Konstantin Simonov, afterword by Abram Vulis. It was unexpected, because the magazine was not considered at that time a stronghold of freethinking. The most liberal magazine of the time was «Noviy mir» (i.e. New World) by Tvardovsky that famously printed Solzhenitsyn for the first time. «Moskva» was quite the opposite of that but the circulation of it was 150 thousand, and it is understandable that the novel after that became widely known. Publication was made possible thanks to Vulis' monograph where he presented Bulgakov as a very Soviet writer. Vulis was asked to commission an afterword. According to the unwritten rules of the time, such publications should have been prefaced with ideologically correct comments. This was done not so much to enlighten the reader as to dull the vigilance of distrustful officials from the Censor Committee. The reader, they say, will be explained that the novel «Master and Margarita» is not «against Soviet power», but «about another power» Vulis understood perfectly what they wanted from him. The editorial board decided to publish the first part of the novel in the eleventh issue of the journal for 1966. That means to quietly wait for authorities' reaction. And if everything goes well, the end of the novel is given in the first issue for the year 1967. That's why preface and afterword, both important, are published with the first chapter - if the reaction was adverse and the second part was never published. According to the researchers, more than 14,000 words were withdrawn from the text (159 censor cuts, of them 138 from the second part). People responsible for the publication of the novel not only considered it possible to erase certain words and phrases from the author's text, but also to throw out whole pieces and episodes, sometimes on many pages (for example, Nikanor Ivanovich's dream, or the scene in Torgsin). Cuts were also made in order to put the novel in the place assigned to it in the magazine («in order to save more space»). When the novel was published in the «Moskva», Bulgakov's wife signed all the changes. This was Simonov's advice: the main thing was to publish the novel, in any form. It's interesting that in «samizdat» separate typewritten lists of notes appeared, that is all pieces of text absent in the magazine publication, with an exact indication of where each missed piece should be inserted. The activity of censorship was thus exposed and pointless.
  • $3,500
  • $3,500
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[ASIA – TURKESTAN – TIAN-SHAN] Puteshestviia po Turkestanskomy Kraiu i Issledovanie Gornoi Strany Tian-Shania, Sovershennye po Porucheniu Russkogo Geograficheskogo Obshchestva [i.e. Travels Across Turkestan and Survey of the Mountainous Country of Tian-Shan, Undertaken on the Assignment of Russian Geographical Society]

Severtsov, N.A. Part 1 and only. [4], vi, 461, [1] pp. Octavo. With a large folding lithographed map. Period style green half morocco with marbled papered boards; spine with raised bands and gilt lettered title. Both original publisher's wrappers bound in. Mild very minor water stains on the lower corners of several leaves at rear, otherwise a very good copy. Very rare imprint with only seven printed copies found in Worldcat. First edition of the major work by the prominent Russian explorer of Central Asia, Nikolai Severtsov (1827-1885), who was described by another famous traveller to Central Asia P. Semenov-Tyan-Shansky as "one of the first Russian travellers who engaged in survey of the interesting, colossal mountainous land of Tian-Shan, one of the pioneers of geographical research in the countries previously unknown and for many centuries not opening themselves to scientific investigations." The book includes accounts of three of Severtsov's travels. During the expedition Severtsov was wounded and captured by the armed group from the khanate of Kokand and freed only thanks to a personal involvement of the commander of Russian border guards General Dansas. Two other expeditions were dedicated to the Tian-Shan Mountains: to their northern part in 1864 and to the surroundings of Lake Issyk Kul in 1865, with many areas not visited by a European before. The book contains voluminous material on geology, climatology, soil, hydrography, hydrology and orography, flora and fauna of the Aral Sea and the Tian Shan Mountains, with an extensive description of the travel to the valley of the Aksai and Naryn Rivers in central Tian Shan. Severtsov gained the reputation of an important Russian zoogeographer. The map shows central Tian-Shan and the surroundings of the Issyk-Kul Lake, based on the surveys of Russian military topographers of 1856-1869. It was planned to issue three parts of the book, but only one part, containing general reports of Severtsov's travels in 1857-1868 was published, the other two not being approved by the author because of the low quality of the maps. The original manuscripts of the next two parts were eventually lost in the archives. Second edition of the first part was issued only in 1947. "Nikolai Alekseevich Severtzov was a Russian explorer and naturalist. On an expedition to the Syr Darya, he was captured by bandits and freed after a month. In 1865-68, he explored the Tian Shan mountains and Lake Issyk Kul. In 1877-78, he explored the Pamir Mountains, following a route close to the current Pamir Highway as far as Lake Yashil Kul on the Ghunt River" (Wikipedia). A peak and a glacier in the Pamir Mountains, and a glacier in the Trans-Ili Alatau (Tian Shan Mountains) were named after him.
  • $3,500
  • $3,500
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[SOVIET VOYAGE TO THE PACIFIC REGION] Tikhookeanskii dnevnik [i.e. The Pacific Ocean Diary]

Lapin, B. 222, [2] pp. 19,5x14 cm. In original illustrated wrappers. Tears of the spine with small fragments lost, vertical crease of the front cover and some leaves, otherwise very good and clean copy. Signed by author on the half title (1929). First edition. One of 4000 copies. Cover design by artist Ivan Rerberg who depicted the upper part of the Pacific Ocean where both continents come near each other and surrounded by islands. This interesting witness account describes a voyage of the Soviet journalist from Vladivostok through Chukotka to coasts of Alaska and Japan. The diary was written by Boris Lapin (1905-1941) who was a travel journalist observing life from Arctic islands to Central Asian steppe. In 1928, he met the Pacific Ocean with enthusiasm. "Doors of the whole world are opened and nothing blocks me anymore. I came out to an alien world", - wrote Lapin in introduction adding that he was interested in people who settled the Pacific Ocean and relied on it. He started from Chukchi lands and lived there trying to understand the radically different lifestyle. The Soviet rule poorly influenced Chukchi people throughout the 1920s and Lapin in detail noticed unchanged customs and social relations. After that, he joined American ship selling goods between Alaska and Chukotka and crossed Bering Strait. Lapin visited Nome city in Alaska, that particularly impressed him with international emigre population, and turned back to Asia. He reached Hokkaido and sought to go to Vladivostok. As he desired, Lapin got acquainted with 'ocean' people, their personal stories and living conditions. Gained personal experience in settlements and on board of ships, the author mixed his notes with narratives he heard about local people and visitors from other lands. Worldcat shows copies located in LoC, Yale and Stanford Universities.
  • $750
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[SOVIET TEMPERANCE CAMPAIGN] Dolbanem! [i.e. Let’s Get Hammered!]

Bedny, D. Moscow; Leningrad: Zemlia i fabrika, 1930. 126, [2] pp. 18Ñ13,5 cm. In original photomontage wrappers. Covers and spine restored, slightly soiled, otherwise very good and clean internally.â â An anti-alcohol poem of 21 chapters "Let's Get Hammered!" [simultaneously "Let's Hammer It"] was written by well-known Soviet poet Demyan Bedny in 1930. Bedny proclaimed "honest soberâ Ham" as a model of morality, who wasn't afraid to expose his own father Noah: "Father got drunk like a pig! All in vomit! It's disgusting to see!" - and called: "So there is nothing to joke with booze!â It needs to be beaten! Culturally! Stormy! Fiery, angry! Hammer it daily". In chapter four, the author lists various slang words used while calling for a drink.â Two book editions were released at the publishing house "Zemlia i fabrika" in the same year. Both consist of the same number of pages. In contrast to another version, this one came out with aâ photomontage cover design. It was created by poster designer L. Griffel. In the 1930s, he was a Hungarian member of the International Bureau of Revolutionary Artists. For the cover, Griffel depicted a satirical story. A large bottle of alcohol (with an Imperial military officer on its side) is crawling along the wall. It wants to grab workers on top of the building; they are trying to hold on to other workers. Another group of workers is trying to knock the bottle down with an I-beam. Some elements of the design are photographical, others are drawn.â In the same year, Deni's poster "Let's Hammer It!" was printed with verses by D. Bedny.â â Worldcat shows copies located in Princeton, North Carolina, Columbia Universities.
  • $750
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[SPORTS PHOTOBOOK] Grebnoi sport v SSSR [i.e. Rowing in the USSR] / Compiled by B. Slivko

Moscow: Fizkul'tura i sport, 1956. â â 28 pp.: ill. In the original wrappers with photographs. Ink inscription (dated 1975) on front cover. Very good condition, spine slightly rubbed. â First and only edition. No title page as issued, all contributors are credited on the back cover.â This photo book is devoted to boating activities common in the USSR, champions and the training system developed by Soviet rowers. â Design was produced by M.L. Kompaneets. The front wrapper features a photo of the Wings of Soviets team that consisted of eight rowers with a coxswain. The most known picture of this group - 'The Eight' (1955) - was taken by Lev Borodulin. Shot also diagonally, this photo looks alike. The back wrapper presents a picture of athlete Rosa Chumakova with her rival at the 1954 European Championships, Dutch rower Agnes Roiter.â The book contains black-and-white photographs and photomontages of rowers and pictures from competitions, including joint photos of two competing teams (for example, Soviet and Dutch). Each of four photomontages combines a photo of a team during the swim and a picture of an award they won.â The book overviews both recreational boating activity and rowing as a competitive sport. In summer time, Soviet people did boating, canoeing, kayaking. Boating stations were organized and actively attended in various settlements across the USSR. Since 1928, All-Union rowing and boating competitions have been held. The program of the 1928 Spartakiad included rowing, racing on kayaks and yals. In 1934, the program was enlarged with rowing on dinghies. Unlike elementary boating, canoeing gained popularity in the Soviet Union in 1952. By 1956, the USSR had already participated in the Olympics, held All-Union competitions and developed canoeing in some school clubs. A kayak as the invention of the people of the North was used much better and longer. People made kayaks with their own hands and organized weekend trips with friends. Schools and universities usually had boat racing teams. Many people, having started doing it in school, continued after that and participated in amateur competitions. The book published a nice picture of young men trained kayaking near Mtskheta (Georgia). Also, an upcoming canoe slalom competition was announced.â A large section is devoted to famous Soviet rowers and their participation in international competitions. The oldest Russian rower was Mitrofan Sveshnikov who joined this kind of sport in the 1890s; his picture is printed in a round frame. In the pre-war Soviet Union, Alexander Dolgushin was considered the best rower which results remained unattainable for a long period of time. He hasn't survived the Great Patriotic War. His photograph with another eminent rower, Petr Rodionov illustrates the section about 1930s achievements. â They are followed by coaches of the leading Soviet teams. "The Wings of Soviets" was the All-Union sports organization uniting different sports clubs of Soviet aviation enterprises. Among rowing teams belonging to the organization were eights and fours, male and female groups. The Wings eight (male) was more recognizable. They managed to create the whole system of preparation for competitions, their own rowing school. They endlessly improved the quality of training and the design of a boat. Up to this day, many masters of paddling sports have imitated the style of this team in many ways. This book presents pictures of them during water exercises but also gymnastics, cross country, skiing and running.â Women's eight and four of the Wings of Soviets society were coached by Petr Pakhomov (1902-1984); his portrait is printed in the edition. He also was a trainer of Emilia Mukhina who became the champion of the USSR twice. Her training sets certainly included lifting a bar with or without weights attached.â â The only copy is located in LoC.
  • $450