Terrae Sanctae Scondiae doctissima descriptio - Rare Book Insider
Terrae Sanctae Scondiae doctissima descriptio

Ziegler, Jacob

Terrae Sanctae Scondiae doctissima descriptio

  • $17,979
Argentorati (Strasbourg) , Rihelium (Rihel). 1536Terra Sancta: Laor mapas 866-700 A; Scondia (Scandia, Scandinavia) : Ginsberg, 2006, map 8; Ehrensvard, 2006, pp 49-51; Burden 1996, Map 9Small in folio (29x19 cm)Contemporary embossed pigskin over wooden boardsTwo original clasps. Raised bands, Title in contemporary manuscript on the spineContemporary paper library label : Terre Sancte descriotio quam palestinam nominant auctore Jacobo Zieglero C 83148 leaves; 14 non numbered leaves; 8 double page woodcut maps;2 nn leaves.Waterstain upper quarter of the book throughout, mostly light. Title page upper blank 2 cm added. Overall a fine atlas in its original, nearly 500 year old constitution and binding.Middle East; Terra Sancta; Arabia lvs 1-74First printed atlas of Terra Sancta, Palestine (1532). Fine maps of the Middle East (A II) ; Palestina (A IIII); Samarium; Judea; Palestina (BIIII); Aegypta ; Crossing of the Red Sea and (C II) mapsSchondia. Plinius: Scandia, Scandinavia lvs 85-103The oldest surviving map of Scandinavia seems to be the manuscript copy of 1427 of the map by the Danish mathematician Claudius Clavus. The earliest printed maps derive from the manuscript map of the region as designed Donnus Germanus around 1470. A new and better design was drawn and printed in 1532 by Jacob Ziegler. Ziegler, a German scientist, worked in Rome between 1521 and 1525, living in that famous St Brigitta hospital, a base for Nordic pilgrims (Ehrensvard) where he received new information from Scandinavian priests. He also worked there with Johannes Magnus and Peder Manson. His map embraces the Northern Atlantic, Greenland and New Foundland, and shows Scandinavia in a very appropriate way.Bibliography: Ginsburg, W: Printed maps of Scandinavia and the Arctic. Septentrionalium Press. 2006Laor, E. Maps of the Holy Land, New York, Liss 1986Sigurdson, Haraldur, Landmarks in Icelandic Cartography in Arctic, Vol 37, December 1985
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Mare Rubrum

Mare Rubrum

Langenes, Barent Mare Rubrum from the atlas, Caert Tresoor, Middelburg, the Netherlands, 1598.Tibbetts 1978, map 56 The first map exclusively dedicated Arabia and the Red Sea is in the Ptolemy edition, in Rome of 1478. It is called Sexta Asiae tabula. The first modern depiction of Arabia and the Red Sea is in Waldseemuller’s Carta Marina of 1516 of which one copy only is known to exist. The first printed modern map of Arabia and the Red Sea is Arabia Felix Nova Tabula by Gastaldi in 1548. Tibbets calls the Gastaldi 1548 map the first printed map to specifically deal with Arabia. That map was copied and enlarged by Ruscelli in 1561. In that same year, 1561 Gastaldi produced a larger map seconda parte dell’Asia including Arabia. The map takes innovations from Portuguese maritime sources, based the exploration of the Asian waters and lands from Vasco da Gama 1498 onwards. Starting with Ortelius the Dutch became dominant in printed maps and charts. One of their pioneers, Petrus Plancius, obtained a fine set of Portuguese manuscript maps made by Lasso. They served as the basis for the map of the Indian Ocean as published in Linschoten’s Itinerario of 1596. The map of the Red Sea here described is directly derived from that Linschoten map. The Red Sea is shown here for the first time as stand-alone printed map. Red Sea The Langenes map closely follows (Lasso) van Linschoten. It is quite distinct from the Porro map of 1596. On our map the bays are shown in distinct detail and places are clearly indicated: the result of direct observation. The emphasis is totally on the sea and sea shore. Present day Yemen shows Zebit after its mayor harbor at the Red Sea. Further North is Medina tabijabi ubi Mahumetis sepulchrum visitor, the place where Mohammed is buried. The utmost southern point is Aden. On the African side of the Red Sea many more places are shown than on for example Ortelius map Turcicum Imperium 1570
  • $2,697
  • $2,697
Ormus

Ormus

Langenes, Barend Copperplate engraving.Amsterdam, Barend Langenes, 1598.pp 85 and 86 from the atlas, Caert Tresoor.Copperplate engraving, 9x12 cm. Clear print. Unrestored in its original state.Description of Ormus (see below) is in verso of the map in Dutch. First map ever printed of the Persian Gulf as a stand alone. Extremely rare as only 13 copes of the original atlas are known to survive. In Sultan al Qasimi’s book the Langenes map is shown in an c 1610 example by Petrus Bertius. Only in its first edition of 1598 the map is presented without the framework of longitude and latitude, as is our map.Text in verso of the map: description of Ormus.On the limits of the Persian (Gulf) there is a mighty Kingdom called Ormus. It comprises a part of Persia that is watered by the rivers Tabo; Tuissindo and Druro and some islands at the inlet (of the Persian Gulf) and also a part of the Happy Arabia bordering the same Gulf. The capital is the island Ormus at the entrance of the Gulf, 12 miles out of the coast where the city of that name lies. .That is a beautiful mercantile city, better than any other (city) bordering the sea in the beauty of the place and the number of shops and exceptionally beautiful pearls.However, there is great scarcity of wheat and sweet water because the island is not fertile and gives no wheat. Thus, everything is transported to them. Trade flourishes there exceptionally and (merchants) come from Arabia; India and Persia. They bring silk; pearls and precious stones.There is a small mountain on this island that on one side has Sulphur mines, on the other side Salt mines.The inhabitants are rather beautiful, half Arab, half Persian who eat mainly rice and are lovers of music and the other arts. Their King is a Sarazin (?) and gives every year 15000 Seraphinen (= stones) to the Portuguese. The Portuguese have a strong and well equipped castle there. Bibliography: Al Qasimi. Sultan Bin Muhammad. The Gulf in Historic Maps 1493-1931. Thinkprint, Leicester, UK 1996
  • $6,742
  • $6,742
Arabia

Arabia

Langenes, Barent Three maps and full description in Dutch from Caert Tresoor, Middelburg, the Netherlands, 1598.Tibbetts 1978, map 54 The first map exclusively dedicated to Arabia is in the Ptolemy edition, in Rome of 1478. This is the Sexta Asiae tabula. The first modern depiction of Arabia is in Waldseemuller’s Carta Marina of 1516 of which one copy only is known to exist. Further modern features are shown in Sebastian Munster’s Geographia of 1540. The first printed modern map is Arabia Felix Nova Tabula by Gastaldi in 1548. That map was copied and enlarged by Ruscelli in 1561. The next innovations in the mapping of Arabia has its sources in the Portuguese, maritime cartography, based the exploration of the Asian waters and lands from Vasco da Gama 1498 onwards. When in the late XVI century the Dutch became dominant in printed maps and charts one of their pioneers, Petrus Plancius, obtained a fine set of Portuguese manuscript maps made by Lasso. They served as the basis for the map of the Indian Ocean as published in Linschoten’s Itinerario of 1596. The map of Arabia, described here is a direct derative from that Linschoten map. Arabia The Langenes map closely follows (Lasso) van Linschoten. It is quite distinct from the Porro map of the same date. On our map the bays are shown in distinct detail and places are clearly indicated: the result of direct observation. The Tropic of Cancer cuts the map in a northern and Southern part, above it Ayaman and under it Arabia Foelix. Present day Yemen is called Zebit after its mayor harbor at the Red Sea. Just under 23 ½ degree is Consida al Ziden (Djedda) and Mecha (Mecca); above it Medina talnabi ubiMahumetis sepulchrum visitor. The utmost southern point is Aden
  • $899
The Decades

The Decades

Eden, Richard Sabin 1561; JCB 1919: I.186; Church 102; Kraus: the first three English books on America, 1971.In small quarto, Contemporary calf binding with English blindstamp on both covers: a pelican plucking blood from her breast to feed her young. Spine renewed.24 nn lvs; 361 lvs plus one extra; 13 nn lvs (index and colophon).Condition: contemporary English full calf binding, restored. Leaf C2 of preliminaries and leaf 345 Afrikke and the 3 last leaves of the index in facsimile, printed on contemporary paper. Signs of use all through, some browning to the first 15 leaves. A few small wormholes filled usually without loss of text. Book block rebound. Provenance: The blind stamp on the covers show a familiar religious image: the pelican feeding her children with her own blood. An expert on early English bindings dr. David Pearson of the Rare Book School at Cambridge University (UK) tells us it is a late XVI century English binding. The image does not necessarily indicate the owner, printer or binder. The text around it needs further study but we read .keepeth the law .good to the common wealth. The first is a quote from the bible, the Proverbs (29-18) the latter a quote from the Magna Carta. A later (1685) manuscript note gives the name of the owner as Richard Dyer not further identified.This is the first Sammelband of the most important sources of the voyages of discovery by Spain to the Americas in the English language. Its main corpus is the translation of Peter Martyr’s first three Decades, as published in Spain in 1516. It also embraces Vespucci’s’ discussion of the South Pole stars; Magellan’s voyage around the world; Lopez de Gomara and Oviedo early histories on the Americas. It also includes the Popes bull of 1493, dividing the world to be discovered between Spain and Portugal and the discussions at Badajoz (1524) and Zaragoza (1529) that lead to the lease of the Moluccas to Portugal in 1529. Finally and on voyages to Moscovie.Martyr’s first three decadas translated in English. The first decade is dedicated completely to Columbus’ first three voyages to the West and the so called minor voyages by Alonso Nino and the Pinzón brothers. The second decade follows Ojeda and Juan de la Cosa in northern Paria (=South America) and Vasco Nunez de Vaca and Enciso in Central America; Valdivia in the Darien and Pedro Arias in Central America. The third decade tells us about Vasco Nunez de Balboa in Central America and his discovery of the Pacific. His meetings with the caciques Thumaco and Chiapes, name givers of their respective regions. The fourth chapter of book three is dedicated to the fourth and last voyage of Columbus following the east coast of Central America upwards (Veragua). It reports on Sebastian Cabot’s exploits in the North for the British; on the first voyage south under Juan de Solis in 1512 and the discovery of Florida by Juan Ponce de Leon in 1513. There is a long description of Isla la Espanola and other Caribbean islands. The chapter ends with the second voyage by Solis south 30 degrees (la Plata river) in 1516.
  • $84,278
  • $84,278
Zehenter Theil

Zehenter Theil

De Bry Th. Zehenter Theil der Orientalischen Indien Frankfurt, Beckers. 1613.Church 242; Muller 1878; Howego I, p. 873/74.Two parts in one.In folio, modern quarter calf and boards.Engraved title to the spine.The 3 maps in printed facsimile on contemporary paper. Mild browning slightly different per gathering. Maps and prints in excellent condition.Part one, text: A;B;C;D; and E in four that is 20 leaves of which the first leaf is the engraved title page and the last leaf an authentic blank. Three folding maps interleaved.Part two: a in four including a letter title page with two woodcut vignettes, thereafter 3 leaves with one plate each.The maps and plates are:(1) Tabula nautica ad Hudsono, anno 161(2) Vera delineatio tractus ex Hollandia (3) Tabula Septentrionalis Russiae Isaac Massa descripta est (1) Wardhusm, bird eye view map of the islan(2) Kilduyn , two bird eye views on one page.(3) Der Samojeden Götter ., plate with printed text.The text is: Henry Hudson, der neuen Schiffahrt uber die Amerische Inseln in Chinam und Japponiam, the new route to sail to China and Japan north of the American islands. Pp 10 & 11. Hudson’s fourth voyage North. In june 1611 he is put on a longboat by his crew in the Bay, named after him and is left there to die. Jan Huygen van Linschoten: short description of the islands to the North pp 12 & 13. Witness to his participation in the two (of three) voyages to find the NE passage by the Dutch in 1594 and 1595.Fernandez de Quiroz, Discurs an Ihn Konigliche Majestat in Spanien wegen des funfsten Theils der Welt, Terra Australis incognita Memorandum to the King of Spain on the firth part of the world, terra Australis. pp 14-21. One of Quiroz’s over 70- different memoranda, written between 1607 and 1614 (Howego) on his discoveries in the South Sea and referring to Terra Australis, the one translated here, was first published in Sevilla in 1610.Isaac Massa: Description of Siberia pp 21-37.This book is the German shortened version of Beschrijvinghe vander Samoyeden Landt .a collection of Dutch arctic voyages NE and NW as published by Hessel Gerrits in Amsterdam in 1612. Both the text and the maps are rare and of great importance.The maps are:The Tabula nautica, is considered the original map as made by Hudson on his last (1610-11) voyage NW that apparently fell into the hands of Hessel Gerrits, the East India Company map maker based in Amsterdam. His map of 1612 is bigger (c 25x54 cm) than ours of 1613 (15x33 cm) but further identical. The second map the Vera delineation ex Hollandiae ad fluvium Obys belongs to the short description by Jan Huygen van Linschoten.The same is true for the second map, the Tabula Septentrionalis Russiae, one of the first maps of the Russian north coast, made by Russian cartographers and copied by Isaac Massa, and published by Hessel Gerrits in the same booklet. Again the sizes are different, 17,5x46 cm versus 14x33 cm but the details identical.
  • $13,485
  • $13,485
Libro prima della Historia de l'Indie Occidentali

Libro prima della Historia de l’Indie Occidentali

Martyr, Peter Libro prima della Historia de l’Indie Occidentali (Martir);Libro secondo delle Indie Occidentali (Oviedo);Libro ultimo del Summario delle Indie Occidentali (lettere delle Peru).Venice, 1534.Harrisse 190; Church 69.In small quarto, 20x15 cm; Rebound in XIX th red Morocco; raised bands; title labels in gilt.Martyr: 1 nn leaf, title; 2-79 lvs ; 1 original blank, folded map Oviedo: 1 nn leaf, title; 2 lvs, prologue; lvs 4-64, the text; 2 lvs, register & text: explanation of the 1534 Ramusio map.Anonymous:: 1 nn leaf, title page; 15 nn lvs: text, early letter describing conquest of Peru.The first book of this Sammelband , who’s Sammler was probably Ramusio is a summary of Peter Martyr’s Decades that appeared for the first time complete in its 8 decades in 1530.Between the first and the second book you will find the woodcut printed map of Hispanola, Isola Spagnuola, in facsimile. The map is missing in most copies. The original is one of the first printed maps of the Americas (Not in Burden).The second book is a faithful copy of the 1626 first edition of Oviedo’s Historia natural de las Indias Occidentales, Toledo 1526 That first edition is practically unobtainable. The simple drawings printed as woodcuts in te original edition have here been copied, enlarged and supplied with details of plants and persons. These are all very early images out of the New World.You will find the woodcuts at: Folio 21 v. Hamaca; Folio 48 v. Arbol gigante; Folio 49 r. Prender fuego; Folio 52 v. Hoja del platano. The last leaf of the Oviedo text is a curious colophon, giving the date of printing (December 1534 in Venice), claiming a 20 year copy right and explains the origin of the map of all the West Indies, that is supposed to be added to the book. However, of this famous map, tutto questo mondo nuovo (Burden 10), only two copies are known to survive, one in the New York Public Library and another, contemporary colored one in the John Carter Brown Library. The third and last book of this Sammelband of Americana is one of the earliest printed reports on the conquest of Peru by Francisco Pizarro. The author of this report came to Spain with or WAS Hernando Pizarro, Francisco’s brother. His ship arrived in Sevilla in January 1534 with loads of presents in gold for the Emperor. It would appear that the oldest surviving printed version of this letter is the German New Zeitung aus Hispanien and Italien of February 1534; the second an imprint in Spanish by Bartolome Perez in Sevilla in April of that same year; a third added to the second edition of Bordone’s Isolario in June 1534, and ours be the fourth in October 1434. In between the same Bartolome Perez printed Pizarro’s secretary’s Francisco de Xeres report under the title of the Verdadera relacion de a Conquista del Peru en Julio 1534.
  • $24,722
  • $24,722
Margarita Philosophica

Margarita Philosophica

Reisch, G. Sabin 69122, best description; Graesse VI pp 73; Brunet 3441; Stillwell II 219. In Smith, Rara arithmetica p. 82 the 1504 Gruninger Strasbourg edition Sanz, Ultimas adiciones, 1960 pp 283/284; Map: Shirley Map 22 (1) In quarto, 18 or 19th century stiff vellum. 301 of 302 nn leaves, lacking the last blank.Includes woodcut title page, Margarita Philosophica, and full page printers mark at the end: IS, Johann Schott, and 15 full page woodcuts One folding map (World, Shirley nr 22) Two folding tables on music, a small one (between h6 and h7); the big one (between h8 and i1) Numerous woodcuts in the text Condition: Rebound in the XIX century possibly for the Colloredo family. Manuscript numbering of the pages in a contemporary hand. Slight uniform overall browning. Both folding music tables strengthened in verso on the fold.Provenance: Colloredo, a princely family, based in Austria; Koch, Berlin; Erwin Tomash.Original edition, Major science collections seem to have the second edition either by Schott with the original woodcuts or by Gruninger with new woodcuts. For example the Maggs science catalogue nr. 520, 1929 it is the 1504 Schott edition; in the Fairfax Murray collection at Harvard it is the 1517 edition wanting the map and folding music sheets. In the Honeyman collection, nr. 2621, it is the 1504 Gruninger edition. The Margarita Philosophica is an overview of the liberal arts (science) at the break of the Renaissance, in Germany about 1490. It was the first modern encyclopaedia to appear in print (Smith). Where all other bibliographies give 1503 as the date of the editio princeps, Graesse mentions an edition without date or place, that he dates 1496 and places in Heidelberg. Panzer and Hain suggest this edition with a date of 1496 is the same one as this 1503 edition and d’Averzac argues that the text was written and finished in 1496, not published. Being the first edition in this case is important as the book carries some medical images and a worldmap that were designed and printed here for the very first time.The Margarita stands in line with earlier encyclopedias like the Ethymologia by Isodorus Hispalensis. This text, written in the VII century, includes an OT worldmap, and was printed for the first time in 1472. Jacobus Magnus’ Sophologium was written in the early XV century and first printed around 1470. Finally Bartolomeus Anglicus’ De proprietatibus rerum was first printed in 1470.Most fields of science are preceded by a full page, metaphorical woodcut, showing and representing the field of science to be discussed. The woodcut title page succeeds in summarising all that follows. Here Margarita holds together or directs the seven fields of science. At the bottom Aristoteles and Seneca represent the sources of PHILOSOPHIA NATURALES & MORALES, at the top four church fathers inspire the PHILOSOPHIA DIVINA.The folding map is almost always wanting (Maggs, 1929). It is so rare Henry Harrisse had never seen it. It is a mostly Ptolemaic worldmap where the Southland encloses the Indian Ocean. Here are written the words: “ hic non terra sed mare est in quo mirae magnitudes insulae sed Ptolomeo fuerunt incognitae” -this is not land but sea wherein a multitude of islands that were unkown to Ptolemy-.The book is important as an encyclopedia, as an early text on the theory of music (Leclerc) and on mathematics (Smith). In medicine the book is considered a “graphic incunable” (Stilwell 1970: 220 ) with the earliest printed image of any value of the eye (Flamm, 2013) at G 3 and the open skull showing centres of brain activity (Flamm) an early depiction of the brain at H2. According to Maggs this is : a phrenological head, showing the brain and its relation to the senses and intellectual process one of the earliest representations of this kind which is found later in many mnemonic works like Dolce; Romberch and Rosselius (Maggs, 1929: 74-76)
  • $47,196
  • $47,196
Verhael van de eerste Schipvaert. by t Noorden om

Verhael van de eerste Schipvaert. by t Noorden om

De Veer, Gerrit Joost HartgensAmsterdam, Adriaan Roest, 1650Tiele, Memoire nr 102 65 pp (last blank)Pp 1&2: Title page with woodcut plate6 original text engravings on copper plateSmall in quartoXIX century cut and rebound in half brown moroccoTitle in gilt on the spineHole in title page in old restoration, probably when rebound. Cut short just affecting a few of the headings.Pp 3-46: The story of the three voyages by the Dutch to find the north-east passage to Cathay (China) in 1594; 1505 and 1596 under Willem Barentszoon and Jacob van Heemskerk. This well-known text, published in 1598 is followed by a summary of Pp 46&47:the fourth voyage North for the Dutch, the third by Henry Hudson in 1609. This includes the exploration of North America’s East coast about 40 degrees North motivated by letters and maps sent to him by Captain Smith and his exploration of what later became the Hudson river. Pp 48-52: Isaac Massa’s description of Siberia, Samojeda en TingoessaPp 52-60: Isaac Massa’s description of the roads and rivers going east from MoscoviaPp 60-64: Johannes Pontanus: Plea to discover a NE or NW passage based on the history up till 1586Second Hartgens imprint (first 1648). All Hartgens editions of the early Dutch voyages to the East are rare.Bibliography:Muller, Samuel. Detectio Freti Hudsoni, Amsterdam, Muller 1878S.P l‘ Honore Naber. Hessel Gerritsz Beschrijvinghe the Hague, Nijhoff 1924S.P l’ Honore Naber. Reizen van Willem Barents Noorden, the Hague, Nijhoff 1917. 2 VolsAsher, G.M. Henry Hudson de Navigator, London, Haykluyt Soc. , 1860Beke, Charles T, True description of the three voyages by the NE towards Cathay and China London, Hakluyt 1853
  • $5,394
  • $5,394
Margarita Philosophica Nova & Appendix

Margarita Philosophica Nova & Appendix

Reisch, G. Smith, Rara arithmetica p 82 and Maggs, Science Catalogue, 1929, both the 1504 Strasbourg edition) In quarto. In contemporary blindstamped pigskin over wooden boards.Titel in manuscript on spine.Text rubricated in red all through.2 engraved title pages.7 full page engraved chapter title pages (trivium and quadrivium).1 folding, woodcut map of the world, watermark bulls head.1 folding table (music)Abundant woodcut text engravings.Most initials and all woodcuts in straight, contemporary colour.The hundreds of woodcuts that illustrate the text are all in contemporary color. We have found only one other copy of this book in original colour. Our book is an extremely rare example of an early overview of all sciences at the turn of the XVI century, the age of Discovery.The Margarita Philosophica is an overview of the liberal arts (science) at the break of the Renaissance, here about 1490. It was the first modern encyclopaedia to appear in print (Smith). The original text was finished in 1496. It stands in line with earlier encyclopaedias like the Ethymologia by Isodorus Hispalensis (VII century, includes an OT worldmap, first printed in 1472) Jacobus Magnus’ Sophologium (early XV century, first printed around 1470, and Bartolomeus Anglicus’ De proprietatibus rerum (1470).Gregor Reisch (1467-1525) was professor at Heidelberg University, where he also taught Waldseemüller. He is part of a circle of scientists/publishers, that include Walter Ludd; Ringmann, professor of cosmology in Basel, Johann Grüninger in Strassburg (printer) , Schott and Amerbach. Between them information flowed freely. Partly under the meacenate of Rene II, Duke of Lorraine, the Cosmographia Introductio was published (1507); wall map of the world naming America (1507); gores of a globe showing & naming America (1507) and later the Carta Marina (1516).Most fields of sciences are preceded by a full page, metaphorical woodcut, showing and representing the field of science to be discussed. In this 1512 edition after the 12 chapters comes a detailed index and an important Appendix on Greek and Hebraic languages, on the Astrolabe and geographical composition; perspective and other issues.The folding map is almost always wanting (Maggs, 1929). It is so rare Harrisse had never seen it. It is a Ptolemaic worldmap where the Southland encloses the Indian Ocean. Here are written the words: “ hic non terra sed mare est in quo mirae magnitudes insulae sed Ptlomeo fuerunt incognitae” (this is not land but sea wherein a multitude of islands that were unkown to Ptolemy”)The book is also important as an early text on music (Leclerc), on mathematics (Smith).Finally in medicine the book is considered a “graphic incunable” with most famously the oldest, printed depiction of the human eye (G 3) (Flamm, 2013) and the open skull showing centres of brain activity (H2) “one of the earliest representations of this kind” (Maggs, 1929)
  • $47,196
  • $47,196
Oost en West Indische Voyagie and l’ Hermite

Oost en West Indische Voyagie and l’ Hermite, Jacques Voyagie om den gantschen Aerdtcloot

Spilbergen, J van Amsterdam, Joost Hartgens. 1648(Tiele Memoire nr. 71 and nr 77)In small quarto. Modern half calfTwo books in one volumeSpilbergen: pp 3-62, six woodcut plates in the textL’ Hermite: pp 3-60, ten woodcuts and seven copper plate engravings in the text.Lacking the two title pages.Spilbergen’s was the fifth circumnavigation ever after Magellan; Drake; Cavendish and van Noort. The voyage took place between 1614 and 1618. Spilbergen was an accomplished admiral who had sailed for the VOC to the Indies (Ceylon) before. He was sent again by the VOC to discover new territories, chart the Magellan’s Straits and damage Spanish interests in South America and the Philippines where possible. He landed in Brazil, mapped Magellan’s Strait, fought Spanish settlements in Chile, Peru and Mexico and sailed to the Philippines. Once in Batavia he picked up le Maire and the rest of his crew who had been arrested in Batavia for breaching VOC laws by sailing to the Indies without VOC consent. Le Maire denied this as he did not sail through Magellan’s Straits (as specified in the VOC laws) but around Cape Horn!! The Schouten version of his voyage with le Maire is no part of our volumes. Instead the voyage around the world by l’ Hermite is added, apparently to unite Dutch circumnavigations.Jacques l’’ Hermite was sent out to attack the Spanish possessions and frustrate the Spanish dominance in the Pacific, considered by Spain a Spanish lake. Spain and the Netherlands had just finished a 12 years truce (1609-1621) in a war of independence that took 80 years (1568-1648). L’Hermite sailed in May 1623 and returned in January 1626.In 1625 two letters were published in Holland, translated from Spanish, that recount the information of the first parts of l’ Hermite’s voyage given by a Dutch sailor, taken prisoner of war in Lima. The first full publication was by Gerritszoon and Wachter in Amsterdam in 1626. That book had 9 plates. A second edition of that book forms part one of another publication by Wachter in 1643. In 1646 a third edition is included in the Commelin series of Dutch voyages. In this 1646 edition a description of Peru is added plus a letter by de Quiros. Ours, the fourth edition is complete in itself, missing the 1646 description of Peru (pp 61-70) and Keyes description of Guyana.So the book we offer here contains the full text and all the plates of the fifth circumnavigation of the world (Spilbergen) and the sixth circumnavigation of the world (l’ Hermite) missing only the two title pages.
  • $3,146
  • $3,146
Relaciones universales del mundo

Relaciones universales del mundo

Botero Benes Primera y segunda parteValladolid, Diego Fernandez de Cordoba. 1603Palau 33704; Vindel, 1955 pp 56-59; JCB, Europ Americana: 603/17; JCB 1922: III pp 20 ; Sabin 6809; Medina: BHA 468; Mapas: Shirley 242; Burden, 129; En folio, 28,5 x 20 cm. Pleno cuero del XVIIILomo con título y adornos grabados en oroDos libros (partes con enumeración propia) en un solo tomoPrimer libro: 4 hojas; 24 folios; 207 folios; 5 mapas plegadosSegundo libro: 1 blanco; 110 foliosLibro reencuadernado en el XVIII en cuero. Lomo compartimentado con adorno en oro. Titulo impreso sobre el lomo. Danos menores e los dos partes extremos del lomo. Texto en impecable condición. Mapas impresos en papel grueso.Segunda edición de la traducción en castellano de la obra famosa de Giovanni Botero, 1544-1617. La edición en castellano es más buscado por su juego de mapas españoles, el mapamundi y los continentes de 1598. Palau menciona una primera edicion de 1600 que difiere únicamente en la fecha en la portada. Otros bibliografos no han visto esta edición. El colofón del libro dice 1599 y la portada 1603.El primer libro trata en cinco partes la geografía de los continentes y sus países. La sexta parte, a partir de la hoja 158, se dedica a las islas del mundo en la tradición de los "isolarios". El segundo libro compara las características los Reynos de Europa con los imperios del pasado como los Romanos y con los Imperios no Europeas como el Turco; el de Persia; El de los Mogoles; la China y el Japón.Los mapas son cinco, grabados nuevos hechos por Hernán de Solis y Ribadeneira en base a los mapas de Ortelius. El de las Americas esta fechada en la plancha, Valladolid 1598.El mapamundi (Shirley 242) copia el deseno geográfico del mapamundi de Ortelius de los años setenta con bastante precisión, cambiando toponimias en Castellano donde estuvieron en Latín, especialmente en España y en las Américas. El borden decorativo del mapa contiene un dibujo de los cuatro continentes.El mapa de las Américas (Burden 129) también cambia los topónimos en castellano. En el Pacifico al Oeste de Nueva Guinea el mapa muestra las Islas de Salomon, como parecen en el mapa Ortelius a partir de 1587. En Tierra Australis dice " esta Costa Austral fue descubierta por un piloto Castellano, región comúnmente llamada de Magellanes, que asta agora no está bien conocida. El borden decorativo tiene el título del mapa y los retratos de Colon y de Vespucio. Mapas españoles del siglo XVI son escasos y raros. Los unicos que preceden a este son el famoso mapa de Pedro Martir (1511) , los mapas de Pedro Medina en su arte de navigar; el pequeno de Chavez (1554) y el otro de Cieza de León (1554).Sobreviven pocos ejemplares del libro completos con sus 5 mapas. Según el Patrimonio Bibliografico Espanol por ejemplo sobreviven en España 39 ejemplares del libro. Sin embargo de los 7 que figuran en el inventario de la Biblioteca Nacional solo uno tiene los 5 mapas. Otros ejemplares por ejemplo de la biblioteca del Palacio; de la Real Academia y de la Complutense todos son faltos de sus mapas. Entre 2000 y 2020 no fueron ofrecidos ejemplares completos en el mercado mundial.Note in EnglishGiovanni Botero aspired to become a Jesuit which to his frustration never occurred. Still he spent his life as a full time intellectual in the circles of power, the first part as a counter-reformation person. Opposing himself to Machiavelli he maintains in his various books that political power can only be successful if it rests on Christian ethics and behavior. This attitude is shown in essays like On the causes of Greatness and Magnificence of Cities (1598) and The reasons of State (1597). The Relaciones universales del Mundo is no longer only descriptive and far less dependent on the classics. Botero drew on the existing travel literature, accounts of merchants and missionaries and especially the reports Venetian Ambassadors were required to submit upon returning form their embassies. His Cosmography is not Eurocentered (like for e
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