Kriegszeit. Künstlerflugblätter [War time. Artistic broadsides]

Liebermann, Max, et al.

Kriegszeit. Künstlerflugblätter [War time. Artistic broadsides], nos. 1 (August 1914) through 64-65 (March 1916) (all published)

  • $4,950
Berlin: Verlag Paul Cassirer, 1914-1916. Folios (ca. 47.5 × 32 cm). Original pictorial self-wrappers; most issues 4 pp. Housed in original cloth-backed printed card portfolio; the latter professionally repaired; most issues toned due to stock, as usual, and with a few occasional nicks but overall an about very good set. A complete run of the important WWI-era periodical, richly illustrated with lithographs by leading German artists of the day, including Max Liebermann, Ernst Barlach, August Gaul, Hans Baluschek, Georg Kolbe, Käthe Kollwitz, Hans Meid, Max Slevogt, Max Beckmann, Willy Jaeckel, Max Unold, Rudolph Grossmann, Franz Heckendorf, Erich Büttner, Oskar Nerlinger, Max Oppenheimer, and many others. Most of the illustrations depict scenes from the war front and everyday life in German society. The texts range from largely patriotic statements by military and government leaders to writings by social critics. The publisher, Ernst Cassirer (1871-1926), a Jewish-German art dealer and publisher, was enthusiastically for the German national cause in the war, and founded the journal before volunteering for front service himself. Most of the artists involved were part of the "Freie Sezession" around Max Liebermann, although their depictions of the wartime events varied considerably in terms of their enthusiasm.
More from Bernett Penka Rare Books
Zaklad pravoslavnago khrama v Zheneve [The founding of the Orthodox Church in Geneva]. WITH: Russkaia Krestovozdvizhenskaia Pravoslavnaia Tserkov' v Zheneve [Russian Orthodox Church of the Exaltation of the Cross in Geneva]

Zaklad pravoslavnago khrama v Zheneve [The founding of the Orthodox Church in Geneva]. WITH: Russkaia Krestovozdvizhenskaia Pravoslavnaia Tserkov’ v Zheneve [Russian Orthodox Church of the Exaltation of the Cross in Geneva]

Moscow: Tip. V. Gotie, 1863. Octavo (23 × 15 cm). Original printed self-wrappers; 5 pp. Binding reinforced with paper; foxing throughout. About good. Geneva: Russkaia tipografiia, 1939. Octavo (20.5 × 14.5 cm). Original printed wrappers; 16, [1] pp. Five leaves of illustrations. Light soil to wrappers, else very good. Two brochures on the history of the Russian Orthodox Church in Geneva, a testament to the active Russian émigré community in Switzerland in the 19th and 20th centuries. The Church initially opened in Geneva in 1854 in a rented building. The first brochure announces the laying of the foundation for the building of the freestanding traditional Orthodox Church in 1863. Printed in Moscow, the brochure was appended to the September 1863 issue of the monthly journal "Dushepoleznoe chtenie," and contains sanctification speeches and fundraising information for the building project. The second brochure, printed by the Church in Geneva in 1939, when the building was under the jurisdiction of the Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia, provides a historical overview of the Church and the work of its congregation, led at the time by ?rchpriest Sergei Orlov. After the Bolshevik Revolution, to meet the needs of the émigré influx, Orlov founded an Orthodox school connected to the Church in 1925. The brochure also discusses a 1938 exhibition, which opened on the occasion of 950th anniversary of Christianity in Russia, with the intention of representing Russian religious traditions to the West. Not in the Russian State or National Libraries. Not in the Savine collection. As of June 2020, KVK and OCLC show only two copies of the 1939 title at Geneva and Ohio State.
X v?esokolských slet? v Praze: 1882

X v?esokolských slet? v Praze: 1882, 1891, 1895, 1901, 1907, 1912, 1920, 1926, 1932, 1938. WITH: XI v?esokolský slet v Praze [10 All-Sokol Slets in Prague. The eleventh All-Sokol Slet in Prague]

Ambrosi, Vilém, design Prague: "Sv?t v obrazech", 1948. Quartos (30 × 22.5 cm). Original staple-stitched pictorial wrappers; [44] and [31] pp, chiefly of black-and-white illustrations from photographs. Very good or better. Strikingly photo-illustrated and with overall design by Vilém Ambrosi (1898-1962), the graphic designer and typographer, these two volumes present the history of the first eleven All-Sokol Slets, with the second issue devoted entirely to the latest event. The Sokol movement was a gymnastics movement similar to Scouting, and with strong nationalist overtones, that was founded in 1862 by Miroslav Tyr? and Jind?ich Fügner. Beginning in 1882, mass gymnatics gatherings known as "Slets" were held, and the popularity of Sokol culture played a key role in the development of the Czech state and self-awareness, as well as that of other Slavic nations. The eleventh slet in 1948 would be the final such gathering. Although it tried to appeal to the new communist regime, the Czech Communist Party permitted no further slets and sought to replace them with more properly Soviet forms such as the Spartakiad. Published by "Sv?t v obrazech," the publishing house of the Czech Ministry of Information. The first volume with a preface by Venceslav Havli?ek and edited by M. Milota and V. Ambrosi. As of June 2020, KVK and OCLC show three copies in North America of the first title, and only one of the second volume.
Christlich-Demokratischer Beobachter. Berliner Ausgabe. Parteitagsmeldungen für die Reichshauptstadt. Nr. 3. 1. 11. 1968 [Christian-Democrat Observer. Party Congress News for the Capital of the Reich

Christlich-Demokratischer Beobachter. Berliner Ausgabe. Parteitagsmeldungen für die Reichshauptstadt. Nr. 3. 1. 11. 1968 [Christian-Democrat Observer. Party Congress News for the Capital of the Reich, nos. 3-5, November 1-4, 1968]

Berlin: ad-hoc-Gruppe CDU-Parteitag, 1968. Three single leaves of DIN A4 (30 × 21.5 cm), offset print in brown ink to rectos and versos. Very good. Very uncommon set of three early flyers of the German student protest movement and the so-called APO, or extra-parliamentary opposition, which formed beginning in the mid-1960s in Germany. One of the main concerns of protesters was the continuity between the Nazi era and Germany's post-war political landscape: not only were many officials allowed to hold political office, but the methods of police and judicial system were also deemed extremely conservative and repressive. This flyer protests the attitude of the CDU, the conservative Christian-Democratic Union, towards the Vietnam War, using particularly provocative visual means. It poses as a periodical, alluding to the Völkischer Beobachter, the official party press organ of the National-Socialist Party (NSDAP), as well as using brown ink. In the letterhead the party's acronym sits next to the swastika. Evidently this led to arrests among those distributing the flyer; part of the series was reprinted in Agit 883 in September 1969 along with a report on the arrest. As of July 2020, KVK and OCLC only show an incomplete run at the Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin which comprises nos. 4, 5, 6, and 6.
Dva s"iezda. III-ii ocherednoi S"ezd Soiuza i "ob"edenitel'nyi" s"ezd. [Two Congresses. The third annual congress of the union and the "unifying congress"]

Dva s”iezda. III-ii ocherednoi S”ezd Soiuza i “ob”edenitel’nyi” s”ezd. [Two Congresses. The third annual congress of the union and the “unifying congress”]

Martynov, Aleksandr] Geneva: Izdanie "Soiuza Russkikh Sotsial'demokratov"; Mr. Rabkine, 1901. 12mo (15.5 × 11 cm). Original staple-stitched printed self-wrappers; 34 pp. Stamps of the Boris Nicolaevsky Collection (Hoover), with duplicate deaccession stamp. Light soil to wrappers; some pencil marks to margins, else very good. This pamphlet captures the complex politics within the Union of Russian Social Democrats Abroad, a joint Socialist organization founded by Russian political émigrés in Geneva in 1894. The organization was a precursor to the Russian Social Democratic Labor Party (RSDLP), the party of Lenin before its split into Mensheviks and Bolsheviks, with Lenin on the side of the Bolsheviks. The pamphlet reports on the organizing work done in Russian and abroad, the activities of the Bund, and includes an accounting table with precise financial information of the organization. Two splinter organizations "Iskra" (The Sparklet), which was founded by Lenin, and "Zaria" (The Dawn), are discussed in the pamphlet as anti-revolutionary and petit-bourgeoisie. The representatives of these organizations reportedly walked out of the meetings with shouts and whistling. Although the pamphlet is unaccredited, it seems to have been written by Aleksandr Martynov (1865-1935, born Piker, Saul Samoilovich). Martynov would later lead the Mensheviks in opposition to the Bolsheviks led by Lenin.
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Russian Anti-German WWI broadside: “Put’ Nashei Pobedy. Po predskazaniiu vsemirnoizvestnogo polkovnika Garrisona. Rossiia v polnoi bezopasnosti! Chto nado znat’ chtoby ponimat’ sut’ proiskhodiashchikh voennykh operatsii” [The path to our victory. According to the prediction of the world famous Colonel Harrison. Russia is completely safe! What you need to know to understand the essence of the ongoing military operations]

Kharkov: Izdanie F. I. Kuzmina, [ca. 1915-1916]. Broadside on purple stock, measuring 55 × 35 cm, printed to recto and verso, with decorative header. Old horizontal and vertical creases; light discoloration; pre-revolutionary stamp of the Imperatorskii Moskovskii Muzei (Moscow State Historical Museum); else about very good. This WWI propaganda poster published in the Russian Empire outlines the action along the Western, Italian, Russian and Eastern fronts for July-December of the year, declaring the certainty of German defeat. Likely printed with the intention of raising the morale of the local population of Kharkov (modern day Ukraine), the poster presents the information as predictions of the "world famous Colonel Harrison" a fictional persona possibly a reference to an eponymous character from Alexander Duma's "Three Musketeers." The header of the poster reads: "Up until recently these predictions were realized with remarkable precision although occasionally with a significant delay. We are printing the predictions of Colonel Harrison, pertaining to the subsequent course of events." A poem printed at the bottom of the poster uses the acrostic form to spell out "Germany will perish". We cannot trace any copies aside from the one held by the Russian National Library. As of June 2020, not in KVK, OCLC.
Doklad predstavlennyi delegatsiei russk. sotsial'demokratov mezhdunarodnomu rabochemu sotsialisticheskomu kongressu v Londonie v 1896 godu [A report made by the Russian Socialist Democrats to the International Workers Congress in London

Doklad predstavlennyi delegatsiei russk. sotsial’demokratov mezhdunarodnomu rabochemu sotsialisticheskomu kongressu v Londonie v 1896 godu [A report made by the Russian Socialist Democrats to the International Workers Congress in London, in 1896]

Plekhanov, Georgii Valentinovich and Pavel Akselrod] Geneva: Izdanie "Soiuza Russkikh Sotsial'demokratov", 1896. 12mo (15.3 × 10.5 cm). Original staple-stitched beige wrappers; 16 pp. Publisher's catalog to wrappers. Stamps of the Boris Nicolaevsky Collection (Hoover), with duplicate deaccession stamp. Very good, save for tear to lower right corner. ? report presented by the Union of Russian Social Democrats Abroad by the de-facto leaders of the group Georgii Plekhanov and Pavel Akselrod at the international congress of Socialists in London. The report covers organizing in Russia and abroad, Russian worker demands, strikes and illegal publishing of the organization. The Union was a joint Socialist organization founded by Russian political émigrés in Geneva in 1894. It was a precursor to the Russian Social Democratic Labor Party (RSDLP), the party of Lenin before its split into Mensheviks and Bolsheviks, with Lenin on the side of the Bolsheviks. Publishing and popularization of Marxist thought among the Russian workers was a large part of the Union's activities. The report includes an extensive publisher catalog, which lists publications by G. Plekhanov, F. Engels, K. Marx, V.I. Zasulich, P. Akselrod, P. Alekseev (speech). It is appended with an essay by P. Struve "Agrarian question and Socialist Democracy in Russia". Scarce in the trade.
Riech' Sofii Illarionovny Bardinoi. Izdanie kruzhka anarkhistov. Le discours de Sophie Bardine. [A speech by Sofia Illarionovna Bardina. A publication of the Anarchist Circle]

Riech’ Sofii Illarionovny Bardinoi. Izdanie kruzhka anarkhistov. Le discours de Sophie Bardine. [A speech by Sofia Illarionovna Bardina. A publication of the Anarchist Circle]

Bardina, Sofiia Geneva: Novaia russkaia tipografiia, 1893. 12mo (13 × 10 cm). Original printed self-wrappers; 48 pp. Light soil to wrappers; edges lightly chipped; still about very good. Stamps of the Boris Nicolaevsky Collection (Hoover Institution), with duplicate deaccession stamp, as well as of the famous Lavroff-Gotz Russian library in Paris, which held many Russian books formerly owned by Karl Marx. First freestanding edition. A pamphlet containing the famous speech of Sofia Bardina (1853-1883), a Russian revolutionary accused of spreading anti-government propaganda and inciting popular revolt during the "Trial of 50" in Moscow in 1877. Born in a family of landed gentry, Bardina became politically active during her studies of agronomy in Moscow. In 1871 she went to study in Zurich where she headed the political women's circle known as "Fritsche". Olga Liubatovich, a major Russian revolutionary and Vera Figner, later an anarchist terrorist and member of Narodnaia Volia (People's Will) party, were also part of the group. Upon returning to Russia Bardina was arrested in 1875 for spreading revolutionary propaganda among her factory co-workers and spent two years in a Moscow prison before being put on trial along with fifty other revolutionaries. Chosen by her co-defendants as their speaker, Bardina gave this speech, which was later published, distributed in the thousands, and generated a lot of support among the Russian intelligentsia for the revolutionary cause. Bardina was eventually one of the 14 defendants sentenced to 9 years of hard labor, commuted to Siberian exile. Escaping her exile two years later she returned to Europe where, weakened by her experiences, she committed suicide. The book was no. 2357 of the Lavroff-Gotz Russian Library in Paris, owned by P. L. Lavrov and M. R. Gots, which also received most of the Russian books formerly owned by Karl Marx following his death (see Miskewitsch-Rumjanzewa, Zum Schicksal der russischen Bücher aus den Bibliotheken von Marx und Engels). As of June 2020, KVK and OCLC show only three copies in North America.
Západon?mecká a západoberlínská avantgarda Lidic?m [West Germany and West Berlin avant-garde art dedicated to Lidice]

Západon?mecká a západoberlínská avantgarda Lidic?m [West Germany and West Berlin avant-garde art dedicated to Lidice]

Chalupecký, Jind?ich (curator) Prague: ?pálova galerie Praha, 1968. Octavo (21.5 × 15.5 cm). Original printed self-wrappers; 12 pp. Very good. A catalog of an exhibition of West German art dedicated to the Lidice massacre, a mass execution of the residents of a small Czech village by SS officers in 1942. The 1968 exhibition titled "Homage to Lidice" was held at the Václav ?pála Gallery in Prague, curated by the art critic Jind?ich Chalupecký (1910-1990). The catalog lists 21 works, with 7 photo-reproductions, of sculpture, paintings, and photography by contemporary German artists such as Joseph Beuys, Gotthard Graubner, Sigmar Polke, Chris Reinecke, and Gerhardt Richter, among others. The ethical focus of this exhibition allowed for presentation of the most avant-garde Western contemporary art behind the iron curtain. Established in 1957, the Václav ?pála Gallery greatly flourished in 1965-1970 under the leadership of Chalupecký. During "normalization" in the 70s and 80s, Chalupecký was not allowed to curate or to hold a public posts. In this period he published in samizdat an important work on Marcel Duchamp, and on the influence of Dada and Surrealism in Czech art. He was also published abroad and became a central figure in promoting Czech, Polish and Soviet non-official art in the West. As of June 2020, not in KVK, OCLC.
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A collection of five texts (all published, in five volumes) of classical Georgian literature, edited and with an introduction by Platon Ioseliani (1809-1875), the Georgian linguist, philologist, and historian

A collection of five texts (all published, in five volumes) of classical Georgian literature, edited and with an introduction by Platon Ioseliani (1809-1875), the Georgian linguist, philologist, and historian. The son of a priest and a hereditary nobleman, Platon Ioseliani graduated from the Tiflis Theological Seminary (1830) and later St. Petersburg Theological Academy (1835). The study of ancient Georgian manuscripts held at the Tiflis Seminary sparked his interest in Georgian antiquity. Ioseliani went on to write a number of works on archeology, philology, and history of the Georgian Orthodox Church, including a description of archeological digs at Kakheti, standardized "Georgian Grammar" (1837), "History of Georgian Grammar" (1840) and "A Brief History of Georgian Orthodox Church" (1841). He was also the editor of "Transcaucasian Messenger" (1845-1855). In 1849 he traveled to the Ivirion Monastery on Mt. Athos, to study the ancient Georgian manuscripts among its holdings, which he found "strewn all over the floor and unmarked shelves." His research resulted in five travelogue essays and a history of Georgian Saints with "historical, geographical, chronological and philological observations," all published in 1850. One of Ioseliani's great contributions is his publication of five classics of medieval and early-modern Georgian literature, for which he provided introductions. The introductions to the two travelogues in this collection are informed by his own travels to Mt. Athos. The commentary on the two poetic works benefit from Ioseliani's linguistic expertise and his historical research. The present series was likely printed in a small print run and funded by Ioseliani. With the exception of no. 5, the titles are in attractive contemporary full calf bindings, with the titles embossed to front board in cyrillic. The spines rubbed; lacking the publisher's wrappers; overall a very good set. List of titles included: 1. T'imote, Mtavar-Ep'isk'op'osi (Archbishop Timothy; ??????-?????????? ??????). Mokhilua ts'mindata da skhuata aghmosavletisa adgilta, t'imotesgan kartlisa mtavar-ep'isk'op'osisa / ts'inasit'q'vaoba p'lat'on egnat'is-dze ioseliani [Review of Platon Egnatia-dze Ioseliani, Archbishop of Kartli / Timothy, from the Holy Places of Saints and Others in the East; ??????? ???????? ?? ?????? ????????????? ???????, ?????????? ???????? ??????-???????????? / ????????????? ?????? ???????-?? ?????????]. Edited and with a preface by Platon Ioseliani. Tbilisi: self-published (k'avk'as. namest'n. k'antsel. st'), 1852. Octavo (20 cm). 188 pp. First edition. The first publication of the eighteenth-century travelogue to Jerusalem, through Mt. Athos and Constantinople, written by the Georgian cleric, cartographer, calligrapher, and travel writer Timothy (Gabashvili) Archbishop of Kutaisi (1707-1764). Timothy's four-year journey (1755-1759) had spiritual as well as political and historiographic motivations. Although many Georgian predecessors traveled to Jerusalem, Timothy was the first to seek out historical and archeological material and to compile a documentary history of the Georgian colony in Jerusalem in his travelogue. Printed in the original old Georgian, "most modern scholars consider Timothy's Georgian complicated" as it reflects the significant changes Georgian underwent in the eighteenth century. His style changes according to his subject matter with "high style" reserved for theological discussions and more colloquial "middle style" used for discussions of everyday life, with this work serving as an excellent example of the linguistic changes in this period (See Miza Ebanoidze and John Wilkinson, Pilgrimage, p. 59). Platon Ioseliani's introduction to this edition was the first attempt at providing a biography of Timothy Gabashvili who came from an ancient Georgian royal family. Born shortly after the introduction of the first printing press to Georgia in 1707, Timothy spoke Armenian, Russian, Turkish and Greek. He became the Archbishop of Kutaisi in the early 1730s. In 1737-1740 Timothy was sent on a diplomatic mission to Russia, for which he prepared a detailed large format color map of Imereti (Western Georgia), that contained strategically important information for the Russian empire, embroiled in war with Turkey. His travels to Jerusalem and Constantinople seem to have had similar political motivations. Ioseliani's publication of Timothy's work reflects his own interest in Georgian antiquity and is informed by his own trip to Mt. Athos. As of May 2020, KVK and OCLC only show one copy, at the University of London SOAS. 2. Archil Mepe (King Archil; ????? ????). Tskhovreba mep'isa T'eimuraz p'irueilisa, aghts'erili leksad archilisagan mepisa / [k'oment'ariebi da shenishvnebi p'lat'on ioselianisa]. [Life of King Teimuraz Pirueil, described in verse by Archil King / [Comments and Notes by Plato Ioseliani; ???????? ?????? ???????? ??????????, ???????? ?????? ??????????? ?????? / [???????????? ?? ?????????? ?????? ???????????]. Tbilisi: self-published (K'avk'as. namest'n. k'antsel. st'), 1853. Octavo (22 cm). [4], 185 pp. First edition. First publication thus of King Archil's "acclaimed masterpiece," the work offers a lyric overview of the tumultuous reign of Teimuraz I (1589-1661) the early seventeenth-century "poet king." Written in 1681-1685 in the form of a "dispute" in 19 responses, it runs to over 1100 stanzas. Embroiled in constant wars with the Persian Shah, Teimuraz I died in captivity. King Archil II (1647-1712), whose reign was also beset by wars, pays tribute to his royal and poetic predecessor and identifies with his plight (See Donald Rayfield "Literature of Georgia," pp. 107-109). Both kings had strong ties to Georgian print culture. The first book printed in Georgian, an Italian-Georgian dictionary, was in fact printed at King Teimuraz's behest. Archil II spent his last 13 years in exile in Russia, where he became one of the founders of the Georgian community in Moscow.
God revoliutsii: vospominaniia ofitsera general'nogo shtaba za 1917-1918 goda [The year of the revolution: memoirs of an officer of the general staff of 1917-1918]

God revoliutsii: vospominaniia ofitsera general’nogo shtaba za 1917-1918 goda [The year of the revolution: memoirs of an officer of the general staff of 1917-1918]

Vertsinskii, Eduard Aleksandrovich Tallinn: ERK, 1929. Quarto (19.5 × 17 cm). Later brown buckram, original wrappers not preserved; 60, [1] pp. Stamps of Bibliotheque de l'union Galipoli, Paris, and Lycee Russe Empereur Nicolas II to title and first page. Light wear; overall about very good. First edition. The first of three memoirs by the White émigré officer Eduard Vertsinskii (1873-1941), this text describes his experiences in the first year of the Russian Revolution, under the command of General Kornilov and as the first quartermaster general of the Main Directorate of the General Staff. A nobleman, Vertsinskii began his service in the Russian Imperial Army in 1890 and took active part in WWI. After the fall of the White Army, Vertsinskii was forced to flee the Bolshevik regime, immigrating to Estonia in 1923. In 1929 he published this first memoir. His second memoir, dedicated to his experiences in WWI, "Iz mirovoi voiny: boevyia zapisi i vospominaniia komandira polka i ofitsera general'nogo shtaba za 1914-1917 gody" (From the World War: battle notes and memories of the regiment commander and an officer of the general staff for 1914-1917) was published in Tallinn just two years later. His memoirs provide invaluable information about the military actions by their immediate participant. After the annexation of Estonia by the Soviet Union in 1941, Vertsinskii was arrested and sentenced to death. Savine 17509. Scarce in the trade.