Carnaval 1929. - Rare Book Insider
Carnaval 1929.

[PARIS CARNIVAL].

Carnaval 1929.

Paris, Festa, 1929.: 1929
  • $1,251
Folio (315 x 218 mm), 20 numbered plates with more than 500 individual elements in full colour; a few marks, central crease throughout; a very good copy in the original orange paper wrappers.Fancy dress French style, a showcase of products available wholesale for the 1929 Carnival, from a costume merchant. Typically available by the dozen and the gross, though the most luxury items are available individually, made variously in cardboard, wax or linen, and beginning with simple dominos, the catalogue also includes full costumes for popular figures, including clowns, cowboys and toreadors. A section of masks for children includes a selection of animal heads as well as human faces; adult full-face masks are subdivided into multiple sections, including caricatures, grotesques, and masks with hairpieces and accessories. Half-face masks, as well as a sizeable selection of false noses and hairpieces, novelty hats, accessories (including lanterns and toy monkeys) are also available. Colin-maillard (blind man's buff) heads, which render the wearer wholly blind for entertainment purposes, have their own page. The catalogue concludes with a selection of Christmas decorations, while the inside back cover advertises further productions, including garlands, banners, flags and lanterns. A rare survival from the heyday of interwar merriment, when people were enthusiastic in their pursuit of everything lively and colourful to vanquish the recent memories of war. Predating the era of political correctness, the faces featured are from across the ethnographical spectrum, featuring stereotypical depictions of many races. Language: French
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The Russians at Merv and Herat and their power of invading India

The Russians at Merv and Herat and their power of invading India

MARVIN, Charles. 8vo, pp. xvi, [4], 470, [10]; with 25 plates and maps including a large folding map ('General Annenkoff's map of the projected Russo-Indian railway'); plate facing p. 208 loose and foxed, closed tear (without loss) to folding map; a very good copy, with a few unopened quires, in original pictorial green cloth, spine and upper cover lettered in gilt and with gilt and coloured vignettes, dark brown endpapers; small tear with loss to foot of spine, some wear to head of spine and to edges and corners, slight discolouration to lower cover; 'Thos Firth 1885' inscribed in ink to blank recto of frontispiece.First edition of this work on the Russian threat to India by Charles Marvin (1854-1890), 'the most widely read writer on Anglo-Russian matters of his day' (Hopkirk).'A former correspondent in St Petersburg for the London Globe, he had the advantage over his rivals of being fluent in Russian, and knowing a number of the Tsar's leading generals personally he also turned out countless newspaper articles on Russian aims in Central Asia, and how best these could be thwarted In general, Marvin's line was that successive British governments, especially Liberal ones, had brought the problem upon themselves by their spineless and vacillating policies towards St Petersburg' (idem). The illustrations here include several of Russia's growing Trans-Caspian Railway, and a remarkable map of the 'projected Russo-Indian railway, to join the European and Indian railway systems'.See Peter Hopkirk, The Great Game (1990), pp. 418-419.
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The Little Holland House Album with an Introduction & Notes by John Christian.

The Little Holland House Album was compiled by Edward Burne-Jones in about 1858-9 for Sophia, MrsDalrymple, the youngest of the seven celebrated Pattle sisters who played such an important role in mid-Victorian cultural life. Their centre was Little Holland House in Kensington where another of the sisters, Sara Prinsep, created an artistic and intellectual salon around her permanent guest, the painter G.F.Watts. Other habitués included Tennyson, Browning, Thackeray, Ruskin, Carlyle, Holman Hunt, D.G.Rossetti, and Du Maurier. Many of them were brilliantly photographed by yet another of the sisters, Julia Margaret Cameron. Burne-Jones was introduced to the circle by Rossetti, his master and hero, in 1857. Although only twenty-four and at the start of his career, he was quickly taken up by MrsPrinsep, who found his combination of genius and poor health irresistible. In the intensely hot summer of 1858 she took him to stay at Little Holland House for several months, ostensibly to recover from illness but probably also to remove him from the ambience of Rossetti, whose influence on the younger artists of the group was mistrusted by Ruskin and Watts. The album presented to Sophia Dalrymple, who became a close friend of the artist, dates from about this time. It consists of eight poems, all transcribed by Burne-Jones and illustrated by him with drawings and vignettes, together with separate designs on the endpapers. The poems which include works by Rossetti, Browning, Tennyson, and Keats, and the ballad Sir Patrick Spens provide an illuminating cross-section of the circle's literary taste. The drawings are meticulously worked in pen and ink, Burne-Jones's favourite medium at this period, and are often closely related not only to better-known examples of his own early work but to contemporary designs by Rossetti. Altogether the album makes a major contribution to our knowledge of this fascinating phase of Pre-Raphaelite activity. The album was first published in 1981 in an edition of 200 copies by the twenty-one-year-old Robert Dalrymple. He has now prepared a revised and expanded edition for the members of the Roxburghe Club, which, more than forty years on, reflects both the advances in printing technology and his subsequent career as a celebrated book designer. Biographically speaking [the album] was an exciting rediscovery in that Burne-Jones's medieval images are also the pictures of that golden summer at Little Holland House. Scenes of young women lying languorously on the lawns; hints of decadence and weirdness, strange fruits and musky odours; the portrait of Sophia herself in floaty garments with a retinue of speeding lovebirds. The album for Sophia has unsettling undercurrents suggesting the richness of experience Burne-Jones underwent in that captive summer and the hint of danger. Fiona MacCarthy in The Last Pre-Raphaelite: Edward Burne-Jones and the Victorian Imagination, 2011150 copies have been printed, of which 75 are offered for sale, bound in quarter cloth with patterned paper boards. 56 pp. 305 x 212 mm. Language: English
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Recollections of Japan, comprising a particular account of the religion, language, government, laws and manners of the people, with observations on the geography, climate, population & productions of the country To which are prefixed chronological details of the rise, decline, and renewal of British commercial intercourse with that country.

8vo, pp. viii, lxxxix, [1 (blank)], 302, [2 (advertisements)]; occasional slight foxing and spotting; good in contemporary half brown cloth, marbled sides, spine lettered in gilt; rebacked with spine laid down, some wear to corners and edges, covers rubbed, endpapers renewed; pencil inscription dated 1868 to front flyleaf.First edition in English of Golovnin's account of Japan and the Japanese, derived from his Russian original of 1816, with a preface on British relations with Japan and an appendix detailing Khvostov and Davydov's fur-trading voyages to the northwest coast of America. Recollections followed Colburn's 1818 publication of Golovnin's two-volume Narrative of my captivity in Japan; all three volumes were subsequently collected together under the title Memoirs of a captivity in Japan in 1824.Golovnin (17761831) was commander of a Russian naval surveying expedition of the Kuril Islands and surrounding waters. Upon landing he was arrested by the Japanese who, after Davydov and Khvostov's raids in 1806-7 on Japanese settlements in the Kurils, feared a Russian attempt to invade Japan. Although Golovnin's ship, the Diana, was allowed to return to Kamchatka, he remained a prisoner in Japan for two years while negotiations for his release were conducted. He was, however, generally treated well and was able to obtain much information about the country, its people, culture and language, as described here.'The captivity of Golovnin was a milestone in Russo-Japanese relations and, unimportant as the events surrounding it might appear, they were really filled with significance. Had Golovnin died in Japanese hands, whatever the cause, Russo-Japanese relations would have taken a turn for the worse, and an aggressive Russia would have been provided with an excuse, indeed an invitation, for hostile measures. His amicable release, on the other hand, improved relations between the two nations Golovnin's own observations were profound [and his] writings were the most significant Russian firsthand portrayal of the Japanese available until the opening of Japan, if not indeed, until the beginning of the twentieth century. In later years, they were crowded aside by misleading accounts, which doted on the quaintness of the Japanese, but, with the onslaught of the Russo-Japanese War, authors were to remember Golovnin's penetrating observations and to regret that his remarks had not been taken more seriously' (G.A. Lensen, The Russian push toward Japan: Russo-Japanese relations 1697-1875, 1959, pp. 246-8).Cordier, Bibliotheca Japonica 465. Language: English
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Life in the Forests of the Far East.

2 vols, 8vo, pp. [4], [vii]-xix, [3], 400; xviii, [2], 420; tinted lithographic frontispieces, 10 tinted lithographic plates by G. McCulloch, T. Picken, and F. Jones, 4 hand-coloured lithographic plates of pitcher plants, heightened with gum Arabic, and 3 folding lithographic maps, all printed by Day and Son, some plates retaining tissue guards; bound without the publisher's advertisements found in some sets, some light spotting or offsetting, folding maps with neatly-repaired tears, inscriptions excised from titles and missing sections skilfully repaired; contemporary half dark green calf over marbled boards, spines gilt in compartments, contrasting gilt morocco lettering-pieces in 2, green endpapers, all edges marbled; extremities a little rubbed and bumped, upper joint partially split, otherwise a very good set; provenance: some late 19th-century pencilled notes, corrections and markings William H. Bartlett, Vermejo Park, New Mexico (1850-1918, early 20th-century bookplates on upper pastedowns) Oliver Patrick III (20th-century red ink stamps on pastedowns and in the text, one touching image of plate V in vol. I).First edition. A richly illustrated account of pioneering expeditions on the island of Borneo, by St John (1825-1910), who had been introduced to Sir James Brooke (the 'White Raja') in 1847, when Brooke was visiting England. St John 'was quickly caught by Brooke's charm and accompanied him as private secretary the next year, when Brooke became British commissioner and governor of Labuan . Thenceforth St John and Brooke were closely associated, though St John's role was usually to tone down Brooke's extravagances. St John had a Malay mistress, Dayang Kamariah, and they had three children; the local Anglican bishop and others protested about his "immorality". St John was with Brooke during his final operations in 1849 against Malay pirates, and he accompanied Brooke to Brunei, the Sulu archipelago, and to Siam in 1850 . St John acted temporarily as commissioner for Brooke (18515), and visited the north-western coast of Borneo and the north-eastern shore, ascending the principal rivers. Appointed in 1856 British consul-general at Brunei, he explored the country round the capital, and went further into the interior than any previous traveller. His habit of wearing native dress resulted in complaints to London . He published his full and accurate journals, supplemented by other visitors' testimonies, in two well-written and beautifully illustrated volumes entitled Life in the Forests of the Far East' (ODNB).BM(NH) IV, p. 1783.
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China monumentis, qua sacris qua profanis, nec non variis naturae et artis spectaculis, aliarumque rerum memorabilium argumentis illustrata, auspiciis Leopoldi primi, Roman. Imper. semper augusti, munificentissimi Mecaenatis.

Folio (325 x 210 mm), pp. [14], 237, [11]; with additional engraved title with imprint of Van Waesberge and Weyerstraet, engraved portrait of the author, 2 folding maps, large folding plate of the Xi'an Stele, 22 other engraved plates, and over 50 illustrations within the text, engraved Jesuit device to title, initials, tail-pieces; small hole at foot of engraved title, both maps with closed tears at foot repaired to verso and with small central hole, Xi'an Stele plate with closed marginal tear repaired to verso, old marginal repairs to occasional leaves and plates, old horizontal repair across pp. 159-160, some browning; overall good in contemporary stiff vellum, title in gilt to spine within gilt frame; corners somewhat bumped, light marks and abrasions; engraved bookplate of 'Domenico Terres negoziante di libri Napoli' to front pastedown.The Amsterdam reprint by Jacob van Meurs of this landmark work on China by the German Jesuit polymath Kircher (16021680), first published by Van Waesberge and Weyerstraet earlier in 1667. Van Meurs's edition is in a smaller format and some of the illustrations are engraved in reverse, but comparison of the two indicates no obvious differences in their respective contents. Kircher's text is divided into six parts, comprising a study of the Nestorian inscription (the Xi'an Stele) found in China in 1625; travels to China, including Marco Polo; the arrival of idolatry from the West; the natural and artificial curiosities of China; the architectural and mechanical arts of the Chinese; and Chinese writing, including a comparison of the alphabet with the Egyptian.'Having begun in the late sixteenth century, the Jesuit missions [to China] were well established by Kircher's time, and he himself was a rejected volunteer for service there. Nothing, therefore, was more natural than he should compile a book of their findings, combined with his own perennial researches in religion and linguistics, and issue it in a splendidly illustrated folio. China monumentis, while one of his least original works, was in many ways his most significant historically, being the first publication of important documents on oriental geography, geology, botany, zoology, religion and language. Kircher admits in the preface that his main concern was to preserve the fruits of his colleagues' efforts . Foremost among his sources were Johann Adam Schall; Bento de Goes, who in 1602 had left from the Jesuit station in Agra, north India, to find a land-route to China and seek the fabled land of Cathay; Kircher's former pupil Martin Martini, appointed mathematician to the Chinese Imperial Court and author of Novus atlas Sinensis (1655); and the trio of intrepid explorers Johann Grueber, Michael de Boym and Heinrich Roth, who all returned to Rome in 1664. Grueber . was an accomplished draughtsman and supplied the originals for many of China's topographical engravings. Boym provided those of Chinese flora, and transcriptions of Chinese characters that enabled Kircher to publish the first vocabulary of the language. Roth, who travelled with Grueber, had already become adept in Sanskrit, of which he compiled a dictionary. Here again, Kircher's China included the first reproduction in the West of the Sanskrit alphabet and grammar . In order to fit the civilizations of the East into his picture of mankind's history, Kircher had to assume that they had derived, since the Flood, from the West . As a confirmed Egyptophile, he naturally found most of the evidence pointing in that direction. Chinese script, he decided, was originally designed on pictorial principles, hence must be a descendant of Egyptian hieroglyphs. The impressions of Indian and Chinese religion which the missionaries brought back suggested that idolatry and polytheism were well-nigh universal in the East. This again suggested the practices of Egypt and the countries whose religions had derived from Egypt. In his two favourite fields, then, comparative religion and language, Kircher saw every evidence of an Egyptian origin; and so Noah's recalcitrant son Ham was again invoked as the founder of Chinese civilization.' (Godwin, pp. 56-7).Provenance: with the bookplate of the Neapolitan printer and bookseller Domenico Terres (17001782).Cordier, Sinica 26; Löwendahl, China illustrata nova 133. Language: Latin
Life in the forests of the far east With numerous illustrations

Life in the forests of the far east With numerous illustrations

ST JOHN, Spenser Buckingham. 2 vols, 8vo, pp. xix, [3], 400, 3 ('Recently published'), 16 (publisher's ads dated May 1862), with 6 tinted lithographic plates, 4 hand-coloured plates of pitcher plants, and 2 folding maps; xviii, [2], 420, with 6 tinted lithographic plates and 1 folding map; all plates with tissue guards (browned); a couple of quires slightly loose, occasional light foxing, closed marginal tears to folding maps (without loss); very good in original publisher's blue cloth, spines lettered in gilt the title within gilt frame, light brown endpapers; lower joint of vol. 1 partially split, some wear to extremities, a few light marks to covers.First edition, a nice copy in the publisher's binding and with their advertisements, of this richly illustrated account of pioneering expeditions on the island of Borneo by St John (1825-1910), who had been introduced to Sir James Brooke (the 'White Raja') in 1847, when Brooke was visiting England. St John 'was quickly caught by Brooke's charm and accompanied him as private secretary the next year, when Brooke became British commissioner and governor of Labuan . Thenceforth St John and Brooke were closely associated, though St John's role was usually to tone down Brooke's extravagances. St John had a Malay mistress, Dayang Kamariah, and they had three children; the local Anglican bishop and others protested about his "immorality". St John was with Brooke during his final operations in 1849 against Malay pirates, and he accompanied Brooke to Brunei, the Sulu archipelago, and to Siam in 1850 . St John acted temporarily as commissioner for Brooke (18515) and visited the north-western coast of Borneo and the north-eastern shore, ascending the principal rivers. Appointed in 1856 British consul-general at Brunei, he explored the country round the capital, and went further into the interior than any previous traveller. His habit of wearing native dress resulted in complaints to London . He published his full and accurate journals, supplemented by other visitors' testimonies, in two well-written and beautifully illustrated volumes entitled Life in the Forests of the Far East' (ODNB).
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Very large historiated initial ‘H’, probably for the antiphon Hodie nata est beata virgo Maria for the Nativity of the Virgin Mary.

[ANTIPHONAL.] Very large historiated initial 'H' (124 x 129 mm) cut from an antiphonal in Latin, the initial in pale pink against a quadrangular background of deep blue and enclosing the Nativity of the Virgin Mary, Anne lying pensively on a wooden bed before an arched background and the infant Mary being bathed by two nurses in the foreground, the whole painted in shades of blue, pink, orange, brown and white and with both burnished and shell gold, the verso with part of two lines of text and music in square and diamond-shaped notation on four-line red staves (stave height c.30 mm); trimmed to the edges of the quadrangular blue background, slightly rubbed with some loss of burnished gold, but generally in very good condition.A very fine large initial painted in a style associated with the Master of the Gradual of Cortona, an artist named for a Franciscan gradual produced c.1290 for the church of San Francesco in Cortona (now Vatican City, BAV, MS Ross.612).The architectural setting is unusual, as is the frontal pose of the small naked infant being washed in a bath shaped like a baptismal font, a composition derived ultimately from Byzantine models.For a closely comparable initial, probably by the same hand and conceivably from the same parent manuscript, see Christie's sale of 13 July 2022, lot 3, a complete leaf with an historiated initial of the Annunciation (stave height also c.30 mm).Visible beneath the initial in the upper left-hand corner is the name 'marie', doubtless a direction (or part thereof) to the artist. The text on the reverse comprises part of the antiphon '[Benedicta tu in mu]lieribus et be[nedictus fructus ve]ntris tui'.Provenance: formerly in the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY, acquired with the Elisabeth H.Gates Fund, 1940. Language: Latin
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The Sure Chance; or, a new Million Adventure. Wherein all are certain of getting Something. Invented for the Benefit of Ladies that want Husbands, and younger Brothers that stand in need of rich Wives

[MARRIAGE LOTTERY.] 4to, pp.12; title-page shaved at head touching 'The', lower margin cut away; rather dusty, especially first and last pages, else good; in late nineteenth-century speckled calf by Kerr & Richardson, Glasgow, front joint repaired, spine worn.First edition, very rare, a satire on the lottery vogue of the mid-1690s: 'the whole Town, nay, the whole Nation is addicted to the pleasant and sometimes profitable Diversion of Publick Lotteries; we have seen Lotteries for old Plate, new Cabinets, China Dishes, and Womens Dresses'. Here the overseers propose a lottery to match 5000 bachelors aged 20 to 50 ('well Descended, or at least pretend to be so') with 5000 similar gentlewomen, each party laying down a stake of £100. The ladies' prizes (the top 5 being of £20,000 each) can only be claimed if they also take to husband the man with the matching ballot. Those desirous of a husband can be guaranteed one for only the price of their ticket rather than a dowry. As encouragement, 'Dr Clewor shall be there ready to Marry 'em gratis; Dr.Bs shall preach the Wedding Sermon, the City Poet [Elkanah Settle] shall write the Epithalamium, the Chamber of London shall receive and keep all the Prize Fortunes'. The managers will take only 5% but will have 'the use of the Women (as other Goldsmiths have of the Money) till the Day of Marriage'. In the second part of the pamphlet the managers answer a series of objections they foresee to the scheme, viz.marriage should not be by chance (but 'Are not Lawyers Honest by Chance Are not Poets Witty by chance'); lotteries destroy trade (but trade is promoted by population growth and 'There is no Occupation but that of Mother Ridgley's [i.e.a bawd] but will have reason to bless' this new invention); there are already too many lotteries; it's immodest (but 'Is it not better to be Married ex tempore, than be teas'd for two or three Months together with the premeditated Harangue of an Amorous Fop'). At the end the overseers are named as Sir Timothy Zealous, 'that send his Officers to suppress Bawdy-Houses', Sir Anthony Bashful, 'that went from Home on purpose because he was Asham'd to see his Wife make him a Cuckold', Sir Orlando Furioso, 'that run mad by hearing of Sermons, and was cured by Reading of Plays', and Sir William Turn-coat. After the success of Thomas Neale's first lottery drawn in November 1693, the first State Lottery, the 'Million Lottery' was set up in 1694 to raise money for the Exchequer, issuing 100,000 £10 tickets, which were also bonds. There were a number of contemporary satires, including Diluvium Lachrymarum 1694, which pointed towards amorous motives (and a large number of women) among the subscribers. The 'husband lottery' was to become a recurrent theme in such satires, of which later examples include A Good husband for five shillings (1710), and A Scheme for a New Lottery: or, a Husband and Coach and Six for forty Shillings (1732). Not in ESTC or Library Hub. OCLC records Columbia only (in a tract volume, as this once was). Language: English
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M.Accius Plautus ex fide, atque auctoritate complurium librorum manuscriptorum opera Dionys.Lambini Monstroliensis emendatus: ab eodemque commentariis explicatus, et nunc primum in lucem editus. Adiecta sunt Plautina loca Additi quoque sunt duo indices copiosissimi

PLAUTUS. Folio, pp.[viii], 1118, [78]; large woodcut device to title, woodcut initials and headpieces; title and following leaf creased, small paperflaws to outer margin of title, small wormhole up to p.120 (without loss of sense), occasional light marginal dampstaining, overall a very good copy in contemporary mottled sheep, spine gilt in compartments with gilt red morocco lettering-piece, edges stained red, marbled endpapers; somewhat rubbed with a few scuffs to boards, small loss at head of spine, small losses to front endpapers; erased inscription at head of title, eighteenth-century ink ownership inscription 'T.Gale' to title, eighteenth-century manuscript list of the plays with page references to front free endpaper verso.Reissue of the 1576 first edition of the plays of Plautus edited by the great French classical scholar Denis Lambin (15201572) and completed after his death by the Parisian professor of Greek, Jacques Hélie (d.1590). Full of 'exuberant word-play, coarse jokes, alliteration, puns, and boisterous humour', Plautus' twenty surviving plays 'are almost the only evidence we have for the Latin language at that period. They were greatly admired in the late republic and under the early emperors Plautus was rediscovered and widely translated in the Renaissance, and his influence is traceable in much sixteenth-century English comedy. Henry VIII had two of the comedies performed to entertain the French ambassador in 1526. Shakespeare used the plot of the Menaechmi in The Comedy of Errors (1594), and Molière's Harpagon in L'Avare (1668) is taken from Euclio in Aulularia' (Oxford Companion to Classical Literature). 'Of this admirable edition, Lambinus lived to finish only the first twelve comedies; but his colleague, Helius, professor of Greek, completed the work, partly by transcribing what remained in Lambinus's hand-writing on the subsequent comedies, and partly by the insertion of his own notes, and emendations of the text. In forming the edition, many MSS and ancient publications were consulted' (Dibdin, An Introduction to the Knowledge of rare and valuable Editions of the Greek and Latin Classics (1827) vol.II, p.310). Adams P-1501; USTC 170374. Language: Latin
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Pervigilium Veneris.

[DOVES PRESS.] 4to, pp.[2], 7, [1 (blank)], with preliminary and final blanks; printed in red and black in Doves type on laid paper watermarked 'CS EW 1902' and 'TJCS 1910'; small mark at foot of colophon, nonetheless a very good copy; bound in vellum by the Doves Bindery (stamp to lower pastedown), spine lettered directly in gilt, sewn with green thread on 4 tapes; vellum bowing slightly with a few scattered spots.One of 150 copies on paper of the elusive Pervigilium Veneris, in the original Doves Bindery vellum, 'a triumph of simplicity and restraint' (Tidcombe). T.J.Cobden-Sanderson (18401922) established the Doves Bindery in 1893 and the Doves Press in 1900, the latter forming the 'triple crown' of private printing along with Morris's Kelmscott Press and Hornby's Ashendene Press. The distinctive Doves type, commissioned in 1899, had been promised by Cobden-Sanderson to his partner Emery Walker for use after his death; following the bitter dissolution of their partnership in 1909, however, he gradually and 'irretrievably committed [the type] to "the bed of the River Thames"' between August 1916 and early 1917, in the wish that the type 'shall never be subjected to a machine other than the human hand'. The enigmatic origins of the Pervigilium Veneris have traditionally been dated to the reign of Hadrian and at times attributed to Florus, although its innovative style has led some to place it as late as the fourth century; Walter Pater rather fancifully imagined its composition by a young scholar under Marcus Aurelius. 'It is a song in celebration of the spring festival of Venus Genetrix, and is remarkable not only for its exquisite melody and romantic evocation of spring-time and its associations, but also as an experiment in a new form of poetry, making large use of assonance, recurrence of words and phrases, and even occasionally of rhyme, in anticipation of the accentual Latin poetry of a later age' (Oxford Companion to Classical Literature). The opening line and repeated refrain, 'Cras amet qui nunquam amavit, Quique amavit cras amet', is here accentuated in red ink, recurring after every four lines of the poem. An additional twelve copies were printed on vellum. See Tidcombe, p.64 ff. Language: Latin
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Le fabricant de Londres, drame en cinq actes et en prose; représenté à la Comédie Françoise le 12 Janvier 1771.

FENOUILLOT DE FALBAIRE, Charles-Georges. 8vo, pp.xii, 116, with 5 copper-engraved plates (De Longueil, C.le Vasseur, and J.B.Simonet after H.Gravelot); slight toning to margins of title and last page, some creasing to corners; overall a good, uncut copy, stab-stitched in contemporary marbled wrappers; some losses to spine and covers, covers creased; ink note to upper cover.First edition of a London-set play by the French dramatist and contributor to the Encyclopédie, Fenouillot de Falbaire (17271800), illustrated with five fine plates after Gravelot. Le fabricant de Londres tells the story of a bourgeois English cloth merchant named 'Vilson' who suffers bankruptcy, plunging his two young children and beloved Fanni into penury. On the point of throwing himself in the Thames, he is saved through the generosity of the wealthy Scottish Lord Falkland, whom he encounters on a bridge contemplating the same demise. Fenouillot explains in his preface that he was prompted to write the play by a desire to promote charitable acts towards society's less fortunate. The play flopped on its opening night, a witty spectator joking at the revelation of Vilson's bankruptcy that he too was bankrupt to the sum of twenty sous (the price of his ticket), but it was translated into German and Italian nonetheless and was performed with great success in Vienna. Fenouillot acknowledges the play's frosty reception in his preface, blaming the acoustics of the theatre. Language: French
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At Home.

SOWERBY, J[ohn] G[eorge], and Thomas CRANE, illustrators. [Eliza KEARY.] 4to, pp.[56]; with a half-title, and a dedication leaf/frontispiece; colour-printed illustrations by Sowerby, colour-printed borders and decorative elements by Thomas Crane, all of the text and the inset illustrations cut down and mounted in place within the borders; in very good condition, preserving the original front wrapper (laid down), bound in contemporary half red morocco with marbled sides, top-edge gilt; ink ownership inscription of Thomas Bumpus with his note '(artist's proofs)'.Original maquette for this charming Victorian children's book, illustrated by the stained-glass designer John George Sowerby and decorated by Thomas Crane, elder brother of the illustrator Walter Crane. The verse, unacknowledged, is by Eliza Keary (18271918). At Home and its sequels Abroad (1882) and At Home Again (1883) have been described as 'among the loveliest books ever produced' (Roger Dixon, in The Oxford History of the Irish Book). This copy lays out the (nearly) final design of the work, the verse, titles, ornaments, and illustrations each printed on separate pieces of thin card, disposed within the blank spaces of Crane's decorations. The pages are in an early unnumbered state and there are a number of differences from the work as finally published, largely changes in the colours, but on at least one occasion ('Black Diana', about a cat) the layout is revised. J.G.Sowerby (18491914), grandson of the naturalist, was a stained-glass designer and director of the family business Ellison Glass Works. Thomas Crane (18421903), elder brother of the artist and illustrator Walter Crane, was a director at Marcus Ward & Co. Language: English
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Variorum poematium liber.

JACQUEMOT, Jean. [bound after:]ROLLER, Johann Nikolaus. Varii generis loci et argumenti poemata diversis temporibus elaborata iam vero in unum fasciculum collecta atque in lucem emissa a Joanne Nicolao Rollero. Frankfurt and Leipzig, for Bremen, G.L.Förster, 1763.Two works in one vol, 8vo, Jacquemot: pp.160; printed in Roman, italic, and civilité types, woodcut ouroboros device to title, woodcut initials, typographic headpieces; Roller: pp.[xl], 220, [4]; some browning; very good copies, bound together in eighteenth-century mottled sheep, spine gilt in compartments with gilt red morocco lettering-piece ('VARIA / CARMIN / I.'), edges stained red; extremities a little rubbed, a few small abrasions to boards.Very rare first edition of this collection of neo-Latin Protestant biblical poetry by Jean Jacquemot (15431615), a notable Geneva preacher, poet, and translator, friend of Theodore Beza, here with the original French in civilité type. Jacquemot's collection of verse and translation includes Chandieu's famous Octonaires sur la vanité et inconstance du monde, with the original French text printed in civilité types and a parallel Latin version (translated by Jacquemot in 1591) in italics. The Octonaires had first appeared in 1583, to great acclaim, and had subsequently been included in several anthologies, even undergoing significant format variations: 'The Octonaires appeared in three different formats that showcase the versatility of Chandieu's verse, and the versatility of the printing industry' (Barker, pp.231-232). It is here bound after the first edition of Roller's collection of civic Latin verses for various occasions, dedicated to the 'patres patriae' of Bremen. No copies of either work traced in the US. OCLC finds only two copies of the Jacquemot outside continental Europe (BL and CUL) and only a single copy of the Roller (BL). Jacquemot: USTC 6900112; Cartier (De Tournes) 711; Arbour 3335; cf.Oberlé 132 (other works by Jacquemot); see Barker, Protestantism, Poetry and Protest: The vernacular writings of Antoine de Chandieu (2009). Roller: VD18 10274898; not in Oberlé. Language: Latin
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Le capucin Escossois. Histoire merveilleuse, et tres veritable, arrivée de nostre-temps. Traduitte du manuscript Italien de Monseigneur Jean Baptiste Rinuccini, archevesque, et prince de Ferme. Par le R.P.Francois Barraut, procureur general des peres de la doctrine Chrestienne, residant à Rome.

RINUCCINI, Giovanni Battista. 12mo, pp.[10], 214, [2 (privilege)]; without engraved frontispiece portrait and index in preliminaries (not found in all copies); the title picked out in gold, blue, and red, some additional overpainting in these colours to the preliminaries and end matter, several initials and head- and tailpieces hand-coloured and gilded; first few leaves somewhat dusty, occasional light marks; a very good copy in contemporary red morocco, boards tooled in gilt to a panel design, spine richly gilt in compartments and lettered directly in gilt, board edges and turn-ins gilt, edges gilt and marbled, later marbled endpapers; corners worn, a little wear to joints and head of spine, wormhole to fore-edge of upper board; partly erased inscription facing title 'ce livre apartient à Therese de Laury chez mademoiselle de Willeman à Bethune', booklabels of Henri Macqueron of Abbeville and Oswald Macqueron to front pastedown, small blue ink stamp of the latter to title.First edition of François Barrault's French translation of Rinuccini's biography of the Scottish Catholic convert George Leslie (d.1637?), a special issue decorated in gold and colour another example bound and decorated thus, also without the index, is to be found in BM Lyon (with provenance from Jesuit libraries in Jersey, Paris, and Chantilly). Leslie was born into a Protestant family in Aberdeen but converted to Catholicism and became a Capuchin friar, serving in Italy and Scotland. 'Leslie was a dedicated missionary and a shrewd observer but hardly a celebrity, yet it has been said that more has been published about him than about any other Scot except Queen Mary Stuart. A biography entitled Il cappuccino scozzese, by Giovanni Battista Rinuccini, archbishop of Fermo, was published at Macerata in 1644. It was based on conversations when Leslie was at Monte Giorgio, near Fermo. Although the work reads like a medieval romance Rinuccini was a shrewd ecclesiastic The book was an instant success, being published again and again in Italian, then in French, then in most of the languages of Catholic western Europe' (ODNB). François Barrault was a member of the Christian Doctrine Fathers. In this copy the titlepage, dedication to the duchess of Châtillon, preface to the reader, approbation, headings to both parts of the text, and privilege have been skilfully coloured in gold, blue, and red. The initials and head- and tailpieces are also skilfully coloured and gilded. The headpiece to the dedication shows the Virgin Mary ('Nostre Protectrice') flanked by angels, and the opening initial encloses a kneeling friar with the devil at his back, while the tailpiece at the end depicts truth alongside divine grace and love. Provenance: Oswald Macqueron (18221899), French artist; Henri Macqueron (18531937), historian. USTC 6008661. Only one copy traced in the US (University of Maryland) and four in the UK (BL, NLS, University of Aberdeen, Cambridge University Library). Language: French
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[Half-title: ‘Il Cappuccino d’Este del Padre Pepe’] ‘Historia Della Vita, e della Morte, et Attioni illustri Del P[ad]re Gio[vanni] Battista d’Este, Cappuccino. Fù nel secolo Alfonso III d’Este, Duca di Modena. Composta dal Molto Reu[erendo] Padre Don Stefano Pepe Chierico Regolare Teatino.Napolitano. divisa in tre libri, dove è inserta anche la Vita dell’Infanta Isabella di Savoia, Principessa di Modena’.

PEPE, Stefano. Manuscript on paper, in Italian, 8vo (207 x 146 mm), ff.[1 (blank)], [xi], 176, [3 (blank)]; neatly written in a single cursive hand in brown ink, with some titles, headings, initials, and words in red ink, up to 25 lines per page; very small dampstain to lower margin of a few leaves, otherwise very good; bound in nineteenth-century marbled sheep-backed boards with tree-marbled sides and vellum tips, spine gilt in compartments with gilt red morocco lettering-piece, edges sprinkled red; lightly worn at extremities, short splits to joints.A seemingly unpublished life of Alfonso III d'Este, Duke of Modena, who renounced his title to become a Capuchin friar. The Cappuccino d'Este offers a detailed though hagiographic account of the life of Alfonso III d'Este (15911644), Duke of Modena and Reggio from 1628 to 1629 and husband of Isabella of Savoy (d.1626). After a reign of only six months, Alfonso abdicated in favour of his son Francesco and entered the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin, where 'his preaching, humility, and exemplary life as a friar aroused admiration and enthusiasm' (Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani, trans.). He founded monasteries, preached in Austria, and 'committed to the conversion of the Jews, to sheltering young endangered women in institutes, and assisting prisoners' (ibid.). The text is the work of Stefano Pepe, a Neapolitan Theatine and the author of several works, including a published biography of Cajetan of Thiene, the founder of the Theatine order (Vita del b.Gaetano Tiene, Venice, 1662). The manuscript opens with a detailed table of contents (ff.[iii]-[viii]), followed by Pepe's poem In lode del padre Giovanni Battista d'Este Cappuccino (ff.[ix]-[xi]). The life of Alfonso is divided into three books, the first two describing his youth and education, his relationship with Isabella, and his government until the abdication (ff.1r89v) while the third covers the rest of his life as a Capuchin friar, his virtues, and the graces obtained through his intercession (ff.90r ad finem). Some of the biographical details derived first-hand from the author himself, and in chapter VIII, part III, Pepe recounts meeting Alfonso himself (ff.131r140r). Another manuscript, probably similar, is held at Modena, Biblioteca Estense Universitaria (Estense, It.30 = alfa.Q.9.25), titled 'Il duca cappuccino: Vita morte e attioni illustri del p.Gio.Battista d'Este cappuccino predicatore apostolico già Alfonso terzo duca di Modena'. Another biography of Alfonso, by Pepe's contemporary the Capuchin friar Giovanni da Sestola, was published under a similar title to the present manuscript: Del Cappuccino d'Este, che fu nel secolo il ser.mo Alfonso III duca di Modana e nella religione serafica il Pre.Gio Battista predicatore apostolico e della ser.ma infanta d.Isabella di Savoia sua dilettissima consorte, nascita, vita, morte e sepoltura (Modena, Bartolomeo Soliani, 1646).? Language: Italian
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  • $1,647
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Nuova cicalata sopra la coda in forma di lettera responsiva alla Signora N.N.

[VERACI, Gaetano.] 8vo, pp.112, with copper-engraved frontispiece with motto 'Si caudam renuis, sit tibi cauda retro' (see below); browned throughout, occasional light spotting; nonetheless a good copy in contemporary mottled sheep-backed boards with mottled paper sides, spine gilt in compartments with gilt red morocco lettering-piece to spine, edges stained red; lightly rubbed, corners somewhat worn; p.112 inscribed 'Croiest 1774' in ink at gutter, twentieth-century ink stamps of Vicenzo Rinaldo to title (faded) and p.17.Second edition, extremely rare and significantly expanded, of this highly suggestive, mock-academic panegyric on the 'tail'. The first edition was published for the author in 1765 'Nel Campo Cauditano' (likely Florence), under the licentious pseudonym 'Scarpafico Codacci' and with a tribute to the anonymous marchioness 'N.N.' on the birth of her son; here, the dedication is replaced by a response from Signora N.N.in praise of the author, and Veraci's work is itself more than doubled in length, inserting several new paragraphs at a time, in some cases including six consecutive pages of new material at once. He expounds on the literary significance of the tail at length, making reference to the Decameron and the Commedia, noting, for example, the significance of Minos passing judgment using his tail in the circle of the lustful, who had themselves 'made poor use of their tails' (p.18, trans.). The second edition is expanded with an additional discussion of other phallic symbols, including sceptres, keys, and even the Ace of Clubs. A particularly suggestive analysis of keys and keyholes reports advice from a locksmith that 'some [keyholes] burn with too much heat, with no north wind to cool them; others are exceedingly moist, and dripping wet, for the sun's rays cannot dry them; then there are others which are dry and rusty, and thus the key cannot enter; finally, some are so full of air that a key has never filled the void: these are occupied only by cobwebs, rust, and dust' (pp.20-21, trans.). The frontispiece, present in both editions, depicts nude putti pulling the tails of a dog and an ox within a border of furry, intertwined tails. Provenance: with the ink stamp of Venetian architect Vincenzo Rinaldo (18671927), best known for his neo-Gothic church of San Fior in Treviso and for his restoration of several churches following the First World War. His library was inherited by his nephew and pupil Lorenzo Rinaldo and subsequently dispersed. ICCU finds a single copy, at the Biblioteca del Seminario Vescovile in Treviso, to which OCLC adds another, at the British Library. For the first edition, see Melzi I, p.205; neither edition in Kearney nor Pia. Language: Italian
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  • $1,120
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The Yellow Book. An Illustrated Quarterly. Volume I [XIII].

BEARDSLEY, Aubrey, art editor; Henry HARLAND, literary editor. Thirteen volumes, small 4to; illustrated throughout with black and white plates with tissue-guards; lightly toned with sporadic foxing; partly unopened, in publisher's original pictorial yellow cloth blocked in black; spines a little darkened with rubbing to covers, extremities a little worn, corners bumped, but a very good set.An excellent set of the first edition of The Yellow Book, the decade-defining illustrated quarterly that captured the spirit of decadence and aestheticism and gave its name to 'the yellow nineties'. Founded in 1894 by Aubrey Beardsley and his friend Henry Harland, The Yellow Book was intended as an antidote to 'conventional magazines'. The quarterly showcased a wide range of literary and artistic genres of the late Victorian avant-garde - poetry, short stories, essays, illustrations, portraits, and reproductions of paintings - promoting the values of decadence and aestheticism. Published by John Lane, and with Beardsley and Harland as art and literary editors, it was designed to be provocative, experimental, and to be read by an enlightened bourgeois audience. As Beardsley explained in a letter to Robert Ross, The Yellow Book sought to provide a platform for the 'many brilliant story painters and picture writers [who] cannot get their best stuff accepted because they are perhaps a little risqué' (Beardsley, Letters, p.61). One contemporary reviewer in The New York Times noted that the quarterly was 'a "cheeky" performance, to be appreciated only by the dilettante, and not written for Philistines' (p.23). The striking yellow cloth covers blocked in black, first proposed by Beardsley, were widely thought to anticipate salacious content within, recalling the yellow covers of French and European novels of an erotic or illicit nature. For Oscar Wilde, Beardsley's design for the first volume's cover depicted 'a terrible naked harlot smiling through a mask- and with Elkin Matthews written on one breast and John Lane on the other' (Beerbohm, Letters, p.94). The Yellow Book's association with the scandalous peaked just one year into its publication. In April 1895, it was widely reported that Wilde was carrying a copy of The Yellow Book when he was arrested at the Cadogan Hotel. The ensuing furore surrounding Wilde's trial led to a backlash against all those associated with Wilde, his decadent values, and in consequence The Yellow Book itself.The journal's reputation was irrevocably damaged and, in an attempt to placate critics, Beardsley was forced to resign after just four issues (although Lane was commissioning his works again within a month). The Yellow Book continued with Lane at the helm, assisted by the artist Patten Wilson. While the volumes following Beardsley's departure have often been read as more conventional than their precedents, they are notable for including work by women writers and artists, among them Ella D'Arcy and Ethel Colburn Mayne (who also served as Harland's subeditors), Ethel Reed, and the sisters Netta, Mabel, and Nellie Syrett. Over its four-year run, The Yellow Book provides a glittering catalogue of turn-of-the-century literati, including writing by Max Beerbohm, Henry James, and H.G.Wells and the artistic work of Beardsley and the Birmingham School, Walter Sickert, John Singer Sargent, and others. See The Letters of Aubrey Beardsley (1970), Letters of Max Beerbohm, 1892-1956 (1988), and 'The Yellow Book' in The New York Times (19 August 1894). Language: English
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  • $2,634
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L.Apuleii Metamorphoseos, sive lusus Asini libri XI. Floridoru[m] IIII. De deo Socratis I. De philosophia I. Asclepius Trismegisti dialogus eode[m] Apuleio i[n]terprete. Eiusdem Apuleii liber de dogmatis Platonicis. Eiusde[m] liber de mundo Apologiae II. Isagogicus liber Platonicae philosophiae per Alcinou[m] philosophum, graece impressus

APULEIUS, Lucius. 8vo, ff.'266' (recte 264), [28]; text in italic, capital spaces with guide letters, second part in Greek, woodcut Aldine device to title and last page; occasional light foxing, some light marginal dampstaining towards the end, but a very good copy; bound in eighteenth-century(?) vellum over boards, title and imprint in ink to spine; some rubbing to extremities, a little marked and dusty, upper hinge almost split; marginal annotations in a sixteenth-century hand to 45 pp., a few manicules, bookplate of Victor Hugo and late nineteenth-century ink stamp of Dr Emeric Forbath to front pastedown.First Aldine edition of the works of the second-century AD Numidian novelist Apuleius, with the editio princeps of Alcinous's second-century handbook on Plato's philosophy in the original Greek, from the library of the great French writer Victor Hugo. The text opens with Apuleius's most famous work, the eleven-book romance known as the Metamorphoses or Golden Ass, featuring the wonderful tale of Cupid and Psyche. Then follow his Florida (excerpts from his philosophical lectures), De deo Socratis (on the existence and nature of 'daimons'), De dogmate Platonis (on Plato's physics and ethics), De Mundo (a translation of a pseudo-Aristotelian work on the universe), and his Apologia (a speech defending himself against a charge of bewitching his wife, with much on magic). Provenance: 1. The neat marginal annotations and manicules by a sixteenth-century reader display a particular interest in the Florida, De deo Socratis, and Apologia. 2. This copy bears the handsome bookplate of Victor Hugo (18021885), designed for him in 1870 by Aglaüs Bouvenne (18291903) and incorporating the western façade of Notre-Dame de Paris. Hugo refers to Apuleius twice in Les Misérables, in chapters 8 and 10. EDIT16 CNCE 2231; Renouard, Annales de l'imprimerie des Alde (1834), p.91; USTC 810106. Language: Latin
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Veteris hominis per expensa quatuor novissima metamorphosis, et novi genesis.

STANYHURST, William. 8vo, pp.[32], '338' (recte336), [8 (index, privilege)]; copper-engraved frontispiece to A1 (partially detached) and a further 4 full-page engravings printed in-text by Frederik Bouttats after Philip Fruytiers; occasional light browning and dampstaining at head, otherwise a very good copy; bound in contemporary stiff vellum, sewn two-on with blue thread on 3 cords sewn in, yapp fore-edges, edges speckled red; light soiling, a few marks, yapp edges soiled at head, without front free endpaper; early ink ownership inscription 'V ?lechien' to front pastedown.First edition, rare, of this work on the Four Last Things by the Irish Jesuit William Stanyhurst (16011663), illustrated with five striking full-page emblematic engravings. Stanyhurst was born in Brussels to a family of Irish origins; like his Dei immortalis in corpore mortali patientis historia, the present work proved wildly popular, appearing in some thirty-two editions in Latin, Dutch, and later French, Spanish, Italian, and German. Each portion of the work death, the Last Judgment, Hell (including discussions of fire, eternal tears, and the feculent stench of the damned), and Heaven is preceded by a splendid engraving by Frederik Bouttats the Elder (15901661) after the Baroque miniaturist Philip Fruytiers (16101666). The engraved title depicts an angel standing upon eternity (depicted as an orb encircled by an ouroboros), with the homo novus on the left guided to salvation and illuminated by sunlight, and the homo vetus on the right depicted as a merry lutenist, accompanied by a demon and teetering on the flaming precipice of Hell. STCV 6605062; USTC 1537221; Daly, Jesuit Series V, J.1364; Landwehr, Low Countries 631; Praz, p.502; Sommervogel VII, 1487, no.6. Language: Latin
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  • $1,153
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Archive of photographs, printed material, student manuscripts relating to Crofton Grange School.

[CROFTON GRANGE SCHOOL.] Archive includes: 11 volumes comprising over 3,600 leaves of drawings and paintings in gouache and watercolour, manuscript poems and short stories, typed termly reports on Crofton Grange news, termly lectures, and sports records [1930-55]; 4 volumes of printed termly reports detailing marriages, births, deaths, and news from alumnae, under the title of The Crofton Magazine [1920-7], The Crofton Journal [1928-33 and 1934-9], and the Crofton Grange News-Letter; a photograph album with the initials of Mary Alice Lyster gilt to upper board, containing 136 sepia-toned photographs of pupils and the grounds; a vellum-bound manuscript presented to the Lyster sisters in 1921 on the twenty-first anniversary of the school's foundation; and an additional manuscript presented on their retirement in 1930 with the names of 249 Crofton Grange students and alumnae.A charming archive from the Crofton Grange girls' boarding school, including over 3,600 leaves of poetry, short stories, and artwork produced by the students between 1930-1955, a poignant insight into a community and a nation irrevocably altered by war. Crofton Grange School was established in 1900 by Mary Alice Lyster (1862-1950), who served as headmistress alongside her sister, Elizabeth Hester Lyster (1865-1942) until 1930. The school relocated several times before its closure in 1964, notably from Orpington to Hamel's Park, Buntingford, in 1935. The Crofton Grange prospectus underlines the school's mission of teaching the girls to 'form their own opinions and develop on their own lines, and to adapt themselves cheerfully to whatever kind of life is in store for them in the changing world of today.' In keeping with the Lysters' vision of the school as a locus for female intellectual and cultural development, students frequently attended lectures by visiting academics as well as excursions to the opera and the theatre. Such excursions ceased neither in 1930, when termly reports recorded the first outbreak of measles at the school, nor during the Second World War: although thirty girls left Crofton Grange in 1940, the remaining students were still able to see a performance of King Lear at the Old Vic and put on plays of their own. Names of new students and records of marriages and deaths appear in termly typewritten reports and in the Crofton Journal; it is the eleven volumes of manuscript material, however, that provide a wholly organic insight into the pupils' lives, reflecting their intellectual pursuits, their fears and hopes, and revealing their ongoing fascination with the themes of continuity and change. The pupils frequently illustrate favourite poems (Christina Rossetti's 'Goblin Market', Wordsworth's 'I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud', and Tennyson's 'Morte d'Arthur' enjoy unwavering popularity over the course of twenty-five years), drawings of horses and flowers, accounts of their family holidays abroad, etc. Rising political tensions in Europe are reflected in both the school's curriculum and in the girls' paintings and cartoons from as early as 1937, with a rapid shift toward a heightened political consciousness from 1938, when odes to springtime or the mice of Crofton are replaced with political cartoons copied from Punch. By the summer of 1939, the threat of war had become imminent: there were only two lectures, on that 'ever-pressing problem, the international situation', and two pupils had to return to South Africa and to Greece as a result of 'Hitler and Mussolini's combined misdeeds.' Several drawings adapt Punch's series of Second World War Cartoons on the 'Changing Face of Britain': a 1940 drawing of a typical Sunday afternoon at Crofton Grange depicts pupils past and present, the latter unchanged but for the presence of gas masks. An original drawing by a pupil in the same year titled 'Poly-ticks' portrays Germany as a skunk, Italy as its porcine accomplice, and the rest of Europe as their insect prey: Austria as a wasp, France as a flea ('a stupid, misled insect'), and Holland and Belgium as an obstinate bumble-bee ('very hard to digest'). The personalities and interests of individual students become apparent in their work: Philippa Shannon, for instance, provides numerous original translations from Sappho and Homer as well as drawings of Minoan sculpture and pottery in 1947; she would matriculate in Classics at St Hugh's College, Oxford, in 1948. A list of the contents of the archive is available on request. Language: English
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  • $6,257
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‘Ein Irländer Riss ‘

[MAGRATH, Cornelius.] Drawing on paper (c.410 x 285 mm), in red, yellow, blue, green, and white ink, and gilt, with a black border, lettering in black at the foot; some foxing, old repairs to tears, small portion wanting from head, laid on card, later framed and glazed.A delightful promotional image for the Continental tour of 'The Irish Giant' Cornelius Magrath (1736/71760), 'To be seen in Nuremberg in the month of July 1756'. Cornelius Magrath (1736/71760), born in Tipperary, was already famous for his stature by the time he arrived in London in 1753 at the age of sixteen. Reported then as seven foot three inches tall, he had grown an extraordinary twenty-one inches since the age of fifteen. After touring England Magrath progressed to the Continent, where at least two portraits were made of him, an engraving by Johann Nepomuk Maag (c.17241800) made in Regensburg in 1756 and a painting by Pietro Longhi produced in Venice in 1757. The current image proves that he was in Nuremberg in July 1756. He returned to Ireland after becoming ill in Flanders in 1760 (we now know he suffered from phthisis) and died in May that year. After his death his skeleton became part of the anatomy collection at Trinity College Dublin, though the legend that it was stolen by students is almost certainly false. The current drawing, showing Magrath towering over a Prussian soldier (the Prussians then known as the tallest in Europe), is very similar to the Regensburg engraving by Maag, though the elaborate floral decoration on Magrath's waistcoat is different. The text is largely the same as in the engraving but with two differences ('Irrländer' for 'Irrländischer', and 'ungemeine' for 'ungewöhnliche'), and an additional line at the foot: 'Zu Nürnberg zum anschauen in Monath July AC.1756'. Not enough is known of Magrath's European itinerary to determine whether this image precedes or is derived from Maag's more highly finished engraving.
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Three very large historiated initials cut from a set of choirbooks.

MASTER B.F. (i) Very large initial 'M' (161 x 164 mm, perhaps introducing the chant Maria Magdalena et altera Maria for Easter Monday in an Antiphonal) enclosing a scene of the Two Maries and the Angel at the Tomb set before a fine dawn landscape, a large rocky outcrop behind the tomb, the outer stems of the 'M' terminating in human feet, the central stem indicated at the head by a suspended classical capital and at the foot by a column base on which appear the small initials 'B F', the column base clasped by two blue human hands which emerge from the foliage attached to the outer stems of the 'M', the whole delicately painted in colours and silver (oxidised), heightened in gold and set against a burnished gold ground; some surface cracking and slight discolouration of the burnished gold, otherwise in excellent condition; pasted into a card mount. (ii) Very large initial 'N' (169 x 177 mm, perhaps introducing the chant Nos autem gloriari for Maundy Thursday in a Gradual) enclosing Christ Washing Peter's Feet, St John standing behind Christ with a towel, set within a richly decorated classical room around which eight other disciples are seated, the initial 'N' itself partly encased and entwined by elaborate foliage and incorporating a grotesque bust and two birds' heads whose beaks interlock at the top centre, the whole delicately painted in colours and silver (oxidised), heightened in gold, and set against a burnished gold ground; some retouching of an area of the frieze and the coffered ceiling where evidently once damaged, some surface cracking of the burnished gold, otherwise in excellent condition; pasted into a card mount. (iii) Very large initial 'S' (162 x 166 mm, perhaps introducing the chant Salve sancta parens in a Gradual) enclosing the Birth of the Virgin, StAnne lying in a canopied bed with a green coverlet and the baby, in swaddling clothes, being handed by a nurse to a woman in the foreground, the initial 'S' formed of two stylised dolphins whose tails terminate in cornucopias, the whole delicately painted in shades predominantly of blue, green, brown, and grey and set against a burnished gold ground; some flaking of the burnished gold along the left-hand side of the initial, otherwise in excellent condition; pasted into a card mount. Three extremely fine initials by the enigmatic artist known as Master B.F., one of the most inventive and accomplished illuminators of the Italian High Renaissance. They come almost certainly from a magnificent set of about twenty choirbooks belonging to the Olivetan monastery of Santi Angelo e Niccolò of Villanove Sillaro in the diocese of Lodi, near Milan, which was suppressed in 1799. 'Master B.F.' is the name first assigned in 1931 to the artist of the Villanova Sillaro initials by Paul Wescher, who in 1960 suggested that he was to be identified with Francesco Binasco (Francesco da Lonate, also known as 'il Binasco') and that the letters 'B' and 'F' stood for 'Binascus Fecit'. While ostensibly rather implausible, some of the artist's initials are signed simply 'B'. Francesco da Lonate was an illuminator, goldsmith and engraver documented as occupying the official positions 'revisore' of the Mint and 'miniatore ducale' under the Sforza dukes Massimiliano Maria (15121515) and Francesco II (15211535). However, since Binasco is not recorded before 1513 (Master B.F's activity is datable from 1490 onwards) and no documented works by him have been discovered with which to compare the miniatures signed by Master B.F., Wescher's theory remains controversial. The only documented illuminator at Villanova Sillaro at the right time is Fra Giovanni da Verona (c.14571525). 'Scholars have situated Master B.F.'s artistic production within the Leonardesque school of painting that developed in Lombardy in the early 1500s, identifying derivations of both figural types and compositional motifs in the monumental works of Leonardo da Vinci who was active in Milan from about 1482 to 1499 and again from 1506 to 1513. For example, the illuminator closely modelled the composition of the Virgin and Child with the infant Saint John and the Angel in an initial N (Chantilly, Musée Condé, n.inv.Divers, VI.402, X) on the second version of the Virgin of the Rocks (London, National Gallery) which was on public view at San Francesco Grande. Master B.F.'s oeuvre also displays his awareness of trends in contemporary art from across the Alps, most notably engravings of Albrecht Dürer of the late 1490s from which he copied architectural elements for his landscapes' (Anne-Marie Eze, 'Master B.F.', in S.Hindman and F.Toniolo, eds, The Burke Collection of Italian manuscript paintings, 2021, pp.354-356, at p.354). The influence of Leonardo is most evident here in the scene of Christ Washing Peter's Feet. The interior setting, with its walls and coffered ceiling rendered using central perspective, immediately brings to mind Leonardo's Last Supper. Here, as there, the vanishing point lies just adjacent to Christ's head, and the eye is therefore led down his left arm and towards the basin of water on the floor. The initial depicting the Birth of the Virgin is of particular interest for showing signs of a radical change of composition during its creation. Among several obvious adjustments, the present large figure of a nurse holding the swaddled baby is painted over the bed, while the faint outline of a figure (looking down towards St Anne and perhaps holding a baby) is visible behind the bed, as is that of a sideboard on which lies a dish or bowl. These changes are especially interesting when our initial is compared with another by Master B.F.now in the Kupferstichkabinett in Berlin. There, in a remarkably similar composition used to depict the Birth of John the Baptist, a servant (holding a tray) and a sideboard are positioned behind the bed of StElisabeth (Min.4214; see B.Alai, Le miniature italiane del Kupferstichkabinett di Berlino, 2019, p.302, no.91); as if to avoid any possible confusio
  • $197,587
  • $197,587