A SELECTION OF RECENT HIGHLIGHTS
(updated 10/17/2019 at 1.00pm EST)

 

Collection of 36 Magee "Arms of the United States" Patriotic Envelopes

Collection of 36 Magee “Arms of the United States” Patriotic Envelopes

PATRIOTIC COVERS -- CIVIL WAR) 36 covers, each 5½" X 3", Philadelphia, PA, n.y. Very good to near fine. All unused and exceptionally bright and nice, with just the faintest bit of age toning to some. Superb complete grouping of this state arms collection published by Charles Magee of 316 Chestnut Street in Philadelphia -- issued as the prospect of civil war loomed. Of these 35 state envelopes, 11 would become Confederate states, 20 would remain Union states and 4 would be classified Border States. Each contains a 2¼" diameter circle at left and a slightly smaller inner circle with the words "ARMS OF" at top and the state name at bottom. In the middle of this inner circle is a colored image of the state coat of arms or appropriate image: "UTAH TER.," for instance, depicts a large beehive resting on a low platform surrounded by grass and shrubbery, bees a-buzzing amidst a blue sky; "ALABAMA' depicts a closeup of a gnarled tree trunk with a large "Map of Alabama" pinned against it. All but 9 of the Union state envelopes bear a printed slogan beneath the circle: "One Flag and One Government" for Maine, "Death to All Traitors" for Minnesota, "The Union at All Hazzards" [sic] for California and other pro-Union sentiments. Interestingly but not surprisingly, none of the future Confederate states include slogans in this Union-slanted collection and the two future Border States often identified as Confederate likewise have none (though future Border States Delaware and Maryland do). A thirty-sixth envelope serves as the title page for this collection, captioned "Arms of the United States" and of course showing a bald eagle, arrows in one talon and olive branch in the other, against a backdrop of American flags. Although undated, this series presumably was published pre-1861, as West Virginia was admitted in that year and thus is not present, nor is Nevada, admitted in 1864. Individual envelopes from this series turn up occasionally, invariably NOT colored; a complete group such as this, all bearing period color and in uniformly exceptional condition with original gum, is quite scarce and would be near-impossible to duplicate.
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Uniformly Bound Separately Published First Editions Works of Dr. [John] Doran.

Dr. [John] Doran. Eight separately published first editions & one second edition revised, enlarged & corrected, 8vo (7¼ -7¾ x 4¾ ). Uniform full calf, gilt extra backs in six compartments, red & green gilt lettering pieces in the second & third, gilt center & corner ornaments in the rest, five gilt roll tooled raised bands, gilt & blind frames on sides, gilt roll tooled edges, blind inner dentelles, marbled edges & endpapers. Comprising: Habits and men, with remnants of record touching the makers of both. First edition, 1854. Table Traits with Something on Them. First edition, 1854. Knights and Their Days. First edition, 1856. Monarchs Retired from Business. First edition, 2 vols, 1857. The History of Court Fools. First edition, 1858. New Pictures and Old Panels. First edition, 1859. The Book of the Princes of Wales, Heirs to the Crown of England. First edition, 1860. Their Majesties Servants, or Annals of the English Stage from Thomas Betterton to Edmund Kean. Actors-Authors-Audiences. Second edition, revised, enlarged & corrected, 1865. Saints & Sinners; or, In Church and About It. First edition 2 vols, 1868. Very attractive uniform full gilt extra calf bindings in near fine condition. Some faint water stain limited to preliminary sheets only of a few volumes, otherwise clean, unmarked, complete. Nine titles, eight first editions, one second edition revised, eleven volumes. H9024
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Les plus beaux monuments de Rome ancienne: Ou Recueil Des Plus Beaux Morceaux De L’Antiquité Romaine Qui Existent Encore; Les plus beaux édifices de Rome moderne, ou recueil des plus belles vues des principales églises, places, palais, fontaines, &c. qui sont dans Rome.

Jean Barbault Recent half morocco with matching marbled paper, spine with 5 raised bands and gilt motifs, morocco label on two., Jean Barbault (1718-1762) was a French artist working in Rome. He was part of the circle of artists which included Piranesi, Duflos and Legeay and contributed to Piranesi's "Vedute di Roma" and also collaborated on "Antichita romane". His work was extremely successful and though influenced heavily by Piranesi, he is an impressive and energetic topographical artist in his own right. "Barbault's presentation of views and fragments of ancient sculpture are extraordinarily tactile and appealing" (Millard). , Size : Folio 500 x 375 mm, Volume 1 with 128 finely illustrated copper plates, 73 numbered plates (29 full page, 44 half page) and 55 unnumbered plates accompanying the half page plates. The numbered plates at top show a view of an architectural ruin in a landscape, while the bottom (unnumbered) plate depicts a sculptural or architectural fragment. In a few instances, the bottom image also relates to the subject of the plate above. The text, written in French, describes the monuments depicted in the adjacent plate(s). In these descriptions, Barbault not only references the work of historians like Pliny the Elder and Bernard de Montfaucon, but also other artists? renderings of the same monuments, particularly those by Giovanni Battista Piranesi.Volume 2 is illustrated with superb large-scale views of Rome, 44 Double page plates and 21 half page plates (a total of 65) of impressive views of important churches, places, palaces, fountains and bridges of Renaissance and Baroque Rome. Each plate is accompanied by an extensive and informative text which included a history of each building. The high-quality plates were made by Domenico Montagi and an entire team of engravers. , Volume : Two Volumes A fine example of this important work on Rome, plates are clean and crisp. First few leaves of volume one with minor worming in the lower left margins not affecting the plates.
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Atlas General de la Ville, des Faubourgs et des Monuments de Paris

Theodore Jacoubet contemporary half navy blue morocco over marbled boards, spine with 6 raised bands, title in gilt on spine, spine decorated with gilt compartments, marbled upper and lower free end papers., The Atlas of Jacoubet, officially the general Atlas of the city, the suburbs and monuments of Paris, is a plan of Paris of 58 sheets, published in nine deliveries between 1827 and 1839. It is about a geometrical plan to the 1/2000 scale. Directed, lifted, drawn and reported by the architect Théodore Jacoubet, to whom the work is attributed, it is written by J.-M. Hacq and engraved by D. Bonnet.Provenance: 3 Ex-libris enamel on the upper free end paper: 1- that of the Philippe-Andre O'Reilly (1786-1863), negotiator, President of the Commercial Court of Le Havre and Knight of the Legion of Honor; 2- Bibliotheque du Docteur Lucien Graux (1878-1994), medical doctor, entrepreneur, collector, bibliophile, writer, editor during French resistant; and 3- Roxane Debuisson. More than 60 years of a real passion for Paris, Roxane Jacques Debuisson (1927-2018) has had an exceptional collection on the French capital, from the mid-eighteenth to the mid-twentieth century: thousands of images, books, commercial invoices, decorative objects and urban furniture, contributed actively to the knowledge of Paris, while reflecting the taste, sensitivity, intellect and elegance of this great city. This large collection was always open to researchers.4- A note by the Author Theodore Jacoubet ' The undersigned Chief Architect. of the Bureau of Engineers Geometers and Draughts men of the high street Certifies that the proofs of which I submitted for the publication conforms to the publication.'One of the most important atlases of Paris prior to the Haussmann transformations. Haussmann's renovation of Paris was a vast public works program commissioned by Emperor Napoleon III and directed by his prefect of the Seine, Georges-Eugene Haussmann, between 1853 and 1870. This work of the architect Theodore Jacoubet, dedicated to the prefect of the Seine, Count Chabrol de Volvic. , Size : Folio. , Illustrated with a double folding title page, and 58 plates, some double page plates folding. The Atlas is extra illustrated with 4 large panoramas of the city from two different editions of the work of Pernot?s Le Vieux Paris., References : La littérature française contemporaine [1827- 1849!: G-LAZ!, Volume 4; p.368 In very good condition. A fine and scarce example in contemporary half morocco with matching marbled boards.
Anno Tricesimo Nono GEORGII III. REGIS. Cap. LXXX. An Act for Better Regulating the Manner of Carrying Slaves

Anno Tricesimo Nono GEORGII III. REGIS. Cap. LXXX. An Act for Better Regulating the Manner of Carrying Slaves, in British Vessels, from the Coast of Africa [caption title]

SLAVERY) 4to, disbound, paginated [637]-652, untrimmed. An act passed by Parliament in the summer of 1799, delineated in 39 paragraphs, numbered I-XXXIX, that regulated the slave trade beginning in August, 1800 - an act no doubt intended to placate the growing voices of opposition to the English slave trade. The act stipulates how many slaves could be stowed in a ship (by mathematical formula according to the size of the ship, but never more than 400); that slaves must be separated from other cargo; and that the space for the slaves "be full and complete perpendicular height of five feet." Nothing is said about their treatment, other than that the ship's surgeon was required keep a log of illnesses and deaths of both slaves and crew. Much of the act is taken up with its enforcement, and the penalties and fines for violations; it also regulates the conditions and treatment of the crew. The acts of Parliament were usually published separately and later issued in collections of the Public General Statutes; this one was issued as part of the collection of statues Passed in the Thirty-Ninth Year of the Reign of His Majesty King George the Third: Being the Third Session of the Eighteenth Parliament of Great Britain. This copy is disbound from such a volume. ESTC N60288 (Lincoln's Inn Library and Wellcome Institute)
The Red Badge of Courage.

The Red Badge of Courage.

Crane, Stephen First edition, first printing with page [235] advertising the three works of Gilbert Parker's Best Books, and the last page of advertisements (page 238) ending with The Land of the Sun, by Christian Reid; last gathering, including ads on laid paper. Octavo, original publisher's tan cloth. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with light rubbing. Rare and desirable in the original dust jacket. An abbreviated version of The Red Badge of Courage was first serialized in The Philadelphia Press in December 1894. This version of the story, which was culled to 18,000 words by an editor specifically for the serialization, was reprinted in newspapers across America, establishing Crane's fame. Crane biographer John Berryman wrote that the story was published in at least 200 small city dailies and approximately 550 weekly papers. In October 1895, a version, which was 5,000 words shorter than the original manuscript, was printed in book form by D. Appleton & Company. "Stephen Crane, with no more military experience than his lively imagination could cull from Battles and Leaders of the Civil War and from Tolstoy, told so graphically how a raw recruit feels in battle that The Red Badge of Courage must be regarded as the first artistic approach to the war. It pictures no historical figure or event, except that Chancellorsville is its setting, but its sense of the helplessness and meaninglessness of the common soldier, maneuvered by superiors and circumstance, is a brilliant achievement in impression. Its illusion of authentic experience has made it a minor classic of the war" (Leisy, 158-59).
When the Daltons Rode.

When the Daltons Rode.

Dalton, Emmett. In collaboration with Jack Jungemeyer. First edition of Emmett Dalton's autobiography. Octavo, original cloth with smoking gun vignette to the front panel, pictorial endpapers, frontispiece portrait of Emmett Dalton after a photograph taken in 1892. Signed by Dalton beneath his frontispiece portrait. In near fine condition. The Dalton brothers led one of the last gangs of horseback outlaws. Ironically, three of them - Bob, Grant, and Emmett - started their careers as deputy marshals. They soon decided that more money could be made from horse rustling and in 1888 they organized a band that carried on a thriving trade. When they came under suspicion toward the end of 1890, the brothers went to California, where on February 6, 1891, at the small station of Aila, they held up a Los Angeles-bound passenger train. The robbery failed when the baggage clerk excaped and the Daltons were unable to break into the safe. Grat was captured and sentenced to twenty years in prison, but escaped from the train carrying him to Folsom. The gang resumed operations in Oklahoma where, during the next two years, they robbed three trains before turning to the more lucrative trade of bank robbery. Modeling their plans on the James brothers, the Daltons struck the two banks at Coffeyville, Kansas on October 5, 1892, hoping, as Bob said, "to beat anything Jesse James ever did - rob two banks at once in broad daylight." However, the identical fate that befell the James gang at Northfield, Minnesota awaited the Daltons. Confronted with a large crowd of armed townsfolk, the gang attempted to shoot its way to safety; in the battle, Bob, Gat and two other gang members were killed, and Emmett was severely wounded and captured.
Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

Stevenson, Robert Louis First edition, first issue with the publication date on the upper wrapper altered by hand of Stevenson's classic book. Octavo, original wrappers, advertisements. In very good condition without the usual restoration seen on most examples. First editions in the original wrappers are rare. "If [Bram Stoker's] Dracula leaves one with the sensation of having been struck down by a massive, 400-page wall of horror, then Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is like the sudden, mortal jab of an ice pick" (Stephen King). Leaping to life out of a "fine bogey dream" from which the author's wife abruptly awakened him, Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde proved "immediately and lastingly Stevenson's most famous story" (Baugh et al., 1499). "Published as a 'shilling shocker,' a form at that time in fashion, it became instantly popular; was quoted from a thousand pulpits; was translated into German, French and Danish; and the names of its two chief characters have passed into the common stock of proverbial allusion" (DNB). "It is a Faustian moral fable which takes the form of a tale of mystery and horror. [It] is the prototype of all stories of multiple personality, transformation and possession. The psychological power of the writing, including Jekyll's agonies, is patent" (Clute & Nicholls, 1165). "When we thrill to the shock and horror of the story, I think it is because we all, at least to some degree, have been torn by [Jekyll's] internal conflict. When we recoil in terror from the selfish savagery of Mr. Hyde, I think it is because we fear our own secret selves" (Jack Williamson).
A Tale of Two Cities.

A Tale of Two Cities.

Dickens, Charles First edition, first issue of one of Dickens' most enduring works, with p. 213 misnumbered "113," the signature mark "b" at the foot of the plate list, and the misspelling "affetcionately" on line 12, p. 134. Octavo, bound in three quarters leather over marbled boards, gilt titles and tooling to the spine, raised bands, marbled endpapers. Sixteen plates after H.K. Browne including frontispiece and title vignette. In near fine condition. The most famous and possibly the most popular of Dickens's novels, A Tale of Two Cities shows a master of dramatic narrative extracting gold from the ore of history. If the bloody tableau of the French Revolution were not in itself sufficient for a dozen novels, Dickens added to it a professional resurrectionist, an authentic ogress, and an antihero as convincingly flawed as any in modern literature. "Dickens had always admired Carlyle's History of the French Revolution, and asked him to recommend suitable books from which he could research the period; in reply Carlyle sent him a 'cartload' of volumes. So great was [Dickens'] enthusiasm for the story that it had indeed 'taken in possession' of him. The force of the novel springs from its exploration of darkness and death but its beauty derives from Dickens' real sense of transcendence, from his ability to see the sweep of destiny" (Ackroyd, 858). The last of Dickens' books to be illustrated by H.K. Browne ("Phiz"), with 16 engraved plates by him. "Browne, for 23 years responsible for all the etchings which had so successfully embellished these [Dickens'] books, produced his last drawings for the present work. Bradbury and Evans, the printers of all and publishers of five of Dickens' works as issued in monthly parts, had ceased to act in this dual capacity after completion of Little Dorrit. [resulting] in the return of Chapman and Hall as publishers of this and all succeeding works" (Hatton & Cleaver, 333).
The Great Gatsby.

The Great Gatsby.

Fitzgerald, F. Scott First edition, first issue of the author's masterpiece with "chatter" p.60, "northern" p.119, "sick in tired" p.205, and "Union Street station" p. 211. Octavo, original green cloth, gilt titles to the spine. With a presentation note inscribed by the author bound in before the half-title page,"For J.E. Cribb from yours sincerely F Scott Fitzgerald Paris, 1929." Paris in the 1920s proved the most influential decade of Fitzgerald's development. Fitzgerald made several excursions to Europe, mostly Paris and the French Riviera, and became friends with many members of the American expatriate community in Paris, notably Ernest Hemingway. Fitzgerald's friendship with Hemingway was quite effusive, as many of Fitzgerald's relationships would prove to be. Hemingway did not get on well with Zelda, however, and in addition to describing her as "insane" in his memoir A Moveable Feast, Hemingway claimed that Zelda "encouraged her husband to drink so as to distract Fitzgerald from his work on his novel", so he could work on the short stories he sold to magazines to help support their lifestyle. In near fine condition with a touch of wear. Housed in a custom full morocco clamshell box. In 1922, Fitzgerald announced his decision to write "something new--something extraordinary and beautiful and simple and intricately patterned." That extraordinary, beautiful, intricately patterned, and above all, simple novel became The Great Gatsby, arguably Fitzgerald's finest work and certainly the book for which he is best known. A portrait of the Jazz Age in all of its decadence and excess, Gatsby captured the spirit of the author's generation and earned itself a permanent place in American mythology. Cyril Connolly called The Great Gatsby one of the half dozen best American novels: "Gatsby remains a prose poem of delight and sadness which has by now introduced two generations to the romance of America, as Huckleberry Finn and Leaves of Grass introduced those before it" (Modern Movement 48). Consistently gaining popularity after World War II, the novel became an important part of American high school curricula. Today it is widely considered to be a literary classic and a contender for the title "Great American Novel". In 1998, the Modern Library editorial board voted it the 20th century's best American novel and second best English-language novel of the same time period. It was the basis for numerous stage and film adaptations. Gatsby had four film adaptations, with two exceptionally big-budget versions: the 1974 version starring Robert Redford and Mia Farrow, as well as Baz Luhrmann's 2013 version starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Tobey Maguire and Carrie Mulligan. Fitzgerald's granddaughter praised Lurhmann's adaptation, stating "Scott would be proud."
A unique photographic triptych of Prime Minister Winston Churchill from The Daily Telegraph archives comprising three wartime press photographs taken on 30 June 1943 at the luncheon held in his honor following his receipt of the Honorary Freedom of the City of London

A unique photographic triptych of Prime Minister Winston Churchill from The Daily Telegraph archives comprising three wartime press photographs taken on 30 June 1943 at the luncheon held in his honor following his receipt of the Honorary Freedom of the City of London

This item from The Daily Telegraph archives is both quite unusual and quite striking – a triptych of Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill comprised of three wartime photographs taken on 30 June 1943 at the luncheon in his honor following his receipt of the Honorary Freedom of the City of London. The composition, measuring 11.5 x 8.5 inches (29.2 x 21.6 cm), comprises three gelatin silver prints on matte photo paper. The Daily Telegraph Art Department hinged the three images together with paper tape on the verso and hand-applied retouching to Churchill’s face and suit. Condition is very good plus. The paper is clean and crisp with only minor softening to the corners. The photographs are arresting; Churchill is in focus with the other figures blurred from motion and a beautiful bokeh to the table setting. The versos of all three photos bear the copyright stamp of "Fox Photos Ltd." and handwritten printing notations. The top and bottom photos have published stamps from The Daily Telegraph dated 1 JUL 1943; and the bottom photo has a clipping of the caption as it appeared in print reading, "THREE INTIMATE STUDIES of the Prime Minister taken yesterday at the Mansion House during the luncheon held in his honour." This triptych is housed in a removable, archival mylar sleeve within a rigid, crimson cloth folder. This is the only such triptych we have encountered in the many hundreds of original press photos we have handled. It is a striking piece well-suited to framing. On 30 June 1943 the City of London bestowed its greatest honor on the man who was leading them through the war when it presented Prime Minister Winston Churchill with the Honorary Freedom of the City of London. The Freedom of the City of London, like many British traditions, is centuries old and today far removed from its original purposes. Established in the 13th century, the Freedom originally meant that its recipient was not the property of a feudal lord and had the right to earn money and own land. Today the Freedom is bestowed on those who have made a significant impact in their field in London. The Honorary Freedom is a far rarer and greater honor usually bestowed only on Heads of State during a formal ceremony at the Guildhall. At the Guildhall ceremony Churchill gave a lengthy speech, opening with thanks for the honor, "The strain of protracted war is hard and severe upon the men at the executive summit of great countries, however lightly care may seem to sit upon them. They have need of all the help and comfort their fellow countrymen can give them. I feel myself buoyed up by your good will here today, and indeed I have felt uplifted through all these years by the consideration with which the British people have treated me, even when serious mistakes have been made." (Complete Speeches, Vol VII, p.6792) This press photo was once a part of the working archive of The Daily Telegraph. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events.Newspapers assembled expansive archives, physical copies of all photographs published or deemed useful for potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions. Photo departments would often take brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs themselves to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art.
An original press photograph of Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill shaking hands with the Ooni of Ife on 8 June 1953 on the grounds of Blenheim Palace during the Commonwealth Prime Ministers Conference

An original press photograph of Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill shaking hands with the Ooni of Ife on 8 June 1953 on the grounds of Blenheim Palace during the Commonwealth Prime Ministers Conference

This original press photograph captures Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill shaking hands with the Ooni of Ife, ruler of the Yaruba people, on 8 June 1953 on the grounds of Blenheim Palace during the Commonwealth Prime Ministers Conference following the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II. The gelatin silver print on glossy photo paper measures 6 x 8.125 inches (15.2 x 20.7 cm). Condition is very good. The paper is crisp and clean with only light cockling and scuffing visible under raking light. This is an exceptional photograph, bright and clear with sharp focus, high contrast, and compelling composition. The verso bears a copyright stamp of "Keystone Press Agency", a Swedish copyright stamp of "Svenskt Pressfoto", two stamps of Svenska Dagbladets Bild-Arkiv (Svenska Dagladets is a Stockholm daily newspaper, and bild-arkiv translates to photo archive), and a typed caption dated "8-6-53" and reading, "SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL the Prime Ministertalks with the ONI [sic] OF IFE in the grounds of BlenheimPalace, Woodstock, Oxfordshire, yesterday - home ofthe Duke and Duchess of Marlborough. They wereguests at a garden party to 1,200 Dominion andoverseas visitors held in the grounds." Blenheim Palace is Winston’s birthplace and ancestral home of the Churchill family. While history best remembers Churchill’s wartime premiership, Churchill spent an additional decade at the apex of leadership. After the General Election of July 1945 ended his wartime premiership, Churchill served as Leader of the Opposition until the October 1951 General Election, when his Conservatives outpolled Labour, returning Churchill to 10 Downing Street for his second and final premiership (1951-1955). The events encompassed by these years are in many ways no less dramatic than those of the war years, including post-war recovery, onset of the Cold War, Soviet acquisition of the atomic bomb, development of the hydrogen bomb, coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, the beginning of the space age, and the unraveling of the British Empire. The last of these events had particular poignancy for Churchill, whose early life and perspective were shaped by his service in Britain’s colonial possessions. By the time he was first elected to Parliament at the age of 25, Churchill had served as a soldier and war correspondent in British colonial campaigns on multiple continents. His first position in Government was Undersecretary of State for the Colonies and he briefly headed the Colonial Office after the First World War. During the early 1930s he broke with his own party over Indian independence. Churchill’s faith in the beneficence and destiny of the British Empire could approach obdurate strength. There was perhaps more than just characteristic wartime defiance in his 1942 utterance, "We have not entered this war for profit or expansion Let me, however, make this clear I have not become the King’s First Minister in order to preside over the liquidation of the British Empire. For that task, if ever it were prescribed, someone else would have to be found." (Complete Speeches, Vol. VI, p.6695) Nevertheless, swiftly following the war India gained long-sought independence and by Churchill’s second premiership general impetus toward colonial independence was becoming inevitability. Churchill shaking hands with Ooni of Ife Adesoji Aderemi (1889-1980) captures a poignant moment in the Empire’s twilight. The Ooni is the traditional ruler of the Yoruba people, one of Africa’s largest ethnic groups, centered in the region of British colonial Nigeria. Churchill hewed to his promise that no part of the Empire would gain independence under his watch. But soon after Churchill resigned his second and final premiership Sudan gained independence shortly followed by Ghana and Malaya in 1957. Nigerian independence followed in 1960 and Aderemi served as the first Governor of the Western Region from 1960-1962.