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TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND AMERICA. MASSACHUSETTS SPY

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND AMERICA. MASSACHUSETTS SPY, EXTRA

Convention of Mortefontaine] [2]pp. Text in four columns. Broadsheet, approximately 10 1/2 x 17 1/4 inches. Moderately tanned, some light staining. Very good. In a green cloth chemise and half morocco and cloth slipcase, spine gilt. An historically-important and rare extra edition of Isaiah Thomas's MASSACHUSETTS SPY, reporting the fledgling United States' 1800 treaty with France that averted all-out war between the two nations. Relieving the tensions that had built through the period of the Genet Affair, the XYZ Affair, and the Quasi-War, the Convention of Mortefontaine re-established peace between the United States and France, abrogated the 1778 treaty of alliance (the United States' first "entangling" alliance), restored captured naval vessels to each side, arranged for payments of debts, and re-affirmed the trade rights of neutral ships. As importantly, it restored friendly relations between the two nations, a condition that reaped great benefits less than three years later when the United States acquired the Louisiana Purchase from France. The Convention of Mortefontaine was negotiated between Supreme Court Chief Justice Oliver Ellsworth, North Carolina Governor William R. Davie, and diplomat William Vans Murray of the United States and Joseph Buonaparte, Charles P. C. Fleurieu, and Pierre L. Roederer of the French Republic, and agreed to in late September 1800. The full text of the treaty appears in this newspaper broadsheet extra, dated December 24, 1800. It enumerates all twenty-seven articles of the treaty, and is signed in type by all six negotiators as well as the French Foreign Minister, Charles Maurice de Talleyrand. This "Extra" issue of the SPY also prints the November 11 speech of King George III before the House of Lords, in which he comments on the treaty between the United States and France, and its potential effects on relations between England and her former colonies. The Convention of Mortefontaine, also known as the Convention of 1800 or the Treaty of Mortefontaine, signed on Sept. 30, 1800 and ratified and proclaimed the following year, was an important event in the course of relations between the United States and France. The two nations first signed a pair of treaties on Feb. 6, 1778 - one of alliance and the other of amity and commerce. They were the first treaties ever signed by the United States with a foreign power, and marked the recognition of the former British colonies as a legitimate nation. French military assistance during the Revolution, a result of the treaty of alliance, was a crucial factor in the achievement of American independence. In 1782 and 1783 further agreements were signed between the two nations regarding loans and credits, and in 1788 a convention was signed establishing the functions and privileges of consuls and vice-consuls. The 1790s brought a cooling of relations between France and the United States, largely due to the war being fought between France and Great Britain, and the American policy of neutrality in the conflict. Relations were further soured by the controversial actions of Edmund Genet, the French Minister to the United States, who commissioned American ships as privateers, established French prize courts in American ports, and sought to raise troops to attack British and Spanish holdings in North America. The Washington administration requested Genet's recall and the French government acceded, but the Jacobin faction in charge demanded the recall of the American minister to France, Gouverneur Morris, who was suspected of having royalist sympathies. Relations between the two nations continued to worsen over the following years. In 1796 the French government, angry over the American treaty with England of 1794 (Jay's Treaty) announced that they would treat American ships as they would British vessels, thus formally endorsing French privateering raids against American vessels. Shortly thereafter President Washington replaced James Monroe (who was considered pro-France) as minister to France with Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, whom the French government refused to acknowledge. All of these events came to a head in the so-called "Quasi-War" between the United States and France, and the diplomatic scandal known as the "XYZ Affair." The Quasi-War was an undeclared naval war between the two nations, fought between 1798 and 1800 mostly off the southern coast of the United States and in the Caribbean. The Federalists in Congress pushed President Adams to declare open war with France, and in July 1798, the Congress abrogated the 1778 Treaty of Amity with France. Adams also sought peace, however, sending three American commissioners to France in 1797 to re-establish good relations. The mission was a failure. Thomas Jefferson and the pro- French Democratic-Republicans called for the publication of the dispatches from the commissioners in an effort to undermine Adams, who they assumed was hiding the truth behind the mission. The dispatches, when released, revealed an attempt by the French to extort a large loan for the French government (upwards of $12 million), and it was revealed that agents of French Foreign Minister Talleyrand demanded bribes from the Americans to even permit talks to begin. In the dispatches, each of the French agents had been given letter designations: "X" for Baron Jean-Conrad Hottinguer, "Y" for Pierre Bellamy, and "Z" for Lucien Hauteval; hence the "XYZ Affair." This diplomatic catastrophe resulted in a political uproar in the United States. Conciliatory moves by Talleyrand encouraged President Adams to appoint another peace delegation to France in 1799, comprised of Supreme Court Chief Justice Oliver Ellsworth, North Carolina Governor William Richardson Davie, and William Vans Murray, the American minister to the Netherlands. Ellsworth resigned as Chief Justice of the Court in order to take the assignment. Murray, stationed at the Hague, had already been meeting with the French envoy, Pichon, to repair relations. The American representat
UNUSUAL VERNACULAR PHOTOGRAPH ALBUM

UNUSUAL VERNACULAR PHOTOGRAPH ALBUM, COMPRISED MAINLY OF PANORAMIC PHOTOGRAPHS, DOCUMENTING AFFLUENT VACATIONERS AT VARIOUS UPSCALE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA HOTELS IN THE EARLY 20th CENTURY]

California Photographica] Eighty-one panoramic photographs, each approximately 3 1/2 x 11 1/2 inches, and eighty- eight smaller photographs, either 6 1/2 x 4 inches or 2 1/4 x 3 1/4 inches. Oblong folio. Patterned cloth over paper boards. Binding chipped, spine tender. Photographs generally in very good condition. A wonderful collection of unique images from early 20th-century California. The photographs feature the buildings and grounds of the Hotel del Monte in Monterey (including at least one image of the topiary maze), the Hotel Virginia in Long Beach, and the Hotel del Coronado in Coronado across the bay from San Diego, and other landmarks such as the Lone Cypress and the Sunny Jim cave in La Jolla. In addition to the fabulous exteriors of these hotels (even panoramas showing a golf course and a tennis court), the photographs also highlight the interiors, namely the grand ballroom and the large indoor pool inside the Hotel del Coronado. Numerous photographs capture the beauty of elaborate gardens and the majesty of grand seaside California architecture during the period. The album concludes with several shots of an outing by boat to what appears to be Santa Catalina Island. The Hotel del Coronado is still in business, but both the Hotel del Monte and the Hotel Virginia closed long ago. The latter was razed shortly after its closing in 1932, and only its foundation remains. A fantastic album of well-composed images of some grand old California hotels.
AUTOGRAPH LETTER

AUTOGRAPH LETTER, SIGNED, FROM JOHN QUINCY ADAMS TO JOSEPH BLUNT, REFUSING A REQUEST TO WRITE A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF HIS FATHER, AND SOLICITING INFORMATION ABOUT ELECTIONEERING IN ALBANY]

Adams, John Quincy [1]p. Previously folded, separated along horizontal center fold, with smaller separations at lower edge. Previously mounted, with strip of mounting material along upper edge. Tape repairs to lower corners. Lower three quarters tanned. Fair. A letter from the beginning of John Quincy Adams' third year in the White House. He writes to his acquaintance Joseph Blunt, informing him that he is unable to provide biographical information about his father, and wishes him luck on his publication project: "[I] am glad to learn that your projected publication of an annual Register is so far advanced - It would give me great pleasure to furnish you with the biographical minutes relating to my deceased father, but I cannot undertake it, for various considerations upon which it is not necessary for me to enlarge.I hope the profits of your work may indemnify you for the trouble you have taken in compiling it, and would not discourage you by the ill success of all former attempts of the same kind." Blunt published the ANNUAL AMERICAN REGISTER, a compendium of information about history, significant figures, politics, and current events in the late 1820s and early 1830s. The elder Adams had died on July 4 of the previous year. The second part of the letter solicits opinions regarding "electioneering" in Albany, in reference to the 1827 state election for the U.S. Senate in which Martin Van Buren defeated Stephen Van Rensselaer, though Adams is reluctant to divulge his opinion on the matter: "I write no Letters upon what is called Politics - that is, electioneering - But I listen with interest to whatever my friends have to say upon topics of public concern. If any of them are dissatisfied, it would be a good Office of friendship in them not only to say so, but to specify the cause of their dissatisfaction, and to point out the means if any by which it might be removed. Not less friendly would it be in them, thinking I have been deceived by some in whom I have placed confidence, to indicate the supposed deceivers, and the errors into which I have been led by trusting them." Adams maintained an interest in the outcome since Van Rensselaer supported him in the House of Representatives during the disputed 1824 presidential election and Van Buren was a proponent of Andrew Jackson. A reserved but quite interesting letter from the second President Adams.
THIRTY-FIVE ORIGINAL SKETCHES BY CHARLES WELLINGTON REED

THIRTY-FIVE ORIGINAL SKETCHES BY CHARLES WELLINGTON REED, ARTIST AND MEDAL OF HONOR RECIPIENT]

Reed, Charles Wellington] [30] leaves, 3 3/4 x 5 3/4 inches each, graphite on paper. Loose leaves, original stitching perished. A few minor chips, and notches from old stitching. Moderate tanning. About very good. In a half morocco and cloth slipcase and chemise. A small sketchbook containing thirty-five pencil drawings by illustrator and Civil War veteran Charles Wellington Reed. Reed served in the Ninth Massachusetts Light Artillery from 1862 to November 1864, when he was wounded and then transferred to the staff of Gouverneur K. Warren, where he was a topographical engineer. He participated in or was present at several major engagements, including the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Petersburg, and Gettysburg, where he saved the life of his captain, John Bigelow, for which he was eventually awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. Reed was an active artist during and after the Civil War, and his drawings were used to illustrate a number of works, including HARDTACK AND COFFEE and the BATTLES AND LEADERS OF THE CIVIL WAR series. One of the sketches reflects part of Reed's Civil War experience, depicting "Camp Stevenson Newbern N.C." It shows a barrack with tents and picket guards at this Union post established when the North seized the lower Nuese River and New Bern in late 1862. Camp Stevenson was a fort just north of the town along the river, and remained a post until the Union took over more of coastal Carolina in late 1864 and early 1865. The sketches here otherwise depict mostly non- military and foreign military themes. A number of images show children dancing at a formal event, as well as several other portraits of adults and children. Other images include a Native American hunting on horseback, a country scene, and a bar fight. The military sketches concentrate exclusively on what appears to be French Army or Foreign Legion and unnamed but distinctly Middle Eastern opponents. These drawings depict members of the French military in various forms of action (and occasionally, repose) and are numbered and captioned; several are signed by Reed. A lively set of sketches from a well regarded 19th-century American illustrator.
SKETCH OF THE EVENTS OF A HUNT IN SOUTHWESTERN TEXAS

SKETCH OF THE EVENTS OF A HUNT IN SOUTHWESTERN TEXAS

Walker, Platt B. Unpaginated, [46]pp. Illustrated with twelve plates from photographs. Stitched. Titlepage verso with repair along spine, else very good. In a morocco-backed slipcase and chemise. Privately printed account of a Texas hunt, in late December 1906 and early January 1907, out of Houston, organized by oilman John S. Bonner, dedicatee of the book; J.D. Fry, B. & O. Railroad; J.C. Weaver, Dallas engineer & "machinery man"; J.F. McDonough, Murray Manufacturing, Dallas; R.H. Nevitt, trusted lieutenant of McDonough. The party travelled by rail from Houston to Victoria and thence by wagon and pony towards the coast, to the lands of the "Rathbone Sporting Club." This was the fourth annual outing of the club formed by Capt. Harry Rathbone, Bonner, Weaver, Fry, and friends, including Henry Crawford and Billy Lanier, who were already at the tent camp. They hunted deer, prairie chicken, duck, and geese, with incidental forays after squirrel and fishing for crab for the pot. The seventh member of the club, Joe Johnson, southwestern representative of Westinghouse, joined the party for a time. They met with rancher T.P. Traynor and one of the duck shoots occurred at his pond; the goose hunt took place at Green Lake. Lanier was official toddy maker, and all told stories of alligators, stampedes, and other matters. Weaver was official photographer, and one of the plates captures the author, Walker, among the camp tents, with Spanish moss hanging in heavy clusters from the trees. The narrative is clearly written and engaging. No copies are listed in OCLC, and we can find no records of any other copies in the market. Rare.
MAP OF THE UNITED STATES WITH THE CONTIGUOUS BRITISH AND SPANISH POSSESSIONS COMPILED FROM THE LATEST AND BEST AUTHORITIES BY JOHN MELISH ENGRAVED BY J. VALLANCE & H. S. TANNER

MAP OF THE UNITED STATES WITH THE CONTIGUOUS BRITISH AND SPANISH POSSESSIONS COMPILED FROM THE LATEST AND BEST AUTHORITIES BY JOHN MELISH ENGRAVED BY J. VALLANCE & H. S. TANNER

Melish, John Engraved map with full period hand-coloring, dissected into forty sections and backed on linen, as issued. Inset of the West Indies, statistical table. Sheet size: 36 3/8 x 58 1/4 inches. Very good. In a blue morocco box, spine gilt. This very rare issue of the first large-scale map of the United States is of great significance to the mapping of the West, being the edition used to determine the boundary between the U.S. and Mexico in the 1819 Adams-Onìs treaty. A map of inestimable importance - one which synthesized the best data available at the crucial moment of the opening of American West, and one which, in a sense, envisioned and enabled the Manifest Destiny of the United States. "The cartographic publication that best publicized for the American people the data derived from the Lewis and Clark Expedition and Zebulon Pike's exploration of the southwest in 1806 and 1807 was John Melish's 1816 MAP OF THE UNITED STATES" - Ristow. Also, much like the Mitchell map of the previous century, the Melish became the map of record in many important treaties between the United States and Spain, Mexico, and both the Republic and State of Texas. Specifically, the United States-Mexico boundary was laid out on a copy of the map according to the Adams-Onìs Treaty signed in Feb. 22, 1819. The map also played a key role in the development of American mapmaking. "An exquisite map, it distinguished Melish as the leading American map publisher of the second decade and placed American maps on equal footing with those produced by the prestigious firms in London and Paris" - Schwartz. In fact, Melish founded the first company in the United States to deal specifically in maps and geographical works. The map was engraved by arguably the two finest map engravers in the United States at the time: John Vallance and Henry S. Tanner. It set a new standard for clarity and precision in map production. The present example is the third issue of the 1818 edition, as identified by Ristow in A LA CARTE, pp.162-182, the most complete account of the map. The 1818 edition is of particular importance, as it is "the 1818 edition that was consulted by the official arbiters in laying down the boundary between the United States and the Spanish possessions in 1819" (Ristow). This issue is the first to show Illinois as a state rather than a territory and to include Chicago as part of Illinois. Martin & Martin write: "Recognizing that the demand for geographical information on the American west was limitless in the foreseeable future, Melish undertook to accumulate a vast amount of descriptions, statistics and maps and in 1816 produced in six sheets his famous map.For the Texas area, Melish relied heavily on the surveys conducted by William Darby, who had personally surveyed much of the Sabine River area.Melish's maps significantly improved the descriptions and depictions of the Texas interior, but perhaps its most lasting value to history was its official association with the Adams-Onìs Treaty, because Melish's 90th meridian, today the eastern boundary of the Texas Panhandle, was off by approximately ninety miles, controversy and court litigation concerning the correct boundary lasted well beyond Texas's annexation.Of lasting value, too, was the widespread dissemination of new information concerning Texas geography only five years before Stephen F. Austin decided to honor his father's contract with the Mexican government to bring Anglo-American settlers to inhabit this rich new land." There are two primary reasons for the great rarity of this map: firstly, Melish only printed 100 copies of each issue to allow him to constantly update the map with the latest geographical information; the second reason is its large size, which has ensured a high attrition rate over the past two centuries. Melish's map, the first on a large scale to show the area of the present United States from coast to coast, provided most Americans with their first clear-sighted view of the continental landmass of which the United States was a part. Thomas Jefferson said of the map that it provides a "luminous view of the comparative possessions of different powers in our America." RISTOW, AMERICAN MAPS AND MAPMAKERS, p.446. Ristow in A LA CARTE, pp.162-82. SCHWARTZ & EHRENBERG, pp.238-39, plate 233. WHEAT TRANSMISSISSIPPI 322, pp.62-64. MARTIN & MARTIN, p.115 (plate 26).
ADVERTISING ARTWORK MOCK UP FOR A TOBACCONIST IN PROVIDENCE

ADVERTISING ARTWORK MOCK UP FOR A TOBACCONIST IN PROVIDENCE, R.I.]

Marryat, Frederick, Capt.: Coe, W.H. Centrally-mounted watercolored lithograph with calligraphed marginal text in red and blue ink. Unrelated painted sign for a tailor's shop on verso. Artist's board, 13 1/2 x 20 3/4 inches. Minor dust- soiling and toning, edges and corners somewhat worn, some surface wear, including portion of title with removed tape scar, light dampstaining. Very good. An eye-catching advertising board, likely a mock up, for a Rhode Island tobacconists. The full text reads: "After Dinner Enjoyment - Fine Cigars. The Celebrated Brands. Robert Bruce Capt. Marryat. The Falconers. Genl. Arthur Cigars. Geo. F. Young & Bro. 29 Westminster St. Prov. R.I." Established in 1854, Geo. F. Young & Bro. appears from a surviving photograph in the Providence Public Library archives, to have been the quintessential American tobacconist. With two full bay windows of display and a wooden "cigar store Indian" sculpture positioned between the double doorway, it is easy to see how the composite attractions of maritime penman Captain Marryat and Scottish freedom fighter Robert the Bruce - with a bit of horseback falconing thrown in for good measure - would fit the brand identity of such an establishment. The artist, W.H. Coe, is likely the same Providence based namesake of a company to have later patented a "gilding wheel" device for rolling gold leaf onto signs and surfaces. The verso of this board shows a re- used mock-up for another local business, James Murphy, Merchant Taylor, also signed by Coe, and demonstrating further his capabilities as a sign artist. A well-used relic of a bygone era of tobacco advertising, with character to burn.
DALLAS

DALLAS, TEXAS NEGRO CITY DIRECTORY 1947 – 1948 [cover title]

African Americana]: [Gilbert, Don (editor)] 356pp. Profusely illustrated with photographs printed in the text. Original red cloth, spine and covers printed in black. Noticeable wear to covers, mild fraying along joints and at spine tail, corners worn, front hinge tender. Clean internally. About very good. A rare and highly-informative city guide for the African-American citizens of Dallas in the mid-20th century, only the second and the last such directory printed in Big D. The NEGRO CITY DIRECTORY was edited and published by Don Gilbert, also the publisher of APPLAUSE, an African-American magazine printed in Dallas beginning in 1933. Though a slightly earlier edition of this Dallas directory was edited and published by T.P. Scott and sponsored by the Dallas Negro Chamber of Commerce, in his Publisher's Note, Gilbert thanks the "zealous citizens whose cooperation made this initial effort possible." The directory is copiously illustrated with photographic advertisements featuring businesses and businesspeople. Most of the advertisements are full-page efforts touting restaurants, schools, banks, insurance companies, beauty shops, hotels, theaters ("Star Theatre - South's Finest New Colored Movie House"), mortuaries, ice cream shops, the DALLAS MORNING NEWS, a local baseball team called the Dallas Rebels who thanks their "Colored Fans who deserve the Best in Sports entertainment," and even two "Negro Achievement Days" at the State Fair of Texas. National and regional companies such as Pepsi, 7-Eleven, Oak Farms Dairy, and Mobil Oil have also bought advertising space in the directory. The people pictured include business owners, pastors, policemen, attorneys, college officials, and others. The directory also includes a national roster of "Negro Chambers of Commerce" and a city-by-city listing of all the municipal branches in Texas. In addition to the advertisements, the "Introduction to Dallas" recounts the progress of race relations in the city, giving information on transportation, services, and providing biographies of some notable Dallas citizens alongside a handful of illustrated histories of local churches. The directory also contains extensive illustrated advertisements for a number of traditionally African- American colleges, including Jarvis Christian College, Prairie View A&M, Wiley College, Paul Quinn College, and Langston University. The majority of the directory is comprised of a 220pp. alphabetical listing of the African-American citizens of Dallas, often with home addresses and occupations listed beside the names, and occasionally phone numbers. This is followed by a statewide classified section listing professional names and addresses from accountants to "wood dealers," and then a short section of "Negro Employees of Greater Dallas." The directory concludes with an Index section and more advertisements. OCLC lists two African-American directories from Dallas in the 1940s - this one and a 1941-42 edition edited by T.P. Scott. Both editions were sponsored by the Dallas Negro Chamber of Commerce, and both are rare in the current market. OCLC is unclear about the total number of physical copies of this 1947-48 edition in institutions, but it is fewer than twenty. One of the most comprehensive and well-executed African-American city guides of the 20th century for any city, composed in a southern municipality known for its history of racial division.
VIEW ABOVE THE FALLS OF SCHUYLKILL

VIEW ABOVE THE FALLS OF SCHUYLKILL

Shaw, Joshua Colored engraving, 12 x 15 1/4 inches to the plate mark on an approximately 14 1/2 x 18-inch sheet. Framed. Scattered light foxing in margins, light toning. Very good. An important and scarce early American color print, based on a painting by Joshua Shaw, a British landscape artist who came to the United States in 1817. He conceived the idea of a published series of American views, which he executed over the next few years and which were published in Philadelphia as a series of nineteen plates entitled PICTURESQUE VIEWS OF AMERICAN SCENERY. The original edition of 1819 was issued by Moses Thomas and exists in only a few copies. The present plate is from the 1820 second issue published by Mathew Carey, also very rare. In this bucolic scene, a pair of river men in a small boat shove off from the bank at a wide point of the upper Schuykill River. In the distance, a few houses dot the farm land on the opposite side of the river, all beneath a partly-sunny, partly-cloudy sky. Complete sets of PICTURESQUE VIEWS. have appeared on the market only twice in the past fifty years and have brought in the neighborhood of $200,000 each time. Individual plates are somewhat less rare, but still very scarce on the market. A wonderful view of a verdant Pennsylvania. DEÁK, PICTURING AMERICA 315. HOWES S345 (PICTURESQUE VIEWS OF AMERICAN SCENERY). MILES & REESE, AMERICA PICTURED TO THE LIFE 5. REESE, STAMPED WITH A NATIONAL CHARACTER 5.
HUNTING NOTES. THE SOUTHWEST REVISITED: A SERIES OF LETTERS OF THE SECOND ANNUAL EXPEDITION TO MISSOURI

HUNTING NOTES. THE SOUTHWEST REVISITED: A SERIES OF LETTERS OF THE SECOND ANNUAL EXPEDITION TO MISSOURI, KANSAS, AND THE INDIAN TERRITORY IN NOVEMBER AND DECEMBER, 1875, WITH A BUFFALO AND ANTELOPE HUNT IN COLORADO

Boutcher, C.S. 39pp., printed in two columns. Three mounted albumen prints of working dogs, with printed captions. Small quarto. Original three-quarter green roan and marbled boards, gilt label on front cover. Minor rubbing, bookplate on front pastedown. Title slightly soiled with minor offsetting. Very good. A presentation copy of this rare, privately printed account of Boutcher's second sporting trip, and one that is as equally scarce as his first. Boutcher and company returned to the Plains the year following their first excursion, and extended their expedition into Colorado. Their main prey was quail, but they also hunted for grouse, buffalo, and antelope. The text also includes descriptions of the towns of Joplin, Missouri, Denver, and Chetopah, Kansas, and also discusses local games laws, railroads, and the agricultural potential of Colorado. With a silk presentation ribbon from C.S. Boutcher laid in. This copy bears the bookplate of F.P. Williamson, a noted collector of American sporting books from the 1950s to the turn of the 21st century. Not in Phillips (but see Phillips pp.53 and 278 for Boutcher's account of his 1874 hunting trip). Only one copy has appeared at auction since Ken Nebenzahl purchased the Streeter copy for $225 in 1969. OCLC locates six copies, at the Denver Public Library, Newberry Library, Univ. of Missouri at St. Louis, Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center, Yale, and New York Historical Society Library. STREETER SALE 4100. HOWES S792, "aa." OCLC 19947354, 476399884.
TRIP TO THE WEST AND TEXAS. COMPRISING A JOURNEY OF EIGHT THOUSAND MILES

TRIP TO THE WEST AND TEXAS. COMPRISING A JOURNEY OF EIGHT THOUSAND MILES, THROUGH NEW-YORK, MICHIGAN, ILLINOIS, MISSOURI, LOUISIANA AND TEXAS, IN THE AUTUMN AND WINTER OF 1834-5.

Parker, A.A. 276pp., plus woodcut frontispiece and one plate. 12mo. Original green muslin, gilt red morocco spine label. Expertly rebacked, retaining most of the original backstrip. Muslin a bit rubbed and shelfworn, corners worn. Some light staining to titlepage and the early part of the text. Very good overall. Parker was a New Hampshire lawyer and judge, and part-time author. During his travels he spent a good deal of time in Texas just prior to the Revolution. This is an early English-language description of Texas, and quite positive in its view of what had been characterized as a very rough country. There are occasional trenchant observations of slavery, including an incident in Texas where a recently re- captured slave beg Parker to help him escape his bondage. Parker also devotes six chapters to an account of his trip through northern and central Illinois with descriptions of the state, and the appendix contains descriptions of other Midwestern states. The plates depict sporting scenes: "Catching Wild Horses" and "Shooting Deer." "Even though quite prosaic in style, it has for a little known new country like Texas the interest that is present in any early contemporary account of travels" - Streeter. "A valuable work" - Buck. HOWES P74. WAGNER-CAMP 57a:1. STREETER TEXAS 1172. CLARK III:82. BUCK 276. PHILLIPS, SPORTING BOOKS, p.286. RADER 2589. RAINES, pp.161-62. SABIN 58643. BASIC TEXAS BOOKS 159. GRAFF 3183. REESE, BEST OF THE WEST 64.
NOTES OF A WESTERN HUNTING TRIP. A SERIES OF LETTERS OF A HUNTING EXPEDITION IN MISSOURI

NOTES OF A WESTERN HUNTING TRIP. A SERIES OF LETTERS OF A HUNTING EXPEDITION IN MISSOURI, KANSAS, AND THE INDIAN TERRITORY, IN THE WINTER OF 1874

Boutcher, C.S. 34pp., printed in two columns. Seven mounted albumen photographs on six leaves, two full-page engraved plates, and in-text woodcut vignettes. Small quarto. Original half morocco and marbled boards, gilt morocco label on front board. Light shelfwear, a bit rubbed at extremities, bookplate on front pastedown. Some minor soiling to text leaves. Very good plus. With the bookplate of F.P. Williamson. Fascinating account of a hunting trip in the Midwest beyond the Mississippi, including incidents of quail shooting and an account of the Great Pigeon Roost of southwestern Missouri, dispersed by a snowstorm a week before Boutcher reached the area. "Full of hunting adventures, but likewise historically important for the excellent observations on life in the back-country at this period. Curiously enough the remnants of the Modocs were encountered and there is an account of Shacknasty Jim, Scarface Charlie, and Captain Jack's still- moaning mourners" - Eberstadt. Boutcher was an associate editor of the EASTON FREE PRESS, and the letters were published in the newspaper from December 1874 to January 1875. This copy bears the bookplate of F.P. Williamson, a noted collector of American sporting books from the 1950s to the turn of the 21st century. Rare, with only one copy appearing at auction since the Streeter sale, where Ken Nebenzahl purchased it for $575 in 1969. OCLC lists four locations (Yale, NYPL, Newberry, University of Missouri at St. Louis). STREETER SALE 4099. PHILIPS, SPORTING BOOKS, pp.53 & 278. HOWES N212, "b" (without mention of photos and not knowing author). OCLC 27855517.
DIARY OF THE WYOMING BEAR HUNT

DIARY OF THE WYOMING BEAR HUNT

McAleenan, Joseph] 59pp. plus sixteen photographic plates. Titlepage with title in a box in the upper left and vignette of a bear chasing a man at the lower right; on verso of titlepage: "Press of P.J. Collison & Co. Brooklyn- New York." Half cloth and stiff brown printed wrappers. Front wrapper chipped at outer corners, bookplate on verso of front wrapper. Ink presentation inscription on titlepage somewhat faded. Some offsetting from the plates, one plate loosening. Very good. In a cloth chemise and half morocco and cloth slipcase, spine gilt. A presentation copy, inscribed on the titlepage from McAleenan to "My Dear Archbishop," modestly disclaiming any literary merit. A rare and engaging day-by-day journal of a bear hunt in Wyoming, with interesting photographs. The bear hunt, which took plate in April and May, was on the Majo Ranch of Jones Bros. & Magill, and the hoped-for prey were grizzlies, brown, and black bears. McAleenan, a New York sportsman, writes: "We were very fortunate in securing the only permit to hunt in the Shoshone Game Preserve on Table Mountain. As this section has not been shot over in many years our prospects for the bear hunt were very good." He describes their train trip to Wyoming, the springtime snow storms that hit the region, their hunting experiences, and life in camp. The photographic plates show the members of the expedition and the landscapes and vistas of Wyoming, and a few show the hides of bears that were killed. Not in Phillips' SPORTING BOOKS. OCLC locates copies only at Yale and Brigham Young University. We are also aware of the Streeter- Litchfield copy, a copy presented to Harlow Brooks, and the William Beach-Samuel Webb copy. HOWES W728. STREETER 4130. OCLC 54200246.
THE CINCINNATI DIRECTORY

THE CINCINNATI DIRECTORY, CONTAINING THE NAMES, PROFESSION AND OCCUPATION OF THE INHABITANTS OF THE TOWN, ALPHABETICALLY ARRANGED; WITH THE NUMBER OF THE BUILDING OCCUPIED BY EACH. ALSO, AN ACCOUNT OF ITS OFFICERS, POPULATION, INSTITUTIONS AND SOCIETIES, PUBLIC BUILDINGS, MANUFACTURES, &c.

Farnsworth, Oliver] 155,[1]pp. plus folding engraved map. Contemporary tree calf, gilt leather spine label, spine ruled in gilt. Moderate wear to extremities. Contemporary ownership inscription on front free endpaper. Six-inch diagonal tear to map repaired on verso, with no loss. Map a bit creased. Moderate foxing. About very good. The rare first Cincinnati directory. The text includes a statistical view of Cincinnati as of 1819, a discussion of the city's foundries and commerce (including a section on trade with Havana), as well as a list of local officeholders and a directory of residents. There is also a lengthy section on the region's steamboats and canals, including the names and descriptions of dozens of vessels. The handsome engraved map shows the rapid progress and expansion of the city, illustrating the populated city blocks. The large and detailed folding map of the city is almost invariably lacking, but is present in this copy. The contemporary ownership signature in this copy reads "John Meyer's book bought at Cincinnati Ohio 19th July 1821." The Streeter copy sold to parties unknown for $175 in 1968. HOWES F51, "b." SABIN 13085. GRAFF 1296. AII (OHIO) 466. JONES 806. THOMSON 196. WILKIE 608. SPEAR, p.99. STREETER SALE 1357. SHAW & SHOEMAKER 47616.
NARRATIVE OF A VOYAGE ROUND THE WORLD

NARRATIVE OF A VOYAGE ROUND THE WORLD, IN THE URANIE AND PHYSICIENNE CORVETTES, COMMANDED BY CAPTAIN FREYCINET, DURING THE YEARS 1817, 1818, 1819, AND 1820; ON A SCIENTIFIC EXPEDITION UNDERTAKEN BY ORDER OF THE FRENCH GOVERNMENT. IN A SERIES OF LETTERS TO A FRIEND

Arago, Jacques Etienne Victor iv,[2],xxvii,[5],285,[2],297,[3]pp. plus folding map and twenty-five lithographic plates. Quarto. Contemporary calf, ruled in gilt and blind, spine elaborately gilt, a.e.g. Expertly rebacked with original backstrip laid down. Minor shelfwear, modern bookplate on front pastedown. Light foxing on map and plates, with some offsetting to facing pages, but text otherwise clean. Very good. Lacking half-title in first part. First edition in English of this important narrative of an expedition supported by the French government, written by the expedition's artist. The purpose of the expedition, which was commanded by Freycinet, was to make chronometric and magnetic observations in various latitudes. The voyage included a one-month visit to the Sandwich Islands, with time spent in Hawaii, Maui, and Oahu, as well as visits to Rio de Janeiro, Cape of Good Hope, Montevideo, Mauritius, New South Wales, and the Caroline Islands. The many handsome lithographic plates add greatly to the ethnographic aspect of the work. Six of the plates feature Hawaiian subjects. "The URANIE, with a crew of 125 men, entered the Pacific from the West to make scientific observations on geography, magnetism, and meteorology. Arago was the artist of the expedition which visited most notably Australia, the Hawaiian Islands, Tonga, and Tierra del Fuego. The original ship, wrecked off the Falkland Islands, was replaced by the PHYSICIENNE which visited Rio de Janeiro.These entertaining letters, written in a lively and witty literary style, provide vivid descriptions of the topography and the inhabitants of the Pacific Islands" - Hill. A scarce and informative account of a far-ranging Pacific voyage. HILL (1st ed), p.295. HILL (2nd ed) 29. SABIN 1865. FERGUSON 885. FORBES HAWAII 562. JUDD 4.
THE QUADRUPEDS OF NORTH AMERICA

THE QUADRUPEDS OF NORTH AMERICA

Audubon, John James, and John Bachman Three large octavo volumes. 155 handcolored lithographed plates by W.E. Hitchcock and R. Trembly after J.J. and John Wodehouse Audubon. Contemporary three-quarter black morocco and cloth, spines gilt. Third volume expertly rebacked, with original backstrip laid down. Minor wear to extremities, front hinge of second volume tender. Internally clean. Very good plus, with tissue guards facing the plates, preserving the fine hand-coloring and preventing the offsetting typically seen with this set. An attractive set of the first octavo edition of Audubon's final great natural history work, with plates and descriptions of the quadrupeds of the United States including Texas, California, and Oregon, as well as part of Mexico, the British and Russian possessions and Arctic regions. Audubon's collaborator on THE QUADRUPEDS was the naturalist and Lutheran clergyman, John Bachman, who had studied quadrupeds since he was a young man and was a recognized authority on the subject in the United States. The two began their association when Audubon stayed with Bachman and his family in Charleston for a month in 1831. This friendship was later cemented by the marriage of Victor and John W. Audubon to Bachman's daughters, Maria and Eliza. Audubon knew Bachman's contribution to THE QUADRUPEDS would be crucial, and endeavored to convince his friend to lay aside his fears about the project. Audubon was eager to begin what he felt could be his last outstanding achievement in natural history, but Bachman was more cautious and worried that they were entering a field where "we have much to learn." Audubon persisted in his efforts to get him to take part, and Bachman, "anxious to do something for the benefit of Victor and John [Audubon]," eventually relented, with the final condition that all of the expenses and all of the profits should go to the Audubons. By 1835, Bachman had become indispensable to the QUADRUPEDS project, writing most of the text and editing the entire work. With the success of the octavo edition of THE BIRDS OF AMERICA in mind, a similar edition of THE QUADRUPEDS. was envisaged from an early stage. The folio edition was published in thirty numbers between 1845 and 1854, and publication of the first octavo edition began in 1849 and was also completed in 1854. Unfortunately, Audubon did not live to see the completion of either project, and after his death in January 1851 the work was seen through to completion by his son, John Woodhouse Audubon. The two editions form a fitting memorial to the greatest natural history artist of his day. WOOD, p.208. REESE, STAMPED WITH A NATIONAL CHARACTER 38. BENNETT, p.5. NISSEN (ZBI) 163.