Phillip J. Pirages Rare Books Archives - Rare Book Insider
last 7 days
last 30 days

Phillip J. Pirages Rare Books

THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE

THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE, SO FAR AS IT RELATES TO THE PROFESSION OF THE APOTHECARY, FROM THE EARLIEST ACCOUNTS TO THE PRESENT PERIOD: THE EVILS TO WHICH THE PROFESSION AND THE PUBLIC HAVE BEEN OF LATE YEARS EQUALLY EXPOSED; AND THE MEANS WHICH HAVE BEEN DEVISED TO REMEDY THEM

PHARMACOLOGY). GOOD, JOHN MASON 195 x 115 mm. (7 5/8 x 4 1/2"). xxiv, viii [i.e. vi], 239, [1], 16 pp. Second Edition, "To which are prefixed, observations on a tract, entitled Murepsologia; and published in Answer to the former edition." Recent retrospective half calf over marbled boards, raised bands, gilt titling, edges untrimmed. Front pastedown with bookplate of Society of Apothecaries. Blake, p. 180; Wellcome III, 135; Garrison-Morton 10016 (citing first edition). Occasional faint browning to edges of margins, a little dust-soiling to untrimmed edges, a couple of pages with minor smudges from printing process, one page with small wax stain in margin, otherwise an excellent copy, clean and fresh with ample, untrimmed margins, in an unworn binding. First published the previous year, this first British history of pharmacology is credited by Britannica for doing "much to effect a greatly needed reform in the profession of the apothecary." A physician and Fellow of the Royal Society, Good (1764-1827) was a founding member of the General Pharmaceutic Association and was commissioned by that organization to produce this history, in an effort to defend the business and reputation of apothecaries from the encroachments of druggists and quacks. At that time, apothecaries functioned rather like general practitioners, providing medical care for those who could not afford the fees of a physician. Druggists were supposed to be responsible for mixing up medicines prescribed and distributed to patients by apothecaries or physicians, but had begun to sell their cures directly to patients, sometimes with disastrous results. While some druggists were qualified professionals, others were dangerous quacks. The General Pharmaceutic Association was formed to protect both the public and the profession of apothecary. DNB notes, "Although itself short-lived and ineffective, the association had an important place in the campaign for the Apothecaries Act in 1815." Good sought to establish the importance of apothecaries by tracing the history of the profession in Great Britain, tracing its origins to the arrival of Italian and French apothecaries circa 1360, following the fall of Constantinople. He goes on to outline the evolution of medical licensing, beginning in the reign of Henry VIII, and to explain the difference between apothecaries and druggists, and to emphasize the necessity of apothecaries in protecting the vulnerable public from unscrupulous quacks. In addition to a successful career as a doctor and an author of medical texts, Good was an accomplished linguist and translator who produced versions of the Song of Songs, the Book of Job, and Lucretius' "On the Nature of Things." First published the previous year, this first British history of pharmacology is credited by Britannica for doing "much to effect a greatly needed reform in the profession of the apothecary." A physician and Fellow of the Royal Society, Good (1764-1827) was a founding member of the General Pharmaceutic Association and was commissioned by that organization to produce this history, in an effort to defend the business and reputation of apothecaries from the encroachments of druggists and quacks. At that time, apothecaries functioned rather like general practitioners, providing medical care for those who could not afford the fees of a physician. Druggists were supposed to be responsible for mixing up medicines prescribed and distributed to patients by apothecaries or physicians, but had begun to sell their cures directly to patients, sometimes with disastrous results. While some druggists were qualified professionals, others were dangerous quacks. The General Pharmaceutic Association was formed to protect both the public and the profession of apothecary. DNB notes, "Although itself short-lived and ineffective, the association had an important place in the campaign for the Apothecaries Act in 1815." Good sought to establish the importance of apothecaries by tracing the history of the profession in Great Britain, tracing its origins to the arrival of Italian and French apothecaries circa 1360, following the fall of Constantinople. He goes on to outline the evolution of medical licensing, beginning in the reign of Henry VIII, and to explain the difference between apothecaries and druggists, and to emphasize the necessity of apothecaries in protecting the vulnerable public from unscrupulous quacks. In addition to a successful career as a doctor and an author of medical texts, Good was an accomplished linguist and translator who produced versions of the Song of Songs, the Book of Job, and Lucretius' "On the Nature of Things." Second Edition, "To which are prefixed, observations on a tract, entitled Murepsologia; and published in Answer to the former edition.".
ESSAYS ON THE PRESERVATION & RECOVERY OF HEALTH

ESSAYS ON THE PRESERVATION & RECOVERY OF HEALTH

CURTEIS, THOMAS 178 x 113 mm. (7 x 4 1/4"). [22], 234 pp. FIRST AND ONLY EDITION. Contemporary calf, skillfully rebacked, raised bands, later pink morocco label with gilt lettering. Ink ownership signature on pp. [ii] and 234, perhaps by same person (J. K----?). Wellcome II, p. 421, ESTC T59936 Some general light wear and scuffs to the boards, leather lightly crackled, edges rounded, but a solid binding in very good shape. Title page a little brittle due to quality of paper, moderate browning throughout and text occasionally a little lightened, a few negligible stains here and there, otherwise a very clean and legible copy of a scarce text. Written by a preacher and poet, this uncommon work advocates the best foods and practices to preserve one's health. While apparently not a trained medical professional, Thomas Curteis (1690-1747) nevertheless expounds upon the relative "benefits and inconveniences" of diet, exercise, baths, and air, citing various medical works along the way. He criticizes wine and spirits, while lauding the benefits of apples, Peruvian Bark (Cinchona), Chocolate, Beer, and horseback riding as the best means to intake fresh air. Sprinkled among the health advice here are warnings against the use of charms ("insignificant unwarrantable and Heathenish"), "Cunning Men," and Quackish Medicines. Clearly written for the common man and inexpensively produced, very few copies appear to have reached the market; we could locate only one copy at auction in the last 30 years. Written by a preacher and poet, this uncommon work advocates the best foods and practices to preserve one's health. While apparently not a trained medical professional, Thomas Curteis (1690-1747) nevertheless expounds upon the relative "benefits and inconveniences" of diet, exercise, baths, and air, citing various medical works along the way. He criticizes wine and spirits, while lauding the benefits of apples, Peruvian Bark (Cinchona), Chocolate, Beer, and horseback riding as the best means to intake fresh air. Sprinkled among the health advice here are warnings against the use of charms ("insignificant unwarrantable and Heathenish"), "Cunning Men," and Quackish Medicines. Clearly written for the common man and inexpensively produced, very few copies appear to have reached the market; we could locate only one copy at auction in the last 30 years.
A COLLECTION OF ANTI-SEMITIC BOOKS AND POSTERS

A COLLECTION OF ANTI-SEMITIC BOOKS AND POSTERS

WORLD WAR II). (ANTI-SEMITISM) One book with cloth spine over paper boards, the rest with printed paper wrappers. One periodical missing wrappers and first bifolium, the other with a printed wrappers depicting a swastika, sword, and laurel wreath. Map and periodicals heavily illustrated, books with a few scattered diagrams and charts. With a bit of general wear but in very good condition overall, the posters with a few pin holes (they were presumably hung on walls), and the map with a crease through the cover (as expected). Contents clean and fresh. This group of 12 items contains the following material: One full color, folding map of England with a provocative Anti-British illustrated cover; two periodicals titled "Die Deutsche Sieg im Westen" [The German Victory in the West] (1940), heavily illustrated with photographs of German military men (including a full page image of Hitler at the front of each copy) and maps of the various fonts; four 8 x 11 propaganda posters with Anti-Semitic content; and five books, including: 1) "The Jews and Us" (1940). Text in French. 2) "Medicine and Jews" (1940). Text in French. 3) "German Family Finds" (1937). Text in German. 4) "The Race Question" (1947). Text in German. 5) "Racial Hygiene Primer" (1933). Text in German. This group of 12 items contains the following material: One full color, folding map of England with a provocative Anti-British illustrated cover; two periodicals titled "Die Deutsche Sieg im Westen" [The German Victory in the West] (1940), heavily illustrated with photographs of German military men (including a full page image of Hitler at the front of each copy) and maps of the various fonts; four 8 x 11 propaganda posters with Anti-Semitic content; and five books, including: 1) "The Jews and Us" (1940). Text in French. 2) "Medicine and Jews" (1940). Text in French. 3) "German Family Finds" (1937). Text in German. 4) "The Race Question" (1947). Text in German. 5) "Racial Hygiene Primer" (1933). Text in German.
TWO ESSAYS ON THE EARL OF CHATHAM

TWO ESSAYS ON THE EARL OF CHATHAM

BINDINGS - MAUDE NATHAN). MACAULAY, THOMAS BABINGTON 220 x 170 mm. (8 5/8 x 6 3/4"). 2 p.l., 276 pp. FINE CONTEMPORARY BROWN MOROCCO, GILT, BY MAUDE NATHAN (signed in gilt and dated 1908 on rear turn-in), covers with graceful entrelac ornament tooled in gilt, lettering at center, raised bands, spine compartments similarly tooled, gilt titling, turn-ins tooled in gilt. Front flyleaf with binder's presentation inscription from the binder to G. E. D.[?]. For the binding: Tidcombe, "Women Bookbinders," p. 157; "The Artist" vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 146-49 (May 1902). A breath of rubbing to tail edge of boards, but A CHOICE COPY, quite clean, fresh, and bright internally with ample margins, in an unworn, lustrous binding. In a refined binding by a pupil of S. T. Prideaux, this is a handsomely printed edition of historian Thomas Macaulay's essays on his fellow Whig William Pitt, originally published in the "Edinburgh Review." Although best remembered as an historian, Macaulay (1800-59) was also a progressive politician, an orator, and a prominent literary critic. His first published literary essay, on Milton, appeared in the "Edinburgh Review" in 1825, and its reception was so positive that he became a frequent and popular contributor; in fact, booksellers complained that the "Review" only sold well if an article by Macaulay appeared in the issue. His writing, which perfectly reflects the Victorian Whig worldview, was renowned for its clarity and eloquence. According to an illustrated article on her work in the contemporary journal "The Artist," Maude Nathan did both forwarding and finishing on her work: "Her books are forwarded with care and judgement, and the skins--in all cases Levant morocco--are selected with discretion. But it is as a finisher that this binder claims our attention. The elements of her designs are markedly simple, and the tools she uses are small, allowing that freedom in combination, brilliance, and directness of impression which are not attainable by the use of large and complicated ones. . . . Taste and originality, allied to manual dexterity, and, above all, that patient attention to 'the prolonged series of minute particulars' which constitute the craft of bookbinding, are qualities which should be the ideal of every binder. Miss Nathan's work shows that she bears this ideal in her mind." Sarah Prideaux thought enough of her former student's work that she used an illustration of her binding on Browne's "Religio Medici" in "Modern Bookbindings" (p. 50, fig. 26), in a section discusses the few women who are able to make a living at the craft. Tidcombe notes that Nathan (d. 1910) bound books for only a short time, and Nathan's bindings are rare in the marketplace, with RBH finding just two examples, both, like ours, presented to friends. In a refined binding by a pupil of S. T. Prideaux, this is a handsomely printed edition of historian Thomas Macaulay's essays on his fellow Whig William Pitt, originally published in the "Edinburgh Review." Although best remembered as an historian, Macaulay (1800-59) was also a progressive politician, an orator, and a prominent literary critic. His first published literary essay, on Milton, appeared in the "Edinburgh Review" in 1825, and its reception was so positive that he became a frequent and popular contributor; in fact, booksellers complained that the "Review" only sold well if an article by Macaulay appeared in the issue. His writing, which perfectly reflects the Victorian Whig worldview, was renowned for its clarity and eloquence. According to an illustrated article on her work in the contemporary journal "The Artist," Maude Nathan did both forwarding and finishing on her work: "Her books are forwarded with care and judgement, and the skins--in all cases Levant morocco--are selected with discretion. But it is as a finisher that this binder claims our attention. The elements of her designs are markedly simple, and the tools she uses are small, allowing that freedom in combination, brilliance, and directness of impression which are not attainable by the use of large and complicated ones. . . . Taste and originality, allied to manual dexterity, and, above all, that patient attention to 'the prolonged series of minute particulars' which constitute the craft of bookbinding, are qualities which should be the ideal of every binder. Miss Nathan's work shows that she bears this ideal in her mind." Sarah Prideaux thought enough of her former student's work that she used an illustration of her binding on Browne's "Religio Medici" in "Modern Bookbindings" (p. 50, fig. 26), in a section discusses the few women who are able to make a living at the craft. Tidcombe notes that Nathan (d. 1910) bound books for only a short time, and Nathan's bindings are rare in the marketplace, with RBH finding just two examples, both, like ours, presented to friends.
THE LAW OF NATURE AND NATIONS: OR

THE LAW OF NATURE AND NATIONS: OR, A GENERAL SYSTEM OF THE MOST IMPORTANT PRINCIPLES OF MORALITY, JURISPRUDENCE, AND POLITICS

PUFENDORF, BARON [SAMUEL VON] 400 x 250 mm. (15 3/4 x 9 3/4"). 10 p.l., 75, [1], 883, [1] pp., [11] leaves.Written in Latin by the Baron Pufendorf ; done into English by Basil Kennet ; to which is prefix'd, M. Barbeyrac's prefatory discourse . . . done into English by Mr. Carew, of Lincoln's-Inn ; to which are now added, all the large notes of M. Barbeyrac, translated from his fourth and last edition, together with large tables to the whole. Fifth Edition, carefully corrected. Contemporary sprinkled calf, rebacked and recornered, raised bands, brown morocco label, newer endpapers. Title page with ink owner inscription of Albert Johnson, dated 1937. ESTC T141113. Boards somewhat stained and rubbed, with a couple of small patches evidencing insect activity, but the restored binding solid. One leaf with upper corner torn away (no loss to text), occasional faint browning or other trivial imperfections, but an excellent copy internally, clean and crisp. This is the most complete English edition of a landmark in the history of natural and international law, an important Enlightenment treatise that was inspired by the concepts put forth by Grotius and Hobbes, but a study that gives them a new warmth and humanity, as well as emphasizing the role of the divine. In this work, which first appeared in Latin in 1672 and in English in 1703, Pufendorf begins with the notion that moral sense is the essence of what makes us human, and that (contrary to Hobbes' view) peace, not war, is our natural condition. He grants humanity free will, and believes that our wills incline us toward the good. The natural law which allows us to recognize what is just, he believes, is inspired by the divinity. Applying principles such as the right of self-defense or the duty of keeping promises, Pufendorf deduces how specific laws should justly carry these notions into effect. He discusses civil law, including such topics as marriage law and the rights and duties of the father; government, including the duties and proper powers of monarchs and ministers; and international affairs, including treaties and war. He believes that humane conduct of international relations should be the rule throughout the world, not just between Christian and Christian. Born in Saxony, Samuel Pufendorf (1632-94) taught law first in Heidelberg and then in Lund, receiving the title of Baron from the king of Sweden before his death. This is the most complete English edition of a landmark in the history of natural and international law, an important Enlightenment treatise that was inspired by the concepts put forth by Grotius and Hobbes, but a study that gives them a new warmth and humanity, as well as emphasizing the role of the divine. In this work, which first appeared in Latin in 1672 and in English in 1703, Pufendorf begins with the notion that moral sense is the essence of what makes us human, and that (contrary to Hobbes' view) peace, not war, is our natural condition. He grants humanity free will, and believes that our wills incline us toward the good. The natural law which allows us to recognize what is just, he believes, is inspired by the divinity. Applying principles such as the right of self-defense or the duty of keeping promises, Pufendorf deduces how specific laws should justly carry these notions into effect. He discusses civil law, including such topics as marriage law and the rights and duties of the father; government, including the duties and proper powers of monarchs and ministers; and international affairs, including treaties and war. He believes that humane conduct of international relations should be the rule throughout the world, not just between Christian and Christian. Born in Saxony, Samuel Pufendorf (1632-94) taught law first in Heidelberg and then in Lund, receiving the title of Baron from the king of Sweden before his death.
Title in Greek

Title in Greek, then]: ISOCRATIS ATHENIENSIS RHETORIS ORATIONES ET EPISTOLAE

ISOCRATES 156 x 88 mm. (6 1/8 x 3 1/2"). 276 leaves. Contemporary stiff vellum, raised bands, ink titling on spine, flowered endpapers. With Sessa's distinctive cat-and-mouse device on title page, historiated initials. Hoffmann II, 472; Schweiger I, 181. Crack to three-quarters of front joint, extremities rubbed, vellum a little soiled and with tiny hole to rear board, hinge open at title page, exposing stitching, first quire a little proud, two historiated initials blotted out with ink, affecting a few words on verso and on facing page, occasional ink smudges or mild foxing, but an excellent, unsophisticated copy despite its imperfections, the text generally clean and fresh with comfortable margins. This volume, described by Hoffmann as "a shining edition," contains the 21 extant complete and confidently ascribed speeches of the celebrated Attic orator and rhetorician Isocrates (436-338 B.C.), as well as five of his letters that were written to friends concerning the political questions of the day. Eight of the orations "were written for judicial purposes in civil cases, and intended to serve as models for this species of oratory; all the others are political discourses or show speeches, intended to be read by a large public: they are particularly characterised by the ethical element on which his political views are based." (Smith) The long-lived Isocrates presided over a school of rhetoric in Athens for many decades. A shy man, he seldom spoke in public, but aired his political views in published speeches. He deplored the quarrelsomeness of the Greeks, and appealed to Philip of Macedon to lead them in a conquest of the Persian Empire, an undertaking realized by Philip's son Alexander. The Sessa family were prominent Venetian printers, publishers, and booksellers for more than a century, with various family members active in the trade from 1502 to 1617. Our volume was published by Melchior Sessa the elder (fl. 1505-62), who often collaborated with the Nicolini de Sabbio press, especially on Greek editions. The Sessas were one of the first firms to make effective use of branding: their cat insignia was not only used in their printer's device, but was mentioned in privileges granting printing rights to Melchiorre and Marchio Sessa ("librer de la gatta," "libraro della gatta," and "domino . della gatta"), and in directions to the firm's bookstore ("a la libraria della gatta"). This volume, described by Hoffmann as "a shining edition," contains the 21 extant complete and confidently ascribed speeches of the celebrated Attic orator and rhetorician Isocrates (436-338 B.C.), as well as five of his letters that were written to friends concerning the political questions of the day. Eight of the orations "were written for judicial purposes in civil cases, and intended to serve as models for this species of oratory; all the others are political discourses or show speeches, intended to be read by a large public: they are particularly characterised by the ethical element on which his political views are based." (Smith) The long-lived Isocrates presided over a school of rhetoric in Athens for many decades. A shy man, he seldom spoke in public, but aired his political views in published speeches. He deplored the quarrelsomeness of the Greeks, and appealed to Philip of Macedon to lead them in a conquest of the Persian Empire, an undertaking realized by Philip's son Alexander. The Sessa family were prominent Venetian printers, publishers, and booksellers for more than a century, with various family members active in the trade from 1502 to 1617. Our volume was published by Melchior Sessa the elder (fl. 1505-62), who often collaborated with the Nicolini de Sabbio press, especially on Greek editions. The Sessas were one of the first firms to make effective use of branding: their cat insignia was not only used in their printer's device, but was mentioned in privileges granting printing rights to Melchiorre and Marchio Sessa ("librer de la gatta," "libraro della gatta," and "domino . della gatta"), and in directions to the firm's bookstore ("a la libraria della gatta").
COMOEDIAE VIGINTI

COMOEDIAE VIGINTI

PLAUTUS, TITUS MACCIUS 306 x 210 mm. (12 x 8 1/4"). [9], 367 leaves lacking aa1, title page, and final blank. 19th century brown morocco-backed marbled paper boards, top and bottom of spine and hinges more recently repaired, raised bands, spine panels with central gilt leaf design, gilt titling. With a great many woodcut initials and 87 woodcuts in the text illustrating scenes from the 20 comedies (some of these woodcuts repeated). Brunet IV, 707; Graesse V, 327; EDIT16 30054; Essling 1725. Boards somewhat scratched, extremities and joints rather worn, small water stain on outer margin affecting first 40 or so leaves (not affecting text), last 150 leaves evenly browned, other trivial internal defects, but in overall excellent condition, the binding sound, and the pages still crisp. This illustrated Renaissance edition, complete with extensive commentary, of Plautus' famous comedies is of particular interest as it provides us with an uncommon example of illustrations about dramatic art in the early 16th century. The 87 woodcuts within the text were expressly engraved for the present edition; they are larger than, and different from, the illustrations of the 1511 edition, and represent a rare record of the manner of acting at the time, depicting as they do the particular combinations of motions and gestures peculiar to the place and time. Three vignettes (l. LXIII recto, l. LXXX verso and l. CXLIIII recto) are signed by an "L," and Essling (VI, p. 246) identified the artist as Luc'Antonio de'Uberti. Mortimer says that our edition, with its commentary by Saracenus and Valla, "is illustrated more in the tradition of Jean Trechsel's Terence of 1493, with single scene blocks, the characters placed before a series of arches opening to landscape background." The celebrated Roman comic poet Plautus (ca. 254-184 B.C.), who began staging his comedies during the Second Punic War, is the earliest major Roman author whose works survive in significant quantity. His animated and often ribald plays give us a picture of Italian society before Greek influence had polished the rough edges, and his language is an important source of information for the understanding of the development of Latin. This illustrated Renaissance edition, complete with extensive commentary, of Plautus' famous comedies is of particular interest as it provides us with an uncommon example of illustrations about dramatic art in the early 16th century. The 87 woodcuts within the text were expressly engraved for the present edition; they are larger than, and different from, the illustrations of the 1511 edition, and represent a rare record of the manner of acting at the time, depicting as they do the particular combinations of motions and gestures peculiar to the place and time. Three vignettes (l. LXIII recto, l. LXXX verso and l. CXLIIII recto) are signed by an "L," and Essling (VI, p. 246) identified the artist as Luc'Antonio de'Uberti. Mortimer says that our edition, with its commentary by Saracenus and Valla, "is illustrated more in the tradition of Jean Trechsel's Terence of 1493, with single scene blocks, the characters placed before a series of arches opening to landscape background." The celebrated Roman comic poet Plautus (ca. 254-184 B.C.), who began staging his comedies during the Second Punic War, is the earliest major Roman author whose works survive in significant quantity. His animated and often ribald plays give us a picture of Italian society before Greek influence had polished the rough edges, and his language is an important source of information for the understanding of the development of Latin.
UNTO THIS LAST. FOUR ESSAYS ON THE FIRST PRINCIPLES OF POLITICAL ECONOMY

UNTO THIS LAST. FOUR ESSAYS ON THE FIRST PRINCIPLES OF POLITICAL ECONOMY

DOVES PRESS). RUSKIN, JOHN 235 x 171 mm. (9 1/4 x 6 3/4"). xiii, [i], 120, [1] pp. ONE OF 300 COPIES on paper (and 12 on vellum). Original gilt-titled flexible vellum. Greek type used for occasional words in text and for two lines in Appendix. Tidcombe DP-11; Tomkinson, p. 55. Covers tending to splay, small (glue?) spot to rear endpapers, isolated light spots of marginal foxing, otherwise a fine copy, clean, fresh, and bright. When these essays first appeared in "Cornhill Magazine," they aroused violent criticism, but Ruskin says with defiance here that he wants them reprinted, without apology, as a kind of introduction to further writings on the subject. Ruskin makes four proposals for improvement in the economic system: he asks for universal access to education, government-run industries working in competition with private companies, governmental unemployment help, and pensions for the aged and disabled. Cobden-Sanderson's elegant type renders even these serious essays on the "dismal science" a pleasure to read. When these essays first appeared in "Cornhill Magazine," they aroused violent criticism, but Ruskin says with defiance here that he wants them reprinted, without apology, as a kind of introduction to further writings on the subject. Ruskin makes four proposals for improvement in the economic system: he asks for universal access to education, government-run industries working in competition with private companies, governmental unemployment help, and pensions for the aged and disabled. Cobden-Sanderson's elegant type renders even these serious essays on the "dismal science" a pleasure to read. ONE OF 300 COPIES on paper (and 12 on vellum).
NECESSARY QUALIFICATIONS OF A MAN OF FASHION

NECESSARY QUALIFICATIONS OF A MAN OF FASHION

COLOR PLATE BOOKS). (BINDINGS - MORRELL). EGERTON, D. T. 270 x 370 mm. (10 1/2 x 14 1/2"). Title page, followed by plates. FIRST EDITION, with pre-publication watermarks. FINE HONEY BROWN MOROCCO BY MORRELL (stamp-signed on front turn-in), covers with large frame of thick and thin gilt rules with sprays of leafy branches emanating from each corner, upper cover with gilt titling within the frame, raised bands, spine gilt in compartments with acorn centerpiece and leafy sprays at corners, gilt titling, turn-ins with ornate gilt roll, marbled yellow endpapers, top edge gilt. In a modern brown buckram slipcase. WITH 12 FINE HAND-COLORED PLATES by Egerton on paper with 1822 watermarks, all with guards. Front pastedown with bookplate of Maxine and Joel Spitz; verso of front free endpaper with book label of Thomas Kelly. Abbey "Life" 286 (with 1824-25 watermarks); Tooley 204. A touch of chafing (from slipcase?) to covers, a hint of wear to joints and extremities, three small spots to title page, otherwise A VERY FINE COPY, the plates very clean and fresh with brilliant colors, and the binding lustrous, with few signs of wear. This is a rare series of amusing illustrations offering satirical advice to the would-be Man of Fashion, with watermarks (Whatman 1822) that indicate the plates here were among the first to be printed. The text and caricatures outline 12 essential traits for the man-about-town: Negligence, Assurance, Confidence, Impudence, Intemperance, Indifference, Unfeelingness, Forgetfulness, Selfishness, Intrigue, Eccentricity, and Inconsistency--in short, the exact opposite of the desirable traits in a gentleman. Ruthlessly mocking the obnoxious manners of a certain type of young swell, the artist encourages drunkenness ("become a four bottle man . . . a walking wine cellar"), gambling, forcing one's attentions on young ladies, and attempting to seduce the wives of one's friends, all while being rude, vicious, and totally without empathy. Many will have recognized a nephew, suitor, or fellow club member in these caricatures of the Regency Buck, brought to the public by publisher Thomas M'lean, who identifies his firm on the title page as a "Repository of Wit and Humour." Artist Daniel Thomas Egerton (1797-1842) was primarily known for his landscapes and his illustrated travel books, and was an original member of the Society of British Artist. Egerton certainly knew something about cads and clearly possessed some of the "Qualifications" listed here, as he ran off to Mexico with the teenaged daughter of a fellow painter. The unfortunate couple was murdered in Mexico City, supposedly by a "robber," but one who left behind large amounts of money and jewelry. The London bindery of W. T. Morrell was established about 1861 as successor to the firm begun by Francis Bedford, who, in turn, had taken over the famous bindery of Charles Lewis. Prideaux, in her "Modern Bookbindings" (1906), says that Morrell at that time had a very large business that supplied "all the booksellers with bindings designed by his men," bindings that were "remarkable for their variety and merit." This is a remarkably rare work, even though the publisher continued to issue copies for some years: Tooley reports an example with watermarks dated 1835(!), and the Abbey copy has watermarks of 1824 and 1825. OCLC finds just five copies in libraries, while ABPC and RBH locate four other copies at auction in the past 30 years. Copies like ours with early watermarks are particularly rare. This is a rare series of amusing illustrations offering satirical advice to the would-be Man of Fashion, with watermarks (Whatman 1822) that indicate the plates here were among the first to be printed. The text and caricatures outline 12 essential traits for the man-about-town: Negligence, Assurance, Confidence, Impudence, Intemperance, Indifference, Unfeelingness, Forgetfulness, Selfishness, Intrigue, Eccentricity, and Inconsistency--in short, the exact opposite of the desirable traits in a gentleman. Ruthlessly mocking the obnoxious manners of a certain type of young swell, the artist encourages drunkenness ("become a four bottle man . . . a walking wine cellar"), gambling, forcing one's attentions on young ladies, and attempting to seduce the wives of one's friends, all while being rude, vicious, and totally without empathy. Many will have recognized a nephew, suitor, or fellow club member in these caricatures of the Regency Buck, brought to the public by publisher Thomas M'lean, who identifies his firm on the title page as a "Repository of Wit and Humour." Artist Daniel Thomas Egerton (1797-1842) was primarily known for his landscapes and his illustrated travel books, and was an original member of the Society of British Artist. Egerton certainly knew something about cads and clearly possessed some of the "Qualifications" listed here, as he ran off to Mexico with the teenaged daughter of a fellow painter. The unfortunate couple was murdered in Mexico City, supposedly by a "robber," but one who left behind large amounts of money and jewelry. The London bindery of W. T. Morrell was established about 1861 as successor to the firm begun by Francis Bedford, who, in turn, had taken over the famous bindery of Charles Lewis. Prideaux, in her "Modern Bookbindings" (1906), says that Morrell at that time had a very large business that supplied "all the booksellers with bindings designed by his men," bindings that were "remarkable for their variety and merit." This is a remarkably rare work, even though the publisher continued to issue copies for some years: Tooley reports an example with watermarks dated 1835(!), and the Abbey copy has watermarks of 1824 and 1825. OCLC finds just five copies in libraries, while ABPC and RBH locate four other copies at auction in the past 30 years. Copies like ours with early watermarks are particularly rare. FIRST EDITION, with pre-publication watermarks.
THE GEORGE ELIOT PORTFOLIO

THE GEORGE ELIOT PORTFOLIO, BEING A SERIES OF SIXTY JAPANESE PAPER PROOFS FROM ORIGINAL ETCHINGS AND PHOTO-ETCHINGS ILLUSTRATING GEORGE ELIOT’S WORKS

ELIOT, GEORGE] 435 x 300 mm. (17 1/4 x 11 3/4"). [2] leaves of text followed by plates. No. 17 OF 50 COPIES of the Edition de Luxe, printed for the Continent. Publisher's ivory cloth, upper cover with two bands of gilt knotwork on a red background, gilt lettering, smooth spine with gilt titling and publisher's device, blue printed endpapers, all edges gilt. 60 ETCHINGS AND PHOTO-ETCHINGS ON JAPON tipped onto lettered cardstock. Baker & Ross F8 (prospectus for deluxe edition). A sprinkling of tiny pale brown spots to tail edge of upper board and to lower board, a couple of plates with wrinkled edges or a faint crease, otherwise AN EXTREMELY FINE COPY, quite clean, fresh, and bright inside and out, with excellent impressions of the plates. This is an outstanding copy of an attractive portfolio containing a suite of plates created for a deluxe edition of the works of George Eliot produced by Estes and Lauriat. In addition to Eliot's eight novels, collected essays, and poems, there was also a life of Eliot by George Willis Cooke. The plates here depict scenes from "Adam Bede" (six plates), "Mill on the Floss" (three), "Felix Holt, Radical" (four), "Scenes of Clerical Life" (four), "Middlemarch" (seven), "Daniel Deronda" (seven), "Romola" (seven), "Silas Marner" (one), "Poems" (13), "Essays" (four), and Cooke's "Life" (four). While copies of this portfolio appear on the market from time to time, they are almost always soiled and worn. A pristine copy like the present one is hard to find. This is an outstanding copy of an attractive portfolio containing a suite of plates created for a deluxe edition of the works of George Eliot produced by Estes and Lauriat. In addition to Eliot's eight novels, collected essays, and poems, there was also a life of Eliot by George Willis Cooke. The plates here depict scenes from "Adam Bede" (six plates), "Mill on the Floss" (three), "Felix Holt, Radical" (four), "Scenes of Clerical Life" (four), "Middlemarch" (seven), "Daniel Deronda" (seven), "Romola" (seven), "Silas Marner" (one), "Poems" (13), "Essays" (four), and Cooke's "Life" (four). While copies of this portfolio appear on the market from time to time, they are almost always soiled and worn. A pristine copy like the present one is hard to find. No. 17 OF 50 COPIES of the Edition de Luxe, printed for the Continent.
A TREATISE OF THE SAFE

A TREATISE OF THE SAFE, INTERNAL USE OF CANTHARIDES IN THE PRACTICE OF PHYSICK

MEDICINE - "SPANISH FLY"). "GREENFIELD, JOHN" [GROENEVELT, JOANNES] 188 x 115 mm. (7 3/8 x 4 1/2"). 20 p.l., 363, [3] pp.Translated from the Latin, with the author's approbation, by John Martin. FIRST EDITION IN ENGLISH. Pleasing contemporary panelled calf, covers gilt roll border, sprinkled leather frame and central panel, the latter with stencilled frame, blind-tooled tulip cornerpieces, rebacked to style with sprinkled calf, raised bands, spine panels with gilt fleuron centerpiece, brown morocco label. Blake (NLM), p. 187; Wellcome III, 168; ESTC T64914. Half a dozen small stains or abrasions to boards, corners somewhat rubbed, minor foxing throughout, a couple of small stains or rust spots, other trivial imperfections, but an excellent copy, generally clean and crisp internally, the restored binding sturdy. Written in response to being jailed for malpractice, this is a defense by a Dutch-born London physician of his use of cantharides, or Spanish fly, to treat bladder and kidney disorders. Groenevelt (1648-1615/16) received his medical degree at Utrecht in 1670 and moved to England in 1676, where he became John Greenfield. As a successful practicing physician, Greenfield promoted the use of Spanish fly, commonly known as an aphrodisiac, to treat a variety of ailments by purportedly modifying its toxicity with camphor oil. Greenfield's problems began when a woman he treated complained that the ingested cantharides had made her ill, sparking a fierce backlash by the College of Physicians that ended with Greenfield in Newgate Prison. Although Greenfield was eventually released, he never quite recovered from the offence. The present edition includes a scathing attack on the College by the author himself, a defense of Greenfield by translator and fellow physician John Marten, and an unusual, laudatory poem in praise of the author, written by satirist and provocateur Bernard Mandeville. Written in response to being jailed for malpractice, this is a defense by a Dutch-born London physician of his use of cantharides, or Spanish fly, to treat bladder and kidney disorders. Groenevelt (1648-1615/16) received his medical degree at Utrecht in 1670 and moved to England in 1676, where he became John Greenfield. As a successful practicing physician, Greenfield promoted the use of Spanish fly, commonly known as an aphrodisiac, to treat a variety of ailments by purportedly modifying its toxicity with camphor oil. Greenfield's problems began when a woman he treated complained that the ingested cantharides had made her ill, sparking a fierce backlash by the College of Physicians that ended with Greenfield in Newgate Prison. Although Greenfield was eventually released, he never quite recovered from the offence. The present edition includes a scathing attack on the College by the author himself, a defense of Greenfield by translator and fellow physician John Marten, and an unusual, laudatory poem in praise of the author, written by satirist and provocateur Bernard Mandeville.
BALLADS OF A CHEECHAKO

BALLADS OF A CHEECHAKO

SERVICE, ROBERT W. 209 x 145 mm. (8 1/4 x 5 3/4"). 146 pp. Second Canadian Edition. Original green cloth, upper cover with pictorial image of author and gilt lettering, smooth spine with gilt lettering, top edge gilt. With frontispiece and nine plates, all with captioned tissue guards. Front free endpaper with pencil ownership inscriptions and a small book label from the Poole Drug Co. Head and tail of spine a touch frayed, corners a little worn, upper hinge slightly weak but the binding entirely solid and in good condition overall. A couple of stains internally (one touching text), a few leaves with a little browning, otherwise entirely clean and bright. Often called the "Bard of the Yukon," Robert Service (1874-1958) was originally born in England and at the age of 20 relocated to the Yukon Wilderness. Although he arrived after the gold rush had run its course, Service took inspiration from that period and lived in a remote cabin for several years while writing his poetry and novels. This second edition is identical to the first in terms of content, but with the addition of 10 photographs. Often called the "Bard of the Yukon," Robert Service (1874-1958) was originally born in England and at the age of 20 relocated to the Yukon Wilderness. Although he arrived after the gold rush had run its course, Service took inspiration from that period and lived in a remote cabin for several years while writing his poetry and novels. This second edition is identical to the first in terms of content, but with the addition of 10 photographs.
SATIRES DE JUVÉNAL

SATIRES DE JUVÉNAL

BINDINGS - KRAUSS). JUVENAL, DECIMIUS JUNIUS 345 x 258 mm. (13 1/2 x 10 1/8"). Two volumes. Translated and annotated by J. Dusaulx. Third Edition. Large Paper Copy. STATELY CONTEMPORARY RED MOROCCO, GILT AND INLAID IN THE NEOCLASSICAL STYLE, BY GEORG FRIEDRICH KRAUSS FOR DUKE ALBRECHT OF SAXE-TASCHEN, covers framed by bead, Greek key, and flower-and-ribbon rolls, sunbursts at corners, double raised bands separated by green morocco inlaid strip with metope-and-pentaglyph gilt roll, spines gilt in compartments with starburst centerpiece containing the initial of Duke Albrecht, green morocco labels, gilt-rolled turn-ins, marbled endpapers, all edges gilt. Each volume with an engraving after Moreau le jeune, in first state before letters. Text of satires in Latin (verse) and French (prose) on facing pages. Front pastedowns with shelf labels from the ducal library. Cohen-de Ricci 524-5. Tiny abrasion to gilt border on one board, scattered small dark spots to boards, extremities lightly rubbed, isolated faint marginal foxing or small smudges, but A VERY FINE COPY, quite clean fresh, and bright internally, in sound and well-preserved bindings. This handsome edition of the 16 satires mocking Roman vices and corruption by the great Roman poet Juvenal (ca. 60 - ca. 130) was designed as a large quarto, so our folio printing--which Cohen-de Ricci notes brought a much higher price in the early 19th century--is notable for the enormous margins that set off Didot's lovely type to great advantage. Moss, quoting "Cours de Litterature," calls this "beautiful edition" the best prose translation to date, with extensive annotation by Jean Dusaulx (1728-99), who contrasts the work of Juvenal (quite favorably) with the satires of Horace. Dusaulx was a French politician for whom translation was an avocation; this rendition first appeared in 1770, and the annotations were first printed in 1782. The animated and intricately detailed engravings here are the work of Jean-Michel Moreau, known as Moreau le jeune (1741-1814), deemed by Gordon Ray to be "the greatest name among French illustrators of the 18th century." Adding to the desirability of this copy is the splendid binding. Francesco Piranesi is generally given credit for inventing the Neoclassical style when he designed volumes presented to Gustavus III of Sweden during this monarch's visit to Rome in 1783-84. Quickly popular, the Neoclassical style was imitated and developed by Staggemeier & Welcher in London, by F. W. Standlander in Stockholm, and by Georg Friedrich Krauss in Vienna. Krauss was the most prominent Continental binder working in this style of the day, and Saxe-Teschen was perhaps his most important client. Products of the Krauss bindery have passed through some of the most distinguished collections over the years, particularly those of Fürstenberg and Schäfer; and his bindings have consistently brought remarkable sums of money at auction. The collector for whom these bindings were originally executed, Duke Albrecht of Saxe-Teschen (1738-1822), was the son of Friedrich August II of Saxony and the son-in-law of the empress Maria Theresa. After providing important military and civil service to the Habsburg empire, he retired to Vienna in 1795 and afterward devoted himself to the fine arts. He founded the Albertina, which now houses the greatest collection of prints in the world, and he put together a great library distinguished by the highest taste and most exacting standards. This handsome edition of the 16 satires mocking Roman vices and corruption by the great Roman poet Juvenal (ca. 60 - ca. 130) was designed as a large quarto, so our folio printing--which Cohen-de Ricci notes brought a much higher price in the early 19th century--is notable for the enormous margins that set off Didot's lovely type to great advantage. Moss, quoting "Cours de Litterature," calls this "beautiful edition" the best prose translation to date, with extensive annotation by Jean Dusaulx (1728-99), who contrasts the work of Juvenal (quite favorably) with the satires of Horace. Dusaulx was a French politician for whom translation was an avocation; this rendition first appeared in 1770, and the annotations were first printed in 1782. The animated and intricately detailed engravings here are the work of Jean-Michel Moreau, known as Moreau le jeune (1741-1814), deemed by Gordon Ray to be "the greatest name among French illustrators of the 18th century." Adding to the desirability of this copy is the splendid binding. Francesco Piranesi is generally given credit for inventing the Neoclassical style when he designed volumes presented to Gustavus III of Sweden during this monarch's visit to Rome in 1783-84. Quickly popular, the Neoclassical style was imitated and developed by Staggemeier & Welcher in London, by F. W. Standlander in Stockholm, and by Georg Friedrich Krauss in Vienna. Krauss was the most prominent Continental binder working in this style of the day, and Saxe-Teschen was perhaps his most important client. Products of the Krauss bindery have passed through some of the most distinguished collections over the years, particularly those of Fürstenberg and Schäfer; and his bindings have consistently brought remarkable sums of money at auction. The collector for whom these bindings were originally executed, Duke Albrecht of Saxe-Teschen (1738-1822), was the son of Friedrich August II of Saxony and the son-in-law of the empress Maria Theresa. After providing important military and civil service to the Habsburg empire, he retired to Vienna in 1795 and afterward devoted himself to the fine arts. He founded the Albertina, which now houses the greatest collection of prints in the world, and he put together a great library distinguished by the highest taste and most exacting standards.
FAR AWAY AND LONG AGO

FAR AWAY AND LONG AGO

HUDSON, W.H. 282 x 210 mm. (11 1/8 x 8 1/4"). xiv, [2], 307, [1] pp., [1] leaf (colophon and signatures). No. 108 OF 1500 COPIES, SIGNED BY THE DESIGNER AND ILLUSTRATOR. Original smooth animal hide on top third of binding and rough hide (retaining the hair) on the bottom, all whip-stitched with rawhide, sueded endpapers. Lacking the dust wrapper and slipcase. With 32 full-page illustrations by Raul Rosarivo. Smooth leather a little browned around spine, hair rubbed to skin in several places, hinge split after front free endpapers, but the binding still very sturdy and the contents clean and bright. This is certainly one of the more unusual bindings done for The Limited Editions Club, and rather appropriate for the memoir of naturalist William Henry Hudson. Born to American parents in Argentina, Hudson (1841-1922) primarily studied birds and was an early proponent of the so-called "back-to-the-land" movement of the '20s and '30s. The present work is his best known piece of non-fiction. This is certainly one of the more unusual bindings done for The Limited Editions Club, and rather appropriate for the memoir of naturalist William Henry Hudson. Born to American parents in Argentina, Hudson (1841-1922) primarily studied birds and was an early proponent of the so-called "back-to-the-land" movement of the '20s and '30s. The present work is his best known piece of non-fiction. No. 108 OF 1500 COPIES, SIGNED BY THE DESIGNER AND ILLUSTRATOR.
PRACTICAL OBSERVATIONS ON THE CONVULSIONS OF INFANTS

PRACTICAL OBSERVATIONS ON THE CONVULSIONS OF INFANTS

PEDIATRICS). NORTH, JOHN 215 x 135 mm. (8 1/2 x 5 3/8"). x, [2], 282 pp., [1] blank leaf (lacking half title). FIRST EDITION. Recent retrospective dark brown quarter calf over marbled boards, raised bands, gilt titling. Title page with ink library stamp of University College Hospital Medical School Library. The Founders of Child Neurology (1990), pp. 148-52. Title a little foxed, with a half-inch brown strip (from older binding?) along gutter edge, last two leaves with minor foxing, otherwise a fine copy, clean, fresh, and surprisingly bright, in an unworn sympathetic binding. This is the first edition of the first monograph in English on the subject of convulsions in children, by a man considered to be one of the founders of child neurology. One of 300 original Fellows of the Royal College of Surgeons and a renowned London practitioner specializing in midwifery and the diseases of women and children, John North (1790-1873) was a forthright, plain-spoken man whose obituary even noted that "he was occasionally too brusque to be pleasant." This candor was an asset in his writings. As "The Founders of Child Neurology" notes, "Whereas most 18th- and early 19th-century medical authors were opaque, verbose, and interminable theorists, North wrote simply and clearly, avoided speculation, admitted ignorance, and actually dealt with practical matters, such as distinguishing between types of convulsions and the extent of treatment required. Also, perhaps in keeping with his character, he did not hesitate to criticize other authors with whom he disagreed." One of his main targets was John Clarke, who had declared that "every case of convulsion" resulted in "inevitable organic damage" to the brain. Consequently, Clarke called for drastic treatment of every seizure, whether caused by teething or serious illness, often doing more harm than good with his purgatives, clysters, and bleeding. North saw convulsions as a disturbance in the brain, but not as evidence of organic disease, citing as evidence the lack of brain lesions found in autopsies of children who had died of convulsions. He distinguished epilepsy from other causes of seizures, and was perhaps the first to note the association between rickets and convulsions. "Founders" concludes, "his greatest gift to his contemporaries may have been his reiterated contention that most babies with convulsions need not be assaulted with calomel, leeches, and the lancet." This is the first edition of the first monograph in English on the subject of convulsions in children, by a man considered to be one of the founders of child neurology. One of 300 original Fellows of the Royal College of Surgeons and a renowned London practitioner specializing in midwifery and the diseases of women and children, John North (1790-1873) was a forthright, plain-spoken man whose obituary even noted that "he was occasionally too brusque to be pleasant." This candor was an asset in his writings. As "The Founders of Child Neurology" notes, "Whereas most 18th- and early 19th-century medical authors were opaque, verbose, and interminable theorists, North wrote simply and clearly, avoided speculation, admitted ignorance, and actually dealt with practical matters, such as distinguishing between types of convulsions and the extent of treatment required. Also, perhaps in keeping with his character, he did not hesitate to criticize other authors with whom he disagreed." One of his main targets was John Clarke, who had declared that "every case of convulsion" resulted in "inevitable organic damage" to the brain. Consequently, Clarke called for drastic treatment of every seizure, whether caused by teething or serious illness, often doing more harm than good with his purgatives, clysters, and bleeding. North saw convulsions as a disturbance in the brain, but not as evidence of organic disease, citing as evidence the lack of brain lesions found in autopsies of children who had died of convulsions. He distinguished epilepsy from other causes of seizures, and was perhaps the first to note the association between rickets and convulsions. "Founders" concludes, "his greatest gift to his contemporaries may have been his reiterated contention that most babies with convulsions need not be assaulted with calomel, leeches, and the lancet."
PROSPECTUS FOR THE EDITION DE LUXE OF "MARK TWAIN'S WRITINGS."

PROSPECTUS FOR THE EDITION DE LUXE OF “MARK TWAIN’S WRITINGS.”

CLEMENS, SAMUEL L.]. "MARK TWAIN," (Pseudonym) 215 x 140 mm. (8 1/2 x 5 1/2"). [12] sample leaves, 5, [3] pp. Publisher's limp brown morocco, gilt lettering on upper cover, marbled endpapers, top edge gilt. Etched series title page with emblem designed by Tiffany & Co. and 16 hand-printed plates on Japanese vellum, all with lettered guards. Front pastedown with sample green buckram spine for "Innocents Abroad." Ends of spine with shallow chips, front joint with one-inch crack at tail, extremities a bit rubbed, one tiny rust spot, faint thumbing to a couple of margins, but A FINE SPECIMEN of an ephemeral item, fresh, clean, and bright internally, the binding sound. This prospectus announces the impending publication of a limited deluxe edition of 1,000 copies of the works of the most popular American author of his time. At $5 per volume--the equivalent of approximately $150 today--this 22-volume edition was clearly geared for the most discerning bibliophiles, and the quality of the prospectus reflects that. This is no salesman's dummy with sign-up sheets to be trotted from door to door in every town in American, but a well-bound brochure touting the Edition De Luxe's many advantages. These include biographical criticism by Brander Matthews, perhaps the prominent literary scholar of the day; specially made "Old Chester Antique Rag" paper with the watermark "MARK TWAIN"; illustrations by "the most skilled and most popular" American artists, printed by hand press on "Imperial Japan vellum," with "only perfect impressions" to be used; and frontispiece portraits in each volume depicting Twain as he looked at the time the title was originally issued, and etched titles with a Tiffany-designed monogram surrounded by vignettes "representing prominent episodes in the author's life." One surprising feature is the binding: only Holliston cloth with Japan paper title labels is offered. No doubt it was assumed that collectors would want to have volumes bound to suit their own taste. In addition to examples of the title pages, frontispiece portraits, and plates, the prospectus contains sample pages from the preface by Twain, Matthew's "Biographical Criticism," "Innocents Abroad," "Roughing It," "Tom Sawyer," "Huckleberry Finn," "A Tramp Abroad," "Life on the Mississippi," "Following the Equator," "The Gilded Age," and "The Prince and the Pauper." The final page directs inquiries to the exclusive distributor of this edition, The New England Society. This prospectus announces the impending publication of a limited deluxe edition of 1,000 copies of the works of the most popular American author of his time. At $5 per volume--the equivalent of approximately $150 today--this 22-volume edition was clearly geared for the most discerning bibliophiles, and the quality of the prospectus reflects that. This is no salesman's dummy with sign-up sheets to be trotted from door to door in every town in American, but a well-bound brochure touting the Edition De Luxe's many advantages. These include biographical criticism by Brander Matthews, perhaps the prominent literary scholar of the day; specially made "Old Chester Antique Rag" paper with the watermark "MARK TWAIN"; illustrations by "the most skilled and most popular" American artists, printed by hand press on "Imperial Japan vellum," with "only perfect impressions" to be used; and frontispiece portraits in each volume depicting Twain as he looked at the time the title was originally issued, and etched titles with a Tiffany-designed monogram surrounded by vignettes "representing prominent episodes in the author's life." One surprising feature is the binding: only Holliston cloth with Japan paper title labels is offered. No doubt it was assumed that collectors would want to have volumes bound to suit their own taste. In addition to examples of the title pages, frontispiece portraits, and plates, the prospectus contains sample pages from the preface by Twain, Matthew's "Biographical Criticism," "Innocents Abroad," "Roughing It," "Tom Sawyer," "Huckleberry Finn," "A Tramp Abroad," "Life on the Mississippi," "Following the Equator," "The Gilded Age," and "The Prince and the Pauper." The final page directs inquiries to the exclusive distributor of this edition, The New England Society.
DER WUNDER-REICHE UBERZUG UNSERER NIDER-WELT

DER WUNDER-REICHE UBERZUG UNSERER NIDER-WELT, ODER ERD-UMGEBENDE LUFFT-KREYS

WEATHER, EXTREME). FRANCISCI [FINX], ERASMUS 210 x 160 mm. (8 1/4 x 6 1/4"). 9 p.l., 1450 pp., [15] leaves. FIRST EDITION. Slightly later pale green velvet, raised bands, remnants of green and gold ties. Engraved frontispiece by Cornelius Nicolas Schurtz, and 27 ENGRAVED PLATES (one folding), five of these by Schurtz, 12 by Johann Alexander Böner, and 10 unsigned. Front pastedown with small numbered (library?) label. VD17 3:302099Z. A little light dust-soiling to velvet, extremities a bit rubbed, corners slightly bumped, but the binding solid and remarkably well-preserved. Intermittent offsetting in the text bed (perhaps a dozen leaves somewhat browned as a result), occasional mild foxing, other trivial imperfections, but A FINE COPY, clean and fresh with rich impressions of the engravings on excellent handmade paper. With dramatic illustrations that include rain showers of rats, ark-worthy floods, and large wagons of hay borne aloft by the wind, this is a huge compendium of extreme weather events and other bizarre natural phenomena by German polymath Erasmus Finx [usually latinized to Francisci]. Best remembered as a writer of Christian hymns, Finx (1627-94) worked as a reader and corrector for the Nuremberg publishing house of Endter, also penning a number of books, many under pseudonyms, for his employer on topics ranging from ghosts and goblins to religious reflections to the Indies and China. Both the New World and the Far East are mentioned in the present work: he describes Indian rain ceremonies and Chinese "weather makers" and "wind devils," the latter depicted as a man flying through the air on an enormous bird while reading a scroll. Perhaps the most mysterious event reported is what seems to be a UFO sighting: a 1665 battle between "ships" in the sky above Stralsund, Germany. At one point, a flat, round object "the color of a darkening moon" descended from above to hover over the church of St. Nicolai, terrifying the townspeople below. Many of these witnesses fell ill in the following days, "with trembling all over and pain in head and limbs." Doctors and scholars were puzzled. This is not a common work: OCLC finds six copies in US libraries; ABPC and RBH locate just two at auction since 1975. With dramatic illustrations that include rain showers of rats, ark-worthy floods, and large wagons of hay borne aloft by the wind, this is a huge compendium of extreme weather events and other bizarre natural phenomena by German polymath Erasmus Finx [usually latinized to Francisci]. Best remembered as a writer of Christian hymns, Finx (1627-94) worked as a reader and corrector for the Nuremberg publishing house of Endter, also penning a number of books, many under pseudonyms, for his employer on topics ranging from ghosts and goblins to religious reflections to the Indies and China. Both the New World and the Far East are mentioned in the present work: he describes Indian rain ceremonies and Chinese "weather makers" and "wind devils," the latter depicted as a man flying through the air on an enormous bird while reading a scroll. Perhaps the most mysterious event reported is what seems to be a UFO sighting: a 1665 battle between "ships" in the sky above Stralsund, Germany. At one point, a flat, round object "the color of a darkening moon" descended from above to hover over the church of St. Nicolai, terrifying the townspeople below. Many of these witnesses fell ill in the following days, "with trembling all over and pain in head and limbs." Doctors and scholars were puzzled. This is not a common work: OCLC finds six copies in US libraries; ABPC and RBH locate just two at auction since 1975.
THE LAUREATE'S COUNTRY

THE LAUREATE’S COUNTRY, A DESCRIPTION OF PLACES CONNECTED WITH THE LIFE OF ALFRED LORD TENNYSON

BINDINGS - PAINTED VELLUM). (TENNYSON, ALFRED, LORD). CHURCH, ALFRED J. 382 x 275 mm. (15 x 10 3/4"). 4 p.l., 111, [1] pp. No. 85 OF 160 COPIES ON LARGE PAPER. Publisher's gilt-stamped vellum, upper cover with titling and the Tennyson coat of arms, BOTH COVERS WITH LOVELY HAND-PAINTED DESIGN BY JOHN T. BEER, upper cover with urn at foot and blooming rose branches emanating from a medallion bearing the date 1902 and curving around the title and escutcheon, lower cover with branches of apple blossoms dividing the board into quadrants, each inhabited by a bird in flight, smooth spine with gilt titling, edges untrimmed. With frontispiece photographic portrait of Tennyson, 31 vignettes in the text, and 14 copper-plate engravings after drawings by Edward Hull. Verso of title page and limitations page with ink stamp of Gloucester County Library. Weber, "The Fore-Edge Paintings of John T. Beer" 195. Small scratch near head of front joint, minor soiling and rubbing to edges of boards, a little dust soiling to untrimmed edges, mild foxing (mostly marginal, and not affecting copper engravings), otherwise an excellent copy, clean and fresh internally with wide margins, the binding sturdy and bright, the pretty decoration perfectly preserved. This deluxe illustrated work describing the places associated with England's beloved Poet Laureate, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, is enhanced by former owner John T. Beer's Arts & Crafts-style embellishments to the vellum binding. After retiring from a successful career as a clothier, Merseyside book collector John T. Beer (ca. 1826-1903) occupied himself in retirement by decorating books from his library, mostly with fore-edge paintings, but in a score of instances with painted bindings. Jeff Weber considers Beer "one of the most highly skilled artists of fore-edge paintings," noting that he was the first artist to put his signature to such works. Weber's catalogue raisonnée of Beer's works lists 189 fore-edge paintings, 22 painted bindings, and three bindings designed by Beer and executed by Fazakerley of Liverpool. The design here is clearly influenced by the Arts & Crafts movement, and Beer owned several works by William Morris, including a Kelmscott Press "Godefrey of Bologne," on the vellum covers of which he had painted a design of tulips and lilies. Among the locations discussed and pictured in the "The Laureate's Country" are Tennyson's childhood homes in Somersby and Bag Enderby, Trinity College, Cambridge, where he matriculated, and his estates Farringford on the Isle of Wight and Aldworth in West Sussex. This deluxe illustrated work describing the places associated with England's beloved Poet Laureate, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, is enhanced by former owner John T. Beer's Arts & Crafts-style embellishments to the vellum binding. After retiring from a successful career as a clothier, Merseyside book collector John T. Beer (ca. 1826-1903) occupied himself in retirement by decorating books from his library, mostly with fore-edge paintings, but in a score of instances with painted bindings. Jeff Weber considers Beer "one of the most highly skilled artists of fore-edge paintings," noting that he was the first artist to put his signature to such works. Weber's catalogue raisonnée of Beer's works lists 189 fore-edge paintings, 22 painted bindings, and three bindings designed by Beer and executed by Fazakerley of Liverpool. The design here is clearly influenced by the Arts & Crafts movement, and Beer owned several works by William Morris, including a Kelmscott Press "Godefrey of Bologne," on the vellum covers of which he had painted a design of tulips and lilies. Among the locations discussed and pictured in the "The Laureate's Country" are Tennyson's childhood homes in Somersby and Bag Enderby, Trinity College, Cambridge, where he matriculated, and his estates Farringford on the Isle of Wight and Aldworth in West Sussex.