Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller Inc. Archives - Rare Book Insider
last 7 days
last 30 days
older than 30 days

Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller Inc.

placeholder

Catalogue des Bronzes et autres Curiosités Egyptiennes, Etrusques, Indiennes & Chinoises; Médailles & Monnoies d’or & d’argent; Bagues & Boutons de diamants; Pierres gravées, Agates, Jaspes & Coquilles, dont la Scalata; Polypiers, Animaux, Oiseaux & Insectes: Pieces anatomiques & nombres d’autres morceaux curieux. Du Cabinet de feu M. Morand.Cette Vente se fera le Mercredi premier Décembre [1 December 1773] [Expert: P. Remy]

AUCTION CATALOGUE: MORAND, Sauveur François) 2 p.l., 66, [1] pp. Small 8vo (180 x 105 mm.), late 19th-century cloth-backed marbled boards, spine gilt. Paris: P. Remy & Musier, 1773. [bound after]: ([BENARD, -]). Catalogue des Bronzes, Marbres, Porcelaines, Meubles, & autres objets de curiosité. Provenant du Cabinet de M.*** Dont la Vente se fera.le Jeudi 26 Mai 1774, & jour suivans. 9 pp. Small 8vo. Paris: Chariot, 1774. I. The very rare auction catalogue of Morand's important cabinet of anatomical curiosities, natural history specimens, art, and antiquities (see below). Morand (1697-1773), the esteemed surgeon and contributor to the Encylopédie, possessed an eclectic collection, but focused principally on anatomical specimens for his research, and antiquities. "Morand sought to be a scholar-surgeon rather than a mere surgeon at a time when many still thought that occupation closer to barbering than to medicine. He taught anatomy and surgery at the Paris College of Surgery, the Charité, the Invalides, and his home. Also, for some fifty years he published articles and books on such varied scientific subjects as cataracts, the anatomy of the brain, the medical uses of electricity, the differing size of humans in the morning and evening, and extra-fingered humans."-Kafker & Kafker, The Encyclopedists as Individuals: a Biographical Dictionary of the Authors of the Encyclopédie (1988), p. 270. This catalogue describes 539 lots of sculpture, ceramics, furniture, medals and coins, weapons, tools, clothes, minerals, shells, petrified wood, fossils, bird and insect specimens, human specimens (many with deformities), Morand's anatomical teaching collection, jewelry, etc. His anatomical collection constitutes just over 100 lots, which are meticulously inventoried and described. For example, we find two fetal skeletons connected at the head, a hand with six fingers, two boxes filled with human and animal teeth, the wax model of a female skeleton assembled by Morand, artificial eyes, etc., etc. A number of the other curiosities come from India, China, Egypt, Greece, and Africa. II. A choice collection of 47 lots of ancient sculpture, weapons, and ceramics. Lugt was able to confirm only the consigner's last name as "Benard." Two rare and interesting sale catalogues, the first thoroughly detailing a fascinating anatomical cabinet. Engraved bookplate of G[eorges] P[annier] (1853-1944) on the front paste-down. Natural paper flaw touching text on Biii of the Morand catalogue. Title-page of the Benard catalogue a little browned. We locate no copy of this second catalogue in North America. ? I. Lugt 2208. N.B.G., Vol. 36, cols. 446-47 (Morand). R. Taton, Enseignement et Diffusion des Sciences en France (1986), pp. 185 & 691. II. Lugt 2294.
placeholder

Quelques Idées sur la Disposition, L’Arrangement et la Décoration du Museum national.

LEBRUN, Jean Baptiste Pierre Two folding engraved plates. 30 pp. 8vo (200 x 128 mm.), self-bound in two quires, stitched. Paris: Didot jeune, An III [1794/95]. First and only edition of one of Lebrun's rare polemical pamphlets on the organization of the Louvre. Lebrun (1748-1813), the great Parisian art dealer and leading connoisseur of Dutch and Flemish art, played an outsized role in the creation of the Louvre. He was essential in the compilation of desiderata lists for the French confiscations of art in conquered territories throughout Europe. Then, once the artworks arrived in Paris, Lebrun was charged with their cataloguing and integration. In 1797, Lebrun was named commissaire expert of the Musée central, but he still sought to leave a larger imprint on the nascent national museum. Charlotte Guichard writes that Lebrun's contribution to the creation of the Louvre remains underappreciated - calling him the "eye of the Louvre" - and that historians have focused too much on Baron Denon, who was appointed museum director in 1802. Beginning in 1793, Lebrun launched a series of treatises regarding the arts and the values a great national museum should maintain. The present work presents his vision for the rooms of the Louvre and their organization. He even elaborates with precise measurements and the arrangement of specific genres of art. Of particular interest is Lebrun's focus on the conservation of paintings. The two plates illustrate two of Lebrun's proposals for the design of the museum's entrance. In very good condition. A fascinating museological treatise by a renowned art dealer. ? D. Speith, Revolutionary Paris and the Market for Netherlandish Art (2018), p. 214. See C. Guichard, "Le Marché au Coeur de l'Invention Muséale?: Jean-Baptiste-Pierre Lebrun au Louvre (1792-1802)," in Revue de synthèse, no. 2011-1, pp. 93-118. N. Etienne, ed., The Restoration of Paintings in Paris, 1750-1815 (2017), p. 58.
placeholder

Catalogue d’une Très-belle Collection de Tableaux de Maîtres très-renommés des différentes Ecoles, rassemblés par un Artiste [added in cont. ms]: “(Le Brun).” Cette Vente se fera les Lundi 20.Décembre 1773.[Expert: Pierre Remy]

AUCTION CATALOGUE: [LEBRUN, Jean Baptiste Pierre, consigner]) 57, 3 pp. Small 8vo (160 x 100 mm.), attractive antique marbled boards, label on spine. Paris: P. Remy, 1773. The scarce sale catalogue, interleaved throughout with prices and buyers' names, of a sale of paintings very probably supplied in large part by the fledgling dealer Jean Baptiste Pierre Lebrun. In the Institut national d'histoire de l'art copy, which belonged to Lebrun, he has written "Par moy" on the title-page. The present example of this catalogue contains invaluable notes on the successful bidders, such as Langlier, Comtesse du Barry, Paillet, Remy, Comte de Merle, etc. The very rare three-page supplement is present and annotated. This catalogue describes 133 lots of paintings, a majority of which are Dutch and Flemish. Lebrun made numerous buying trips to the Netherlands and he quickly became the foremost connoisseur of art from the region. This sale offered paintings by J. Brueghel the Elder, Rubens, van Poelenburgh, Jordaens, Rembrandt (7 lots), Teniers, A. & I. van Ostade, Dou, Metsu, Weenix, G. van den Eeckhout, Berghem, P. Potter, J. & S. Ruysdael, J. Steen, A. van de Velde, G. Netscher, Dujardin, J. Asselijn, J. Wijnants, Moucheron, Watteau, Restout, Wouwerman, Lairesse, etc. In good condition, minor dampstaining throughout. An uncommon catalogue with important provenance information. ? Lugt 2217. Francis Haskell, Rediscoveries in Art: Some Aspects of Taste, Fashion & Collecting in England & France (1976), p. 21-"With hindsight we can see that Lebrun was doing something whose implications were even more revolutionary than he himself probably realized. He was the first connoisseur to break with the prevailing habit of trying to attribute as many pictures as possible to the great and established names and to insist instead on the value of rarity and unfamiliarity.".
placeholder

Title on upper wrapper of catalogue]: Les Livres Surréalistes ainsi que les Publications Surréalistes sont toujours en vente à la Librairie José Corti.

SURREALISM) Cover illustration by Max Ernst & 12 photographic closeups of authors, printed on both sides of six sheets of coated paper, tipped-in. 15 pp. 8vo (220 x 130 mm.), orig. printed paper wrappers, staple-bound. Paris: J. Corti, [1931]. A rare bookseller's catalogue issued by one of the principal distributors of Surrealist works in Paris. The famous chart of authors prescribed and invalidated by the Surrealists "Lisez / Ne Lisez Pas" appears for the first time in print on the lower wrapper of this catalogue. The Librairie José Corti on the Rue de Clichy served as the occasional headquarters of the collective imprint Editions Surréalistes. Ernst's steel-engraved collage on the cover was specially made for the bookstore. The catalogue offers for sale the works of Maxime Alexandre, Louis Aragon, André Breton, René Char, René Crevel, Salvador Dalí, Paul Eluard, Max Ernst, Benjamin Péret, Tristan Tzara, Pierre Unik, and Luis Buñuel. Most of the portraits tipped-in are reproductions of photographs taken by Man Ray. Each author is given one page, with their works listed with prices and noted when "épuisé." Below the listings are excerpts of contemporary reviews and and commentary on the authors and the Surrealist movement as a whole. Breton and Eluard's L'Immaculée Conception is offered on page 9, followed by reviews of the work. Fine and fresh copy. With an unrecorded and heavily "annotated" José Corti price list, possibly incomplete. ? Georges Sebbag, Les Editions Surréalistes: 1926-1968 (1993), pp. 199-200 (in trans.)- "Methodical, a bibliography has a cognitive aim. Descriptive, a bookseller or auction house catalogue has a commercial end. The Corti catalogue of 1931.transcends these two goals. On the one hand, it participates in the campaign to launch Editions Surréalistes and led to the unification of the group. A surrealist object, theoretical and visible, the catalogue is a model of Edition Surréaliste [publishing]." In the bibliography cited above, "Annexe II" describes the evolution of the "Lisez / Ne Lisez Pas" chart. The cover of the present catalogue is reproduced on the cover of Sebbag's work.
placeholder

Sur la Liberté de la Presse, Imitée de l’Anglois, de Milton.

MIRABEAU, Honoré Gabriel Riqueti, Comte de 66 pp. 8vo (220 x 140 mm.), stitched as issued, uncut. London [i.e., Paris]: 1788. First edition of this important tract by Mirabeau (1749-91), famed orator and Revolutionary leader, on the necessity of a free press in France. Greatly influenced by Milton and English republicanism, Mirabeau criticized the restrictions placed on the press by the king. On page 44, he writes (in trans.): "That we examine books provided with approbations, one will see that they contain only the most common ideas, and as such often the most false. In fact, according to his mission, the censor can allow to circulate only trivial truths, which were not even worth writing, or favored truths." "Mirabeau found in Milton a kindred spirit; he found in him that flaming love of liberty, that passion for essential freedoms, that lofty and unselfish devotion to country to which he himself aspired. Milton's influence on Mirabeau, many times suggested but never evaluated, is one of significant interest to students of Milton's politics. De la Liberté de la Presse is a product of Mirabeau's pen conceived in the last tumultuous months of 1788. On the eighth of August Lomenie had announced that the Estates-General would meet on May 1, 1789, and that the thinkers were invited to discuss in the public press a plan for holding and forming this body. Bitter controversy about the status of the Third Estate in the Estates-General filled the months that followed. Called by Necker, the Assembly of Notables met on November 6 to determine the constitution of the Estates-General. All France awaited their decision. It was at this moment of popular ferment, amid 'the snowing of pamphlets,' that Mirabeau wrote his plea for liberty of the press."-Don M. Wolfe, "Milton and Mirabeau" in PMLA, Vol. 49, No. 4 (Dec. 1934), p. 1116. Very good copy of an influential work on press freedom and journalism, in original state. A second edition was posthumously published in 1792.
placeholder

Memoirs of Painting, with a Chronological History of the Importation of Pictures by the Great Masters into England since the French Revolution.

BUCHANAN, William xvi, 364 pp.; 2 p.l., 397 pp. Two vols. 8vo (220 x 140 mm.), 19th-century polished calf (joints a trifle rubbed), spines gilt, red & green morocco lettering-pieces on spines. London: R. Ackermann, 1824. First edition of an essential firsthand history of the mass British acquisitions of Old Masters in the first decades of the 19th century. "William Buchanan (1777-1864), a Scottish lawyer turned art dealer, was to benefit most from the turmoil caused by the Napoleonic Wars, although he started too late to participate in the Orléans sales. He employed mainly James Irvine of Drum, Aberdeenshire, in Italy and George Augustus Wallis in Spain and Portugal as agents to scour the cities for available works of art and ship them back to London."-J. Stourton and C. Sebag-Montefiore, The British as Art Collectors, p. 159. Buchanan structures this work around the celebrated collections to which he added or from which he extracted magnificent works. He describes the collections of Michael Bryan, de Calonne, Fagel, Robit, Vitturi, Lebrun, Sebastiani, Lucien Bonaparte, and Talletrand. He cites prices and provides numerous insights into the dispersal of many of the early great 19th-century art collections. The sections beginning "Mr. Buchanan's Importations." (Vol. II, pp. 95-180; 203-50; 294-304; 349-77), are perhaps of the greatest interest, due to the author's candor and to the excerpts of private (and revealing) correspondence between Buchanan and his foreign agents regarding the pursuit of great works. Nice set, internally fine. Presentation inscription on front fly-leaf: "James McDouall from his sincere friend Charles F. Rushout, on his leaving Eton, Election 1857." Engraved armorial bookplate of "Jacobi McDouall de Logon" on front paste-down. ? Oxford Art online (Buchanan). "His book is by far the frankest ever written by any dealer anywhere, and by printing many of the original documents and letters that passed between him and his agents Buchanan conveys much of the profitable excitement of the pursuit - bliss indeed was it to be a collector in that dawn, but to be a dealer was very heaven."-Francis Haskell, Rediscoveries in Art: Some Aspects of Taste, Fashion & Collecting in England & France (1976), p. 27.
placeholder

Sanka tangan zuketsu [Obstetrical Insights, Illustrated]

MIZUHARA, Sansetsu Several full-page woodcut illus. 40; 37 folding leaves. Two vols. 8vo, orig. blue wrappers, orig. block-printed title labels on upper covers. Osaka, Edo, & Kyoto: 1836. [with]: -. Sanka tangan zushiki [Illustrated Manual of Obstetrical Forceps Use]. Accordion-printed album with 33 double-page illus. Two parts in one vol. Thick 8vo, orig. boards (quite rubbed), orig. block-printed title label on upper cover. [Kyoto?]: 1837. First edition and a rare complete set, including the two volumes of illustrated text and the atlas, all in fine condition. "Perhaps the most fascinating of the old books on obstetrics in the writer's collection is a Japanese obstetrical atlas printed in one 'accordion-style' volume, composed by Sansetsu or Gihaku or Yoshihiro Mizuhara (1782-1864) and published in 1837 with the title Sanka zushiki. Mizuhara is now considered to have been the 'Semmelweis of Japan,' credited with saving many lives of both mother and child because of his knowledge and his inventions - different 'styles' of forceps or seekers or probes. Drawings of these Japanese obstetrical instruments (which appear to be variations on those of the Kagawas) are shown, with many illustrations of them in practical use. Prudery was not unknown in the practice of Japanese obstetrics, and an illustration shows the physician 'operating under the sheet.'.The only advantage this 'obscurity' offered the Japanese physician was as a means for him to employ the obstetrical instruments which, by the traditional belief of the unsuspecting mothers of Japan, he was not supposed to use. A second part of this atlas was devoted to illustrative case reports. The artist of the woodcuts for this obstetrical atlas was Unshorin Shiokawa (1807-77), who also contributed a postscript to that book describing his work. Sanka zushiki is a beautiful example of the fine Japanese printing of that period, and the damp-staining of the copy in my collection merely adds to its charm."-Mestler, A Galaxy of Old Japanese Medical Books, II, p. 498. In fine condition. The comparable Blondelet set sold for $19,200 in a subsequent auction held in 2007.
placeholder

Illustrated manuscript on paper, entitled on upper wrapper “Kakukotsu shinkeizu” [“All the Bones of the Human Body Faithfully Illustrated”]

DISSECTION & OSTEOLOGY Numerous fine brush & ink paintings in many colors, including three folding plates. 29 folding leaves (265 x 180 mm.), orig. wrappers, new stitching. "Copied at Torinken Juku [which was founded by Genkaku Nakajima, the author of the Preface], Edo, in 1858 from a manuscript written in 1846." A finely and richly illustrated manuscript depicting the results of a dissection of a male criminal that took place in the winter of 1845. We learn from the explanatory notes at the beginning of the manuscript that the lead doctor of the dissection was Keishu (or Gendai or Gentai) Kamada (1794-1854), who had studied for five years with Seishu Hanaoka, the most notable Japanese surgeon of the Edo period and the world's first surgeon to successfully perform surgery under general anesthesia. Considered to be one of Hanaoka's star students, Kamada returned to his native island of Shikoku in southwestern Japan, where he immediately became court doctor to the Ozu fiefdom lord and was known as a remarkable surgeon. He performed many plastic, orthopedic, and pediatric surgical procedures and was especially regarded for treating breast cancer. Kamada wrote the first textbook of clinical anesthesiology, the Mafutsuto-ron, in 1839 and created one of the earliest illustrations of surgery under general anesthesia in his Gekakihai-zufu [Illustrations of Surgical Cases], a casebook of surgical treatment he published in 1840. He also trained the world's second anesthesiologist, Gensei Matsuoka. Dissections were rare events in Japan in the Edo period and only about 34 such procedures took place before 1868. We learn from the text at the beginning of the manuscript that this is a record of a dissection of an executed male criminal that took place in 1845. Kamada was the lead doctor; he was assisted by several other doctors and observed by about 50 more doctors and students. The introductory remarks state that Japanese knowledge of the osteology of the human body stemmed from Bunken Kagami's magnificent atlas, the Kakkotsu shinkeizu, published in 1810. The Preface states that following the dissection of this body, the remaining corpse was thoroughly steamed in order to make it easy to cleanse all the bones of any remaining skin or tissue. The bones were left to dry for ten to twenty days. Models were made of the bones for future study of joint structure and function. The knowledge gained from this dissection greatly influenced future treatment of patients. An artist was engaged to faithfully render every bone and joint. The Preface states that this is an absolutely accurate record of this important moment. At the end, there is a list of the six doctors who performed the actual dissection: Kamada, "Matsuzawa," "Higuchi," "Matsuoka," "Iwai," and "Itokawa." The Preface was written by Genkaku Nakajima, who had established a private school of medicine in Edo. This manuscript was copied in 1858 from a manuscript kept at the school. The beginning illustrations of this fine manuscript depict the stages of the dissection, with images of a cross-section of the neck of the decapitated criminal, the decapitated body on a mat with the head nearby, the removal of the chest flesh to reveal the ribcage, the organs of the chest and abdomen, the removed organs and intestines tied and hung (front and back views), the emptied chest cavity, the heart (with cross-sections), the lung (with cross-sections), liver (with cross-sections), spleen, kidneys (with cross-sections), stomach (with anterior view), intestines, bladder, penis and testicles (with cross-sections), a partly dissected head, the skull from the rear, brain (front and anterior views), and a cross-section of the brain from the top. The second half of the manuscript is concerned with the osteology of the human body, beginning with two views - front and back - of the skeleton of the criminal. There follows a series of finely drawn images of all the bones of the body, including skull (front and side), many views of the spine (front and back) with each vertebrae separately and minutely depicted, ribcage (front and back), individual rib bones, pelvis (several views), bones of the leg, bones of the hand, with "exploded" depictions of each bone, and the foot (several views from side and front and exploded). Many of the illustrations contain additional commentary by various doctors, with remarks on similarities to illustrations in Western and Chinese anatomical textbooks. On the penultimate leaf, there is a pasted-on slip with the seal of the Maebashi Fiefdom (in today's Gunma Prefecture), next to Tokyo. On the final leaf there is an ownership inscription of two generations of chiropractors in Gunma Prefecture, whose family name was Ushigome. There have been repairs to extremities of leaves but in fine and fresh condition. The three folding plates have been carefully backed. Preserved in a silk-covered board folder.
placeholder

An assembled scroll, measuring 408 x 2260 mm., consisting of four sheets of paper (sheet height is 350 mm.; the four sheets are 1630 mm. in total length), recently backed with green silk fabric borders

SUGITA, Genpaku, attributed to [Japan]: before 1811. Genpaku Sugita (1733-1817), one of the most renowned of all Japanese medical doctors, was a physician and scholar in Tokyo. In 1771, he was one of two lead physicians to witness the famous dissection of an executed female criminal. He was accompanied by several fellow doctors, all of whom had studied Dutch medicine. During the dissection, Sugita and his colleagues noticed the extreme accuracy of the images in the Dutch medical book Tabulae Anatomicae (1731) of Kulmus. Sugita decided to learn Dutch and translate the book into Japanese and illustrate it. He worked with his fellow physicians and in 1774 published the famous Kaitai Shinsho [The New Book of Dissection]. "This classic work was a milestone in the history of medicine, and particularly of anatomy, in Japan, marking as it did the transition from the traditional Chinese medical teachings to the period when medical knowledge (anatomy) was to be based strictly upon human dissection and when anatomical inferences were to be confirmed 'in the flesh,' so to speak. Kaitai shinsho was the first Japanese translation of a Western anatomical work.[it] launched a long series of anatomical works."-Mestler, A Galaxy of Old Japanese Medical Books, I, p. 311. The first sheet of paper, measuring 350 x 245 mm., is a fine brush and ink portrait of Shennong (or Shen Nung), the deity who first instructed the Chinese in the use of herbal drugs and many other aspects of medicine. The image shows Shennong tasting a plant, one of the classic depictions of this god. It would be pleasant to think this finely drawn portrait was executed by Sugita himself. The second sheet measures 350 x 475 mm. and contains three illustrations. There is a note on the right side of the sheet stating that these images are a combination of Japanese, Chinese, and Dutch medicine and the information comes from Ryotaku Maeno (1723-1803). He was the other leading physician to witness the dissection with Sugita and worked with him on the translation. The first image depicts the anatomy of the chest and abdomen (lungs, heart, and intestines) and genitals. Above and below this image are a series of pharmaceutical recipes. The second image depicts an infected foot with a tourniquet at mid-calf. A knife is shown where it has opened and cleaned the infection. Explanatory text is above and to the left. The third image shows a tourniquet at mid-thigh, the resulting constricted artery, and two Western-style forceps entering the calf muscle. The text just to the left describes the procedure. On the extreme left is a note stating "1811, March, Genpaku true hand" with traces of a now-faded seal. The third sheet, measuring 350 x 495 mm., is related to the previous sheet and depicts a series of herbal plants, all labelled. They include mountain lilies, fish mint, poison orchid, smilax glabra, garlic, and one we cannot identify. At the end of this image, on the bottom left, there is another note stating "Genpaku" with a faded illegible seal. The final sheet (350 x 415 mm.) is a calligraphic statement regarding medicine and physicians. The first column can be translated in several ways: "Medicine is a benevolent Art" or "Humanistic Medicine" or "Physicians practice compassionate healing." The next five columns appear to be poems on medicine and its value to society (but this is really hard to read and we are not entirely certain). The final three columns state "1811, March. Japanese, Chinese, Dutch medical practice. Genpaku" with the same faded seal. We know that Genpaku wrote poetry. In very good condition.
placeholder

Bakyo taizen [Complete Collection of Equine Classics]

MA, Shih-wen (or Shiwen) Many illus. (many full-page or double-page). 50; 73; 49; 40 folding leaves. Four vols. Large 8vo, orig. blue wrappers, remains of block-printed title labels on upper covers (each label partly rubbed away), new stitching. Osaka: Ogawa et al., 1786 Second Japanese edition (1st ed.: ca. 1728-30), written in Chinese with Japanese reading marks, of one of the most important Chinese veterinary medicine books, first published in China in 1608. Recent scholarship has shown (see Buell, May, & Ramey, "Chinese Horse Medicine: Texts and Illustrations" in Imagining Chinese Medicine, eds. Vivienne Lo & Penelope Barrett, 2018, pp. 315-26), that this text is not the work of two brothers, Yuan and Heng, horse specialists with long experience. Actually, it is a new edition of an earlier text, the Yuan Heng liaoma ji (Collection for Treating Horses), now lost. It has been compiled from a variety of sources. "Spurious attribution notwithstanding, this [text] is an extraordinarily rich work. It is in six books and includes detailed discussions of a variety of topics: horse physiognomy; horse whorl lore, a kind of divination based upon close examination of the configurations assumed by a horse's hair that is also found outside of China; horse diagnosis and physiology; horse pathology, including a consideration of the eye diseases of the horse; taboo and propitious days for treatments; correspondences; and a huge section, comprising all of books 3 and 4, on specific conditions and the treatments preferred for them. At the end of the book, there is also a detailed listing of herbal medicines and preparation and their specific applications."-Buell et al., p. 316-(& see references to the 1608 edition & reproductions of illustrations throughout the Lo & Barrett book). The book is divided into four sections: "Spring," "Summer," "Autumn," and "Winter," each with many chapters of diagnosis and treatment. The attractive title-page in the first volume depicts several breeds of horses. There is a fine full-page woodcut of a Chinese professor of veterinary medicine seated with open books, surrounded by students. There are a series of illustrations depicting pressure points on the horses (and the author stresses that the pressure points are very different from those on humans). There is a long section on the significance of the color of the tongue (with a most attractive woodcut showing a doctor examining a horse's tongue). We also find extensive sections on acupuncture, the bleeding of horses, constipation and kinds of enemas, dentition from age one to twelve (12 small woodcuts showing the changes), upset stomachs and vomiting, recipes for herbal medicines, hemorrhoids, joint pains, respiratory illnesses, fevers, diseases of the kidneys, birthing, eye diseases, heart problems, blood in the urine, diseases of the hoof, castration of stallions, auspicious days for surgery, etc., etc. The final volume is devoted to rules on how to feed and water horses correctly, with many recipes. A fine set, with some minor worming, mostly marginal.
placeholder

Zoho teita hatsumo or Zoho shuhan hatsumo [Enlarged Dictionary Handbook of Pharmaceutical Ingredients]

FUJII, Kansai, or OSAKAYA, Shirobei (not OOSAKAYA, Shirobee) 1, 2, 7, 148, 45 folding leaves. Thick oblong 8vo, orig. blue patterned wrappers (first leaves with some minor worming), new stitching. Edo: Yamashiroya, first Preface dated 1829; colophon dated 1824, title-page dated 1823. Second edition (1st ed.: 1823 or 1824), of this rare dictionary of pharmaceutical ingredients, written as a reference book for pharmacists. Our work was the late-Edo equivalent of today's famous Merck's Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy. It is based on Ranzan Ono's Honzo komoku keimo (1803-05), the great Japanese materia medica and classification of plants. According to the Union Catalogue of Early Japanese Books, Fujii and Osakaya were actually one and the same person, a pharmacist in the Hachikancho area (today's Ginza) of Tokyo. Following the Preface, there is a massive index serving as a guide to the rest of the book. The categorization is as follows: "products of the mountains," scents, and animal, mineral, and vegetable products. By the time of the publication of this book, thanks to the Dutch influence, Western pharmaceutical materials were widely known in Japan, and here many foreign ingredients are listed: sassafras, cream of tartar, coffee, antimony, quinine, Portuguese oil, tamarind, sal ammoniac, saltpeter, fresh milk, purified water, ammonia, rosewater, cinnamon, a cough syrup, etc. At the end there is a double-page opening, with the numbers one to ten in Roman and Arabic numerals with their Japanese transliterations. The section on mineral products gives a list of colors used for painting and dyeing. Very good copy, preserved in a chitsu. WorldCat lists a copy at Berkeley and another - incorrectly under Oosakaya - in Japan.
placeholder

Manuscript on paper, primarily written in French but with many recipes in German as well, entitled on the first leaf “Koch Buch von Allerhand Arten Speissen so wohl von Fleisch als Gebackenes und Fischen. 1730.”

FRENCH & GERMAN MANUSCRIPT COOKBOOK) Written in several hands, some French, some German. 1 p.l., 358, [11] pp. Two parts in one vol. 4to (210 x 175 mm.), cont. boards (recased, title carefully backed, some inevitable staining & foxing). N.p., but probably western Germany: "1730." A most interesting cookbook, written in several mid-18th-century French and German hands, with many recipes from each country's culinary traditions. The recipes range from a bourgeois standard to fine cuisine. The manuscript is divided into two parts. Pages 1-124 provide recipes for fish and meat dishes; soups; "Pouding;" terrines; baked goods of all sorts; liquors like ratafia, quince brandy; beer, etc. Most of the recipes are titled in French: "Creme Souflée," "Poisson Mariné," "Crême au chocolat," "Boudin blanc très bon," "Pouding au pommes de terre," "Excellente Soupe au pain," "Pouding au Chocolat a la Vanille," etc., etc. The second part, which is much more German, gives recipes for baked goods and liquours and many other dishes. They include "Gateau sans sucre," "Omlette au pain," "Moutarde," "Oeufs aux gratin," regional varieties of beer, etc. In addition, there are a number of recipes for home remedies for various illnesses. These include a bouillon for "Estomacs Dérangés," an "Opiate pour les Dents," "Remède contre la Fièvre, de Mr Helvetius," a recipe to cure "Coliques d'estomac," etc. At the end is an 11-page index of the contents. About 15 leaves of the main section of the manuscript are blank. A very good early 18th-century cookery manuscript in good condition.
placeholder

Catalogus eener voortreffllijke, uitmuntende en allerprachtigste Verzameling Boeken, en Prentwerken, heerlijk geconditioneerd en Voortreffelijk gebonden; uitmakende de keur der beroemde Bibliotheek des Heeren.hetwelk verkocht zal worden op Donderdag den 24e Junij 1824, te Amsterdam.Door de makelaars: Jeronimo de Vries, Albertus Brondgeest, Engelbert Michael Engelberts en Cornelis François Roos.

AUCTION CATALOGUE: FRIES, Moritz, Grave von) 3 p.l., 42 pp. 8vo, orig. printed glazed paper wrappers (wrappers a little detached & spine worn), uncut. [From the lower cover]: Amsterdam, B.J. Crajenschot & G. Lamberts, [from the title-page]: 1824. The very rare sale catalogue, fully priced throughout, with buyers' names in a contemporary hand, of a collection considered among Europe's finest at the opening of the 19th century. Fries (1777-1826), an Austrian banker, patron of Beethoven, and passionate collector of books and art, amassed a library of 16,000 volumes, 300 Old Master paintings, over 100,000 drawings and engravings, as well as large accumulations of coins, sculptures, and rare minerals. His collections were stored and displayed at his palace (known today as the Palais Pallavicini) located on Josefsplatz square in Vienna. Married to Princess Maria Theresa zu Hohenlohe-Waldenburg-Schillingsfürst in 1800, Fries is largely remembered for his patronage of music in Vienna; in particular, he supported the careers of Haydn, Beethoven, and Schubert. His profligate lifestyle, voracious collecting, and the struggles of his bank in the wake of the Napoleonic Wars led to bankruptcy, and Fries was forced to sell his collections in a series of public auctions. The present catalogue describes the second part of the first sale of his estate, which offers his "extravagant" copies of famous illustrated and color-plate books of natural history, architecture, art, literature, etc., and books of prints. It consists of 132 lots, many of which are large-paper copies or printed on vellum and finely bound in red or green morocco. Very good copy, fully priced, with buyers' names, and totaled at end. Bookplate of the Dutch bookseller Simon Emmering. ? Lugt 10705. Lugt, Marques, 2903.
placeholder

Catalogue de la Collection d’Estampes anciennes provenant du Cabinet de M. H. de L.dont la Vente aux enchères publiques aura lieu.le Lundi 21 avril 1856, et jours suivants.Par le ministère de Me Delbergue-Cormont, Commissaire-Priseur [Expert: P. Defer].

AUCTION CATALOGUE: [HIS DE LA SALLE, Aimé Charles Horace]) xviii, 203, [1] p. of errata. 8vo (225 x 145 mm.), orig. green printed wrappers (spine defective). Paris: P. Defer, 1856. The expert's own copy, with two autograph letters from the consigner His de la Salle. This copy is fully priced and with all buyers' names: we learn that Adolphe Thiers, the brothers Dutuit, the dealers F. Guichardot, Georges Rapilly, Vignères, and Dominic Colnaghi were all active at this sale. In the formation of his own collection, His de la Salle benefitted from the numerous outstanding print sales that took place after 1825, the year he began to collect in earnest. This is the sale catalogue for the first, and far more impressive, of the two sales of his collection. It netted 53,480 francs according to the pencil annotation at the end. In the preface, Defer remarks on the numerous highlights of the sale. The catalogue describes 1184 lots of prints and 19 lots of books on engraving and 19th-century sale catalogues. In the margins, each lot is individually priced, with all buyers noted. We also learn from the marginal notes which lots were bought in (retiré) and paid for in cash (payé). Addressed to Defer, the two letters tipped-in after the half-title show that His de la Salle was a very involved consigner who wrote and edited a number of the descriptions. A valuable copy that illuminates the mechanics of a 19th-century French art auction and provides useful provenance information. The lower half of the spine is exposed, but the quires are still firmly in place. ? Lugt 22951. See Marques, 1332 & 1333.
placeholder

Anweisung zur Vertheidigung der Festungen von.[translated by]: F. von Bressensdorf.

CARNOT, Lazare Nicolas Marguerite 11 folding engraved plates & numerous tables in the text. xxxii, 542, [2] pp. Large 4to (250 x 215 mm.), cont. red sheep maroquiné, flat spine gilt, covers framed with gilt Greek keys, gilt round sides, a.e.g. Stuttgart: Cotta, 1820. The important German translation of the third and final edition of Carnot's chief work, in a most attractive binding. Written at the request of Napoleon and published for the first time in 1810 (third ed.: 1812), it concerns the coordination and logistics necessary for a successful defense of fortified positions. The plates are highly detailed with elevations and cross-sections demonstrating his theories of fortification, which replaced those of Vauban and improved upon the ideas of Montalembert. The translator, von Bressensdorf, was a lieutenant in a Bavarian grenadier guard unit. "Known to French history as the 'Organizer of Victory' in the wars of the Revolution and to engineering mechanics for the principle of continuity in the transmission of power, Carnot [1753-1823] remains one of the very few men of science and of politics whose career in each domain deserves serious attention on its own merits.Throughout the Napoleonic period he served on numerous commissions appointed by the Institute to examine the merits of many of the mechanical inventions that testify to the fertility of French technical imagination in those years of conquest and warfare."-D.S.B., III, p. 70 & 72. An excellent copy. WorldCat locates only one example of this book in North America. Unidentified engraved noble bookplate on front paste-down. ? David Eugene Smith, "Lazare Nicholas Marguerite Carnot" in The Scientific Monthly, Vol. 37, No. 2, (Aug., 1933), pp. 189. Jähns 2816. N.B.G., Vol. 8, cols. 788-800.
placeholder

Manuscript on paper, entitled on upper wrapper “Gozofu betsu narabini kyudan chiho” [“The Five Organs Carefully Examined, Also Acupuncture Treatment”]

OTSUBO SCHOOL OF MILITARY EQUITATION 22 brush-and-ink color paintings & diagrams of which seven are double-page. 25 leaves (five pages are blank). 8vo (249 x 184 mm.), orig. self-wrappers, new stitching. [Japan]: at end "1607" (but this is surely a later copy of the 1607 manuscript). Bajutsu, the Japanese form of military equestrianism, had several traditional schools, the most important of which are the Otsubo, Ogasawara, and Hachijo Schools. The art of military equestrianism required skill in riding and mounted sword-fighting and also included teachings on the care and upkeep of horses. These schools were founded around the 14th century but have their roots in the transfer of knowledge from China in the 7th century. Because of the numerous wars in pre-Edo Japan, there was a comparative scarcity of horses. Therefore, there was a great need for well-trained and healthy horses to be made available to the samurai soldiers. The founder of the Otsubo School of military equitation was Yoshihide Otsubo (1324-1407). He was appointed head of court ceremonies in Kyoto and governed a large part of the city. An accomplished horseman, he also made saddles and stirrups. Otsubo was succeeded by Nagayuki Murakami Kaga Nokami, and by 1477 the school was well established. It was the leading school for a considerable period specializing in the art of riding in combat, using a bow, sword, spear, and gloves. The Otsubo bow was very large and the sword was long and bent. In training, the Otsubo School believed in the liberal use of the whip and ropes to encourage the horse's correct behavior and posture. At the end of our manuscript, we learn that "Shigehide Ueda" received the original manuscript in 1607. This Ueda was probably a member of the Ueda School of equestrianism, an offshoot of the Otsubo School. We are also given the name of Ueda's teachers, his older brother, Saito Aki no kami, and "Hosokawa." Our manuscript begins with an explanation of 17 different whips and ropes, each of which is suited for a certain kind of horse or training goal. There are instructions on how to apply the lashes of each whip to the horse's body. This is followed by a fine illustration of a horse and the nine sections to which whips could be applied (top of head, mouth, neck, thigh, etc.). Now we have two illustrations of horses tied with red ropes in specific ways to vertical and horizontal posts. Clearly, there was a great emphasis on obedience and improving the posture of the horse. Next are two fine double-page illustrations of horses and their trainers, who have tied one hind leg of the horses. The horses are wearing ornate tack, including an elaborate bit, a decorative saddle and stirrups, etc. The trainers are standing behind the horses, clearly forcing the horses to take measured steps. The next image is that of a horse tied with red ropes in an elaborate fashion, making it impossible for the horse to walk. There is a full-page illustration of the horse's blood circulation from the heart to the rest of the chest, along with pressure points. Facing this is an illustration of a horse whose head is being restrained to improve its posture. The next two illustrations are double-page depictions of a horse tied to two upright posts, being restrained by its trainer. Then we have a series of illustrations of horses tied by red ropes to restrict movement. There is a most interesting image of a horse judged to be "second-rate." One of the double-page images shows a man using a lit torch under the horse's hindquarters. At the end, we learn that this is an accurate copy of the earlier manuscript, with "not one word missing or added." The source manuscript was owned by the Hosokawa family. The final section provides a list of the heads of the Otsubo School, starting with the founder Yoshihide Otsubo, and those who were trained in the school's secrets. These men became highly respected master trainers, stable masters, farriers, and veterinarians in service to the samurai, fiefdom lords, and shogun. In fine condition, preserved in a chitsu.
placeholder

Baryo benkai [Good Horse Treatment Explained]

JIZANSHI Many woodcut illus., of which 26 are full-page. Five parts in one vol. 3, 163 (i.e., 153, due to misnumbering) folding leaves. Oblong 8vo, orig. dark blue thick wrappers (wrappers rubbed, some dampstaining), orig. stitching. Kyoto: Hishiya magobei, 1796. A later Japanese edition of one of the earliest Chinese collections of texts on horse medicine. Our book stems from a "late 14th-century compilation [which] does contain genuine works from earlier times. This is the Simu anji ji (Collections for Pacifying Stallions when Administering Flocks), published in 1384. Judging from internal evidence, most of its components are apparently from the 11th and 12th centuries, but some may be later. In particular, some show the signs of the developed correspondence theory that first came to fruition in human medicine during late Song, Jin (1125-1234) and Yuan (1260-1369) times. Most [of its texts] are probably northern in origin (China was disunited at the time) although some, probably those added last, may have been Southern Song (1125-1279)."-Buell, May & Ramey, "Chinese Horse Medicine: Texts and Illustrations," in Lo & Barrett, Imagining Chinese Medicine (2018), pp. 315-16. The Simu anji ji was first published in Japan in 1604 as part of a 12-volume work entitled Kana an'i shu [Kana Book of Old Chinese Remedies for Horses] by Doha Hashimoto. The text was then separately published under the title Baryo benkai in 1732, with later editions in 1759, 1796 (our copy), and 1859 (but that edition may be a much revised or entirely different text). The first part is devoted to the anatomy and organs of the horse. Part II is concerned with the outer appearance of the horse, with illustrations of the pressure points and what constitutes an "ideal" horse, and the five elements. There is an extensive discussion on how to judge a horse and its age while considering a purchase. Part III is a dictionary of medicines for horses, divided by source (mineral or botanical). The pulse, blood circulation, and the meridians are the main topics of Part IV. Many case histories are provided. Part V contains detailed recipes for medicines, including a number of hitherto "secret" recipes. The numerous fine woodcut illustrations depict the organs of the horse, pressure points, grooming equipment (such as scissors, knives and tools to trim hooves, acupuncture needles, moxibustion tools, combs, a bamboo torch, etc.), a doctor administering medicine using a bamboo tube inserted into a horse's mouth, horses being treated with acupuncture and moxibustion, horses being restrained after treatment, swimming as a physical therapy, etc. A very good copy of an extremely rare work in any edition. WorldCat locates only one copy of our edition, in Japan. ? Taniguchi, The Education and Research of Veterinary Medicine in Japan (online resource).
Manuscript on paper. Two hand-drawn maps & a diagram of a Japanese sword

Manuscript on paper. Two hand-drawn maps & a diagram of a Japanese sword

OFFICIAL REPORTS & LETTERS FROM THE BAKUMATSU ERA, 1853-1863 Three parts in two vols. 139; 86 folding leaves. 8vo (235 x 165 mm.), cont. patterned covers (extremities a little worn), new stitching. Edo: ca. 1863. A fascinating compilation of contemporary reports chronicling the first 11 years of the turbulent Bakumatsu era, 1853-67, the period between Commodore Perry's first visit to Japan and the establishment of the Meiji government. These two volumes consist of manuscript copies of high-level official documents in the years 1853 to 1863, describing pivotal moments in Japan's history that fundamentally shaped its relationship to the rest of the world. Heralding the end of the Edo period and a Tokugawa-controlled government, the Bakumatsu period saw Japan end its policy of strict isolationism. The shogun reluctantly accepted that interactions with the rest of the world were unavoidable; however, sizable factions steadfastly and violently resisted opening Japan to the world. The influx of Americans, British, Russians, French, and Dutch in several port cities instigated numerous crimes against foreigners. In one notable incident in January 1861, a group of samurai assassinated a Dutchman named Henry Heusken, who was serving as secretary and interpreter for the American embassy. That summer, at the British legation in Edo, a band of ronin (masterless samurai) attacked ambassador Rutherford Alcock and several other diplomats, killing two. Composed in a single hand, our manuscript preserves firsthand reports on many consequential events during the first ten years of the Bakumatsu period. These include detailed accounts of: -an American ship approaching Haneda in 1853. The text of the letter from President Fillmore delivered by Perry and a hand-drawn map of the Uraga Channel and the positions of American ships follows; -an early sighting from Tsushima Island of a Russian ship on 13 April 1854; -Perry's second expedition; -the 1858 Treaty of Amity and Commerce between Japan and the United States; -the Sakuradamon incident; -the marriage of Princess Kazunomiya to Shogun Iemochi; -the Tenchugumi incident (accompanied by a hand-drawn map of the battlefield); -the Namamugi incident; -the battle of Shimonoseki Straits; -the British bombardment of Kagoshima; -the closure of Yokohama to foreigners; -and many other pivotal events. In most of these episodes, the main figures, both Japanese and Western, are listed. Throughout the two volumes we have eyewitness insights into the reactions and decision-making of Japanese officials as they were confronted with seemingly existential threats. There are several copies of communiqués from the shogun to fiefdom lords, which are either orders or inquiries soliciting advice from the lords. We also learn about contingency plans, the formulation of replies to foreign demands, and efforts to reassure the Japanese people - for example, an order for citizens to pray accompanied the production of 100 special white-silver coins to be donated to temples across the country for good luck. The anxieties of Japanese officials about opening the country to foreigners are expressed repeatedly, and reveal the divide between those accepting of it and those who strove to reverse it. This dilemma came to a head with the Sakuradamon incident, when ronin of the Mito clan brazenly murdered Ii Naosuke, the head diplomat who had signed the 1858 treaty with the United States. This event is described at length in this manuscript, and the account even records the punishments handed down to the perpetrators. In good condition and composed in a legible and neat hand. The volume marked "I & II" on the cover has several worm trenches touching text. The other book has only a few wormholes, which do not touch the text. ? Reinier H. Hesselink, "The Assassination of Henry Heusken," Monumenta Nipponica, Vol. 49, No. 3 (Autumn, 1994), pp. 331-51. John McMaster, "Alcock and Harris: Foreign Diplomacy in Bakumatsu Japan," Monumenta Nipponica, Vol. 22, No. 3/4 (1967), pp. 305-67.
placeholder

The Scriptural History of the Earth and of Mankind, compared with the Cosmogonies, Chronologies, and Original Traditions of Ancient Nations; an Abstract and Review of Several Modern Systems.

HOWARD, Philip vi, [2], 602 pp., one leaf of errata. 4to, fine cont. tree calf (very slightly worn at head), gilt borders on sides, spine gilt in compartments, red morocco lettering piece on spine. London: R. Faulder, 1797. First edition and a lovely copy. This book was written at a pivotal point in the history of geology, after the publication of Hutton's Theory of the Earth (1795) but before Playfair's Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth (1802). It was a time when no theory had been generally accepted and Biblical theories were still widely current. Howard's substantial book is a review of some current theories and the exposition of his own. The theories he reviews are those of Bailly, Buffon, Wallerius and Hutton. His own theory, while based on science, is Mosaical and is intended to be perfectly consistent with the Scriptures. Howard's theory of geology is one of nineteen reviewed by Accum in his A System of Theoretical and Practical Chemistry (1807), who devotes an entire page to it. Howard (d. 1810) was a member of the prominent Roman Catholic Howard family from Corby Castle in Yorkshire. This work grew out of two letters that he published in French in 1786, occasioned by a difference of opinion relative to the causes of the formation of mountains between him and his friend the Marquis de Montegny. Fine copy. ? Roy Porter, The Making of Geology. Earth Science in Britain 1660-1815, pp. 165 & 196-(who describes Howard as a "Scriptural-Geologist").