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Catalogus eener voortreffllijke, uitmuntende en allerprachtigste Verzameling Boeken, en Prentwerken, heerlijk geconditioneerd en Voortreffelijk gebonden; uitmakende de keur der beroemde Bibliotheek des Heeren.hetwelk verkocht zal worden op Donderdag den 24e Junij 1824, te Amsterdam.Door de makelaars: Jeronimo de Vries, Albertus Brondgeest, Engelbert Michael Engelberts en Cornelis François Roos.

AUCTION CATALOGUE: FRIES, Moritz, Grave von) 3 p.l., 42 pp. 8vo, orig. printed glazed paper wrappers (wrappers a little detached & spine worn), uncut. [From the lower cover]: Amsterdam, B.J. Crajenschot & G. Lamberts, [from the title-page]: 1824. The very rare sale catalogue, fully priced throughout, with buyers' names in a contemporary hand, of a collection considered among Europe's finest at the opening of the 19th century. Fries (1777-1826), an Austrian banker, patron of Beethoven, and passionate collector of books and art, amassed a library of 16,000 volumes, 300 Old Master paintings, over 100,000 drawings and engravings, as well as large accumulations of coins, sculptures, and rare minerals. His collections were stored and displayed at his palace (known today as the Palais Pallavicini) located on Josefsplatz square in Vienna. Married to Princess Maria Theresa zu Hohenlohe-Waldenburg-Schillingsfürst in 1800, Fries is largely remembered for his patronage of music in Vienna; in particular, he supported the careers of Haydn, Beethoven, and Schubert. His profligate lifestyle, voracious collecting, and the struggles of his bank in the wake of the Napoleonic Wars led to bankruptcy, and Fries was forced to sell his collections in a series of public auctions. The present catalogue describes the second part of the first sale of his estate, which offers his "extravagant" copies of famous illustrated and color-plate books of natural history, architecture, art, literature, etc., and books of prints. It consists of 132 lots, many of which are large-paper copies or printed on vellum and finely bound in red or green morocco. Very good copy, fully priced, with buyers' names, and totaled at end. Bookplate of the Dutch bookseller Simon Emmering. ? Lugt 10705. Lugt, Marques, 2903.
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Catalogue de la Collection d’Estampes anciennes provenant du Cabinet de M. H. de L.dont la Vente aux enchères publiques aura lieu.le Lundi 21 avril 1856, et jours suivants.Par le ministère de Me Delbergue-Cormont, Commissaire-Priseur [Expert: P. Defer].

AUCTION CATALOGUE: [HIS DE LA SALLE, Aimé Charles Horace]) xviii, 203, [1] p. of errata. 8vo (225 x 145 mm.), orig. green printed wrappers (spine defective). Paris: P. Defer, 1856. The expert's own copy, with two autograph letters from the consigner His de la Salle. This copy is fully priced and with all buyers' names: we learn that Adolphe Thiers, the brothers Dutuit, the dealers F. Guichardot, Georges Rapilly, Vignères, and Dominic Colnaghi were all active at this sale. In the formation of his own collection, His de la Salle benefitted from the numerous outstanding print sales that took place after 1825, the year he began to collect in earnest. This is the sale catalogue for the first, and far more impressive, of the two sales of his collection. It netted 53,480 francs according to the pencil annotation at the end. In the preface, Defer remarks on the numerous highlights of the sale. The catalogue describes 1184 lots of prints and 19 lots of books on engraving and 19th-century sale catalogues. In the margins, each lot is individually priced, with all buyers noted. We also learn from the marginal notes which lots were bought in (retiré) and paid for in cash (payé). Addressed to Defer, the two letters tipped-in after the half-title show that His de la Salle was a very involved consigner who wrote and edited a number of the descriptions. A valuable copy that illuminates the mechanics of a 19th-century French art auction and provides useful provenance information. The lower half of the spine is exposed, but the quires are still firmly in place. ? Lugt 22951. See Marques, 1332 & 1333.
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Anweisung zur Vertheidigung der Festungen von.[translated by]: F. von Bressensdorf.

CARNOT, Lazare Nicolas Marguerite 11 folding engraved plates & numerous tables in the text. xxxii, 542, [2] pp. Large 4to (250 x 215 mm.), cont. red sheep maroquiné, flat spine gilt, covers framed with gilt Greek keys, gilt round sides, a.e.g. Stuttgart: Cotta, 1820. The important German translation of the third and final edition of Carnot's chief work, in a most attractive binding. Written at the request of Napoleon and published for the first time in 1810 (third ed.: 1812), it concerns the coordination and logistics necessary for a successful defense of fortified positions. The plates are highly detailed with elevations and cross-sections demonstrating his theories of fortification, which replaced those of Vauban and improved upon the ideas of Montalembert. The translator, von Bressensdorf, was a lieutenant in a Bavarian grenadier guard unit. "Known to French history as the 'Organizer of Victory' in the wars of the Revolution and to engineering mechanics for the principle of continuity in the transmission of power, Carnot [1753-1823] remains one of the very few men of science and of politics whose career in each domain deserves serious attention on its own merits.Throughout the Napoleonic period he served on numerous commissions appointed by the Institute to examine the merits of many of the mechanical inventions that testify to the fertility of French technical imagination in those years of conquest and warfare."-D.S.B., III, p. 70 & 72. An excellent copy. WorldCat locates only one example of this book in North America. Unidentified engraved noble bookplate on front paste-down. ? David Eugene Smith, "Lazare Nicholas Marguerite Carnot" in The Scientific Monthly, Vol. 37, No. 2, (Aug., 1933), pp. 189. Jähns 2816. N.B.G., Vol. 8, cols. 788-800.
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Manuscript on paper, entitled on upper wrapper “Gozofu betsu narabini kyudan chiho” [“The Five Organs Carefully Examined, Also Acupuncture Treatment”]

OTSUBO SCHOOL OF MILITARY EQUITATION 22 brush-and-ink color paintings & diagrams of which seven are double-page. 25 leaves (five pages are blank). 8vo (249 x 184 mm.), orig. self-wrappers, new stitching. [Japan]: at end "1607" (but this is surely a later copy of the 1607 manuscript). Bajutsu, the Japanese form of military equestrianism, had several traditional schools, the most important of which are the Otsubo, Ogasawara, and Hachijo Schools. The art of military equestrianism required skill in riding and mounted sword-fighting and also included teachings on the care and upkeep of horses. These schools were founded around the 14th century but have their roots in the transfer of knowledge from China in the 7th century. Because of the numerous wars in pre-Edo Japan, there was a comparative scarcity of horses. Therefore, there was a great need for well-trained and healthy horses to be made available to the samurai soldiers. The founder of the Otsubo School of military equitation was Yoshihide Otsubo (1324-1407). He was appointed head of court ceremonies in Kyoto and governed a large part of the city. An accomplished horseman, he also made saddles and stirrups. Otsubo was succeeded by Nagayuki Murakami Kaga Nokami, and by 1477 the school was well established. It was the leading school for a considerable period specializing in the art of riding in combat, using a bow, sword, spear, and gloves. The Otsubo bow was very large and the sword was long and bent. In training, the Otsubo School believed in the liberal use of the whip and ropes to encourage the horse's correct behavior and posture. At the end of our manuscript, we learn that "Shigehide Ueda" received the original manuscript in 1607. This Ueda was probably a member of the Ueda School of equestrianism, an offshoot of the Otsubo School. We are also given the name of Ueda's teachers, his older brother, Saito Aki no kami, and "Hosokawa." Our manuscript begins with an explanation of 17 different whips and ropes, each of which is suited for a certain kind of horse or training goal. There are instructions on how to apply the lashes of each whip to the horse's body. This is followed by a fine illustration of a horse and the nine sections to which whips could be applied (top of head, mouth, neck, thigh, etc.). Now we have two illustrations of horses tied with red ropes in specific ways to vertical and horizontal posts. Clearly, there was a great emphasis on obedience and improving the posture of the horse. Next are two fine double-page illustrations of horses and their trainers, who have tied one hind leg of the horses. The horses are wearing ornate tack, including an elaborate bit, a decorative saddle and stirrups, etc. The trainers are standing behind the horses, clearly forcing the horses to take measured steps. The next image is that of a horse tied with red ropes in an elaborate fashion, making it impossible for the horse to walk. There is a full-page illustration of the horse's blood circulation from the heart to the rest of the chest, along with pressure points. Facing this is an illustration of a horse whose head is being restrained to improve its posture. The next two illustrations are double-page depictions of a horse tied to two upright posts, being restrained by its trainer. Then we have a series of illustrations of horses tied by red ropes to restrict movement. There is a most interesting image of a horse judged to be "second-rate." One of the double-page images shows a man using a lit torch under the horse's hindquarters. At the end, we learn that this is an accurate copy of the earlier manuscript, with "not one word missing or added." The source manuscript was owned by the Hosokawa family. The final section provides a list of the heads of the Otsubo School, starting with the founder Yoshihide Otsubo, and those who were trained in the school's secrets. These men became highly respected master trainers, stable masters, farriers, and veterinarians in service to the samurai, fiefdom lords, and shogun. In fine condition, preserved in a chitsu.
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Baryo benkai [Good Horse Treatment Explained]

JIZANSHI Many woodcut illus., of which 26 are full-page. Five parts in one vol. 3, 163 (i.e., 153, due to misnumbering) folding leaves. Oblong 8vo, orig. dark blue thick wrappers (wrappers rubbed, some dampstaining), orig. stitching. Kyoto: Hishiya magobei, 1796. A later Japanese edition of one of the earliest Chinese collections of texts on horse medicine. Our book stems from a "late 14th-century compilation [which] does contain genuine works from earlier times. This is the Simu anji ji (Collections for Pacifying Stallions when Administering Flocks), published in 1384. Judging from internal evidence, most of its components are apparently from the 11th and 12th centuries, but some may be later. In particular, some show the signs of the developed correspondence theory that first came to fruition in human medicine during late Song, Jin (1125-1234) and Yuan (1260-1369) times. Most [of its texts] are probably northern in origin (China was disunited at the time) although some, probably those added last, may have been Southern Song (1125-1279)."-Buell, May & Ramey, "Chinese Horse Medicine: Texts and Illustrations," in Lo & Barrett, Imagining Chinese Medicine (2018), pp. 315-16. The Simu anji ji was first published in Japan in 1604 as part of a 12-volume work entitled Kana an'i shu [Kana Book of Old Chinese Remedies for Horses] by Doha Hashimoto. The text was then separately published under the title Baryo benkai in 1732, with later editions in 1759, 1796 (our copy), and 1859 (but that edition may be a much revised or entirely different text). The first part is devoted to the anatomy and organs of the horse. Part II is concerned with the outer appearance of the horse, with illustrations of the pressure points and what constitutes an "ideal" horse, and the five elements. There is an extensive discussion on how to judge a horse and its age while considering a purchase. Part III is a dictionary of medicines for horses, divided by source (mineral or botanical). The pulse, blood circulation, and the meridians are the main topics of Part IV. Many case histories are provided. Part V contains detailed recipes for medicines, including a number of hitherto "secret" recipes. The numerous fine woodcut illustrations depict the organs of the horse, pressure points, grooming equipment (such as scissors, knives and tools to trim hooves, acupuncture needles, moxibustion tools, combs, a bamboo torch, etc.), a doctor administering medicine using a bamboo tube inserted into a horse's mouth, horses being treated with acupuncture and moxibustion, horses being restrained after treatment, swimming as a physical therapy, etc. A very good copy of an extremely rare work in any edition. WorldCat locates only one copy of our edition, in Japan. ? Taniguchi, The Education and Research of Veterinary Medicine in Japan (online resource).
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Manbyo baryo shinkyu satsuyo [Acupuncture Treatments for Ten Thousand Illnesses of Horses]

DEIDOJIN Six full-page woodcut illus. in the text. 4 p.l., 34 leaves. Oblong 8vo, orig. wrappers (quite rubbed, some worming to first six leaves, mostly missing both text & image), orig. printed block title label on upper cover, new stitching. Kyoto: Zeniya; Edo: Nishimura; & Osaka: Yasui, 1760. First of one of the most important Japanese works on equine acupuncture. Acupuncture has been used on animals in traditional Chinese medicine for several thousand years. By the 6th century, Buddhist priests brought knowledge of acupuncture as applied to both humans and animals to Japan and Korea. The practice spread widely, and by the 18th century, several books on equine acupuncture had been published in Japan. In the Preface, the author recommends that both acupuncture and herbal medicines be used to treat horses. The text describes how to insert the needles, and then Deidojin focuses on a series of illnesses: constipation; paralysis; respiratory problems; joint and muscle aches; swelling to the joints; boils and malignant tumors; problems of the eye, ear, nose, tongue, lips, and mouth; infections, lacerations, hemorrhoids, reproductive problems, undescended testicles, nosebleeds, vomiting blood, problems with hooves, ingestion of poisonous weeds, lack of appetite, etc., etc. The author provides a number of recipes for medicines. There is much on the treatment of newly born colts. This was a popular book, with a second edition appearing in 1800. Five of the full-page illustrations depict pressure points on the horse's body, and each point is named. The sixth woodcut depicts a doctor administering medicine using a bamboo tube inserted into a horse's mouth. Very good copy. Minor worming. WorldCat lists only one copy, at Harvard.
Manuscript on paper. Two hand-drawn maps & a diagram of a Japanese sword

Manuscript on paper. Two hand-drawn maps & a diagram of a Japanese sword

OFFICIAL REPORTS & LETTERS FROM THE BAKUMATSU ERA, 1853-1863 Three parts in two vols. 139; 86 folding leaves. 8vo (235 x 165 mm.), cont. patterned covers (extremities a little worn), new stitching. Edo: ca. 1863. A fascinating compilation of contemporary reports chronicling the first 11 years of the turbulent Bakumatsu era, 1853-67, the period between Commodore Perry's first visit to Japan and the establishment of the Meiji government. These two volumes consist of manuscript copies of high-level official documents in the years 1853 to 1863, describing pivotal moments in Japan's history that fundamentally shaped its relationship to the rest of the world. Heralding the end of the Edo period and a Tokugawa-controlled government, the Bakumatsu period saw Japan end its policy of strict isolationism. The shogun reluctantly accepted that interactions with the rest of the world were unavoidable; however, sizable factions steadfastly and violently resisted opening Japan to the world. The influx of Americans, British, Russians, French, and Dutch in several port cities instigated numerous crimes against foreigners. In one notable incident in January 1861, a group of samurai assassinated a Dutchman named Henry Heusken, who was serving as secretary and interpreter for the American embassy. That summer, at the British legation in Edo, a band of ronin (masterless samurai) attacked ambassador Rutherford Alcock and several other diplomats, killing two. Composed in a single hand, our manuscript preserves firsthand reports on many consequential events during the first ten years of the Bakumatsu period. These include detailed accounts of: -an American ship approaching Haneda in 1853. The text of the letter from President Fillmore delivered by Perry and a hand-drawn map of the Uraga Channel and the positions of American ships follows; -an early sighting from Tsushima Island of a Russian ship on 13 April 1854; -Perry's second expedition; -the 1858 Treaty of Amity and Commerce between Japan and the United States; -the Sakuradamon incident; -the marriage of Princess Kazunomiya to Shogun Iemochi; -the Tenchugumi incident (accompanied by a hand-drawn map of the battlefield); -the Namamugi incident; -the battle of Shimonoseki Straits; -the British bombardment of Kagoshima; -the closure of Yokohama to foreigners; -and many other pivotal events. In most of these episodes, the main figures, both Japanese and Western, are listed. Throughout the two volumes we have eyewitness insights into the reactions and decision-making of Japanese officials as they were confronted with seemingly existential threats. There are several copies of communiqués from the shogun to fiefdom lords, which are either orders or inquiries soliciting advice from the lords. We also learn about contingency plans, the formulation of replies to foreign demands, and efforts to reassure the Japanese people - for example, an order for citizens to pray accompanied the production of 100 special white-silver coins to be donated to temples across the country for good luck. The anxieties of Japanese officials about opening the country to foreigners are expressed repeatedly, and reveal the divide between those accepting of it and those who strove to reverse it. This dilemma came to a head with the Sakuradamon incident, when ronin of the Mito clan brazenly murdered Ii Naosuke, the head diplomat who had signed the 1858 treaty with the United States. This event is described at length in this manuscript, and the account even records the punishments handed down to the perpetrators. In good condition and composed in a legible and neat hand. The volume marked "I & II" on the cover has several worm trenches touching text. The other book has only a few wormholes, which do not touch the text. ? Reinier H. Hesselink, "The Assassination of Henry Heusken," Monumenta Nipponica, Vol. 49, No. 3 (Autumn, 1994), pp. 331-51. John McMaster, "Alcock and Harris: Foreign Diplomacy in Bakumatsu Japan," Monumenta Nipponica, Vol. 22, No. 3/4 (1967), pp. 305-67.
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The Scriptural History of the Earth and of Mankind, compared with the Cosmogonies, Chronologies, and Original Traditions of Ancient Nations; an Abstract and Review of Several Modern Systems.

HOWARD, Philip vi, [2], 602 pp., one leaf of errata. 4to, fine cont. tree calf (very slightly worn at head), gilt borders on sides, spine gilt in compartments, red morocco lettering piece on spine. London: R. Faulder, 1797. First edition and a lovely copy. This book was written at a pivotal point in the history of geology, after the publication of Hutton's Theory of the Earth (1795) but before Playfair's Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth (1802). It was a time when no theory had been generally accepted and Biblical theories were still widely current. Howard's substantial book is a review of some current theories and the exposition of his own. The theories he reviews are those of Bailly, Buffon, Wallerius and Hutton. His own theory, while based on science, is Mosaical and is intended to be perfectly consistent with the Scriptures. Howard's theory of geology is one of nineteen reviewed by Accum in his A System of Theoretical and Practical Chemistry (1807), who devotes an entire page to it. Howard (d. 1810) was a member of the prominent Roman Catholic Howard family from Corby Castle in Yorkshire. This work grew out of two letters that he published in French in 1786, occasioned by a difference of opinion relative to the causes of the formation of mountains between him and his friend the Marquis de Montegny. Fine copy. ? Roy Porter, The Making of Geology. Earth Science in Britain 1660-1815, pp. 165 & 196-(who describes Howard as a "Scriptural-Geologist").
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A Comparative View of the Huttonian and Neptunian Systems of Geology: in Answer to the Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth, by Professor Playfair

MURRAY, John] 2 p.l., [iii]-v, 256 pp. 8vo, cont. half-calf (spine nicely rebacked with the orig. spine laid-down), recent red morocco lettering piece on spine. Edinburgh: Printed for Ross and Blackwood.and T.N. Longman, and O. Rees, 1802. First edition; this valuable book explores one of the major geological controversies of the period and illustrates the main contemporary criticisms of Hutton's work. It is "one of the best and most complete presentations of it.and sets forth very impartially the explanations put forward by the advocates of each of these theories."-Adams, The Birth and Development of the Geological Sciences, p. 227. This is Murray's critical response to John Playfair's Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth, also published in Edinburgh, earlier in the same year. Using much of the same geological evidence as Playfair, Murray objectively analyzes the theories' claims through rock and fossil formations and concludes in support of the Wernerian theory. Murray (1778-1820), chemist and public lecturer, was also a writer of "celebrated textbooks" (ODNB) on chemistry and materia medica. After attending the University of Edinburgh, he became a popular freelance lecturer on chemistry, mineralogy, geology, and pharmacology. Nice copy. ? Ashworth & Bradley, Linda Hall Library, Theories of the Earth 1644-1830, 42-French ed. of 1815.
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Manuscript in German, written in ink in several clerical hands on paper, entitled “Laus Deo. Anno Christi 1598. Leibtziger Ostermarck Büchlein Sambt. [with the hallmark of Straub] Schüld unnd Gegen-Schüldt Register. Gott der Almechtige verleye seinen gotlichen Segen tzü Nützbarlicher verrichtung Unnd Einbringung der Schulden Amen” [trans.: “Praise God. Anno Christi 1598. Leipzig Easter Fair booklet including a register of debts and counter debts. May God the Almighty give his divine blessing to the advantageous performance and recovery of these debts. Amen”]

STRAUB, Hans I, gold- & silversmith in Nuremberg 22 leaves (including some blanks or pages ruled in ink for entries). Agenda format (315 x 100 mm.), stitched as issued, uncut. [Nuremberg]: 1598. A fascinating document, of a type that rarely survives: the manuscript account book for the spring 1598 Leipzig fair of Hans Straub I (or the Elder, 1541-1610), the prominent Nuremberg gold- and silversmith, alderman, and son-in-law of Wenzel Jamnitzer, the best-known German goldsmith of his time. The first leaf bears Straub's hallmark (interwined initials "HS" over an arrow pointing upward within a plain shield & also containing the inscription "No. 72"). Our manuscript sheds important light on the business relations in the late 16th century between the Nuremberg goldsmiths and their trade at the Leipzig fairs. Our account book is a list of sales, orders, and expenditures of Nuremberg goldsmith Hans Straub the Elder during the Leipzig Easter fair held in May 1598. While Straub is not expressly named, he can be identified by his hallmark on the first leaf. At the fair, trade was done in goblets, rings, knife-sheaths, cutlery, jewelry, gemstones, etc. Several business partners are named, including the Nuremberg goldsmiths Heinrich Hahn (Haan), David Lauer, and Paulus Koch. As an example of a transaction, we see that the council of Halle paid over 33 florins for a goblet. In 1596, Straub was elected Alderman of the Artisans, the most elevated and honorable office to which a Nuremberg artisan could aspire. Straub retained this position until his death in 1610. In 1569, he married Anna, daughter of the famous goldsmith Wenzel Jamnitzer. On his father-in-law's death in 1585, Straub inherited his casting molds, and used them extensively in his own creations. Despite his long period of activity, relatively few pieces made by Hans Straub have survived (see Nürnberger Goldschmiedekunst 1541-1868, 2007, ed. by Karin Tebbe et al., Vol. I, p. 409). In fine condition. ? The mark is similar to Marc Rosenberg, Der Goldschmiede Merkzeichen, Frankfurt 1925, Vol. III, no. 3969.
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An Introduction to the Study of Bibliography. To which is prefixed a Memoir on the Public Libraries of the Antients

HORNE, Thomas Hartwell Folding frontis., 11 plates (several folding), & numerous text illus. (including facsimiles & type specimens). [iv]-xvi, 402 pp.; 1 p.l., [403]-758, [2], clvi pp. Two vols. Large 8vo, cont. diced russia (heads of spines a tiny bit chipped), spines gilt. London: T. Cadell & W. Davies, 1814. First edition of a reference book that has remained very useful. "This is a very valuable work to the student of the history of printing."-Bigmore & Wyman, I, p. 345. Topics include paper, manuscripts, history and techniques of printing, bookbinding, the nature of rarity, classification systems, bibliographies, catalogues and reference books, etc. "Horne relied largely on Peignot, but made some independent additions. He names (pp. 564-614) perhaps a hundred and fifty institutional catalogues published outside the British Isles. His references to catalogues printed in the latter part of the eighteenth century are especially valuable. Few bibliographers have mentioned catalogues of Russian and Turkish libraries and few European bibliographers have cited those issued by Harvard College (1790) and the Library Company of Philadelphia (1807). Horne's list (pp. 614-637) of these and other foreign libraries has not been completely replaced by any later list."-Taylor, Book Catalogues, p. 209 & see pp. 16, 118, 188, 214, & 220. Some foxing but a very good set. Lacking half-titles. ? Besterman 784 & 3561.
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Serie dell’ Edizioni Aldine per Ordine Cronologico ed Alfabetico. Terza Edizione con Emendazioni e Giunte

LAIRE, François Xavier] One folding printed table. vi, 84, 195 pp., one leaf of colophon. 8vo, cont. blue paste-paper boards (a bit worn), uncut. Firenze: G. Molini, 1803. Fourth (in spite of the title-page) and final edition and rather scarce. "The opening sentence of the preface in the first three editions of this work makes it clear that 'this is not a catalogue of books printed by the Aldine Press, but a collection intended to lead to a more complete and disciplined study.' The list of Aldine imprints is based on the collection of Cardinal Étienne-Charles de Loménie de Brienne (1727-1794), whose librarian François Xavier Laire (1738-1799) is the anonymous, attributed author, or compiler, of the work. The author kindly asks readers for corrections, particularly as they related to items that are included incorrectly as Aldine imprints, or are overlooked and should be added. Such notices are to be sent to Abbot Antonio Cesare Burgassi, who, for this reason, is often assigned the authorship of the work.The third edition of 1791 and the fourth of 1803 incorporate additional information, ostensibly provided to Abbot Burgassi by correspondents."-Clemons & Fletcher, Aldus Manutius, 137. Fine copy, with the bookplate of Tammaro de Marinis (1878-1969), Neapolitan bookseller, book collector, and binding scholar. ? Bigmore & Wyman, I, p. 416. See Breslauer & Folter, Bibliography, 115.
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Catalogus Librorum Impressorum [& Codicum Manuscriptorum] in Bibliotheca.Ordinis Sancti Johannis Hierosolymitani asservatorum Argentorati, ordine alphabetico, nova grataque methodo contextus a Johannes Nicolao Weislinger

COMMANDERIE SAINT JEAN, Strasbourg 4 p.l., 262, [4] pp.; 56, [8] pp. Two parts in one vol. Folio, cont. sheep (upper joint cracked but strong, three corners somewhat worn, minor foxing), vellum lettering piece on spine. Strasbourg: typis S. Kürsner, 1749. [bound after]: WEISLINGER, Johann Nikolaus. Armamentarium Catholicum perantiquæ, rarissimæ ac pretiosissimæ Bibliothecæ, quæ asservatur Argentorati in.commenda.ordinis Melitensis Sancti Johannis Hierosolymitani.Notis.interspersis illustratum ex ejusmodi libris, qui ab anno Christi M. CCCC. LXIII. ordine chronologico prodierunt usque ad annum M.D. XXII. quo prodiit primò Martini Lutheri Novum Testamentum. Engraved frontis. port. of the author. Title printed in red & black. 16 p.l., 824, [30] pp., one leaf of errata. Small folio (final leaves of index with some dampstaining). Strasbourg: J.F. Le Roux, 1749. I. The catalogue of the printed books and manuscripts in the library of Strasbourg's St. John's Commandery; this is the best and only record of the contents of the library. The library was originally located in the former monastery of the Trinity at Grünen Wörth, of which the Order of St. John of Jerusalem (or Johannites) took possession in 1371, thanks to the funds provided by the Strasbourg patrician and mystic Rulman Merswin. The Order of St. John (the Knights of Malta) organized a system of commanderies throughout Europe during the medieval and early modern period. Although a prestigious commandery, it was expelled in 1633 as it became necessary to strengthen city fortifications at that site. In 1687, the order found a new home in the old monastery of St. Mark; in 1789 the Revolution put an end to the community and brought about the dispersion of its wealth. The library was clearly formed largely before 1600, and the vast majority of the ca. 6000 titles listed are 15th and 16th century. The library also had an important collection of early manuscripts, here compiled by Johann Jacob Witter; about 2000 are listed in the second part. As we learn from the title-page, the arrangement of books is alphabetical, with columns for author, title and format, place of publication and date, printer, and shelf-mark. II. This bibliography, here also compiled by Weislinger (1691-1755), a Catholic polemical writer, was written to champion the Roman church. He gives extensive polemical criticism of Luther's Bible and works of the early Protestants. Besterman 5043-44 considers it to be the first bibliography of printing in Strasbourg, describing about 500 early printed books. Very good copies.
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Catalogue des Livres sur les Arts tous bien reliés composant la Bibliothèque de M. R***[in cont. ms]: eiset.dont la Vente aura lieu le mardi 15 avril 1879 et jours suivants.Par le ministère de Me Maurice Delestre, commissaire-priseur.

AUCTION CATALOGUE: REISET, Frédéric) 2 p.l., iv, 377, [1] p. Large 8vo (250 x 170 mm.), cont. brown morocco-backed marbled boards, spine gilt, t.e.g. Paris: A. Labitte, 1879. A special copy of the auction catalogue of Reiset's esteemed library devoted to the history of art; this was the finest and largest collection of sale catalogues ever assembled prior to that of Baron Pichon, which was dispersed 20 years later. A contemporary hand has added all prices and many buyers' names, including Edmond de Goncourt, Edmond J. de Rothschild, Georges Duplessis, Paul Demidoff, Baron Pichon, and Georges Rapilly. This catalogue describes 3123 lots of books, of which the first 2315 are art auction catalogues, many from the 17th & 18th centuries and extremely rare. Ordered alphabetically by collector, the catalogues are well described individually, uncommon for the time. The compiler also indicates if they are annotated or illustrated. Reiset (1815-91), a renowned art historian, served as curator of drawings and prints at the Louvre and was later named director general of national museums in France. He amassed singular collections of early sale catalogues, collection catalogues, Salon livrets, and rare works on the arts, all finely bound. Many of his books and catalogues are now in the library of the Institut National d'Histoire de l'Art. "The Baron Pichon collected constantly from 1835; he only had one rival for this specialty, Frédéric Reiset, director of the Musées nationaux, whose library of catalogues, beautifully bound, was dispersed in a public sale on 15 April 1879. It was a memorable scene: Pichon and Edmond de Goncourt dueled over these impossible-to-find livrets.Still today, when chance reveals one of the Reiset copies, amateurs fight over them."-Seymour de Ricci, "La Collection de Catalogues de ventes de la Bibliothèque d'art et d'archéologie," in the Bulletin Sémestriel No. 3 of the Société des amis de la Bibliothèque d'art et d'archéologie de l'Université de Paris, Fondation Jacques Doucet (1930), p. 13 (in trans.). A fine copy with fascinating marginal annotations documenting the auction room battles over Reiset's splendid library. Ownership inscription on half-title of "H[en]ri Delaborde" (1811-99), the painter and art critic. ? INHA's online "Dictionnaire critique des historiens de l'art actifs en France de la Révolution à la Première Guerre mondiale" (Reiset).
A vast collection of ca. 2500 photographic postcards (ehagaki) of kabuki actors in costume

A vast collection of ca. 2500 photographic postcards (ehagaki) of kabuki actors in costume, along with a large selection of kabuki-related vernacular photographs

KABUKI ACTORS Japan: ca. 1912-80. A large and impressive ensemble of Japanese photographic postcards depicting kabuki actors. Photographic postcards effectively replaced ukiyo-e woodblock prints which were enormously popular through 1900. This collection documents the rise and fall of great actors, the evolution of costume styles, the various sets and decorations employed on stage, as well as the proliferation of photographic postcards as mementos and collectible memorabilia. Offered with this collection is a series of vernacular photographic prints of actors, many from the early 20th century. Japan's postal system was established in 1870 as part of many Meiji era reforms to modernize the country. All postcards were produced by the government until 1900. Initially, postcards served a commemorative purpose, printed with images of famous events and holidays. Following the Russo-Japanese War in 1904-5, many thousands of postcards celebrating victories were sold and demand increased exponentially. By the 1910s, progress in photographic printing enabled the mass-production of photographic postcards, such as those represented in the present collection. Such postcards featuring legendary kabuki actors superseded the genre of woodblock prints yakusha-e (actor prints), an offshoot of ukiyo-e. This new type of memorabilia, called ehagaki (picture postcard), developed in parallel to buromaido (photographs of movie and kabuki stars). Our comprehensive collection of postcards and photographs contains examples of both. Actors are generally depicted in costume on stage or in a photo studio; however, there are a large number depicting them away from the stage, often with their families. These mementos were either distributed in advance of a performance for promotional purposes or sold at the theater to devotees. An avid community of collectors for this material emerged within a short time. On many of the postcards there are notes or messages which note the date of the performance, the actors who performed, and the name of the play. Others have this information printed. There are also several examples of postcards printed with dialogue from iconic scenes. One series of photographs has been signed in red or black ink by the great kabuki actor depicted, Sawamura Yujiro. Another series bears the stamps provided by theaters to those attending so that they could commemorate and show off their visits. A few more depict the cast on stage during a performance for their "curtain call." Many candid photographs show the actors as they prepare for a performance, applying their makeup, rehearsing lines, and putting on their costumes. Another highlight of our collection is its considerable number of early photographic celebrity "stills" of the kabuki actors. They were likely produced in the early 1910s and reveal costumes and makeup from the period. These earlier examples were clearly not intended as postcards since they lack an indicated location for the stamp, a message, and an address. It is possible these are precursors to mass-produced buromaido and photographic postcards which constitute the bulk of this collection. Printed on larger format paper that is rather thick, these photographs would have been far more expensive. One series, in particular, consists of photographs taken among the audience during a performance, with the heads of fellow attendees in the way. Celebrated actors represented on the postcards in this collection include (with last names first): Nakamura Utaemon, Onoe Baiko, Nakamura Ganjiro, Ichimura Hazaemon, Ichikawa Sadanji, Onoe Kikugoro, Nakamura Kichiemon, Ichikawa Danjuro, Matsumoto Koshiro, Kataoka Nizaemon, Nakamura Senjaku, Nakamura Kanzaburo, Nakamura Kinnosuke, Yorozuya Kinnosuke, Onoe Matsusuke, Sawamura Sonnosuke, Bando Tamasaburo, Ichikawa Danshiro, Ichikawa Ennosuke, Ichikawa Ebizo, Bando Mitsugoro, Nakamura Fukusuke, Ichikawa Chusha, Nakamura Shikan, Jutsukawa Enjaku, Onoe Shoroku, Sawamura Kinjuro, Sawamura Yujiro, Nakamura Tokizo, Kawarazaki Tokizo, Kawarazaki Kunitaro, Bando Hikosaburo, etc., etc. DATING THE POSTCARDS: We are able to date the ehagaki based on several features. Layout: Division between address and message on the verso of the postcard 1910-1918 - The dividing line leaves the bottom third of the card for the message. 1918-present - In most cases, the line divides the reverse of the card into halves. Reading: "Postcard" (or yubin ha(ka)gaki) label on verso. Pre-1945 - Japanese is printed right to left. Post-1945 - Japanese is printed left to right. Reading of hagaki: Pronunciation of middle syllable. Pre-1933 - Written hakaki without consonant mark. Post-1933 - Written hagaki with consonant mark. Thickness: Postcards on thicker stock are generally older. We know of no comparable collection of this material related to Japanese theater outside of Japan. Our ensemble of several thousand photographic postcards is in fine condition. A few of the earlier examples are slightly worn or faded but overall the postcards and photographs are in an excellent state of preservation. ? Kenji Sato, "Postcards in Japan: A Historical Sociology of a Forgotten Culture," in International Journal of Japanese Sociology, (2002) no. 11, accessed online.
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Wei mo jie suo shuo jing [The Vimalakirti Sutra]

KUMARAJIVA, trans. & comm Two full-page woodcuts serving as frontispieces & a full-page woodcut on final leaf. 1 p.l., 38, 38, 29 folding leaves. Three parts in one vol. 8vo, orig. blue wrappers, manuscript title label on upper cover, new stitching. [Guangzhou]: Yao Shi, [1679]. One of the earliest printings - if not the earliest printing - of the translation by Kumarajiva, of the Vimalakirti Sutra, one of the fundamental texts of Chinese Buddhism. Kumarajiva (344-413), Buddhist monk, scholar, missionary, and translator, who came from the Silk Road kingdom of Kucha, was famous for his encyclopaedic knowledge of Indian and Vendantic learning. He was the greatest translator of Buddhist scripture from Sanskrit into Chinese, and it was largely owing to his efforts and influence that Buddhist religious and philosophical ideas were disseminated in China. Following many years of study in Kucha and Kashmir, he arrived in Chang'an (now Xi'an), in 401 with a great reputation. He became known as "teacher of the nation." There, he headed a famous school of translators, and together they translated many important texts into Chinese, including the Vimalakirti, the Diamond, the Lotus, and the Amitabha Sutras. The Vimalakirti Sutra had been unreliably translated several times before, but Kumarajiva's knowledge of Chinese enabled him to provide lucid explanations of complex Buddhist concepts. Also, his ability to reconcile conflicting positions within Buddhism made his translations the most reliable and important of all. His translations, a major part of the Tripitaka, or "canon" of Chinese Buddhism, were disseminated widely throughout China, Korea, and Japan and are still held in high regard by modern scholars. Without Kumarajiva, some of the great Buddhist texts may not have been preserved. The first woodcut depicts Buddha surrounded by gods and goddesses. On the verso, we see, we believe, Kumarajiva, pen in hand, surrounded by disciples. The woodcut on the recto of the final leaf depicts an unidentified Buddhist god. Kumarajiva's own writings are rare. This edition is particularly notable as it contains his commentary on the Vimalakirti Sutra, which is considered to be the most important for the understanding of Kumarajiva's thought. An early scholar has made numerous notes throughout in red ink in Chinese. Nice crisp copy. The fore-edge of the first leaf, which contains the two woodcuts, is a little frayed but does not touch the images. The final leaves have a growing wormhole and the final leaf has several tears with small loss of image. Lower cover wormed. Preserved in a chitsu. ? Enichi Ocho & Robert F. Rhodes, "The Beginnings of Buddhist Tenet Classification in China" in The Eastern Buddhist, New Series, Vol. 14, No. 2 (Autumn 1981), p. 77-Kumarajiva was "the most important translator of Buddhist texts in China"-& see the whole article, pp. 71-94.
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Scroll on paper depicting the story of “Momotaro” [“The Tale of Peach Boy”]

MOMOTARO EMAKI, Tale of Brush & ink and colors. Scroll (284 x 13,800 mm.), fine front endpaper with silk & gold. [Japan: late Edo]. A very beautiful and accomplished scroll, painted by Goshun (or Gekki) Matsumura (1752-1811), founder of the Shijo school of painting, "which combined elements of shaseiga ('life-drawing painting'), developed by Maruyama Okyo, and Bunjinga ('literati painting'), practised by his early mentor Yosa Buson.The name Shijo school reflects the location of Goshun's painting studio on Shijo (fourth) street in Kyoto."-Oxford Art online. As a painter, Matsumura had a mastery of the use of space while maintaining complete control of the brush. Our scroll, which has Matsumura's characteristic seal of his first name at the beginning, depicts the famous Japanese folklore story of Momotaro ("Peach Boy"), which first appeared in the late Muromachi period (1392-1573). It was passed down orally until the Edo period, when it became portrayed in picture scrolls and, later, in illustrated printed books. By the Meiji period, the story was known to every Japanese child and was one of the five most beloved folk tales throughout Japan. During World War II, Momotaro was used in wartime propaganda. Our scroll is very finely painted and reveals Matsumura's mastery of landscape, color, facial emotions, and lively brush strokes. In a series of 18 scenes, we see the story of Momotaro unfold. The first scene depicts an old woman washing clothes at the river. She sees a giant peach floating by. The next scene shows her carrying the peach back home. Following this, we see her elderly husband waiting for her arrival at the front gate. After opening the peach, they discover a small child in samurai attire, who explains that he is a gift from the gods to be their son. The next scene depicts the husband and wife preparing a meal in their house for Momotaro and themselves. The next scene shows Momotaro as a growing young man, showing his strength by lifting a large rock, being observed by admirers. Following this, we see Momotaro at a waterfall practicing sumo with a bear cub as an opponent. Next, we see Momotaro leaving his parents with his dog to fight a band of Oni (demons or ogres), who have marauded over the land, looting and pillaging. The following scene shows Momotaro encountering a monkey, who asks for a dumpling. Next, a pheasant joins the entourage. They arrive at a beach where they meet small ogres who have also been abused by the Oni; suddenly the dog, monkey, and pheasant have taken human form with animal faces. The next scene takes place on a ship, which Momotaro and his band are sailing to the Onis' island. Following is a scene showing the ogres viewing the arriving ship in the distance. Next is an extended fierce battle scene with the three helpers of Momotaro fighting the ogres. A further battle scene depicts Momotaro participating. The demons are defeated, and we see the demon chief and several others offering Momotaro and his band plundered treasure, including an uchide no Kozuchi (a magic mallet); a kakure mino (a raincoat that makes the wearer invisible); and a kakurekasa (a hat with the same effect). Momotaro sits, holding a fan with a peach symbol. The next scene shows the victorious four approaching Momotaro's home, all carrying treasures. In fine condition. A few wrinkles and, at the beginning of the scroll, there is a long tear carefully repaired.
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Manuscript sutra scroll on indigo-dyed paper of the “Gokito-kyo Hokkekyo” (“The Gokito-kyo Lotus Sutra”)

LOTUS SUTRA SCROLL Fine frontispiece at beginning & "afterpiece" scene at end. Scroll (210 x 9560 mm.), written in ink, color, gold, & silver on indigo-dyed paper. [Japan]: at end (in trans.): "copied on 28th April 1782 by [name impossible to determine as the characters can be read in multiple ways]." This devotional scroll contains a selection of texts - known as the Gokito-kyo Lotus Sutra - taken from the much larger Lotus Sutra, one of the most influential scriptures of the Mahayana Buddhism. It is highly regarded in a number of Asian countries, including China, Korea, and Japan, where it has been traditionally practiced. The Gokito-kyo Lotus Sutra was produced by the Kempon Hokke-shu branch of Nichiren Buddhism, which was based on the teachings of the 13th-century Japanese monk Nichiren. The brushwork throughout this scroll is of a very high and refined level. At the beginning, our fine scroll has fine silk "endpapers" on the outer side employing gold thread to depict four of the Bagua (the Eight Trigrams), representing the fundamental principles of reality and other motifs. On the inside of the endpaper is a magnificent scene in dark green and rich gold and silver depicting a dreamy landscape and sea with a crane and turtle. The gold has been applied in many layers and using many techniques. The calligrapher has also brushed the text by hand in silver paint (a pigment created by mixing crushed silver leaf with animal-fat glue). This is followed by an illustration, very rare in sutras, of thirty portraits of gods and Buddhist practitioners, framed on each side by protective gods and a pair of lions. All are finely depicted in gold and each has red lips and sits in front of a bamboo screen. For the rest of the scroll, including the above scene, the text is framed above and below by decorative and varied patterns in rich gold. A full line of text contains 14-16 characters. The text is finely written in a calligraphic hand in gold. At the end, we learn about the traditional transmission of this text, including ownership and scribes, whose first names are given: there is a four-column statement of when this scroll was copied and by whom. The first copy was made in 1537, using the source scroll owned by the chief of Echigo province. In 1657, it was copied again. And in 1714, it was copied and ours is a copy of that scroll. We learn that the best way to produce such a scroll is to be "fast, sit still, be calm, and concentrate." At the end, we find a remarkable and long (167 x 490 mm.) scene, painted in blue, gold, and red, of various Buddhist divinities and devotees with a seated Buddha. A ray of light extends from Buddha's forehead and illumines the vast assembly, who have gathered to hear his teaching. Various episodes from the scroll and parables are depicted. The reverse or outer side of the scroll is equally finely painted with various seasonal nature scenes framed at top and bottom with rich gold and silver speckled borders. The dark blue paper is suggestive of precious lapis lazuli. The use of gold paint to write the texts of the sutra is considered an act of reverence toward the Buddha's teachings and can also be seen as a representation of the shining bright body of the Buddha himself. The attached cord, used to tie the sutra together, consists of woven persimmon and gold threads. At the end are three tassels with persimmon and gold threads. The cord and tassels are attached to the scroll with a finely decorated metal lotus flower clasp. The roller is made of clear crystal, it ends covered by metal caps with lotus flower and vine patterns. In fine and fresh condition. The scroll is preserved in a corded silk damask wrapper within a fine lacquer box decorated with two family crests (the first with eight wisteria flowers framing a flower in the center; the second with a Konoe peony) in gold on the upper cover and attached tassels. There is some worming in the later part of the scroll but it is not offensive.
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Setsuyoshu [Convenient & Useful Dictionary, a Vade Mecum by Manjuya Hayashi Soji]. Edited by Manjuya Hayashi Soji

MANJUYA BON Eight vertical lines of text per page. 98 folding leaves. Oblong 8vo (144 x 206 mm.), orig. (or very early) dark thick wrappers, new stitching. [Nara?: Manjuya Hayashi Soji, ca. 1532-73]. One of the earliest surviving setsuyoshu, the essential Japanese dictionary, "one of the mainstays of the publishing industry and.probably the most likely book to be found in a house of few books."-Kornicki, The Book in Japan, p. 248. Widely used from the 15th century through the early Meiji period; there were more than 500 editions in many styles, additions, and formats. All early editions are extremely rare, as they were used to death. Anonymously compiled sometime in the second half of the 15th century, setsuyoshu was originally a dictionary used for looking up Chinese characters using the Japanese reading of that character or word. Through the 16th century, it remained a Japanese language dictionary of characters appropriate to the vocabulary popular in Muromachi times, with occasional word commentary and etymological explanation. The earliest setsuyoshu (kohon setsuyoshu or "old-style" setsuyoshu), are divided into three main categories, based on the first word listed in the dictionary: the earliest, Ise (the old name for Mie prefecture), and two offshoots: Indo (India) and inui (northwest). Our edition is an example of the earliest, the Ise bon. The first printings were in the late 15th century, and all of are of the greatest rarity; we find no 15th- or 16th-century edition of the setsuyoshu in WorldCat. This is the first printing of Manjuya Hayashi Soji's edition of the setsuyoshu. It is printed on rather thick paper in kanji and katakana, imitating the square style of handwriting (kaisho), used for scholarly and formal works. The National Diet Library owns a copy of our edition and dates it as "late Muromachi" (that era ended in 1573). The copies at Tenri, Waseda, and Toyo Bunko are quite incomplete; our copy is absolutely complete. There is also a 1596 printing. The audience for the kohon setsuyoshu was the literate elite, and they used the dictionary mainly for artistic pursuits. By the late 17th century, the setsuyoshu developed from its initial dictionary form into a household encyclopedia with additional text containing useful knowledge for daily life. The editor and publisher of our edition was Soji Hayashi (1498-1581), book collector, scholar of poetry, and a 7th-generation member of a family famous for operating a bean-jam steamed bun shop (manjuya) in Nara (the company still exists). The name of the shop was so famous - its buns were favored by a number of legendary warriors and shoguns - it became attached to this edition. The main section of the dictionary continues until leaf 90, where addenda begin, one listing the wards of Kyoto (three pages), and another of additional words. The organization of the dictionary is by iroha order and further divided by eleven categories or mon: heaven and earth, ethics, natural history, food, numbers, and others. Each word has a pronunciation guide in katakana. This copy was offered by Shigeo Sorimachi in 1982 in his monumental Kobunso aisho zuroku catalogue for 5,000,000 yen. Sorimachi has placed his seal on the final leaf of text. Our copy is in very good condition, with clear dark printing. The first leaf is rather soiled, and there is some light soiling throughout and some dampstaining at end. There are two wormholes in the beginning leaves are not offensive. Seven leaves towards the end have some minor worming. There is also some minor marginal worming. Preserved in a chitsu. ? Don Clifford Bailey, "Early Japanese Lexicography" in Monumenta Nipponica, Vol. 16, Nos. 1/2 (1960), pp. 1-52. Steffen Remvik, Setsuyoshu in Early Modern Japan: A Book Historical Approach, PhD dissertation, January 2017 (online).
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The Tale of Hogen, the Tale of Heiji]

HOGEN HEIJI MONOGATARI Ten vertical lines per page, 19 characters per line. 44; 60; 53 folding leaves & 57; 62; 64 folding leaves. Three vols. of Hogen Monogatari & three vols. of Heiji Monogatari, issued together. Large 8vo (283 x 208), orig. dark wrappers dyed with persimmon juice (shibubiki), new stitching. [Japan: privately printed with movable type, mid-Keicho, ca. 1607-08]. There are several movable type editions of these famous war tales; ours is of the earliest printing but is an apparently unknown variant. Kawase states that there are two variants of the mid-Keicho "ten line" edition of these two tales. The first listed - but with no priority - has 18 characters per line and is printed in a total of five volumes (two of The Tale of Hogen and three of The Tale of Heiji). The second variant described has 19 characters per line and, again, is printed in five volumes. However, in our set, which is printed with 19 characters per line, The Tale of Hogen appears in three volumes. Kawase reproduces the first pages of the first volumes of the second variant of The Tale of Hogen and The Tale of Heiji, and the pages are absolutely identical to ours. Early manuscripts of these two tales traditionally appear in six volumes (see the Hyde sale of 1988, lot 24). The mid-Keicho printings are of the very greatest rarity and are handsome and early examples of Japanese movable type printing. They are printed in a large format in kanamajiri ("kanji and hiragana mixed"). Later printings have eleven or twelve vertical lines of text per page. The Tale of Hogen and The Tale of Heiji are a pair of war tales (gunki monogatari) composed during the 13th century, which together tell the story of the succession struggles of the mid-12th century that resulted in the eclipse of Fujiwara power and the rise to supremacy of the former provincial warrior clan, the Taira (or Heiki) family. The tales resemble one another so much in subject, style, and ordering that they are sometimes thought to be written by the same person, but authorship is unknown. The titles derive from the Hogen disturbance of 1156 and the Heiji rebellion of 1160. These were the first such disputes to be settled by force in the capital, using members of the rising warrior class. As mentioned above, the wrappers have been dyed with persimmon juice, which serves a dual purpose: to strengthen the paper and as an insect repellent. Inside the front covers of each volume, a manuscript title label has been pasted. In fine and fresh condition, preserved in chitsu. The first volume of The Tale of Hogen has some worming very expertly repaired. The remaining volumes of both works also have some minor worming, which is mostly marginal. ? Kazuma Kawase, Kokatsuji-ban no kenkyu [Study of the Early Typographic Editions of Japan] (1967), Vol. I, pp. 539-40 & Vol. III, p. 138, nos. 414 & 416 for the reproductions of the first pages.