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Il Campanello Opera buffa in un atto . Rappresentata al Teatro Nuovo di Napoli il 1o. Giugno 1836 . L'opera intera D.2. . [Piano-vocal score]

Il Campanello Opera buffa in un atto . Rappresentata al Teatro Nuovo di Napoli il 1o. Giugno 1836 . L’opera intera D.2. . [Piano-vocal score]

DONIZETTI, Gaetano 1797-1848 Oblong folio. Brown cloth-backed dark yellow mottled paper boards, spine in gilt-ruled compartments with titling gilt. 1f. (recto title, verso blank), 3-52 pp. Each number with separate caption title and pagination. Engraved. From the collection of Italian conductor, vocal coach, and close associate of Puccini and Mascagni, Luigi Ricci (1893-1981). Binding slightly worn, scuffed, and rubbed; endpapers somewhat browned and stained. Minor internal soiling and staining. First edition, later issue (with Girard's address from 1846-53). Inzaghi IN. 57, p. 177. Donizetti composed his one-act opera Il Campanello di notte to his own libretto based on a French vaudeville, La sonnette de nuit, by Brunswick, Mathieu-Barthélemy Troin, and Victor Lhérie. It premiered at the Teatro Nuovo in Naples on June 1, 1836. The absurd plot follows Enrico as he continually harasses pharmacist Don Annibale, who is trying to celebrate his wedding night with Serafina, whom Enrico still loves. "Enrico's role (created by Giorgio Ronconi) is fitted with all sorts of musical and dramatic opportunities. His encounters with Annibale develop in musical ingenuity. Particularly effective are the episode of the hoarse singer, replete with musical allusions to other scores by Donizetti and by Rossini, and the encounter over the prescription which develops into something with even more bizarre medical terms than Dr Dulcamara's aria in Elisir, and with more frantic parlando than the Don Pasquale-Malatesta duet." William Ashbrook in Grove Music Online. Ricci was an important figure in the transmission of 19th century traditions passed on to him by noted baritone Antonio Cotogni (1831-1918), whom he accompanied from the age of 12. He was active as a vocal coach at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, where he taught (amongst many others) Sesto Bruscantini, Anna Moffo, Rosalind Elias, Ezio Flagello, Peter Lindroos, and Martti Wallén.
Il Deserto Ode Sinfonia in Tre Parti Poesia di M. A. Colin Traduzione di T. Solera . Canto e Piano Fr.24 . [Piano-vocal score]

Il Deserto Ode Sinfonia in Tre Parti Poesia di M. A. Colin Traduzione di T. Solera . Canto e Piano Fr.24 . [Piano-vocal score]

DAVID, Fe?licien 1810-1876 Folio (265 x 360 mm). Brown leather-backed marbled boards with titling and decorative lyres gilt to spine. 1f. (recto engraved title within decorative border printed in green, verso blank), 1f. (recto movement title, verso blank), 8 pp. (libretto in Italian and French), 37 pp., 1f. (recto movement title, verso blank), 21 pp., 1f. (recto movement title, verso blank), 23 pp. Text in Italian and French. Engraved. Each title with large lithographed illustrations by Célestin Nanteuil (1813-1873) depicting scenes from the work. From the collection of Italian conductor, vocal coach, and close associate of Puccini and Mascagni, Luigi Ricci (1893-1981). From the collection of Italian composer Francesco Maria Albini (1829-1917), with his signature and "306" to title. Binding slightly worn, rubbed, and bumped. Minor staining to lower outer corners throughout; lower blank margin slightly trimmed. First Italian edition, published in the same year as the French edition. The French composer Fe?licien David struggled early on in his musical studies and personal life and joined the Saint-Simonian community, embarking on a life-changing tour of the Middle East and North Africa for several years. His fascination with these eastern cultures provided him with inspiration for his compositions, leading directly to Le désert, premiered December 8, 1844 in Paris. This unique work, an "ode-symphonie" for soloists, male chorus, narrator, and orchestra, became David's most famous and popular composition. "Within each movement are a number of separate scenes, describing a desert storm, a prayer to Allah, the caravan, the 'rêverie du soir', and the muezzin's call. The opening is particularly striking with a long-repeated pedal C representing the vast wastes of the desert; the picturesque orchestration won Berlioz's admiration. . The music is rarely strictly oriental in inflection-even the muezzin's call is diatonic (though David had the performer introduce some microtones into it at the first performance)-and the straightforward tunefulness of the hymn to Allah accounts for some of its popularity. Yet the character and colour of the East had left its mark." Hugh MacDonald in Grove Music Online. Ricci was an important figure in the transmission of 19th century traditions passed on to him by noted baritone Antonio Cotogni (1831-1918), whom he accompanied from the age of 12. He was active as a vocal coach at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, where he taught (amongst many others) Sesto Bruscantini, Anna Moffo, Rosalind Elias, Ezio Flagello, Peter Lindroos, and Martti Wallén.
Norma Tragedia lirica di F. Romani posta in musica e dedicata al Signor Nicolò Zingarelli . Proprietà degli Editori Deposta all' I.R. Bibla. Con Scene Prezzo fr. 31. Senza Scene Prezzo fr. 26. [Piano-vocal score]

Norma Tragedia lirica di F. Romani posta in musica e dedicata al Signor Nicolò Zingarelli . Proprietà degli Editori Deposta all’ I.R. Bibla. Con Scene Prezzo fr. 31. Senza Scene Prezzo fr. 26. [Piano-vocal score]

BELLINI, Vincenzo 1801-1835 Oblong folio. Brown leather-backed marbled paper boards, gilt-ruled compartments with decorative devices blindstamped and titling gilt to spine. 1f. (recto title, verso blank), 1f. (recto named cast list, verso table of contents), 173 pp. Each number with separate caption title, some with separate pagination. Engraved. Named cast includes Donzelli as Pollione, Negrini as Oroveso, Pasta as Norma, Giuletta Grisi as Adalgisa, Sacchi as Clotilde, and Lombardi as Flavio. From the collection of Italian conductor, vocal coach, and close associate of Puccini and Mascagni, Luigi Ricci (1893-1981). Previous owner's name "M. Astolfi" in black ink to title, possibly the noted Italian dancer and choreographer Luigi Astolfi, ca. 1790-1860. Binding slightly worn, rubbed, and bumped. Minor soiling to title with creases, light foxing scattered throughout. First Edition, second issue (distinguished by the presence of continuous pagination). Lippmann, p. 386. Crawford, p. 30. Norma, in two acts to a libretto by Felice Romani after Alexandre Soumet's verse tragedy Norma, was first performed in Milan at the Teatro alla Scala on December 26, 1831. "With Norma, the most ambitious of his operas, Bellini created a work of extraordinary lyrical and dramatic beauty. Through melody of a kind that had not been written before or has been since, the structure of the music expresses a tragedy that is virtually of epic scale." Galatopoulos: Bellini, p. 242. "Norma has always been revered above other Italian operas of the period. The title role is one of the most taxing and wide-ranging parts in the entire repertory: a noble character whose tragedy lies in her fatal love for an enemy of her people. The many different aspects of Norma's temperament are marvellously drawn by Bellini, not only in the aria 'Casta diva', but also in the superb duets with Adalgisa and Pollione, and in the ensemble in the finale of Act 2, where Bellini reaches his peak as a musical dramatist." Simon Maguire and Elizabeth Forbes in Grove Music Online. Ricci was an important figure in the transmission of 19th century traditions passed on to him by noted baritone Antonio Cotogni (1831-1918), whom he accompanied from the age of 12. He was active as a vocal coach at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, where he taught (amongst many others) Sesto Bruscantini, Anna Moffo, Rosalind Elias, Ezio Flagello, Peter Lindroos, and Martti Wallén.
Lagrime di S. Pietro

Lagrime di S. Pietro, descritte dal Signor Luigi Tansillo, e nuovamente poste, in musica . del serenissimo signor Duca di Bauiera, &c. con un mottetto nel fine à sette voci. [Tenor primo and Tenor secondo]

LASSO, Orlando di 1532-1594 2 volumes. Small folio (305 x 201 mm.). Contemporary half pigskin with decorative blindstamping, embossed black paper boards, the year 1598 and "TENOR. I"/"TENOR. II" stamped in black to upper, shelfmark "96" in manuscript. Decorative woodcut initials throughout. Music typeset. Title within decorative border with woodcut portrait of Lasso dated 1594 after the 1593 engraving by Sadeler to both volumes. With printed dedication to Pope Clement VIII dated May 24, 1594. Twenty madrigals for seven voices concluding with a seven-voice motet, Vide homo quae pro te patior. Volume I (Tenor primo): 1f. (recto title, verso dedication), 21 pp., [i] (blank) + 6 pp. manuscript music + 9ff. (blank ruled staves, watermark fleur-de-lis) + 29ff. (blank, watermarks fleur-de-lis and shield). Volume II (Tenor secondo): 1f. (recto title, verso dedication), 21 pp., [i] (blank) + 6 pp. manuscript music + 9ff. (blank ruled staves, watermark fleur-de-lis) + 35ff. (blank, watermarks fleur-de-lis and shield). Bound with: A contemporary mass in manuscript for 7 voices in an unidentified hand, commencing with "Kyrie eleÿson" and concluding with "Agnus Dei." 6 pp. With elaborate decorative initials, some in red. Watermark fleur-de-lis. From the former ducal library of Georg Rudolf of Liegnitz. Bindings worn, rubbed, bumped, slightly stained, and wormed; upper to Volume II detached; spine and free front endpaper lacking. Very slightly worn throughout. Minor modern markings in blue ink and multiple treble clefs to page 19 of the Lagrime and page 6 of the mass in Volume II. In very good internal condition overall. First edition. Rare. Boetticher 1595a; RISM L 1009. No examples of any parts located in the U.S. Only one complete set known (Regensburg; Tenor II parts held in Munich and Modena; no other holdings of Tenor I). Identified as part of a complete set of bound part books formerly held in Liegnitz: Libr. Mus. 96. (Pfudel, Mittheilungen über die Bibliotheca Rudolfina, pp. 66-67, 116; no other parts located). Hell and Leuchtmann: Bayerische Staatsbibliothek catalogue, no. 38. Fleur-de-lis watermark in the manuscript mass similar to Nostitz 583 (Silesia, 1606) and Briquet 6944-5 (Nysa, 1570). Shield with horn and "B" above identified as Briquet 7865 (Bydgoszcz, 1591) and Nostitz 628 (Silesia, 1588). Lasso's final set of madrigals, composed three weeks before his death in 1594. "This cycle of seven-voice spiritual madrigals is one of the most remarkable artistic testaments in the history of music. Deliberately restrained in mood and character, planned as a magnificent tonal arch covering the whole range of 16th-century sound, the work is at once musically unified and expressively varied. Lassus's lifelong habits of concision and balance, subordinating vivid declamation and rhetorical power to inexorable musical clarity, are here given their definitive statement. the transcendentally synthetic quality of this music, blending styles as diverse as the Prophetiae Sibyllarum and the late madrigals, stands in the sharpest possible contrast to what was in other hands already becoming the drily academic stile antico." James Haar: The New Grove High Renaissance Masters, pp. 189-190. Einstein, in his monumental 3-volume work The Italian Madrigal, calls the Lagrime "a spiritual counterpart to the cycles from the great epics of Ariosto and Tasso, an old man's work comparable in its artistry, its dimensions, its asceticism only to the Musical Offering and the Art of the Fugue." "Lasso's madrigal reveals most strongly and clearly one aspect of the inner change that takes place in music during the second part of the sixteenth century: the increasing gloom, the trend away from gaiety, vitality, and artlessness toward contrition and a tormenting awareness, the transition from the Renaissance to the Counter Reformation. As a madrigalist Lasso begins with the crudity and lasciviousness of his Neapolitan villanelle; he ends with the gloom of the poet Luigi Tansillo's Lagrime di San Pietro, an excess of penance and regret, a tearful turning away from everything secular. It is the same change that took place in Tansillo himself: from the exuberant and lascivious stanzas of the Vendemmiatore, which was placed on the Index in 1559, to the exaggerated self reproach of the Lagrime di San Pietro." Ibid, p. 477. With text by Italian poet Luigi Tansillo (1510-1568) regarding the grief of Peter following his denial of Christ. Lasso's setting is full of numerical symbolism: three sets of seven pieces, each for seven voices, and only utilizing the first seven of the Renaissance modes. "Tansillo wrote the words for Lasso's cycle of seven-voiced madrigali spirituali, the Lagrime di San Pietro, a work of almost Baroque religious fervor, written, like Lasso's last motets, in an austere polyphony that seldom allows a place for elaborate melismas, and yet draws on a lifetime's experience to bring out the poetry's meaning by relatively simple but inexhausibly subtle and inventive means." Brown: Music in the Renaissance, p. 312. Printed a year after Lasso's death by Adam Berg: "An expert craftsman . the leading Bavarian printer of the Counter-Reformation and one of the most important German printers of his time." Marie Louise Göllner in Grove Music Online. Few seven-voice masses are documented in RISM. Lasso's final masterpiece, the accompanying undocumented contemporary manuscript mass deserving of further research.
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Lucia di Lammermoor Dramma Tragico di Salvatore Cammarano . rappresentato sul Real Teatro di S. Carlo nell’ autunno del 1835 . D.6.00 [Piano-vocal score]

DONIZETTI, Gaetano 1797-1848 Oblong folio. Vellum-backed and edged boards with burgundy cloth laid down, initials "C.G." gilt to upper, titling to spine stamped in black, original light pink publisher's printed wrappers bound in. 1f. (recto title, verso blank), 3-176 pp. Each number with separate caption title and pagination. Engraved. With priced catalog, "Opere Teatrali Intere," to upper wrapper listing works by Bellini, Donizetti, Rossini, Verdi, et al. composed through 1851, and with list of pieces with individual prices and plate numbers to title. From the collection of Italian conductor, vocal coach, and close associate of Puccini and Mascagni, Luigi Ricci (1893-1981). Binding slightly worn, bumped, and scuffed. Title moderately foxed; light scattered foxing and a few small stains throughout. Later edition, later issue. Inzaghi IN. 55, pp. 172-5. Girard's first edition of Lucia di Lammermoor appeared circa 1835. This later issue combines a number of varient plates from their early editions. Lucia di Lammermoor was composed to a libretto by Salvadore Cammarano after Walter Scott's novel The Bride of Lammermoor (1819). It premiered in Naples at the Teatro S Carlo on September 26, 1835. "Both historically and artistically, Lucia deserves its reputation. When it was new it was regarded as the apogee of high Romantic sensibility. The clear plot, which trims away much of Scott's accessory detail, possesses the stark tautness of a tale by Poe. It is no coincidence that Flaubert employed it as an important point of reference in the downward course of Emma Bovary, that quintessential victim of Romantic illusions." "Although all the principal roles are vocally challenging, their music is uniformly grateful. The score contains scant sign of the unevenness that afflicts a number of Donizetti's works. Cammarano's libretto moved him deeply and, inspired by his recent first exposure to Paris, Donizetti produced what is certainly his masterpiece." William Ashbrook in Grove Music Online. Ricci was an important figure in the transmission of 19th century traditions passed on to him by noted baritone Antonio Cotogni (1831-1918), whom he accompanied from the age of 12. He was active as a vocal coach at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, where he taught (amongst many others) Sesto Bruscantini, Anna Moffo, Rosalind Elias, Ezio Flagello, Peter Lindroos, and Martti Wallén.
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La Sonnambula Melodramma di Felice Romani . Rappresentato nel Teatro Carcano di Milano li 6 Marzo 1831 e ridotto con accomp.to di PIanoforte . L’opera intera D.4. [Piano-vocal score]

BELLINI, Vincenzo 1801-1835 Oblong folio. Quarter vellum with marbled boards. 1f. (recto title, verso blank), 3-156 pp. Each number with separate caption title and pagination. Engraved. From the collection of Italian conductor, vocal coach, and close associate of Puccini and Mascagni, Luigi Ricci (1893-1981). Binding worn, bumped, and rubbed; small hole to head of spine; some paper loss to edges; loss to upper outer corner; front free endpaper lacking. Minimal foxing throughout; minor dampstaining to lower right corner of a few interior leaves. First Naples edition, published shortly after the first edition issued by Ricordi in Milan. Lippmann, p.385. La Sonnambula was composed to a libretto by Felice Romani after Eugène Scribe and J.-P. Aumer's ballet-pantomime La somnambule. It premiered in Milan at the Teatro Carcano on March 6, 1831. "In La sonnambula Bellini's mature style appears finally crystallized, a synthesis of heartfelt melody, expressive declamation and coloratura from which all Rossinian hedonism has been banished." Budden, Forbes, and Maguire in Grove Music Online. Ricci was an important figure in the transmission of 19th century traditions passed on to him by noted baritone Antonio Cotogni (1831-1918), whom he accompanied from the age of 12. He was active as a vocal coach at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, where he taught (amongst many others) Sesto Bruscantini, Anna Moffo, Rosalind Elias, Ezio Flagello, Peter Lindroos, and Martti Wallén.
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Lucrezia Borgia Melodramma posto in Musica . ridotto per Piano Forte Solo Dal Mo. Luigi Truzzi . Fr 15._. | Fl. 5.45.cm. [Piano solo]

DONIZETTI, Gaetano 1797-1848 Oblong folio. Light yellow calf-backed marbled boards, gilt-ruled compartments to spine. 1f. (recto title, verso blank), 1f. (recto table of contents, verso blank), 5-107 pp. Each number with separate caption title, some with separate pagination. Engraved. From the collection of Italian conductor, vocal coach, and close associate of Puccini and Mascagni, Luigi Ricci (1893-1981). Binding worn, rubbed and bumped; some loss to edges of boards; minor loss to head and tail of spine; narrow strip cut from upper margin of front free endpaper with remnants of contemporary markings, in all likelihood related to ownership. Light foxing and a few small stains to title; very minimal scattered foxing throughout. First edition for piano solo. Inzaghi IN. 47, pp.164-6. Lucrezia Borgia, to a libretto by Felice Romani after Victor Hugo's play Lucrèce Borgia, was premiered in Milan at the Teatro alla Scala on December 26, 1833. Despite an uneven reception, Lucrezia Borgia became one of Donizetti's most successful operas, particularly after the second production of the work in 1840. Ricci was an important figure in the transmission of 19th century traditions passed on to him by noted baritone Antonio Cotogni (1831-1918), whom he accompanied from the age of 12. He was active as a vocal coach at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, where he taught (amongst many others) Sesto Bruscantini, Anna Moffo, Rosalind Elias, Ezio Flagello, Peter Lindroos, and Martti Wallén.
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Il Pirata Melodramma Posto in Musica e Dedicato a Sua Eccellenza La Signora Duchessa Litta dei Principi Belgiojoso d’Este . Rappresentato per la prima volta nell I.R. Teatro alla Scala . [Piano-vocal score]

BELLINI, Vincenzo 1801-1835 Oblong folio. Vellum-backed and edged boards with black cloth laid down, initials "C.G." gilt to upper, titling to spine stamped in black. 1f. (recto title, verso blank), 1f. (recto named cast list and table of contents, verso blank), 255 pp. + 1f. unpaginated (comprising no. 16) between pp. 170-171. Named cast list from the premiere includes Giovanni Battista Rubini, Henriette Méric-Lalande, and Antonio Tamburini. From the collection of Italian conductor, vocal coach, and close associate of Puccini and Mascagni, Luigi Ricci (1893-1981). Binding moderately worn, bumped, and scuffed with some loss to upper; head of spine slightly defective. Title moderately foxed; light foxing and a few small stains throughout. First Edition. Lippmann, pp. 377-78. Crawford, pp.31-32 (an earlier issue). Il pirata, to a libretto by Felice Romani, was first performed at the Teatro alla Scala in Milan on October 27, 1827. "Bellini had lived in Sicily and Naples until arriving in Milan on 12 April 1827, invited by Barbaia to write for La Scala. Il pirata was only his second professional production, and his first collaboration with Romani. Bellini took over six months writing the opera, in order to impress the audience at La Scala. With an excellent cast that included Giovanni Battista Rubini as Gualtiero, Henriette Méric-Lalande as Imogene and Antonio Tamburini as Ernesto, the opera was well received and Bellini was hailed as an exciting new voice. Il pirata played a significant role in establishing the style of the Romantic melodramma later developed by Donizetti and Verdi." Simon Maguire and Elizabeth Forbes in Grove Music Online. Ricci was an important figure in the transmission of 19th century traditions passed on to him by noted baritone Antonio Cotogni (1831-1918), whom he accompanied from the age of 12. He was active as a vocal coach at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, where he taught (amongst many others) Sesto Bruscantini, Anna Moffo, Rosalind Elias, Ezio Flagello, Peter Lindroos, and Martti Wallén.
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Anna Bolena Tragedia lirica di F. Romani . L’opera intera per canto D. 5. 50 . [Piano-vocal score]

DONIZETTI, Gaetano 1797-1848 Oblong folio. Dark brown morocco-backed textured red paper boards, titling and decorative device gilt to spine. 1f. (recto title, verso cast list, table of contents), 3-154, 1f. (recto title, verso blank), 157-227 pp. Each number with separate caption title and pagination. Engraved. Title includes an index of pieces with individual plate numbers and prices, including alternate versions and chamber arrangments. From the collection of Italian conductor, vocal coach, and close associate of Puccini and Mascagni, Luigi Ricci (1893-1981). Binding moderately worn, rubbed, and bumped; scattered defects and stains; large gouge to lower. Title split at gutter; light scattered foxing; minor dampstaining to right margin of first few leaves and to lower margin throughout; page number "99" used twice. An early edition, later issue. Inzaghi IN. 35, pp. 150-2. Girard's first edition of Anna Bolena was issued circa 1831, shortly after its premiere and publication by Ricordi. This later edition contains a mix of old and new plates and was printed when Girard was located on Strada Toledo between 1837 and 1846. Anna Bolena was composed to a libretto by Felice Romani after Ippolito Pindemonte's Enrico VIII, ossia Anna Bolena (1816) and Alessandro Pepoli's Anna Bolena (1788). The opera was first performed in Milan at the Teatro Carcano on December 26, 1830. "This was Donizetti's first great international success, giving him his initial exposure to Paris and London audiences. Pasta (Anne) and Rubini (Percy) sang in the première. Immensely popular for almost half a century, it re-entered the modern repertory following a triumphant revival at La Scala with Callas in 1957. Since then the work has proved a favourite vehicle for such bel canto specialists as Sutherland, Sills and Caballé. [The] final 20 minutes of Anna Bolena reveals for the first time Donizetti's mature ability to flesh out an ariafinale so that it provides the substance of a gripping scene. Nothing Donizetti had done before approaches the scope and multiform intensity of this magnificent scene." William Ashbrook in Grove Music Online. Ricci was an important figure in the transmission of 19th century traditions passed on to him by noted baritone Antonio Cotogni (1831-1918), whom he accompanied from the age of 12. He was active as a vocal coach at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, where he taught (amongst many others) Sesto Bruscantini, Anna Moffo, Rosalind Elias, Ezio Flagello, Peter Lindroos, and Martti Wallén.
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La Sonnambula Melodramma di Felice Romani . Riduzione con accompagnamento di Pianoforte . L’opera intera D.5.50. [Piano-vocal score]

BELLINI, Vincenzo 1801-1835 Oblong folio. Vellum-backed and edged boards with burgundy cloth laid down, initials "C.G." gilt to upper, titling to spine stamped in black, original light pink publisher's printed wrappers bound in. 1f. (recto title, verso named cast list and table of contents), 3-190 pp. Each number with separate caption title and pagination. Engraved. With priced catalog, "Opere Teatrali Intere," to upper wrapper listing works by Bellini, Donizetti, Rossini, Verdi, et al. composed through 1851, and with list of pieces with individual prices and plate numbers to title. Green ink stamp to title "Successori di Girard Edizione emessa . 12 agosto 1852" Named cast list from the premiere includes Giuditta Pasta, Giovanni Battista Rubini, Luciano Mariani, and Elisa Taccani. From the collection of Italian conductor, vocal coach, and close associate of Puccini and Mascagni, Luigi Ricci (1893-1981). Binding slightly worn, bumped, and scuffed. Title moderately foxed; light scattered foxing and a few small stains throughout. Second edition. Lippmann, p.385. Girard's first edition of Sonnambula appeared circa 1832. This later edition combines a number of old and new plates. La Sonnambula was composed to a libretto by Felice Romani after Eugène Scribe and J.-P. Aumer's ballet-pantomime La somnambule. It premiered in Milan at the Teatro Carcano on March 6, 1831. "In La sonnambula Bellini's mature style appears finally crystallized, a synthesis of heartfelt melody, expressive declamation and coloratura from which all Rossinian hedonism has been banished." Budden, Forbes, and Maguire in Grove Music Online. Ricci was an important figure in the transmission of 19th century traditions passed on to him by noted baritone Antonio Cotogni (1831-1918), whom he accompanied from the age of 12. He was active as a vocal coach at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, where he taught (amongst many others) Sesto Bruscantini, Anna Moffo, Rosalind Elias, Ezio Flagello, Peter Lindroos, and Martti Wallén.
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La Sonnambula Melodramma di Felice Romani posta in Musica e Dedicato al Sigr. Mo. F. Pollini . Rid. con accomp. di Pianoforte . 30._. [Piano-vocal score]

BELLINI, Vincenzo 1801-1835 Oblong folio. Full burgundy cloth with decorative blindstamping and floral gilt device to upper, titling gilt to spine. 1f. (recto title in decorative borders by Sperati, verso blank), 1f. (recto named cast list, verso table of contents), 5-211 pp. Each number with separate caption title, some with separate pagination. Engraved. Named cast list from the premiere includes Giuditta Pasta, Giovanni Battista Rubini, Luciano Mariani, and Elisa Taccani. From the collection of Italian conductor, vocal coach, and close associate of Puccini and Mascagni, Luigi Ricci (1893-1981). Binding somewhat worn, rubbed and bumped; spine faded. Scattered light foxing throughout, primarily to margins; moderate foxing to title and a few interior leaves. A later edition. Not in Lippmann. La Sonnambula was composed to a libretto by Felice Romani after Eugène Scribe and J.-P. Aumer's ballet-pantomime La somnambule. It premiered in Milan at the Teatro Carcano on March 6, 1831. "In La sonnambula Bellini's mature style appears finally crystallized, a synthesis of heartfelt melody, expressive declamation and coloratura from which all Rossinian hedonism has been banished." Budden, Forbes, and Maguire in Grove Music Online. Ricci was an important figure in the transmission of 19th century traditions passed on to him by noted baritone Antonio Cotogni (1831-1918), whom he accompanied from the age of 12. He was active as a vocal coach at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, where he taught (amongst many others) Sesto Bruscantini, Anna Moffo, Rosalind Elias, Ezio Flagello, Peter Lindroos, and Martti Wallén.
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Don Checco Opera buffa in due atti composta espressamente pel Teatro Nuovo di Napolo e rappresentatavi per la 1a. volta li 11. Luglio 1850 Parole di Almerindo Spadetta . Riduzione per Canto con accompagnamento di Pianoforte del Maestro Giovanni Festa L’opera intera D.6.00 . [Piano-vocal score]

DE GIOSA, Nicola 1819-1885 Oblong folio. Vellum-backed and edged boards with dark brown cloth laid down, initials "C.G." gilt to upper, titling to spine stamped in black, original yellow publisher's printed wrappers bound in. 1f. (recto title, verso blank), 3-235 pp. Each number with separate caption title, some with separate pagination. Engraved. Endpapers watermarked with a fleur-de-lis and "Michele Dupino Marmorato." With priced catalog, "Opere Teatrali Intere," to upper wrapper listing works by Bellini, Donizetti, Rossini, Verdi, et al. composed through 1853, and with list of pieces with individual prices and plate numbers to title. From the collection of Italian conductor, vocal coach, and close associate of Puccini and Mascagni, Luigi Ricci (1893-1981). Binding slightly worn, bumped, and scuffed; minor soiling to upper. Light browning to title; minimal foxing throughout, primarily confined to margins. Probable First Edition. Rare (one holding only in the U.S., at the University of Washington, OCLC 27091390). Nicola De Giosa spent most of his life and career in Naples, first as an opera composer and later as a conductor. His comic operas are ". in the best tradition of Neapolitan opera buffa, culminating in Don Checco (Naples, 1850), his masterpiece and one of the greatest successes in the history of opera in Naples." Andrea Lanza in Grove Music Online. Don Checco was composed to a libretto by Almerindo Spadetta and was first performed at the Teatro Nuovo in Naples on July 11, 1850. After being out of the repertoire for nearly a century, Don Checco was revived in 2014 for a series of performances in Naples to resounding success. Ricci was an important figure in the transmission of 19th century traditions passed on to him by noted baritone Antonio Cotogni (1831-1918), whom he accompanied from the age of 12. He was active as a vocal coach at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, where he taught (amongst many others) Sesto Bruscantini, Anna Moffo, Rosalind Elias, Ezio Flagello, Peter Lindroos, and Martti Wallén.
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Fausta . ridotta per Piano-Forte N.__ Fr 16 [Piano solo]

DONIZETTI, Gaetano 1797-1848 Oblong folio. Dark green leather-backed embossed dark green paper boards with titling "MUSICA ISTRULE" and decorative devices gilt to spine. 1f. (recto title, verso blank), 1f. (recto table of contents, verso blank), 5-91 pp. Each number with separate caption title and pagination. Engraved. Piano reduction by Luigi Truzzi (1799-1864). Bound with: ROSSINI, Gioachino, 1792-1868 L'Italiana in Algeri Dramma Giocoso . Per il Teatro St. Benedetto in Venezia . per Piano Forte [Fr.]15._. . [Piano solo] Milano: Gio. Ricordi [PNs 4346 172, 1192-1206], [1830]. 1f. (recto title, verso blank), 96 pp. Each number with separate caption title and pagination. Engraved. From the collection of Italian conductor, vocal coach, and close associate of Puccini and Mascagni, Luigi Ricci (1893-1981). Binding somewhat worn, rubbed and bumped; some loss to edges of boards. Slight dampstaining to lower right corners,; light foxing throughout. Donizetti: First edition for piano solo. Inzaghi IN. 39, pp. 153-5. Rossini: Early edition for piano [1822], later issue with new sinfonia reduction [1833]. Donizetti's Fausta, to a libretto by Domenico Gilardoni, was first performed in Venice at the Teatro San Carlo, January 12, 1832. "As Donizetti's first opera seria for Giuseppina Ronzi de Begnis . Fausta contains a remarkable aria-finale in which the Larghetto, with its text almost certainly by the composer, is in the then uncommon scheme of decasyllabic lines and boasts a subtly inflected melody." William Ashbrook in Grove Music Online. Rossini's L'Italiana in Algeri, to a libretto derived from Angelo Anelli, was first performed in Venice at the Teatro San Benedetto, May 22, 1813. "Rossini's first buffo masterpiece in the fully-fledged two-act form." Richard Osborne in Grove Music Online. Ricci was an important figure in the transmission of 19th century traditions passed on to him by noted baritone Antonio Cotogni (1831-1918), whom he accompanied from the age of 12. He was active as a vocal coach at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, where he taught (amongst many others) Sesto Bruscantini, Anna Moffo, Rosalind Elias, Ezio Flagello, Peter Lindroos, and Martti Wallén.
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Roberto Devereux Tragedia lirica Di S. Cammarano . dedicata a S.E. il Cavaliere G.C. Nicola Santangelo Ministro Segretario di Stato Degli Affari Interni . L’opera intere D.6 [Piano-vocal score]

DONIZETTI, Gaetano 1797-1848 Oblong folio. Vellum-backed and edged boards with burgundy cloth laid down, initials "C.G." gilt to upper, titling to spine stamped in black, original yellow publisher's printed wrappers bound in. 1f. (recto title, verso blank), 8 pp. (Sinfonia), 3-150 pp. Each number with separate caption title and pagination. Engraved. Endpapers watermarked with a fleur-de-lis. With priced catalog, "Opere Teatrali Intere," to upper wrapper listing works by Bellini, Donizetti, Rossini, Verdi, et al. composed through 1853 and with list of pieces with individual prices and plate numbers to title. From the collection of Italian conductor, vocal coach, and close associate of Puccini and Mascagni, Luigi Ricci (1893-1981). Binding slightly worn, bumped, and scuffed. Light browning to title; minimal foxing throughout, primarily confined to margins. Revised first edition, later issue. Inzaghi IN. 61, pp. 180-2. The first edition of Roberto Devereux was revised by Girard with the changes Donizetti made for the 1838 performance in Paris (PNs 4292-4). This later issue has "Successori della Ditta" added to the title plates indicating it was issued shortly after Girard's imprint changed in 1853. Roberto Devereux, to a libretto by Salvadore Cammarano after François Ancelot's tragedy Élisabeth d'Angleterre (1829); first performed in Naples at the Teatro S Carlo on October 28, 1837. "The portrait of Queen Elizabeth I in Roberto Devereux is the most imposing of Donizetti's representations of that character (who also appears in Elisabetta al castello di Kenilworth and Maria Stuarda), and the role must rank as one of the great acting and singing opportunities in the bel canto repertory. Musically, the score has much to commend it. As in other Donizetti operas, the first act moves in a rather leisurely manner, with a sequence of full arie di sortita; the pace accelerates to a dramatic climax in a briefer Act 2; then Act 3, like that of Lucia, is a sequence of three powerful scenes." "Particularly impressive are Elizabeth's entrance aria, the duet for Sarah and Essex, the trio-finale to Act 2, the Prison Scene of Essex, and Elizabeth's aria-finale. Everywhere the score shows the sure hand of a composer in control of his materials. The powerful prelude to the Prison Scene recalls the opening of Act 2 of Fidelio. Elizabeth's final Larghetto, 'Vivi, ingrato', is a fine example of a melody developing in a long emotional arc of searing poignancy, and of Donizetti's sensitive response to the expressive colour of the words." William Ashbrook in Grove Music Online. Ricci was an important figure in the transmission of 19th century traditions passed on to him by noted baritone Antonio Cotogni (1831-1918), whom he accompanied from the age of 12. He was active as a vocal coach at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, where he taught (amongst many others) Sesto Bruscantini, Anna Moffo, Rosalind Elias, Ezio Flagello, Peter Lindroos, and Martti Wallén.
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Important 17th century manuscript collection of ninety-one 16th and 17th century works, both sacred and secular, for Cantus voice, including pieces by some of the most important Italian and German composers of the period

MUSICAL MANUSCRIPT - 17th Century] Quarto (190 x 160 mm.). Full vellum. 2ff. (blank), 42ff., 13ff. (blank), 19ff., 38ff. (blank), 25ff., 39ff. (blank), 24ff., 16ff. (blank). With "DISC[AN]TUS NO. 58" in contemporary manuscript to upper. Musical notation in ink in at several different hands, later annotations of composers and number of voices in pencil. Some text in German, some in Latin. Paper watermarked with an animal (possibly a stag) encircled with the letters GVRCA. Similar watermarks identified in Briquet: 845 (Leipzig, c.1600), 4528 (Reinebeke, 1607). Works primarily for 4-8 voices, with four works for 10 voices, and one for 20 voices. Four instrumental settings, without text. Only one work dated: "13 Jul: 1627." Major composers represented in the collection are: GABRIELI, Giovanni, c.1554-1612 HANDL, Jacob, 1550-1591 [6] HASSLER, Hans Leo, 1564-1612 [3] LASSO, Orlando di, 1532-1594 MERULO, Claudio, 1533-1604 PALESTRINA, Giovanni Pierluigi da, 1525?-1594 STRIGGIO, Alessandro, c.1537-1592 VECCHI, Orazio, 1550-1605 VENTO, Ivo de, c.1540-1575 VULPIUS, Melchior, c.1570-1615 WERT, Giaches de, 1535-1596 Also included are works by lesser-known composers from Silesia and nearby Brandenburg and Saxony: ELSBETH, Thomas, fl.1599-1624 [6] GESIUS, Bartholomäus, d.1613 [2] WALLISER, Christoph Thomas, 1568-1648 [3] ZANGIUS, Nikolaus, c.1570-c.1618 [2] Contains the only known works of: BOSSELIUS, Christian LEUSCHNER, Georg LÜDERS, Burchard MEISNER, Abraham PRAETORIUS, Isaac From the former ducal library of Georg Rudolf of Liegnitz. Binding somewhat worn, stained, and warped; joints partially split; a few small wormholes; head of spine slightly frayed; remnants of small square label to foot; endpapers soiled; front free endpaper lacking; "5045" in very faded pencil to upper outer corner of front pastedown. Some browning and staining; a number of leaves trimmed at outer margin just affecting text and/or notation; f.[24] lacking, with only small stub remaining at lower inner margin; hole to upper inner portion of f.[25] with slight loss to music and text. Kolbuszewska: Kataloge . Bibliotheca Rudolphina (1992), Rud. 251. Pfudel: Musik-Handschriften der Königl. Ritter-Akademie zu Liegnitz (1886), 24, pp. 37-39. Identified as one of eight partbooks from the former ducal libary of Liegnitz: Libr. Mus. 58, Rud. 5045. Three others survive: Alt and Septima vox, P-BUWr (60201 Muz.); Bas, P-BN (Mus. 2101). The Duchy of Liegnitz (Legnica) in Lower Silesia was ruled by members of Piast dynasty of Poland for centuries and served as a major center of culture and commerce in the region. Georg Rudolf (1595-1653) ruled as Duke of Liegnitz for over forty years and was a consummate patron of the arts, amassing a large library of printed and manuscript music. Despite the Thirty Years War and centuries of social and political upheaval, the collection remained relatively intact and a full inventory was prepared in 1876-8 by Ernst Pfudel that served as a source for Eitner. The collection was, however, dispersed during World War II and now resides in various public and private institutions, with the major portion held at the University Library of Wroc?aw. The complete set of partbooks to which this volume belongs was, in all likelihood, a performing set compiled from sources in the Rudolf collection; many of the works can, in fact, be traced to printed editions known to have been in the library. The diverse nature of the contents is representative not only of the breadth of Rudolf's collection, but also the realities of Silesia, a region at the intersection of larger powers and of Catholic and Protestant nobility fighting for influence. Of considerable historical significance, including what appear to be a number of unique sources. A full inventory is available upon request.
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Lucifer. Autograph musical manuscript full score of the ballet commissioned and choreographed by Martha Graham, her first work for the famed Russian dancer Rudolf Nureyev. Signed and dated by the composer April-May 1975

EL-DABH, Halim 1921-2017 Large folio (14" x 11"). Unbound. 124 pp. notated on one side of the leaf only, leaves 1-22 in pencil and leaves 23-124 in black ink. On 20-stave Aztec SP-21 R onionskin music paper. A fair copy with numerous autograph alterations. Titling to head and composer's name to upper right margin of each movement; copyright notice ("1975 by Halim El-Dabh") to lower margin of first page of each movement; and ("2008 Halim El-Dabh Music LLC") and "6-5-75 Final Version" to lower margin of first page of first movement, all in black ink. With measure numbers to foot of each leaf and occasional performance annotations, additional musical notation, dynamics, etc. throughout in black ink and pencil; occasional markings in blue and purple pencil, some in another hand; very occasional erasures and deletions. 1st movement: Lucifer The Giver of Light Leaves 1-28 Signed and dated April 1975 at conclusion at lower right, in pencil, with additional annotation to right margin: "The Giver of Light in Mockery of the Gods." 2nd movement: The Giver of Light in Mockery of Th[e] Gods Leaves 29-62 Signed at conclusion in pencil, with additional annotation "Torture in the Spell of Night." 3rd movement: Torture in the Spell of Night Leaves 63-92 With annotation in pencil to left margin "Dawn Balance of Light in the Night." 4th movement: Balance of Light in the Night Leaves 93-98 Signed at conclusion in pencil and with additional annotation "The Triumph of Lucifer." 5th movement: The Triumph of Lucifer Leaves 99-124 Signed and dated May 1975 at conclusion in pencil. Together with photographic dye-line copies of: - pp. 1-124 of the full score with autograph annotations in Halim's hand - pp. 2-79 of the full score with autograph annotations in Halim's hand - pp. 82-124 of the full score with autograph annotations in Halim's hand - a set of string parts - a set of orchestral parts for winds, harp, piano, tipani, and percussion, with occasional autograph annotations to the timpani part Slightly worn. Small neat rectangle excised from instrumentation list at left margin of leaves 23-28, 57-62, and 120-124. One leaf (109) trimmed at right margin with no loss of notation; one leaf trimmed (116); two leaves (114 and 115) photographic reproductions with minor autograph additions. Lucifer premiered on June 19, 1975 at the Uris Theater on Broadway in New York, with sets designed by noted Filipino architect Leandro V. Locsin and costumes by the famed designer Halston. It was a star-studded event staged to celebrate the Martha Graham Dance Company and School, ultimately taking in a record $200,000. The gala was attended by celebrities including Paul Newman, Joanne Woodward, Lauren Bacall, Andy Warhol, Dick Cavett, Diane Keaton and Woody Allen; honorary leaders of the drive included Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and Alice Tully. Seachrist: The Musical World of Halim El-Dabh, pp. 116-117. "After far too long an absence, Martha Graham is back on Broadway. Well not quite -but if not Martha, who is now the presiding genius of her company rather than its resident goddess, at least her dancers, and for their longest season yet-32 performances. The company, in superb fettle, opened last night at the Mark Hellinger Theater with a gala at which Miss Graham really did preside, speaking at the beginning of the evening." ". This opening gala began with two world premieres. "Adorations" and "Point of Crossing," and included a slightly amended version of Miss Graham's first work for Rudolf Nureyev, "Lucifer." Mr. Nureyev, incidentally, will be appearing in 23 of the 32 performances." ". "Lucifer" is also biblical-but again biblical with a difference. Miss Graham typically sees Lucifer both as a bringer of light and a seeker of darkness, a fallen being, half?god, half?man, subject to man's temptations but with only a god's experience to deal with them. Not, you will note, a particular JudeoChristian, or even Miltonic treatment of the theme, but a problem not perhaps unknown to the Satan of William Blake." "Mr. Nureyev made a striking first impression in the title role last June, and he is now even improved. His lean, spare dancing, still hungry for space, with Graham acquires a more sculptural mould, and he was beautifully partnered by the sensuous Janet Eilber, dancing the part designed for her but originally danced by Margot Fonteyn, and at one point, surprisingly, wearing almost as little as Mr. Nureyev himself. How times change - once it was only the men who took their clothes off in Graham ballets." Clive Barnes in The New York Times, December 9, 1975. An Egyptian-born American composer, performer, ethnomusicologist, and educator, El-Dabh came to the United States in 1950, becoming a part of the New York music scene that included Cage, Varèse, and Hovhaness. He went on to study composition with Krenek, Copland, Dallapiccola, and others. "El-Dabh's compositional style is influenced by Egyptian folk and traditional music. Frequently monodic, his works feature complex rhythms and much use of percussion. His career was launched in 1949 with a highly acclaimed performance of It is Dark and Damp on the Front (1948) at All Saints Cathedral, Cairo. In 1950 he made his début as a solo drummer, under the direction of Stokowski, in the first performance of Tahmeela. Other works include Clytemnestra (1958), One More Gaudy Night (1961), A Look at Lightning (1962) and Lucifer (1975), commissioned by Martha Graham; Sound and Light of the Pyramids of Giza (1960), written for the Cultural Ministry of the Egyptian Government and performed daily at the pyramids; and New Pharaoh's Suite, written for the Cleveland Museum of Art to accompany a visiting Ethiopian exhibit from the Louvre (1996). Spectrum no.1 'Symphonies in Sonic Vibration' (1955) and Leiyla and the Poet (1959) have been recorded." Denise A. Seachrist in Grove Music Online. An early pioneer of electronic music, El-Dabh composed one of the earliest known works of tape music, or "musique concrète," in 1944,
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Fantaisie sur des Thêmes favoris de l’Opera Masaniello de Carafa composée pour le Piano. Opus 162. Paris chez A. Brullé, Leipzig chez Breitkopf & Härtel, Londres chez Chappel. Pour le publication le 24 fevrier prochain (1849). Autograph musical manuscript

HÜNTEN, Franz 1793-1878 Folio (347 x 265 mm.). Sewn. Notated in dark brown ink on 12-stave music paper with small embossed stamp of Lard-Esnault Paris to upper inner margins of most leaves. [1] (autograph title), [2]-[13] (autograph music), [14] (blank). With autograph corrections to title; one measure crossed out and another extended into margin; editorial markings in pencil. In 4 sections marked "Moderato," "Andantino," "Allegretto," and "Bolero." Slightly worn, browned, and soiled; outer leaves separated at spine and with minor tears to edges; creased at central fold with short split to outer edge; some outer edges slightly trimmed just touching manuscript. MGG (1) p. 842. The Stichvorläge for the edition, listed in MGG as having being published by Breitkopf & Härtel in 1847 (perhaps Hünten's notation at the foot of the title giving 1849 as the projected date of publication was simply an error). Hünten, a German composer and piano teacher, "entered the Paris Conservatoire [in 1819] at the suggestion of his friend Herz, studying the piano with Pradher and composition with Reicha and Cherubini. On completing his studies in 1821 he settled in Paris, quickly establishing a reputation as a fashionable piano teacher with prestigious aristocratic pupils and as a composer of salon music for the piano. He was regarded as the successor to Henri Karr in the genre of lightweight music, though more lively and elegant in style." ". Of Hünten's 267 published works, all but a handful were written for piano solo or duet. As with Czerny, Herz, Kalkbrenner and Moscheles, the bulk of his output consisted chiefly of variations on the works of others, especially on popular operatic themes and dances of the day. Fink described Hünten in the Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung (1837) as the favourite piano composer of the day, played by more pianists than any other and at the peak of fame. His Méthode nouvelle et progressive pour le piano op.60 (1833) was widely used." John Rutter and Michael Musgrave in Grove Music Online.
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Belisario Tragedia lirica del Sig.r Salvatore Cammarano . e dal medesimo dedicata al Sig.r Agostino Perotti Maestro della Cappella Patriarcale di S.Marco in Venezia . Fr 30._. Fl 11. 30. cm. [Piano-vocal score]

DONIZETTI, Gaetano 1797-1848 Oblong folio. Dark green leather backed, embossed paper boards, titling and decorative devices gilt to spine. 1f. (recto title, verso blank), 1f. (recto named cast list, verso table of contents), 5-179 pp. Each number with separate caption title and pagination. Engraved. 19th-century marking "A.[?] 6" in ink on upper right title page. Sinfonia reduction by T[ito] Ricordi. Cast list from the first performance includes Carolina Unger, Celestino Salvatori, and Ignazio Pasini. From the collection of Italian conductor, vocal coach, and close associate of Puccini and Mascagni, Luigi Ricci (1893-1981). Binding somewhat worn, rubbed and bumped; some paper loss to edges of boards; front free endpaper lacking. Small stain to upper margin of title, slight dampstaining to lower right corners, light foxing throughout, mostly contained to margins. First edition, variant issue. Inzaghi IN. 56, pp. 175-7. This issue's title page has the imprint of Ricordi's branch in Florence as well as that of Chappell in London and Pacini in Paris. The individual pieces contain the Florence and London imprints. The primary imprint of Ricordi in Milan appears to have been removed from this issue. Belisario was composed to a libretto by Salvadore Cammarano after Luigi Marchionni's adaptation of Eduard von Schenk's Belisarius (1820). It premiered at the Teatro La Fenice in Venice on February 4, 1836 and was dedicated to his friend Giovanni Agostino Perotti (1769/70-1855), composer and maestro di cappella at San Marco. "Well and widely received during its first decade, Belisario was however overtaken by the vogue for Lucia di Lammermoor, which immediately precedes it in the Donizetti canon. That rarity, an opera without a romantic love interest, Belisario had problems sustaining its popularity because the prima donna's role is unsympathetic dramatically, in spite of her brilliant arias in the first and last acts. The plot is, in sum, an uneasy mixture of classical and Romantic elements; but considering the eloquence of the music it drew from Donizetti it is fair to say that Belisario does not deserve the neglect into which it has largely fallen." William Ashbrook in Grove Music Online. Ricci was an important figure in the transmission of 19th century traditions passed on to him by noted baritone Antonio Cotogni (1831-1918), whom he accompanied from the age of 12. He was active as a vocal coach at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, where he taught (amongst many others) Sesto Bruscantini, Anna Moffo, Rosalind Elias, Ezio Flagello, Peter Lindroos, and Martti Wallén.
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L’Elisire[!] d’Amore Melodramma giocoso in due Atti di F. Romani . ridotto con accompagnamento di Pianoforte L’Opera intera D.6 . [Piano-vocal score]

DONIZETTI, Gaetano 1797-1848 Oblong folio. Vellum-backed and edged boards with burgundy cloth laid down, initials "C.G." gilt to upper, titling to spine stamped in black, original light pink publisher's printed wrappers bound in. 1f. (recto title, verso blank), 1f. (recto cast list and table of contents, verso blank), 5-226 pp. Each number with separate caption title and pagination. Engraved. Endpapers watermarked with a fleur-de-lis and "Michele Dupino Marmorato." With priced catalog, "Opere Teatrali Intere," to upper wrapper listing works by Bellini, Donizetti, Rossini, Verdi, et al. composed through 1853 and with list of pieces with individual prices and plate numbers to title. From the collection of Italian conductor, vocal coach, and close associate of Puccini and Mascagni, Luigi Ricci (1893-1981). Binding slightly worn, bumped, and scuffed. Minimal foxing throughout, primarily confined to margins. Later edition, later issue. Inzaghi IN. 41, pp. 155-7. Girard's first edition of L'elisir d'amore appeared circa 1833. This new issue from 1852 contains many new plates alongside the older ones. L'elisir d'amore, to a libretto by Felice Romani after Eugène Scribe's text for Auber's Le philtre (1831), was first performed at the Teatro Cannobiana in Milan on May 12, 1832. "Donizetti's score is a study in shrewd contrasts: from the fairly florid lines of the duet 'Chiedi all'aura' - florid yet always rhetorically tidy - to the bumptious 3/8 stretta of the Act 1 finale, or from the sharply differentiated tones of Nemorino and Belcore in the 'Venti scudi' duet, to the comic irony in the duet for Adina and Dulcamara, 'Quanto amore!', which sets off the potion as charm against the charm of Adina herself. The apparently effortless outpouring of melody arouses wonder, especially as it is never melodiousness for its own sake but always describes some aspect of character; moreover, there are those moments of genuine pathos ('Adina, credimi' and 'Una furtiva lagrima', for instance) that keep this comedy from seeming merely heartless or cruel. Ultimately, the continuing appeal of L'elisir lies in the appropriateness of Donizetti's music to this bucolic variant of the 'male Cinderella' myth. Nemorino's good-heartedness and his singleness of purpose win out in spite of potions and unforeseen inheritances." William Ashbrook in Grove Music Online. Ricci was an important figure in the transmission of 19th century traditions passed on to him by noted baritone Antonio Cotogni (1831-1918), whom he accompanied from the age of 12. He was active as a vocal coach at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, where he taught (amongst many others) Sesto Bruscantini, Anna Moffo, Rosalind Elias, Ezio Flagello, Peter Lindroos, and Martti Wallén.
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Aus Natur und Kindeswelt für Klavier. [op. 5] Erste Folge. Autograph musical manuscript of 12 short pieces for piano solo: Mütterchen erzählt; Kriegswiegenlied; Kinderreigen; Lach, Traute, lach!; Die Nachtigall; Marie auf der Wiese; Der Kuckuckruft Unter dem Weihnachtsbaum; Die drei Könige aus dem Morgenland; Bär und Elfe; Versteckenspiel; and Helle Tage. With “komponiert Skutari [Albania] Juni, Juli, 1918” in Grabner’s autograph to title

GRABNER, Hermann 1886-1969 10 pp. Notated in ink on 12-stave music paper. With occasional corrections in pencil, some with individual completion dates and notes regarding text upon which the pieces are based. Recto of final leaf with pencilled notes and sketch of a song with text commencing "Als die Marie zu uns kommen." Bound with: Das Rote Wichtlein und andere Erzählungen. Autograph musical manuscript of 10 short pieces for piano solo: Zum Anfang; Schlafendes Trautchen; Tänschen auf der Blumenwiese; Wenn die Englein singen; Kleiner Marsch; Tanz der Brotschberggeister; Das Rote Wichtlein; Waldesmärchen; Der kleine Kobold; and Schlussgesang. 10 pp. Notated in ink on 12-stave music paper. With occasional corrections and annotations in pencil and a one-measure overpaste to Das rote Wichtlein." 1f. (recto title within green border with titling highlighted in red and green, verso with 4-line autograph poem with text commencing "Nun komm mein liebes Mütterlein" and a note to foot "Ernst Jacob zu Eigen! Mai 1923"). With autograph inscription signed to title (in German): "To my excellent student, Miss Wilhelmina, in fond remembrance Mannheim, April 27, 1923. Folio. Modern green cloth-backed boards with gray/green wrappers hand-stencilled with floral motifs in green, blue and orange bound in. Slightly worn, browned, and creased; final leaf with small old tape repair to blank margin. None of these works appear to have been published with the exception of Das Rote Wichtlein, in a version for voice and piano published by C.F. Kahnt in Leipzig in 1925. German teacher, theorist and composer, Grabner "studied composition in Leipzig with Reger [from 1910], becoming his assistant in Meiningen (1912). In 1913 Pfitzner invited him to the Strasbourg Conservatory as a theory teacher; after 1918 he held similar posts in Heidelberg and Mannheim. He moved back to Leipzig in 1924, first as a lecturer in composition at the conservatory, then as university music director (1930) and professor (1932). Finally, he lectured in Berlin at the Musikhochschule (1938-45) and the conservatory (1950-51). His importance lies chiefly in his work as a theorist and teacher. Starting from Riemann's notion of harmonic function and its symbology, Grabner rejected its basis in harmonic dualism, which had become a pedagogical handicap. His 'monistic' function theory proved both durable and influential, helping to maintain function theory as the leading method of harmonic analysis in Germany. Grabner's pupils included Fortner, Riisager and Distler. His compositional style evolved directly from that of Reger." Hanspeter Krellmann and Daniel Harrison in Grove Music Online.
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L’Esule di Roma Melodramma Eroico di Domenico Gilardoni . con nuovi pezzi espressamente composti dallo stesso Maestro in occasione che lo riproduceva sulle Scene del Teatro di Bergamo nella Fiera del 1840 Per Canto L. 30 It. . [Piano-vocal score]

DONIZETTI, Gaetano 1797-1848 Oblong folio. Vellum-backed and edged boards with dark brown cloth laid down, initials "C.G." gilt to upper, titling to spine stamped in black, original light brown publisher's printed wrappers bound in. 1f. (recto title, verso blank), 1f. (recto named cast list, verso table of contents), 185 pp. Each number with separate caption title and pagination. Engraved. Original wrapper upper with series title "Opere Teatrali Complete Per Canto e per Piano-forte" in elaborate decorative frame engraved by Giuseppe Buccinelli, with portraits of Donizetti, Rossini, Bellini, Coppola, Mercadante, and Coccia. Named cast list from the 1839 performance in Codogno includes Cesare Badiali, Laura Assandri, and Ignazio Pasini. From the collection of Italian conductor, vocal coach, and close associate of Puccini and Mascagni, Luigi Ricci (1893-1981). Binding slightly worn and with minor defects. Minimal foxing throughout, primarily confined to margins. First edition of the Bergamo version. Inzaghi IN. 26, pp. 145-6. Bergamo catalog, p. 123. L'Esule di Roma was composed to a libretto by Domenico Gilardoni after Luigi Marchionni's Il proscritto romano (1820). It was premiered at the Teatro San Carlo in Naples on January 1, 1828. "Donizetti's score for L'esule is best known for the trio ('Ei stesso! La mia vittima!') that forms the finale to Act 1, notable for the naturalness of the diction and the eloquent interplay of the vocal parts. Donizetti's first generally successful opera seria, it comes nine operas before Anna Bolena in the composer's canon. It enjoyed a real vogue in the 1830s until it was supplanted by more overtly romantic works, such as Lucrezia Borgia and Lucia di Lammermoor. Donizetti thought well of this score, revising the part of Settimio for Rubini, for a revival at the S Carlo in December 1828. In July of that year, it had enjoyed a modest success at La Scala, with ten performances, in which Lablache and Winter (who had both sung in the première) were joined by Méric-Lalande as Argelia (originally sung by Adelaide Tosi). Donizetti was involved in further revising the opera when it was given in his honour at Bergamo in the summer of 1840, now with Eugenia Tadolini, the tenor Donzelli and Ignazio Marini as Murena. Recent performances and recordings have shown the work to contain much pleasing music, suggesting that it has been unfairly neglected." William Ashbrook in Grove Music Online. The named cast list from the Codogno performance perhaps suggests a preliminary performance before the revival in Bergamo, and the new aria ("S'io finor, bell'idol mio") was first sung by Ignazio Pasini. (See this edition, p. 141, Bergamo catalog, p. 123; cf. Ashbrook, Donizetti and His Operas, p. 152). Ricci was an important figure in the transmission of 19th century traditions passed on to him by noted baritone Antonio Cotogni (1831-1918), whom he accompanied from the age of 12. He was active as a vocal coach at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, where he taught (amongst many others) Sesto Bruscantini, Anna Moffo, Rosalind Elias, Ezio Flagello, Peter Lindroos, and Martti Wallén.
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Belisario Melodramma tragico di S. Cammarano . ridotto con accomp.to di Pianoforte dallo stesso. [Piano-vocal score]

DONIZETTI, Gaetano 1797-1848 Oblong folio. Vellum-backed and edged boards with dark brown cloth laid down, initials "C.G." gilt to upper, titling to spine stamped in black, original light pink publisher's printed wrappers bound in. 1f. (recto title, verso blank), 3-21, A-I, 23-78, 1f. (r. title, v. blank), 83-155 pp. Complete. Each number with separate caption title and pagination. Engraved. Endpapers watermarked with a fleur-de-lis and "Michele Dupino Marmorato." With priced catalog, "Opere Teatrali Intere," to upper wrapper listing works by Bellini, Donizetti, Rossini, Verdi, et al. composed through 1853 and with list of pieces with individual prices and plate numbers to title. From the collection of Italian conductor, vocal coach, and close associate of Puccini and Mascagni, Luigi Ricci (1893-1981). Binding slightly worn, bumped, and scuffed. Minimal foxing throughout, confined to edge of margins; a few small stains. An early edition, later issue. Inzaghi IN. 56, pp. 175-7. Some pieces have dual plate numbers and pagination on some pages that shared plates with abbreviated forms: "A si tremendo annunzio" (PN 3067 3200), "Eterno Iddio!" (PN 3069 3110), and "Da quel di che l'innocente" (PN 3070 3111). While the individual plate numbers suggest a date circa 1836 (Antolini, 175), the title page lists Girard's address on Largo S Ferdinando, their location from 1846. Furthermore, the wrappers on this issue are issued under Stabilimento Musicale Partenopeo, the name of publisher Girard beginning in 1853. Belisario was composed to a libretto by Salvadore Cammarano after Luigi Marchionni's adaptation of Eduard von Schenk's Belisarius (1820). It premiered at the Teatro La Fenice in Venice on February 4, 1836 and was dedicated to his friend Giovanni Agostino Perotti (1769/70-1855), composer and maestro di cappella at San Marco. "Well and widely received during its first decade, Belisario was however overtaken by the vogue for Lucia di Lammermoor, which immediately precedes it in the Donizetti canon. That rarity, an opera without a romantic love interest, Belisario had problems sustaining its popularity because the prima donna's role is unsympathetic dramatically, in spite of her brilliant arias in the first and last acts. The plot is, in sum, an uneasy mixture of classical and Romantic elements; but considering the eloquence of the music it drew from Donizetti it is fair to say that Belisario does not deserve the neglect into which it has largely fallen." William Ashbrook in Grove Music Online. Ricci was an important figure in the transmission of 19th century traditions passed on to him by noted baritone Antonio Cotogni (1831-1918), whom he accompanied from the age of 12. He was active as a vocal coach at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, where he taught (amongst many others) Sesto Bruscantini, Anna Moffo, Rosalind Elias, Ezio Flagello, Peter Lindroos, and Martti Wallén.
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Torquato Tasso Melodramma in Tre Atti di Giacopo Ferretti . e dal med.o Dedicata Alle tre Citta Bergamo Sorrento e Roma Ridotta con accomp.to di Pianoforte Dall’Abate G. Moro . L. 30. It. [Piano-vocal score]

DONIZETTI, Gaetano 1797-1848 Oblong folio. Full burgundy cloth with decorative blindstamping and floral gilt device to upper, titling gilt to spine. 1f. (recto title, verso blank), 5-258 pp. Each number with separate caption title and pagination. Engraved. From the collection of Italian conductor, vocal coach, and close associate of Puccini and Mascagni, Luigi Ricci (1893-1981). Binding somewhat worn, rubbed and bumped; spine faded. Scattered light foxing throughout, mostly contained to margins; moderate to title page and a few interior leaves. First edition, later issue, without Pacini imprint to title. Inzaghi IN. 46, p. 163. Bergamo catalog, p. 130. Torquato Tasso was composed to a libretto by Jacopo Ferretti primarily after Giovanni Rosini's Torquato Tasso (1832). It premiered at the Teatro Valle in Rome on September 9, 1833. "Donizetti was drawn to the subject because of Tasso's connections with his native Bergamo. Unfortunately, Tasso is compromised by the semiseria genre, here involving an odd deployment of vocal types: tenor rival, buffo villain and baritone hero. Tasso's moving death scene, written for Giorgio Ronconi and a favourite with baritones of the Battistini ilk, survived more hardily than the rest of the opera. Recent revivals have revealed Donizetti's effective treatment of the figures of Tasso and Eleonora d'Este, but the viability of this work has yet to be established . Ferretti's libretto contains a number of quotations from Tasso's texts as well as some allusions to them. Eleonora's expressive sortita, 'Io l'udia nei suoi bei carmi', and her duet with the poet that follows, 'Colei Sofronia', are notable passages. The finest music in the score, however, comes in the last act with Tasso's Larghetto, 'Perché dell'aure in sen', leading into a touching dialogue with chorus; this culminates in a mournful cantabile to form the lyric section of the tempo di mezzo, and is followed by an elegiac cabaletta in C major. As in Anna Bolena, Donizetti here expanded the structure of the aria-finale to fill out an entire scene." William Ashbrook in Grove Music Online. Ricci was an important figure in the transmission of 19th century traditions passed on to him by noted baritone Antonio Cotogni (1831-1918), whom he accompanied from the age of 12. He was active as a vocal coach at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, where he taught (amongst many others) Sesto Bruscantini, Anna Moffo, Rosalind Elias, Ezio Flagello, Peter Lindroos, and Martti Wallén.
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Maria di Rohan Dramma lirico in tre atti di S. Cammarano . Rappresentato in Vienna li 6 Giugno 1843 L’opera intera D. 6.00 . [Piano-vocal score]

DONIZETTI, Gaetano 1797-1848 Oblong folio. Vellum-backed and edged boards with dark brown cloth laid down, initials "C.G." gilt to upper, titling to spine stamped in black, original yellow publisher's printed wrappers bound in. 1f. (recto title, verso named cast list, table of contents), 3-158 pp. Each number with separate caption title and secondary pagination. Engraved. Endpapers watermarked with a fleur-de-lis and "Michele Dupino Marmorato." With priced catalog, "Opere Teatrali Intere," to upper wrapper listing works by Bellini, Donizetti, Rossini, Verdi, et al. composed through 1853 and with list of pieces with individual prices and plate numbers to title. Named cast list includes the performers from the premieres in Vienna, Paris, and Naples, including: Eugenia Tadolini, Giorgio Ronconi, Carlo Guasco, Lorenzo Salvi, Giulia Grisi, Marietta Brambilla, Gaetano Fraschini, and Filippo Coletti. Piano reduction of the Sinfonia by Czerny "nello stile elegante." From the collection of Italian conductor, vocal coach, and close associate of Puccini and Mascagni, Luigi Ricci (1893-1981). Binding slightly worn and with minor defects. Minimal foxing throughout, primarily confined to margins. An early edition, later issue. Inzaghi IN. 76, pp. 196-7. Girard's first edition of Maria di Rohan appeared circa 1844, but this issue contains a new title page with Girard's later imprint Stabilimento Musicale Partenopeo. Maria di Rohan was composed to a libretto by Salvadore Cammarano after Lockroy and Badon's play Un duel sous le Cardinal de Richelieu (1832). It premiered at the Kärntnertortheater in Vienna on June 5, 1843. "The most tautly constructed of Donizetti's romantic melodrammi, Maria di Rohan shows clear signs, particularly in Act 3, that Donizetti was moving towards the effect of unbroken musical continuity, abandoning the closed patterns of conventional 'number' opera. Even in Act 1, the usual succession of 'entrance' arias is given new force and dynamism by Donizetti's tendency to reduce the fixed forms to their minimum, and to inject vivid musical characterization. It is a work that calls for accomplished singers who are also powerful actors, particularly for the baritone role of Chevreuse. Chorley described the powerful effect produced by Giorgio Ronconi in this part. Maria di Rohan contains some of Donizetti's most expressive music. The soprano's first-act aria, 'Cupa, fatal mestizia', suggests Un ballo in maschera. The tenor's aria at the beginning of Act 2, 'Alma soave e cara', is one of a number of fine single-movement tenor arias from the final years of Donizetti's output that reveal how effectively he wrote for this range of voice. The baritone's scene in Act 3, 'Bella e di sol vestita', has been eloquently recorded by Mattia Battistini." William Ashbrook in Grove Music Online. Ricci was an important figure in the transmission of 19th century traditions passed on to him by noted baritone Antonio Cotogni (1831-1918), whom he accompanied from the age of 12. He was active as a vocal coach at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, where he taught (amongst many others) Sesto Bruscantini, Anna Moffo, Rosalind Elias, Ezio Flagello, Peter Lindroos, and Martti Wallén.