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Burke

Burke

Morley, John; [Burke, Edmund] Handsomely bound "new edition" of John Morley's classic nineteenth-century study of statesman and philosopher Edmund Burke: "Burke has the sacred gift of inspiring men to use a grave diligence in caring for high things, and in making their lives at once rich and austere." This volume is extra-illustrated with dozens of inserted portraits of Burke and his contemporaries, including Adam Smith, Samuel Johnson, David Hume, Hannah More, Edward Gibbon, Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Louis XVI, Marie Antoinette, Robespierre, and Catherine the Great. The book was awarded as a school history prize to Mason Hammond (1903-2002), who would go on to become a Rhodes Scholar, one of the first American "Monuments Men" during World War II, and a prominent classical historian at Harvard. A unique near-fine copy, lavishly extra-illustrated, with an excellent association. Octavo, measuring 7.25 x 4.75 inches: viii, 216. Early twentieth-century chestnut morocco, raised bands, spine compartments decorated and lettered in gilt, boards triple-ruled in gilt, gilt seal of St. Mark's School to upper board, top edge gilt, gilt dentelles, marbled endpapers, red silk ribbon marker. Extra-illustrated with 51 engraved plates. St. Mark's prize bookplate to front pastedown, awarding this volume to Mason Hammond as the winner of the 1919 George Hall Burnett Prize in History. Joints lightly rubbed, occasional faint foxing.
Evelina

Evelina, or The History of a Young Lady’s Entrance into the World; with: original pen-and-ink illustration by Hugh Thomson

Burney, Fanny; Dobson, Austin (introduction); Thomson, Hugh (illustrator) Popular illustrated edition of Fanny Burney's epistolary novel, first published anonymously in 1778, with an introduction by Austin Dobson and illustrations by Hugh Thomson. In this tale of an intelligent provincial girl thrown into the whirl of London society, Burney offers satiric sketches of both higher and lower social circles, as Evelina struggles to find her rightful place: "what, thought I, can I possibly say to him in excuse for running away? he must either conclude me a fool, or half mad; for any one brought up in the great world, and accustomed to its ways, can have no idea of such sorts of fears as mine." Evelina was a great success upon publication; contemporary admirers included Edmund Burke, Edward Gibbon, Joshua Reynolds, Samuel Johnson, and Hester Thrale, and the next generation of English novelists, including Maria Edgeworth and Jane Austen, show the direct influence of Burney's pointed social comedy. This modern edition, first published in 1903, is accompanied by illustrator Hugh Thomson's original drawing of Evelina dodging the embrace of Sir Clement Willoughby, who lures her into his coach with the promise of a ride home after the opera: "I shall take very particular care never to be again alone with him." Thomson's illustration is reproduced on page 113. A fine copy of a striking illustrated edition, accompanied by Thomson's original drawing of Evelina in action. Single volume, measuring 7 x 5 inches: xxxv, [1], 477, [3]. Deep blue-green pictorial cloth elaborately stamped in gilt, all edges gilt. Dozens of black-and-white illustrations throughout text. Two pages of publisher's advertisements at rear. Single sheet, measuring 12.75 x 10.5 inches, featuring Thomson's original drawing of Evelina and Sir Clement, signed by Thomson at lower righthand corner. Marginal pencil notes and smudges, not affecting drawing; ink caption to verso.
Analyses of Stewart

Analyses of Stewart

MANUSCRIPT]; Rousseau, Frances Anne; [Stewart, Dugald] Philosophy notebook of Frances Rousseau, an 1847 graduate of Emma Hart Willard's groundbreaking Troy Female Seminary, the first preparatory school in the United States "founded to provide young women with an education comparable to that of college-educated young men" (Britannica). Still in operation today as the Emma Willard School, the Troy Female Seminary provided girls with a solid academic foundation in subjects traditionally closed to them: mathematics, philosophy, and science. Willard's rigorous curriculum was a direct influence on Mary Lyon's Mt. Holyoke Female Seminary, founded in 1837, which would develop into the first American women's college. Rousseau's notebook contains transcribed excerpts from Scottish philosopher Dugald Stewart's Philosophy of the Human Mind (1792) and The Philosophy of the Active and Moral Powers of Man (1828). Stewart's work at the University of Edinburgh did much to popularize the ideas of the Scottish Enlightenment, especially the work of Adam Smith. Rousseau copies passages by Stewart on various topics, from practical ethics to linguistic theory. Of particular interest is Rousseau's six-day class schedule, penciled at the back of the notebook, testifying to the surprising range of her studies, which include Physiology, Mechanics, Logic, Hydrostatics, and Astronomy. "Stewart" was part of her curriculum three days each week. Rousseau would go on to become a well-known missionary, living for over fourteen years in India. See also W. Jeynes, American Educational History. A compelling source document of philosophical education for women in antebellum America. Single volume, measuring 7.25 x 5.75 inches: [2] 1-15 15-34 [2] 35-36 36-108 [98]. Original half sheep over marbled paper boards. Ink manuscript notes throughout, with page numbers, corrections, additions, and last four pages in pencil. One slip with additional notes tipped in. Class schedule penciled onto rear pastedown. Binding lightly rubbed.
Commemorative card depicting Rochester's monument to Frederick Douglass

Commemorative card depicting Rochester’s monument to Frederick Douglass

Douglass, Frederick] Original printed souvenir commemorating the 1899 unveiling of the monument to Frederick Douglass in Rochester, New York: "the first public monument to an African American in the country" (O'Keefe). When Rochester's Soldiers and Sailors Monument was erected in 1892, Douglass observed that African-American soldiers were omitted from the design. A local community leader, John W. Thompson, began fundraising for a monument to Rochester's black soldiers, a project reimagined as a monument to Douglass after his burial in Rochester in 1895. Partly funded by the Haitian government, the statue by sculptor Sidney W. Edwards was dedicated in June of 1899, with Douglass's widow and Theodore Roosevelt, then governor of New York, in attendance. Rochester was a fitting location for the Douglass landmark: the city was a critical stop on the Underground Railroad, and the home of Douglass's anti-slavery newspaper The North Star. This commemorative card depicts an early design for the statue above a quote by Douglass: "Men do not live by bread alone; so with nations, they are not saved by art, but by honesty; not by gilded splendors of wealth, but by the hidden treasure of manly virtue; not by the multitudinous gratifications of the flesh, but by the celestial guidance of the spirit." The image captures Douglass as the great orator, with one hand extended and the other holding a text to his chest: a stance that differs slightly from the final monument, in which Douglass has both hands extended. The likeness was based partly on photographs of Douglass and partly on his son, Charles Remond Douglass, the first African American to enlist in New York during the Civil War. The Rochester monument was considered important enough that W.E.B. DuBois recreated it, on a smaller scale, for his groundbreaking "Exhibit of American Negroes" at the 1900 World's Fair in Paris. See Rose O'Keefe, Frederick and Anna Douglass in Rochester, New York. OCLC locates one institutional holding, at the University of Arizona. A fine survival. Single sheet, measuring 9.25 x 4 inches. Halftone image of the monument in Douglass Park above a printed quote by Douglass on recto; halftone portrait and text on verso. Edges lightly toned.
Box Kvinnliga Nobelpristagare [women Nobel laureates]

Box Kvinnliga Nobelpristagare [women Nobel laureates]

Alexievich, Svetlana; Buck, Pearl; Deledda, Grazia; Gordimer, Nadine; Jelinek, Elfriede; Lagerlöf, Selma; Lessing, Doris; Mistral, Gabriela; Morrison, Toni; Müller, Herta; Munro, Alice; Sachs, Nelly; Szymborska, Wislawa; Undset, Sigrid; Lidström, Kristin (designer) First (and to date only) collected edition of the fourteen women writers to have been awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature, a limited edition boxed set issued by a group of eight Stockholm publishers. Each of the uniformly designed trade paperbacks features a color portrait of the author by Swedish illustrator Kristin Lidström. The set includes Herr Arne's Horde and The Emperor of Portugallia by 1909 winner Selma Lagerlöf; Elias Portolu by 1926 winner Grazia Deledda; the first book of Kristin Lavransdatter by 1928 winner Sigrid Undset; The Good Earth by 1938 winner Pearl Buck; Beauty, a collection of poems by 1945 winner Gabriela Mistral; The Great Anonymous, a selection of short works by 1966 winner Nelly Sachs; Burger's Daughter by 1991 winner Nadine Gordimer; Beloved by 1993 winner Toni Morrison; Late Poems by 1996 winner Wislawa Szymborska; Women as Lovers by 2004 winner Elfriede Jelinek; The Golden Notebook by 2007 winner Doris Lessing; The Hunger Angel by 2009 winner Herta Müller; Too Much Happiness by 2013 winner Alice Munro; and The Unwomanly Face of War by 2015 winner Svetlana Alexievich. The eight publishers who partnered on this set are Albert Bonniers Förlag, Atlas, Bokförlaget Forum, Ellerströms, Ersatz, Modernista, Norstedts, and Wahlström & Widstrand. Given the complexity of managing multiple publishers, translators, and authors, the set was only issued in Scandinavia. Text in Swedish. A striking tribute, featuring Lidström's colorful portraits of all fourteen women Nobel laureates to date. Fourteen trade paperbacks, each measuring 7.75 x 4.75 inches, in color pictorial wrappers designed by Kristin Lidström. Occasional stray mark to publisher's color-patterned cardboard slipcase.
The Young Artist's Assistant

The Young Artist’s Assistant, a New Drawing Book; Containing Full Instructions for Drawing and Colouring Birds, Beasts, Flowers, Landscapes, Shipping, the Human Figure, Shells, Insects, &c. &c.; [with] Supplement to The Young Artist’s Assistant, a New Drawing Book; Containing Directions for Drawing, Colouring, Mixing Colours, &c.; [with] four booklets of colored and uncolored wood-engraved plates

ARTS EDUCATION] Scarce group of early nineteenth-century pocket coloring books for children, providing a model and canvas for their early artistic efforts. Designed to encourage sales of the art supplies which "may be had of the Publisher of this work and most Shops that vend it," the first booklet outlines the principles of independent drawing, recommending the immediate purchase of "Blacklead Pencils, Indian Rubber, a flat Parallel Rule, Compasses, Camel Hair Pencils, Indian Ink, Sponge, Drawing Paper, Marble Slabs or Doll's Saucers, a Drawing Board, &c." The primary appeal of this series, however, lies in the cheerful wood-engraved plates waiting to be colored according to the facing examples. While the wrapper on the first booklet announces that the series is "to be continued weekly," it may have run only for three numbers, as stated on the wrapper of the second. The first booklet contains ten pages of instructive text, followed by a suite of four plates depicting animals. The second booklet, titled "supplement" and labeled No. 2, contains an additional twelve pages of text, picking up mid-sentence from the first booklet, and itself ending mid-sentence: there are no plates present, though plates may have been removed for coloring. The third section of text is not present. The four accompanying booklets each contain a suite of four plates, colored and uncolored: one suite of houses, one suite of landscapes (featuring a country house and an abbey), and two duplicate suites of ships at sea. OCLC lists one institutional holding of the Young Artist's Assistant series, featuring 36 pages of text and 96 plates, at Winterthur. A surprising survival, unused in original wrappers, of these ephemeral examples of art instruction in the late Georgian period. Six side-stitched booklets, measuring approximately 2.75 x 4.5 inches: [2], 10, [4]; 11-22; [4]; [4]; [4]; [4]; plates included in collation. First booklet with text and four wood-engraved plates (two hand-colored, two identical plates uncolored) in original printed wrappers; second booklet containing text only in original printed wrappers; remaining four booklets containing four wood-engraved plates each (two hand-colored, two identical plates uncolored), stitched into early plain paper wrappers in blue and lavender. Lavender wrappers unobtrusively numbered in ink. Light soiling and edgewear.
Kings of Jazz

Kings of Jazz

MUSIC]; Armstrong, Louis; Beiderbecke, Bix; Davis, Miles; Dodds, Johnny; Ellington, Duke; Gillespie, Dizzy; Morton, Jelly Roll; Oliver, King; Parker, Charlie; Smith, Bessie; Waller, Fats Striking series of illustrated jazz biographies, originally published between 1959 and 1963. As Michael James writes in his volume on Miles Davis: "It is in the very nature of jazz that its essence cannot be caught on paper, and if it were not for the gramophone record the appeal of the music, though initially just as strong, would be far less widespread. . . . For collector and critic alike, however, records have drawbacks other than the obvious ones. Prominent among these is the ease with which they allow the listener to imagine the music existing in a void, detached from the manifold forces, interior and exterior, which went into its making." This series attempts to fill that void, offering historical and musical background on eleven jazz masters, complete with discographies. The set includes Albert McCarthy on Louis Armstrong, Burnett James on Bix Beiderbecke, Max Harrison on Charlie Parker, Charles Fox on Fats Waller, Michael James on Miles Davis and Dizzy Gillespie, G.E. Lambert on Johnny Dodds and Duke Ellington, and Martin Williams on Jelly Roll Morton and King Oliver. Paul Oliver also contributes a volume on Bessie Smith, a lone queen among the kings. A bright fine set, in a worn slipcase. Eleven octavo volumes, measuring 8 x 5.5 inches. Glossy color pictorial wrappers, illustrated with black-and-white photographs throughout text. Housed in publisher's faded and tape-repaired slipcase.
The Grand Instructions to the Commissioners Appointed to Frame a New Code of Laws for the Russian Empire: Composed by Her Imperial Majesty Catherine II. Empress of all the Russias

The Grand Instructions to the Commissioners Appointed to Frame a New Code of Laws for the Russian Empire: Composed by Her Imperial Majesty Catherine II. Empress of all the Russias

Catherine the Great; Tatischeff, Michael (translator) First English translation of Catherine the Great's Nakaz, her instructions to the commission she convened in 1767 to reform the Russian legal system. A student of the philosophes, Catherine was inspired by the principles of Montesquieu, Diderot, and Rousseau, as well as the writings of the Italian jurist Cesare Beccaria. She was eager to promote herself as a voice of enlightened reason, and Russia as a modern European nation. Although she considered the absolute power of the tsar the only practical means of governing such a vast empire, her Nakaz represented a striking break with Russia's feudal past: "the Equality of the Citizens consists in this; that they should all be subject to the same Laws." Catherine called for a transparent, universally applied legal code: "The Laws ought to be written in the common vernacular Tongue; and the Code, which contains all the Laws, ought to be esteemed as a Book of the utmost Use, which should be purchased at as small a Price as the Catechism." She argued that "it is better to prevent Crimes, than to punish them," condemning the use of torture and the death penalty. The hundreds of commissioners Catherine appointed, representing a range of regional and class interests, fell into partisan squabbling soon enough, and the 1768 war with the Turks provided an excuse to suspend the reform project. But the Nakaz, widely translated and debated across Europe, and banned by Louis XV in France, placed Russia in a new light internationally. Predating the American and French revolutions, Catherine's early attempt to articulate a modern legal system "established an ideal and a measure for future legal reform in Russia," and remains a compelling document of the Enlightenment (Wortman, 59). Voltaire described the Nakaz as "the finest monument of the age." A wide-margined, near-fine example of a scarce book, in a contemporary binding. Quarto, measuring 11 x 8.25 inches: xxiii, [1] 3-258. Contemporary three-quarter calf, raised bands ruled in gilt, traces of gilt decoration to spine compartments, marbled paper boards, no spine label, text block uncut. Woodcut initials and headpieces throughout text. Private library label ("Case D / Shelf 6") and cropped armorial bookplate to front pastedown, early owner signature to title page. Boards rubbed; expert reinforcement to joints and corners; light occasional foxing, heavier to first and last pages.
English art student's sketchbook of historic ornament

English art student’s sketchbook of historic ornament

MANUSCRIPT]; Timson, Leonard; Timson, Enid Beautifully executed sketchbook of historic ornament based primarily on artifacts in the Victoria & Albert Museum, containing thirty pages of pencil, ink, and watercolor sketches by English art student Leonard Timson (1879-1936). The range of ornamental details is wide, covering sculpture, ceramic, and stained glass designs, from a sixth-century Coptic frieze, to thirteenth-century Italian mosaics in porphyry and marble heightened with gold, to colorful seventeenth-century Spanish tiles. Most of the designs are marked "S.K.M." for the South Kensington Museum, formally renamed the Victoria & Albert in 1899: most notably, a fully-finished pen and watercolor painting of the stained glass window "The Adoration of the Magi," which came to South Kensington from the Cathedral of Cortona in Tuscany. Outside the galleries, Timson records local architectural and sculptural details from Cobham Church in Kent, Fairford Church in Gloucestershire (famous for its stained glass), St. Mary's in Buckinghamshire, and even, farther afield, the entrance gates to the Antwerp Zoo. Timson's style of sketching and his annotations are indebted to the work of Richard Glazier, a member of the South Kensington Circle (along with Owen Jones and Henry Cole), and head of the Manchester Municipal School of Art. Glazier's 1899 Historic Ornament was the most widely assigned art textbook in England in the early twentieth century, and Timson was clearly immersed in it. His sketchbook imitates Historic Ornament in lettering, layout, shorthand (including "S.K.M."), and choice of subjects. In the National Art Competition of 1904, while a student at Battersea Polytechnic Institute, Timson won a bronze medal "for his well-executed design for a panel in the Italian Renaissance style," perhaps inspired by the subjects in this sketchbook; his stained-glass work would later appear in an exhibition at the Royal Academy, and he would pursue a career as a draughtsman. Toward the end of the sketchbook, Leonard's daughter Enid Timson (1906-1994), an avocational painter, contributes thirteen pages of her own, including six full-page watercolors. While her work is less accomplished than her father's, her watercolors of the Ponte Vecchio and other Florentine scenes have their own charm. A remarkable ornamental sketchbook, testifying to the influence of the South Kensington Circle in early twentieth-century English art education. Oblong folio measuring 7.5 x 10.5 inches, original half diapered black calf over pebbled green cloth boards, spine ruled in gilt, black calf cylindrical pencil-holder attached to lower board, original elastic band (mended) attached to upper board, all edges speckled red. Front pastedown bears a calligraphic ink ownership inscription ("Leon: B. Timson / July 1903"), the bookplate of "RcF" in Morningthorpe, and a Reeves & Sons stationer's ticket ("Made of Whatman's Paper") beside their Ludgate Hill showroom stamp. Forty-five illustrated pages of pencil sketches, pen-and-ink drawings, and watercolors, including one pen-and-ink sketch of stained glass windows on older paper tipped to the final pastedown. One of Enid Timson's watercolors cleanly excised at rear. Corners bumped, pencil holder and spine ends heavily rubbed.
Invitation to private reception following Whitman's lecture

Invitation to private reception following Whitman’s lecture, “The Death of Abraham Lincoln”

Whitman, Walt; [Lincoln, Abraham] Invitation to Walt Whitman's private reception after his celebrated lecture, "The Death of Abraham Lincoln," at Madison Square Theatre on April 14, 1887. Whitman had given public readings of his Lincoln lecture, variously edited, since 1879; one version was published in Specimen Days in 1882-1883. Scheduled on the twenty-second anniversary of Lincoln's assassination, the 1887 event was staged as a benefit for the ailing Whitman, who remained seated throughout his sold-out tribute to the Union's "Martyr Chief": "there is a cement to the whole people, subtler, more underlying, than any thing in written constitution, or courts or armies - namely, the cement of a death identified thoroughly with that people, at its head, and for its sake." As William Pannapacker notes, Whitman's passionate public identification with Lincoln was central to his emergence as "The Good Gray Poet," a national treasure: "Whitman's experiments in self-creation finally succeeded with a major segment of the public when he enclosed his persona within the halo encircling the martyred President" (Revised Lives, 22). The New York audience for Whitman's performance included Mark Twain, John Hay, Augustus St. Gaudens, James Russell Lowell, and Charles Eliot Norton; Andrew Carnegie could not make it, but purchased a box for $350. At the end of his performance, Whitman was surprised by a gift of lilacs from poet E.C. Stedman's young granddaughter, a reference to his great elegy for Lincoln, "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd." In New York City for a single night, Whitman hosted a reception in his rooms at the Westminster Hotel after the lecture; this invitation was printed for the occasion. The evening was an important one for New York literary society, a celebration "at least as spectacular as the event itself," according to the New York Sun. Looking "like a painting of Jove," Whitman entertained a constant stream of admirers, relieved only by the performance of the Afro-Cuban violinist Claudio Brindis de Salas Garrido, "El Paganini Negro," who serenaded Whitman on a seventeenth-century Ruggeri violin: "Walt was mightily pleased with the music." A surprising survival, a near-fine artifact of the nineteenth-century American literary scene. Ivory card, measuring 2.75 x 3.75 inches, printed recto only: "Walt Whitman / At Home -- Thursday Evening / April 14th 1887 / Westminster Hotel, Irving Place and 16th St., New York." Penciled bookseller note to verso: "April 14, 1887 for his most famous lecture (Lincoln) / WW in NY for only one (1) night." Card lightly toned; half-inch closed tear to head, expertly repaired. Housed in envelope fragment with penciled inventory number, bookseller note, and collector's note: "Whitman card / gift from Capt. Cohn -- / House of Books / Aug 7 1950.".
Továrna Na Absolutno [The Absolute at Large]

Továrna Na Absolutno [The Absolute at Large]

Capek, Karel; Capek, Josef (illustrator) First edition of this biting science-fiction satire by a major Czech modernist, inscribed by Capek in the year of publication to an actress at the national theatre. Capek's plot is set in motion by an invention. A new carburetor uses nuclear fission to create clean, cheap energy, but also releases a byproduct of "Absolute," a "God particle" that produces an intense spiritual experience: "It must be some kind of poisoning." Mixing the philosophy of Leibniz and Spinoza with commentary on modern technology and capitalism, Capek explores the unexpected pairing of limitless energy and unrestrained inspiration with black humor: "There have been some serious cases of enlightenment." The climax of the book reflects the cynicism produced by World War I, as an absurd Great War breaks out between competing religious groups: "you should not listen to those people when they proudly say that they lived through was the greatest war of all time. We all know, of course, that in a few decades' time we will manage to create a war which is even greater." The novel is illustrated by Karel Capek's brother Josef, an important modernist illustrator and book designer. The two brothers were central members of the Czech avant-garde between the wars: their intellectual circle promoted the modern renaissance of written Czech, publishing works like Továrna Na Absolutno in the vernacular rather than German. Josef Capek would die in a concentration camp in 1945, victim of an "even greater" war. Capek inscribed this copy in Czech to the actress Tana Cuprova, later art manager of the national theatre in Prague where R.U.R., Capek's most famous play, introduced the word "robot" to the world. Text in Czech. A wonderful inscribed copy of an important early science-fiction novel. Octavo, measuring 7.75 x 5.5 inches: 219, [5]. Original tan pictorial wrappers with blue and orange design by the author's brother Josef, spine and lower wrapper lettered in blue, text block uncut, many individual signatures unsewn and laid in (as issued). Title page printed in blue and black, twenty full-page black-and-white illustrations (included in collation). Manuscript prices in blue and grey pencil to verso of upper wrapper. Ink inscription by Capek in year of publication to front fly leaf. Small chip to head of spine, closed tear at top joint of front wrapper.
Qiu yu qiu feng ["Autumn rain

Qiu yu qiu feng [“Autumn rain, autumn wind”: memorial for the executed revolutionary Qiu Jin]

Qiu, Jin]; Huang, Min (editor) Extraordinary memorial pamphlet for the Chinese revolutionary and feminist Qiu Jin (c.1875-1907), printed less than two months after her public beheading in 1907. Qiu Jin was born into wealth and privilege. Her parents bound her feet and arranged her marriage, but also provided her with a comparatively thorough education. She was deeply drawn to revolutionary ideas, however, chafing under the restrictions of life as a Chinese wife and mother; in one poem, she writes: "My body will not allow me to join the ranks of men, but my heart is far braver than that of a man." In 1904, Qiu Jin sold her dowry to finance an escape to Japan, joining the expatriate Chinese revolutionaries gathering there. She unbound her feet and undertook the study of traditionally male martial skills, like her hero Mulan: sword fighting, archery, and horseback riding astride. She adopted masculine dress, especially Japanese and Western styles: the famous photograph reproduced in this pamphlet shows Qui Jin in Japanese dress, wielding a warrior's sword. The portrait is a provocation, intended to spark discussion about women's roles in the coming revolution, as well as to burnish her own legend. Qiu Jin began writing and speaking publicly in defense of women's emancipation, arguing that China as a whole would benefit from reforms that gave women more opportunities. She directed her criticism at the arranged marriages, inadequate schooling, and foot binding that limited the potential of Chinese women. Foot binding, in particular, literally disabled women, making it impossible for them to participate in the public sphere. (While the practice had been outlawed in 1902, it was still an unquestioned expectation of an upper-class woman.) Qui Jin was a brilliant orator, a talent all the more unusual because she "lived at a time when women in China were not permitted to venture out of their homes, let alone participate in public affairs" (New York Times Overlookedobituary, 2018). Her famous poem "Reply to a Japanese Friend," included here, is characteristic: "Don't tell me women are not the stuff of heroes." In 1906, Qiu Jin moved back to China, and founded theChinese Women's Journalto advocate for women's rights. She became principal of a school of physical education that served as a front for her underground revolutionary organization. In 1907, the organization's leader was captured after assassinating a local government authority, and officials soon came in pursuit of Qiu Jin, the second in command. After a fight, she was captured, tortured, and executed. The title of this pamphlet references her death poem, her last words, which play on her surname ("qiu," meaning 'autumn'): "Autumn rain, autumn wind: they make one die of sorrow." Qiu Jin's body would eventually be buried and reburied nine different times, as various factions competed to claim her as one of their own. This 1907 pamphlet is one of the earliest examples of an attempt to shape her legacy, including excerpts from her writings and tributes by others; the printer ran an exceptional risk in producing this memorial before the revolution. Sun Yat-Sen's revolutionary party, of which Qiu Jin was the first female member, would finally overthrow the Qing Dynasty in 1911: Sun Yat-Sen's wife described Qiu Jin as "one of the noblest martyrs of the revolution." Today, she remains a national hero, central to modern China's vision of itself. The legend of Qiu Jin, revolutionary general and martyr, is memorialized in print, inscribed on stele, and dramatized on stage and screen. Rare: no holdings in OCLC, and no auction records in the West. Housed in a custom chemise and slipcase. A remarkable survival of a poorly printed underground publication. Single volume, measuring 7.25 x 5 inches: [4], 75, [1]. Original printed wrappers, stitched as issued, ornamental border stamped in purple on upper wrapper. Half-title printed on green paper. Portrait of Qiu Jin in Japanese dress, wielding a sword, following the table of contents. Single character written in ink on verso of upper wrapper, name written in ink and 1922 "paid" stamp of a San Francisco Chinese grocer on lower wrapper. Foxing to covers, some edgewear, spine largely perished, text block uniformly embrowned.
Dess Epictetus Politische Sitten-Lehre in vier der Sprachen vornembsten Europens übersetzt

Dess Epictetus Politische Sitten-Lehre in vier der Sprachen vornembsten Europens übersetzt

Epictetus First polyglot edition in vernacular languages of the Stoic classic Enchiridion, in an unusual early Italian painted vellum binding. Born a slave, and crippled early in life, Epictetus gained his freedom in Rome and moved to the Adriatic coast, where he opened a school of philosophy. His sayings were collected by his student Arrian, and edited into the handbook of moral philosophy known as the Enchiridion. Epictetus understood philosophy as an active pursuit, more difficult than the abstract exercise of logic: "Do you think that you can act as you do, and be a philosopher? . . . You must watch, you must labor, you must get the better of certain appetites, must quit your acquaintance, be despised by your servant, be laughed at by those you meet" (Carter translation). Epictetus's emphasis on self-knowledge and self-discipline greatly impressed the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, who quotes him at length in the Meditations, and his philosophy was read across Renaissance Europe, inspiring the Neostoicism movement and influencing the likes of Pascal and Descartes. While editions of the Enchiridion appeared in many languages, this is the first edition to contain multiple vernacular languages in a single publication: Spanish, German, Italian, and French. W.A. Oldfather, in Contributions toward a Bibliography of Epictetus, describes this polyglot edition as "extremely rare" (560). This copy is from the library of eighteenth-century Milanese collector Marquise Luigi Sylva, whose books are immediately identifiable by the exuberant hand-painting of their custom vellum bindings. While hand-painted vellum bindings were popular in eighteenth-century England and France, those from Sylva's library provide some of the rare surviving Italian examples from the period. A wonderful example of an important vernacular edition in a vernacular binding. Octavo, measuring 6.5 x 4 inches: [16], 127, [1]. Eighteenth-century Italian binding, three strips of vellum per board hand-painted with ornaments in black and gold around a central window of red and gold marbled paper, manuscript shelf label in black ink on spine, matching yellow, green, and pink ornamented spotted endpapers. Additional ink shelf mark on verso of second fly leaf. Old paper strip, covering an ownership inscription, and engraved bookplate mounted to half-title. Eighteen pages for notes (blank) added by binder at rear. Some bowing to boards, faint soiling, and light toning to spine.
Happiness as Found in Forethought Minus Fearthought

Happiness as Found in Forethought Minus Fearthought

Fletcher, Horace; [James, Henry] Early edition of this inspirational self-help treatise by American health faddist Horace Fletcher, known as "The Great Masticator" for his insistence on chewing every bite of solid food to liquid before swallowing. This copy is warmly inscribed by Fletcher to his recent convert, the novelist Henry James: "To the most subtle and elevating influence in contemporary literature / Henry James / all happiness always / is the devout wish of / Horace Fletcher / Palazzo Saibante / Canal Grande / Venice / August 1905." Henry James and his brother, the philosopher William James, were both enthusiastic "Fletcherizers" for a time, along with Thomas Edison, Mark Twain, John D. Rockefeller, and even Franz Kafka. Happiness as Found in Forethought Minus Fearthought, originally published in 1897, predates Fletcher's celebrity as "the chew-chew man." The book advocates a relentless model of positive thinking that pulverizes all obstacles to happiness. "All time - all eternity - is made up of a succession of nows. If you are free in the present now, you may more easily be free from temptation in the succeeding nows until emancipation shall be complete and the very atmosphere of your freedom shall exorcise all evil before it can come near enough to attract your consciousness." Henry James would eventually abandon the dietary practice of Fletcherizing in 1910, blaming the liquid diet for his chronic digestive ailments and general low spirits. A notable association copy, and an intriguing artifact of mainstream American quackery, handsomely bound by Riviere & Son. Single volume, measuring 7.25 x 5 inches: [6], 261, [1]. Contemporary three-quarter brown morocco over brown cloth boards; raised bands; spine compartments lettered, ruled, and decorated in gilt; boards ruled in gilt; top edge gilt; marbled endpapers. London bookseller ticket (B.F. Stevens & Brown) to title page. Ink presentation inscription, dated August 1905, from Horace Fletcher to Henry James on half-title. Light shelfwear to binding.