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INSTRUCTIONS FOR COLLECTORS OF TAXES. CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, TREASURY DEPARTMENT, RICHMOND, MAY 15, 1863. THE FOLLOWING INSTRUCTIONS WILL BE PURSUED BY ALL OFFICERS ENGAGED IN THE COLLECTION OF TAXES FOR THE CONFEDERATE STATES.

Confederate Imprint] 15, [1 blank] pp. Caption title [as issued], stitched. Signed in type at end by C.G. Memminger, Secretary of the Treasury. Addressed on final blank page to "Wesley A. Black Esq., Assessor, Diamond Hill PO, Abbeville Dist., SC." Notation, "War Tax," above address Hand-stamped 'June 25' and 'PAID' in blue ink. Small mar to first page costing a few letters. Some ink smears on blank portion of final page. Good+. These instructions include qualifications for collectors; appointment of deputies; bonds for duties of office; the required oath; "the penalty of the bonds of the several State collectors"; the occupations, trades and persons to be taxed and the amounts; procurement of returns of taxable property. Capt. Wesley Alexander Black [1830-1888], a graduate of Erskine College, was an Abbeville, South Carolina, farmer for most of his life. In 1880, he was nominated to represent Abbeville county in the House of Representatives. He was married to Letitia Alamanza Cowan; they had ten children. His father was James A. Black, known as "Swanky Jim Black" around town. His brother, James A. Black, Jr. [1820-1869] was General Comptroller of South Carolina from 1862-1866. [Press & Banner, Abbeville, Wed., Sept. 8, 1880, p.1] Parish & Willingham 2084.
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MANUSCRIPT LETTER SIGNED, TO WILLIAM RAWLE, ESQUIRE, U.S. ATTORNEY FOR PENNSYLVANIA, SEEKING RAWLE’S AID IN SECURING TESTIMONY FROM A RELUCTANT WITNESS IN HARISON’S PROSECUTION OF THREE CASES PENDING IN THE DISTRICT OF NEW YORK FOR VIOLATION OF THE 1794 SLAVE TRADE ACT

Slave Trade] Richard Harison, United States Attorney for the District of New York Single page, 9-1/2" x 15-3/4", entirely in manuscript. Headed with names of three cases pending in the New York District Court, followed by Harison's letter to Rawle. Old folds with a pinhole at a fold intersection [no text loss]. Short fold split expertly repaired. Very Good. Harison [1747-1829] was President Washington's appointee in 1789 as the first United States Attorney for the District of New York. He served until 1801, when Edward Livingston succeeded him. His correspondent, William Rawle, was Washington's appointee as U.S. Attorney for Pennsylvania. Rawle was also the founder and first president of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, president of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society, and a highly respected writer on governmental matters. The Slave Trade Act of 1794, passed by the Third Congress and signed by President Washington, was the first American regulation of the international slave trade. It prohibited American citizens or residents from participating in trafficking slaves to any foreign country. Harison had brought several cases under the Act as noted in this letter: The United States vs. The Brigantine Active; and two by George Geer, for himself and the USA vs. Elisha King. Harison explains, "The above Suits were commenced upon the Act prohibiting American Citizens from carrying on the Slave Trade in foreign Countries." Harison's problem: "The principal witness is supposed to have been prevailed upon by undue Methods, to quit this District is thought to be either in Philadelphia or Baltimore." If he's in Philadelphia, "I will esteem it a Favor if you will take every regular Method of procuring his Testimony." If he's in Baltimore, please "recommend the Business to the Attorney for the District of Maryland. The Public is in every Point of View interested in the Event." Diligent research has uncovered no additional information on these cases.
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THE JUDGMENT OF WHOLE KINGDOMS AND NATIONS, CONCERNING THE RIGHTS, POWER, AND PREROGATIVE OF KINGS, AND THE RIGHTS, PRIVILEGES, & PROPERTIES OF THE PEOPLE: SHEWING THE NATURE OF GOVERNMENT IN GENERAL, BOTH FROM GOD AND MAN. BY LORD SOMMERS. THE TWELFTH EDITION, CORRECTED

Somers, John?] [viii], 9-156 pp. Stitched, untrimmed, original plain rear wrapper. Light dusting. Final blank with the elaborate, contemporary ownership signature of Polly Noyes. "Her Book." Very Good. "The attribution to Somers is considered doubtful in the Dictionary of national biography. Also attributed to Daniel Defoe and John Dunton" [ESTC]. The book was printed in Philadelphia and Boston during the previous year, their first American appearances. It provided intellectual ammunition to advocates of Independence on the eve of Revolution. The author's Natural Rights theory of government argues that, "It remains free and entire to the People at their first Erection of, and Submission to Government, to prescribe and refine.unto what Rules and standards the Magistrate shall be restrained, in order to his defending and promoting the Benefit of the Society of which he is created the civil and political Head. And every one being equally Master of his own Property and Liberty, antecedently to their Agreement with one another," Rulers "can lay claim to no more Authority over the Liberty and over the Property of that Body Politick, than what the Community conferr'd upon them." Evans 13631. Alden 564. ESTC W27536.
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THE ESCAPE AND SUICIDE OF JOHN WILKES BOOTH OR THE FIRST TRUE ACCOUNT OF LINCOLN’S ASSASSINATION CONTAINING A COMPLETE CONFESSION BY BOOTH MANY YEARS AFTER THE CRIME. GIVING IN FULL DETAIL THE PLANS, PLOT AND INTRIGUE OF THE CONSPIRATORS, AND THE TREACHERY OF ANDREW JOHNSON, THEN VICE-PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES. WRITTEN FOR THE CORRECTION OF HISTORY

Bates, Finis L. Original printed wrappers [wrapper wear along spine, wraps nearly detached], depicting Booth shooting Lincoln at Ford's Theater. Photo illustration frontis of the author. [12], 309, [1 blank] pp. With photo illustrations of Booth, Lincoln, and others. Text uniformly browned but the illustrations are unscathed. A few contemporary ink notes. The imprint information is in the form of a pasted label at the foot of the title page. Good+. "One of the best selling Lincoln books. This volume was hawked along with an exhibition of the alleged corpse of Booth" [Monaghan]. The book is an example of a popular genre; in today's world, it is comparable to arguments that Hitler or Elvis is alive, or that the U.S. did not really land a man on the moon. "I became satisfied that John Wilkes Booth was not killed, as has been supposed, at the Garrett home in Virginia, on the 26th day of April, 1865, and present this volume of collated facts, which I submit for the correction of history, respecting the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, and the death or escape of John Wilkes Booth." Monaghan 1519 [noting also several variants printed in 1907].