David Brass Rare Books Archives - Rare Book Insider
last 7 days
last 30 days

David Brass Rare Books

Three Men Seated in a Tavern]

Three Men Seated in a Tavern]

ROWLANDSON, Thomas, artist A Fine Original Thomas Rowlandson Watercolor Drawing ROWLANDSON, Thomas, artist. [Three Men Seated in a Tavern]. [London], 1809. Pen, ink and watercolor drawing (6 15/16 x 9 3/8 inches; 176 x 238 mm.). Signed and dated at lower left. The scene depicts three gentleman seated at a tavern table. They are being waited on by a serving wench. A typical 'Rowlandson dog' can be seen on the floor by the table begging for food! Thomas Rowlandson (1756-1827) was an English artist and caricaturist of the Georgian Era, noted for his political satire and social observation. A prolific artist, he also wrote satirical verse under the pen name of Peter Pindar. Like other contemporary pre-Victorian caricaturists like James Gillray, he too depicted characters in bawdy postures and he also produced erotica which was censured by the 1840s. His caricatures included those of people in power such as the Duchess of Devonshire, William Pitt and Napoleon Bonaparte. "We are told of his aimless wandering about the country, of his indolence and dissipation, of his gambling and high living, and of the reprobation with which his habits of life were regarded by the good people of his day, but undoubtedly it is to these things that we are indebted for the marvelous record which he left of the England he knew, perhaps the most important contribution to our knowledge of the manners of the Englishman during the extraordinary years from 1780 to 1825" (Grolier Club).
An English Squire]

An English Squire]

ROWLANDSON, Thomas, artist; [An English Squire] An Original Thomas Rowlandson Watercolor Drawing ROWLANDSON, Thomas, artist. [An English Squire] ca. 1803 Pen, ink and watercolor (9 7/8 x 7 5/8 inches; 252 x 194 mm.). This watercolor drawing has been drawn on the back of a note citing the terms of a bill of sale. Thomas Rowlandson (1756-1827) was an English artist and caricaturist of the Georgian Era, noted for his political satire and social observation. A prolific artist, he also wrote satirical verse under the pen name of Peter Pindar. Like other contemporary pre-Victorian caricaturists like James Gillray, he too depicted characters in bawdy postures and he also produced erotica which was censured by the 1840s. His caricatures included those of people in power such as the Duchess of Devonshire, William Pitt and Napoleon Bonaparte. "We are told of his aimless wandering about the country, of his indolence and dissipation, of his gambling and high living, and of the reprobation with which his habits of life were regarded by the good people of his day, but undoubtedly it is to these things that we are indebted for the marvelous record which he left of the England he knew, perhaps the most important contribution to our knowledge of the manners of the Englishman during the extraordinary years from 1780 to 1825" (Grolier Club). "On all these Bills of Sale it is observable that the Bill of sale must be accompanied with papers? and when chosen or accounts are opened there should be a letter of -- -- to the person liable to the demand.
Tom Belcher

Tom Belcher

ROWLANDSON, Thomas, artist An Original Thomas Rowlandson Watercolor Drawing ROWLANDSON, Thomas, artist. "Tom Belcher" [London], 1810. A fine circular pen, ink and watercolor drawing (10 3/4 x 10 1/8 inches; 273 x 257 mm.) of Tom Belcher standing with his fists raised in a prize fighter's stance. Titled at lower left and signed and dated at lower right. Thomas Rowlandson (1756-1827) was an English artist and caricaturist of the Georgian Era, noted for his political satire and social observation. A prolific artist, he also wrote satirical verse under the pen name of Peter Pindar. Like other contemporary pre-Victorian caricaturists like James Gillray, he too depicted characters in bawdy postures and he also produced erotica which was censured by the 1840s. His caricatures included those of people in power such as the Duchess of Devonshire, William Pitt and Napoleon Bonaparte. "We are told of his aimless wandering about the country, of his indolence and dissipation, of his gambling and high living, and of the reprobation with which his habits of life were regarded by the good people of his day, but undoubtedly it is to these things that we are indebted for the marvelous record which he left of the England he knew, perhaps the most important contribution to our knowledge of the manners of the Englishman during the extraordinary years from 1780 to 1825" (Grolier Club). Tom Belcher (178?-1871) was the younger brother of James Belcher, also known as Jem Belcher (1781-1811) who was an English bare-knuckle prize-fighter and Champion of All England 1800-1805. Tom Belcher, was scarcely inferior as a pugilist. He won battles in succession with Dan Dogherty, the 'Young Ruffian' John Firby, and some fighters of less repute, but he was badly defeated by Dutch Sam (Samuel Elias). He was an accomplished boxer and sparrer, and at the Tennis Court, during Tom Cribb's proprietorship, he defeated with the gloves such experts as Shaw the lifeguardsman, John Gully, and the African-American Tom Molineaux. When Tom travelled to face Dogherty at the Curragh of Kildare (23 April 1813), Pierce Egan's commentary implies that the Irish fighter was outclassed by the London Fancy's hero: 'Twentieth. - Belcher now seemed perfectly at home, and felt convinced how things were going. The length of his arm, added to the advantage of superior science, enabled him to serve out Dogherty about the head with such severity of manner, as to occasion the latter to fall at his feet'. Tom Belcher, who is described as 'gentlemanly and inoffensive,' died in London on 9 December 1854, aged 71, having earned a competence as tavern-keeper at the Castle, Holborn, subsequently kept by Tom Spring. He is buried in Nunhead Cemetery, London. The British Museum has a mezzotint print of Tom Belcher standing full-length in a boxing ring with fists raised in a prize fighter's stance. (BM 1851,0308.739). 'Prize Fighting' was not just for the rich and influential. Any man might attend a boxing match. The privileged rubbed elbows with clerks and millworkers. The more common folk also joined with the upper classes to discuss boxing and watch demonstrations of pugilism at the Daffy Club, run by former boxing champion Jem Belcher from his Castle Tavern, Holborn, beginning in 1814.
Sammelband of Engraved Sheet Music for Voice and Piano

Sammelband of Engraved Sheet Music for Voice and Piano

BEETHOVEN, Ludwig van; ROSSINI, Gioachino; HANDEL, George Frideric A Fine Sammelband of Ten Eighteenth Century Works for Voice and Piano Including the First Printing of Beethoven's Vier Deutsche Gedichte BEETHOVEN, Ludwig van. ROSSINI, Gioachino. HANDEL, George Frideric, et al. [General title]. Theater-Journal fur Gesang mit Begleitung des Piano-Forte. Vienna: S.A. Steiner [1823]. A fine sammelband of ten published engraved sheet music for voice and piano, including the first printing of Ludwig van Beethoven's Vier Deutsche Gedichte (Four German Poems), Vienna, [1823] and works by Rossini, Handel, Gluck, Wollank and others. Oblong quarto ( 9 7/16 x 12 3/8 inches; 240 x 314 mm.). A series of 10 published works by Beethoven, Gluck, Rossini, Handel, et. al. Collation: 10; 16; 14; 12; [2], 12, [2, blank]; [2], 14; 4; 4; 6; 8 pp. Some light foxing throughout. Title-page with early ink signatures of Minna Fournier and Alice V. Fournier. Full early nineteenth century red straight-grain morocco. Covers elaborately tooled in gilt with hearts, flowers and a central 'sun ray' design. Spine elaborately tooled in gilt, decorative gilt board-edges, tree calf liners richly bordered in gilt, light blue coated end-leaves, marbled end-papers. Corners a little worn but still a really amazing early nineteenth century binding. Works included: 1. Rossini, Giaochino. Theater-Journal. 11. Heft. Vienna: S.A. Steiner. Rossini's Cavatina from Der Barbier von Sevilla. 9 pp. (Printer's slug S;u:C:2961). 2. Weber, Carl Maria von [&] Wollank Friedrich. Sechs Italienische Gesaenge. Leipzig and Berlin in Kunst und Industrie Comptoir, 15 pp. (Printer's slug 389). 3. Fedrigotti, Giovanni. Tre Cavatine. Vienna: Pietro Mechetti qm Carlo. 13pp. (Printer's slug 485). 4. Diabelli, Anton. Philomele. Vienna: A. Diabelli et Comp. 11 pp. (Printer's slug C. et D. No. 293). 5. Beethoven, Ludwig van. Vier Deutsche Gedichte. Op 113. Vienna: Sauer & Leidesdorf (Bonn, Simrock; Leipzig, Peters). 12 pp. (Printer's slug Sauer et Leidesdorf 226: in Wein). First Printing. 6. Kreutzer, Conradin. Neun Wander Leider von Uhland. Augsbburg: Gombart und comp. 34tos Werk, Ites Heft. 13 pp. (Printer's slug 625). 7. Gluck, Ritter. Cavatine aus der Oper: Die Pilgrimme auf Mecca. Berlin: T. Trautwein. 4 pp. 8. Handel George Frideric. Duett aus dem Oratorium Athalia. Berlin: Grobenschutz und Seiler. 3 pp. 9. Carafa, Michele. Sempre piu l'amor mio etc. Duettino. Leipzig: Breitkopf & Hartel, 5 pp. (Printer's slug 3687). 10. Wollank, Friedrich. Drei Gesange für zwei Weibliche Stimmen. Berlin: T. Trautwein. 7 pp.
La Ménagerie Parisienne

La Ménagerie Parisienne

DORÉ, Gustave A Work of "Great Rarity" From Lions to Sewer Rats, Doré's Ruthless Pencil has Spared None of the Classes of Urban Society DORÉ, Gustave. La Ménagerie Parisienne. Paris: Au Bureau du Journal Pour Rire, n.d. [1854]. First edition. Oblong folio (10 1/4 x 12 5/8 in; 259 x 320 mm). Twenty-four superb and very amusing black and white lithographed plates. Bound without the lithograph title but with the original green paper front wrapper titled in gold bound in. Nineteenth century red roan over limp boards, lettered in gilt on front cover "Doré / Album". Corners of binding and text rounded, green and gold patterned end-papers, all edges stained red, extremities of binding worn. Internally a very good clean example. Housed in a fleece-lined, half brown morocco over purple cloth boards. Spine with five raised bands, ruled and lettered in gilt in compartments. A Doré album of extreme rarity. OCLC records only five copies in institutional holdings worldwide, only one of which, the Michael Sadlier-Gordon Ray copy at the Morgan Library, is colored. According the ABPC, no copies have been seen at auction since at least 1923 A rare collection from Gustave Doré's youth. 'The title and legends recall Grandville - who strongly influenced the beginnings of Doré - but the drawings rather evoke the manner of Daumier. The principle of Doré's menagerie is to assign an animal name to a class of society whose attitudes and clothing correspond to that animal. From lions to sewer rats, Doré's ruthless pencil has spared none of the classes of urban society. Some of the illustrations are particularly well known such as the noisy assembly of washerwomen. "Doré visited Paris with his parents in 1847. There he showed Charles Philipon some of his drawings, and the impressed publisher offered him employment as a caricaturist for his new Journal Pour Rire. His first lithographic album, published at the age of fifteen, was Les travaux d'Hercule. It and the more imposing albums which followed remain too little known even among Doré's ardent admirers because of their great scarcity. They show the artist at his most engaging, bearing witness to a lively sense of humor, now broad, now sophisticated. Though only Les Différents publics de Paris and Les folies gauloises are described below, Les Agréments d'un Voyage de Désagrément of 1851 and Les Ménagerie Parisienne of 1854 are almost equally amusing" (Ray, The Art of the Illustrated Book in France 1700-1914, p. 327). The plates: 1. Lions 2. Petits Lions, Lions adultes 3. Lionnes 4. Lionnes (Sortie de la messe d'1 heure) 5. Lionnes et leurs petits 6. Paons 7. Rats (d'opéra) 8. Rats (d'égout) 9. Rats peintres (alias rapins) 10. Rats de Jardin 11. Loups 12. Loups cerviers 13. Vautours 14. Les dindons et les oies 15. Serpents 16. Pies 17. Crapauds 18. Coq (de barriere) 19. Tigre / Serin 20. Pantheres 21. Chouettes 22. Vielles Pantheres 23. Buses 24. Oiseau de proie / Merlan.
Historical and Political Illustrations. [Album of hand colored caricature prints by James Gillray George Cruikshank

Historical and Political Illustrations. [Album of hand colored caricature prints by James Gillray George Cruikshank, Alfred Crowquill, J. Marks, and others]

CARICATURE]; MARKS, John Lewis; GILLRAY, James; CRUIKSHANK, George A Fascinating Collection of Nineteenth Century Hand-Colored Caricature Plates [CARICATURE]. Historical and Political Illustrations. [1820-1855]. Album of ninety-eight hand colored caricature prints (all mounted on eighty-eight sheets of brown paper) including caricatures by John Lewis Marks (26), James Gillray (15), George Cruikshank (7), William Heath (3), George Moutard Woodward (2), Henry Bunbury (2), Robert Dighton (1), Henry Heath (1), John Phillips (1), Alfred Crowquill (1), Louis Maloeuvre (1), Samuel Collings (1), A. Frost (1), A.O. (1), T.C. (1), and 25 unidentified, 1820-55. Quarto (10 5/8 x 8 5/8 inches; 278 x 219 mm.). Ninety-eight hand-colored caricatures mounted on eighty-eight leaves. Nineteenth century marbled boards re-backed and re-cornered with dark blue grained morocco ruled in gilt. Housed in a felt-lined half black morocco over gray cloth boards clamshell case, spine with five raised bands, ruled and lettered in gilt. A fascinating collection. Listing of Plates: 1. The Beggars Opera. (anonymous) 2. A Traveller stopt at a Widows Gate. (George Cruikshank) 3. [No title] Illustration of people dancing in a theater. 4. The Modern Phenomenon of a Murphy, or the Gullcatcher of 1838. (Anonymous) 5a. "Pray Ma'am what dress do you call that? This is the Ramalaigh Rage! Sir. I'll tip them all nine for a tankard Done." 5b. "Sir for the great valour shewn by your Corps at the late fire at the soup boilers - I present you with these colours. Madam - you do you Corps much Honor & we shall make it out study to preserve the good opinion of the Ladies." "Charming Exercise Ma'am. Oh Dear." (George Moutard Woodward) 6a. The Rivals! (J.L. Marks) 6b. Measure for Measure! (J.L. Marks) 7. An Eclipse. Lately discovered in the Georgium Sidus, and quite unexpected by any of the Astronomers.(John Phillips) 8a. The Busy Body!! (J.L. Marks) 8b. The Children in the Wood. (J.L. Marks) 9a. Every Man in his Humour! (J.L. Marks) 9b. Courtship!!! (J.L. Marks) 10a. Not At Home, or a Disappointed Dinner Hunter! (J.L. Marks) 10b. Matrimony!!! (J.L. Marks) 11a. Inconstant!! (J.L. Marks) 11b. Three Weeks After Marriage!! (J.L. Marks) 12a. Not At Home, or a Disappointed Dinner Hunter! (J.L. Marks) 12b. Courtship!!! (J.L. Marks) 13. The Head Ache. (George Cruikshank) 14. Jealousy. (George Cruikshank/ Alfred Crowquill) 15. Pleasing Pastime, or a Christmas Quadrille Party. (A. Frost) 16. Parson - What did your Godfathers & Godmothers then for you? (Published Thos. Maclean, 1826) 17. Les Mésaventures, No. 4. Les Draps humides. (Louis Maloeuvre) 18. Division. (Henry Heath) 19. [No title] An illustration of a woman and a sleeping baby in a crib. (Anonymous) 20. [No title] An illustration of a woman and a dog sitting with a harp. (Anonymous) 21a. Things as they Were 1757. (William Heath) 21b. Things as they Are 1827. (William Heath) 22. Old Times. (Anonymous) 23. Animation. No Fit Peruke Maker Hairdresser to his Majesty (Anonymous) 24. New Times. (Anonymous) 25. Gardening under a Vertical Sun a worried by Musquietoes!! (James Gillray?) 26. "Why Captain your nose and chin look as if they were going to fight they are in such a Milling attitude." "Very likely my friend for a great many angry words have passed between them." (Anonymous) 27. Leg of Beef, and Soup Meagre. (J.L. Marks) 28. S.o, am I! (J.L. Marks) 29. Small Beer and Porter! (J.L. Marks) 30. Very Cold! (J.L. Marks) 31. I.'m, rather Gapish! (J.L. Marks) 32. Very Wet! (J.L. Marks) 33. A Sentimental Idea! (J.L. Marks) 34. Very Ill! (J.L. Marks) 35. A Merry Thought! (J.L. Marks) 36. The Minuet. The Dancing Lesson Pt.2. (George Cruikshank) 37. Push-Pin. (James Gillray) 38. [No title] An illustration of a girl in a forest by a waterfall. (Anonymous) 39. Quite Well! (J.L. Marks) 40a. George Frederick Cooke. (Anonymous) 40b. Songs. Mary, dear Mary list awake, and like the moon thy slumbers break. (Anonymous) 40c. Hat Department. (Anonymous) 41. Company shocked at a Lady getting up to ring the Bell. (James Gillray) 42. Finding. (J.L. Marks) 43. An Old Maid on a Journey. (James Gillray) 44. Throwing Off. (J.L. Marks) 45. Comfort to the Corns. (James Gillray) 46. The Fashionable Mamma - or - The Convenience of Modern Drefs. (James Gillray) 47. [No title] An illustration of a man in a shop with busts of women. (Anonymous) 48. Evening. (Anonymous) 49. [No title] Illustration depicting a man siting at a table with pouches of coins. (Anonymous) 50. Political Candour, - ie - Coalition Resolutions of June 14th, 1805. (James Gillray) 51. The Daily Advertiser. (James Gillray) 52. [No title] Illustration of eight people playing a game where one man is blindfolded. (Anonymous) 53. Blowing up the Pic Nic's, - or - Harlequin Quixote attacking the Puppets. (James Gillray) 54. Buy a Broom?!! (George Cruikshank) 55. Le Gout du Jour. Ou Des Chinois du Boulevard Coblentz. (Anonymous) 56. Opening of the Budget; - or - John Bull giving his Breeches to save his Bacon. (James Gillray) 57. The Bear and his Leader - "What tho I am Obligated to Dance a Bear, a Man may be a Gentleman for all that, my Bear ever dances to the Genteelest of Times." (James Gillray) 58. How to make the most of a Horse. (Henry Bunbury) 59. An Old English Gentleman pester'd by Servants wanting Places. (James Gillray) 60. A Diplomatist, after his 51st Protocol, 1831. (A.O. ?) 61. A French Gentleman, of the Court of Louis XVI / A French Gentleman, of the Court of Egalite 1799. (James Gillray) 62. A Cure for the Heart Ache. (Anonymous) 63. Venus Attired by the Graces. (James Gillray) 64. The Bucephalus Riding Academy for grown Gentlemen. (Henry Bunbury) 65. Doublures of Character - or - Strikeing Resemblances in Phisiognomy - "If you would know Mens Hearts look in their faces". (James Gillray) 66. 'Twere well if we had never met. (Anonymous) 67. Just looked in! hope I don't intrude? Paul Pry. (William Heath?) 68. A Kick at the Broad Bottoms! - ie - Emancipation of all the Talents. (James Gillray) 69. Haley Packs Up Un
Le Violon de Faïence

Le Violon de Faïence

CHAMPFLEURY, Jules; Fleury-Husson, Jules Francois Felix CHAMBOLLE-DURU, binder; ADELINE, Jules, artist Le Violon de Faïence. "A Violin Made of Pottery - That Would Make Stradivarius Himself Jealous" With a Fine Original Watercolor Drawing by Jules Adeline CHAMBOLLE-DURU, binder. CHAMPFLEURY, Jules. ADELINE, Jules, artist. Le Violon de Faïence. Nouvelle Édition. Illustrée de 34 eaux-fortes de Jules Adeline. Avant-Propos de L'Auteur. Paris: Librairie L. Conquet, 1885. One of 150 copies printed on Papier du Japon Impérial (this being number 144), initialed by the publisher and with the plates in three states. This copy enriched with a fine original pen, ink and watercolor drawing on the half-title and limitation leaf, of a cabinet with books, ornaments and artists materials taken from the engraving at the beginning of chapter II (page [13]), signed at lower left by Jules Adeline. Octavo (7 5/8 x 5 1/8 inches; 194 x 130 mm.). Title-page printed in red and black. xv, [i, blank]. 160, pp. plus [4, advertisements]. Engraved frontispiece "Avant-Propos" and thirty chapter head and tail pieces, all in three states. Original printed wrappers (front wrapper in three states, rear wrapper in two states) bound in together with the original printed paper spine and an additional engraved tailpiece. Handsomely bound ca. 1885 by Chambolle-Duru, stamp-signed in gilt on front turn-in. Full midnight blue morocco, front and back covers with an elaborate gilt frame and gilt violin corner pieces. In turn surrounding an elaborate gilt violin, inlaid with blue and olive green morocco. Spine with five raised bands, decoratively tooled and lettered in gilt. Double-ruled board-edges and decorative gilt turn-ins, Marbled end-papers, all edges rough gilt. A very fine example. Chambolle-Duru. An important French bindery that was run by René Victor Chambolle (1834-1898) and Hippolyte Duru (1803-1884). Jules Adeline (1845-1909) was born in Rouen. He was a French artist, engraver and historian. During his lifetime he produced about nine thousand drawings, engravings and watercolors, mainly on the old town of Rouen. During the years 1873-1885, he exhibited his engravings at the Salon of French Artists and won a medal at the World Fair in Philadelphia in 1876. In 1880, he was elected a member of the Rouen Academy, of which he was president in 1890. In 1886, he was one of the founding members of the Society of Friends of Rouen Monuments . [CHAMPFLEURY]. Jules François Felix Fleury-Husson (17 September 1821 - 6 December 1889), who wrote under the name Champfleury, was a French art critic and novelist, a prominent supporter of the Realist movement in painting and fiction. While pursuing his career as a man of letters, Champfleury specializes in the art of faience and soon appears as an authority in the field. In 1872, he was appointed "head of the Sèvres Manufactory's collections" and, in 1876, "curator of the museum and the collections at the Manufacture" and finally, sub-director in 1887, a position he held until his death. A great collector himself , he is ironic about his own mania in an autobiographical novel, The Violin of Earthenware . (Le Violon de Faïence. ). The Violin of Faience. The scene is laid in Nevers, the center of the fine pottery districts of France; and the characters, Gardelanne and Dalègre, at the first warm friends, end in being rival collectors, consumed with envy and suspicion. Gardelanne, who lives in Paris, having learned of the existence of a violin made of pottery - that would make Stradivarius himself jealous, charges Dalègre, his old companion at Nevers, the home of their boyhood, to hunt it up; and on his failing to find it, undertakes the search himself at last, discovering it in a collection of old rubbish, and buying it for a mere trifle, much to Dalègre's chagrin. To satisfy his friend, however, he puts a clause in his will leaving to him the violin; a concession that helps to convert the former love of his friend into eagerness to hear of his death. At length the coveted porcelain comes into Dalègre's possession, and is about to be assigned to the shrine long kept waiting for it, when, on being tuned for a few delicious notes of greeting, the precious idol cracks and falls to pieces on the floor. The owner, in his grief and mortification, is for a time thought by his friends to have fallen in "defaience." He has horrid dreams of people who have turned into fine vases and may not mingle too freely with their companions lest they spoil their glaze. At length, recovered from his malady, he marries; and amid the joys of home, contrasts the happiness of domestic life with the hollow pleasures of those unfortunates "whose feelings are turning into stone.".
Au Bal Masqué

Au Bal Masqué

BEAUMONT, Charles-Édouard de Charles-Édourd de Beaumont's Au Bal Masqué - At the Masked Ball BEAUMONT, Charles-Édouard de. Au Bal Masqué. [At the Masked Ball] Album par Beaumont. Paris: Au Bureau du Charivari, Maison Martinet, [1860]. [Fifth Series]. Quarto (13 1/4 x 10 inches; 336 x 254 mm.). Pictorial lithograph title-page and thirty superb lithograph plates printed on strong white paper. Some light foxing to a few plates, otherwise near fine. Publisher's pictorial lithographed yellow boards, front cover titled in gold. Some light rubbing to extremities, otherwise fine. This rare album of lithographs echoes that of Gavarni who dedicated works of the same theme at the same time. We have been unable to find any other examples of this 'fifth' series of Au Bal Masqué. Charles-Édouard de Beaumont (1819-1888) was one of the great caricaturists and lithographers that illustrated the beautiful pages of Charivari and other fashionable image journals. He produced all the illustrations for the picturesque Revue, Le Diable Amoureux (The Devil in Love) and many of the illustrations for the 1844 edition of Victor Hugo's Notre-Dame de Paris. Often criticized for drawing too much inspiration from Paul Gavarni, he published between 1228 and 1273 lithographs in the years 1842 to 1866. He was often criticized for drawing too much inspiration from Paul Gavarni. In 1879 he co-founded the Societe d'Aquarellistes Francais in 1879, where he exhibited several watercolors Masquerades were popular imagery in France at this time, which suggests that de Beaumont might have implied that the latent qualities of the masquerade, such as anonymity, deceit, promiscuity and superficiality, equally exist in more everyday settings. Additionally, because masked balls were contexts that permitted forms of interaction and intimacy otherwise prohibited, they can be regarded as occasions where gender and sexual norms could be transgressed. De Beaumont's satirical images of gender relations are not always as progressive as this description of the series might suggest. In 1848, after Au Bal Masqué, de Beaumont stopped depicting women in acceptable female roles and instead reconnected them to the role of prostitute. He would also reverse their gender roles to support an antifeminist backlash prompted by a conservative political climate. Out of this same school of thought, de Beaumont authored a book titled The Sword and Womankind that attributes a range of historical calamities to the deeds of wayward women. For example, depictions of women castrating men and enacting other violent acts spread from the belief that women were responsible for the failure of the 1848 revolution. While the prints from Au Bal Masqué may not depict these same sentiments, it satirizes diversions from gender norms while also depicting women outside of the domestic sphere, behaving contrary to traditional social expectations. The plates: 1. Ohé! Fanny déguisée en femme honnête. ohé! t'es bien sûre que ce soir, personne ne te reconnaîtra! 2. Ma chére amie. je suis avec mon époux qui ne veut pas me quitter, je ne sais vraiment pas par quel moyen m'en débarrasser! 3. Allons, bon! Caroline s'est endormie sur la table, que vais-je en faire? 4. C'est la seconde fois depuis huit jours que je vois Georgina avec un Anglais! mais pas le même! 5. Fanny, serre-moi davantage. 6. Voyons, Turlurette., lève donc mieux la jambe que ça! 7. Combien me vendrez-vous ce costume de débardeur? 8. Tu t'imagines que ta Caroline dort tranquillement chez elle., eh! Bien, tu te trompes, je viens de la recontrer ici. 9. La première fois que je te verrai parler à Adolphe, tu. 10. Tiens! Te voilà seule? là bas, tout à l'heure, dans cette loge, ne parlais-tu pas à des Anglais? 11. Tiens, voilà un cigare de cinq sous, prends-le. 12. Maudit portier! il ne viendra donc pas vous ouvrir? 13. Pourquoi cette manivelle? 14. Comment, Laure., je vous ai demandé ce matin si vous vouliez venir avec moi au bal de l'opéra., vous avez refusé sous prétexte que vous aviez la grippe. et la première personne que je rencontre ici., c'est vous! 15. Pardon monsieur., mais il me semble bien vous reconnaître? 16. Comment., vous ma p'tite dame., vous fumez des cigares? 17. Charmant débardeur! Permets-moi de t'aimer et de t'emmener avec moi dans une île déserte! 18. Comment! On t'a donc t'a laissé sortir toute seule ce soir? 19. Si tu veux., charmant petit cuisinier., je te prends à mon service? 20. On vient encore de me payer un bâton de sucre de pomme! 21. En v'la une idée de prendre un costume pareil, et qui ne se porte plus! 22. Ah! Bien, tu es bonne, toi, d'apporter tes rafraîchissements! 23. Paméla, tu viens encore de parler à mon Alfred., et tu lui as même demandé de l'argent, carotteuse! 24. Partons-nous? 25. Je peux bien faire joujou avec lui, il n'y a pas trop grande disproportion d'age! c'est aussi un bébé., puisqu'il est trombé en enfance! 26. Théophile, attends moi là. je vais danser, je viendrai te reprendre dans deux heures! 27. Moi, qui en acceptant à souper chez un noble Hidlgo, croyais faire un festin de Balthazar, et je ne trouve que du fromage d'Italie! quelle chance! 28. Avec qui es-tu dans cette loge? 29. Bébé! Veux-tu venir vivre avec moi dans mon île? 30. Tenez., voilà ce que je peux vous donner pour avoir gardé mon manteau. un bâton de sucre de pomme., c'est tout ce que je possède!
R. Caldecott's Picture Books

R. Caldecott’s Picture Books

CALDECOTT, Randolph A Fine and Complete First Edition Set of all Sixteeen Randolph Caldecott 'Toy Books' Finely bound ca. 1900 in the 'Harlequin' Style by Rivière & Son CALDECOTT, Randolph. R. Caldecott's Picture Books. [Engraved by Edmund Evans]. London: George Routledge & Sons. A complete first edition set of the sixteeen toy books. Sixteen volumes bound in four, all complete with their heavy-stock color pictorial paper wrappers. Titles from front wrappers. Volume I: The House that Jack Built (1878), The Diverting History of John Gilpin (1878), The Mad Dog (1879), The Babes in the Woods (1879). Volume II: The Three Jovial Huntsmen (1880), Sing a Song for Sixpence (1880), The Queen of Hearts (1881), The Farmer's Boy (1881). Volume III: The Milkmaid (1882), Hey Diddle Diddle and Baby Bunting (1882), A Frog He Would a-Wooing Go (1883), The Fox Jumps over the Parson's Gate (1883). Volume IV: Come Lasses and Lads (1884), Ride a-Cock Horse to Banbury Cross & A Farmer Went Trotting upon His Grey Mare (1884), An Elegy on the Glory of her Sex Mrs. Mary Blaize (1885), and The Great Panjandrum Himself (1885). Quarto and oblong quarto (9 x 8 inches; 228 x 203 mm.). and (7 7/8 x 9 1/4 inches; 200 x 235 mm.). The first eight titles each 32 pp. including covers (with the exception of The Queen of Hearts which has 32 pp. + covers); The second eight titles all with 24 pp. + covers. With color and line drawing illustrations throughout by Caldecott. Handsomely bound ca. 1900 by Rivière & Son in 'Harlequin Style'. Full red, brown, green and dark blue morocco. Covers with elaborate gilt frames, spines with five raised bands decoratively panelld and lettered in gilt in compartments, double gilt-ruled board edges, quadruple gilt-ruled turn-ins, various colored coated end-papers. Some mild rubbing to extremities, otherwise a fine set. A pencil note on a rear blank leaf in the back of the first volume reads: "4 vols. 1st. Edition bought of Maggs Bros, 109 Strand, London, Sept. 27. 1911 @ £10. 19s. 6d." "Caldecott's toy books, though still priced at a shilling, are more elaborate than those in Crane's series. Able to count from the first on a sale of 10,000 copies, Evans eliminated blank pages by supplying nine colored illustrations, many black and white drawings, and more text. The reasons for Caldecott's success are apparent in the initial volumes of the series. The animals in The House That Jack Built of 1878 could not be improved. And the delicious humor of John Gilpin of the same year is perfectly conveyed through the artist's rendering of the staid dignity of this elderly linen draper during his quiet preparations for a day of pleasure, the grim tenacity with which he adheres to his runaway horse, the enthusiastic interest that the whole countryside takes in his wild ride, and the good humor he displays during moments of relief from adversity" (Ray). "When the children look at Randolph Caldecott's picture books they turn the pages very slowly. Each page tells a story, first in the action, then in the characters and, finally, in the little details that children love to linger over. Their eyes turn occasionally to the words on the opposite page, but only for a moment. Then they go back to the pictures. Often the poem or the nursery rhyme that is illustrated is known to them; but Randolph Caldecott's interpretation of that rhyme is a new and delightful adventure" (Davis, p. 7). It is very difficult to assemble all sixteen titles and much more so in this kind of condition. Randolph Caldecott (1846-1886) was an English artist and illustrator, born in Chester, UK. The Caldecott Medal was named in his honor. He exercised his art chiefly in book illustrations. His abilities as an artist were promptly and generously recognized by the Royal Academy. Caldecott greatly influenced illustration of children's books during the nineteenth century. Two "Picture Books" illustrated by him, priced at a shilling each, were published every Christmas for eight years between 1878 and 1885. Davis, Randolph Caldecott, p. 45. Ray, The Illustrator and the Book in England, 250.
Sporting Notions]

Sporting Notions]

ALKEN, Henry, illustrator A Fine Contemporary Album Containing Eighteen of Henry Alken's Highly Amusing Hand Colored Lithographs ALKEN, Henry, illustrator. [Sporting Notions]. [London: T. McLean, 1831-33]. Small oblong quarto (6 11 /16 x 8 3/8 inches; 170 x 212 mm.). Eighteen fine hand colored lithographs mounted on G. Whatman watermarked paper. all plates heightened with gum arabic. Average plate size: 4 7/8 x 6 5/8 inches; 124 x 168 mm. Nineteenth century blue patterned paper boards (ca. 1838), covers decoratively bordered in gilt, spine worn and chipped, otherwise near fine. Front flyleaf with ink date "1838". This is an intriguing little album of eighteen fine hand colored lithographed plates, each of which has been cut to the border thus losing it's title. We have been able to identify eleven of the images - nine are very similar to the illustrations in one of Henry Alken's rarest titles Sporting Notions (London, 1831-33) and the other two are very similar to the illustrations in his equally rare Ideas, Accidental and Incidental To Hunting and Other Sports (London, 1830). However the plates in our album are approximately one inch less all round in size and all of the images are 'in reverse'. A fine contemporary album with amusing plates. The plates: 1. Woo - Woo- I have a notion that I shall lose him. 2. [Horse and rider over water] 3. I have a Notion that you are going the wrong way, don't you see our party out yonder. 4. [Horse and rider jumping over stile and water] 5. [Horse and rider jumping over stile] 6. I have a Notion you must pull him over or persuade him to pull you back again. 7. [Horse and rider jumping over gate] 8. Two horses and their riders going through gate] 9. I have an Idea that this Fence is either too High or that my Horse is too Short (Sporting Ideas) 10. I have an Idea that this is a situation that this of considerable difficulty (Sporting Ideas) 11. [Horse and rider jumping over fence] 12. I had a Notion that that there was room for two to go through at a time. 13. I had no Notion of the Comforts of Hunting by Water. 14. I have a Notion that this may be called "Riding to the hounds at a Smashing rate." 15. I had not the most distant Notion that my Horse was going to stop. 16. I had a Notion that Timber jumping was quite an easy thing. 17. [Horse and rider having caught a large branch] 18. This gives me a Notion that its better to "Look before you leap." See: Tooley 54; Siltzer p. 73; Dixon 95; Mellon/Snelgrove 34; Schwerdt l, p.23; Mellon/Podeschi 136; Tooley 36; Schwerdt I, pp. 17-18; Siltzer, p. 72;.
Les Parures Fantaisie

Les Parures Fantaisie

GAVARNI, Paul; [pseudonym of Guillaume Sulpice Chevallier]; MÉRY, Joseph "Fashion Plates of the First Order." (Ray). GAVARNI, Paul, illustrator. MÉRY, Joseph. Les Parures Fantaisie. [Fantastic Ornaments] Histoire de la Mode par Le C[om]te Foelix. Paris [&] Leipzig: G. De Gonet, Éditeur [&] Chez Charles Twietmeyer, [1850]. First edition. Two parts in one volume. Octavo (10 9/16 x 7 1/8 inches; 268 x 181 mm.). [iv], 300 pp. Hand colored engraved frontispiece and fifteen fine hand-colored plates by Geoffroy, printed on chine appliqué (lace-paper), all with original tissue guards. Some sporadic light foxing. Publisher's red cloth over beveled boards, front cover titled and decorated in gilt, lower cover decoratively stamped in blind, spine ruled, decorated and titled in gilt, pale gray 'watered silk' pare endpapers, al edges gilt. Library stamp on front free endpaper and title-page. Extremities a little rubbed, otherwise excellent. The plates are of particular interest, because they are printed on sheets with elaborate and delicate stencil-cut lace pattern frames and borders. The plates are studies of beautiful women, fashionably attired for the most part, which were drawn in London. Joseph Méry (1798-1865) wrote the 'fantasy' accompanying them to fit Gavarni's designs. "Far more appealing than the volumes just described in this special edition in which the steel engravings are printed and delicately colored on paper with borders cut to various lace patterns. So presented, Gavarni's designs become fashion plates of the first order." (Ray). "La réunion des deux ouvrages avec les gravures à marges de dentelles est assez rare à recontrer" (Carteret). Gordon Ray. The Art of the French Illustrated Book 1700 to 1914, 209 (pp. 286/287); Carteret III, 460-461.
Proceedings of the Sussex Agricultural Society

Proceedings of the Sussex Agricultural Society, from its Institution, to 1798, inclusive

SCOTT, Edmund Ten Superb Hand-Colored Aquatint Plates Depicting Cattle & Sheep SCOTT, Edmund. [Portraits of Prize Cattle & South Down Sheep] Proceedings of the Sussex Agricultural Society, from its Institution, to 1798, inclusive. Together with Engravings of the Prize Cattle for that Year, from Drawings made by Actual Measurement. By Edmund Scott, Miniature Painter, of Brighthelmston. Lewes: Printed by W. and A. Lee, (1800). First edition. Folio (14 1/4 x 10 5/8 inches; 362 x 270 mm.). [vi], iv, 18, pp. Ten fine hand colored aquatint plates, six depicting cattle and four depicting sheep. Publisher's gray paper wrappers, sewn as issued with original printed label on front cover. Minimal chipping to extremities, still very fine. Housed in a quarter black morocco over marbled paper boards clamshell case, spine with five raised bands. decoratively stamped in blind and lettered in gilt in compartments. The plates: 1. Mentor, Mr. Colgate's two year old Bull (Brighton, Nov. 15 1799 by E. Scott). 2. Waxey. Mr. John Ellman's three year old Bull. (Brighton, Pubd. Nov. 15 1799 by E. Scott). 3. Old Noble. Mr. Kingsnorth's nine year old Bull. (Brighton, Pubd. Nov. 15 1799). 4. Pink. Mr. Kingsworth's two year old Heifer. (Brighton, Nov. 15 1799 by E. Scott). 5. Mr. Gorringes' (of Westham) three year old Heifer. (Brighton, Nov. 15 1799 by E. Scott). 6. Speck & Speed two Oxen the Property of Mr. Carr. (Brighton, Pubd. Nov. 15 1799). 7. Mr. John Ellman's Ram & Ewe, one year old. (Brighton, Nov. 15 1799 by E. Scott). 8. No.3 Mr. Kemp's Ram, No. 4 W. Famcomb's Ewe, each one year old. (Brighton, N. 15 1799 by E. Scott). 9. Mr. John Hamshar's Ram & Ewe, three years old. (Brighton, Nov. 15 1799 by E. Scott). 10. No. 7. Mr. J. Ellman's Ram two year old. No. 8. Mr. J. Hamshar's Ram three year old, both Flock Rams. (Brighton, N. 15 1799 by E. Scott). Extremely Rare. OCLC locates just one copy (British Library, UK) and it is unclear from the record whether or not the plates are hand-colored. Edmund Scott (1758-1815?) Engraver and draughtsman. There are several of his portraits in the National Portrait Gallery (London, UK), including those of James Sadler, Thomas Sheridan, John Howard, King George IV, King William IV, etc., etc.
Sketches in Belgium and Germany

Sketches in Belgium and Germany

HAGHE, Louis The Superior Hand Colored and Mounted on Thick Card 'Portfolio' Issue HAGHE, Louis. Sketches in Belgium and Germany. London: Hodgson & Graves, 1840. First series only (of three). First Series, first edition, hand colored issue with the plates mounted on thick card. Folio (21 1/2 x 18 1/8 inches; 545 x 460 mm.). Lithographed dedication leaf with 'list of drawings' on verso, Hand colored lithograph title and twenty-five hand colored lithograph plates heightened with gum arabic, all mounted on thick card as issued. Some light foxing to a few plates, mainly marginal. Bound by Rivière & Son ca. 1940. Half brown levant morocco over brown cloth boards ruled in gilt. Spine with six raised bands, decoratively paneled and lettered in gilt, marbled end-papers, all edges gilt. A spectacular copy of the very scarce 'Portfolio' issue with all the plates hand-colored and mounted on card. The plates are of Bruges, Heidelberg, Nuremburg, Cologne, Liege, Salzburg, Innsbruck, Louvain, Antwerp, Munich, Oudenarde, Treves, etc. The inclusion of Austrian cities might seem anomalous, but it should be realized that Germany as a modern nation was not yet in existence and so the designation of "Germany" in the title referred to areas where German was the predominant language. "Published at £4. 4s (tinted); Proofs on India paper at £5, 5s., and at £10.10s., coloured and mounted, in a portfolio." (Abbey). Two further series were published in 1845 and 1850, with twenty-six, and twenty-seven lithographs respectively (Abbey, Travel I. 37 & 41). Abbey, Travel I. 35.
Le Peau de Chagrin. Études Sociales

Le Peau de Chagrin. Études Sociales

BALZAC, Honoré de; KIEFFER, René, binder An Incredible Early Twentieth Century 'Portrait' Binding by René Kieffer Specially Bound for Gérard de Berny in Memory of his Father Gabriel de Berny First Illustrated Edition with an additional set of Proof Illustrations on 'Large Thick Paper' BALZAC, Honoré de. KIEFFER, René, binder. La Peau de Chagrin. Études Sociales. Paris: H. Delloye [&] Victor Lecou, Éditeurs, 1838. First Illustrated Edition, First Printing of the Vignette Illustrations. Specially bound by René Kieffer for Gérard de Berny in memory of his Parents. 'Thick Paper' copy with an additional 'proof' set of the illustrations. Large octavo (11 1/16 x 7 1/2 inches; 281 x 191 mm.). [iv], 402, [1, Table des Matières], [1, blank]. One hundred and one decorative engraved vignettes in the text by Baron, Janet-Lange, Gavarni, French and Marckl, plus one on the title, engraved on steel by Brunellière, Nargeot, Langlois, etc. Additional engraved portrait on India paper of "Pauline", after Janet-Lange, engraved by Félicie Fournier, née Monsaldy (as appearing on pp. 149). Some foxing throughout, mainly marginal, otherwise fine. An incredible early twentieth-century 'Portrait' binding by René Kieffer, stamp-signed in gilt on front turn-in and with his printed label on verso of front endpaper. Full brown morocco, covers triple-bordered in gilt enclosing a highly elaborate symmetrical gilt diamond design with gilt stars. The front cover inlaid with a large oval nineteenth century 'medallion' portrait in oil of Honoré de Balzac and four smaller circular nineteenth century 'medallion' oil paintings titled "Enfance" (childhood), "Etude" (study), "Amour" (love), and "Plaisir" (pleasure). The rear cover similarly inlaid with a large oval nineteenth century 'medallion' portrait in oil of Madame Louise Antoinette Laure de Berny (Balzac's first love "La Dilecta") and four smaller circular nineteenth century 'medallion' oil paintings titled "Ambition", Misère (misery), "Desespoir" (despair), and "Suicide". Spine with five raised bands, similarly decorated and lettered in gilt in compartments. Double-ruled gilt board-edges and multi-gilt ruled turn-ins surrounding an orange morocco liner, elaborately decorated in gilt in a symmetrical design, olive green watered silk endleaves, blue-gray marbled endpapers, all edges gilt. Original brown morocco over blue marbled boards chemise, housed in the original brown morocco edged blue marbled boards slipcase. Spine of chemise sunned, slipcase a little worn at extremities. The binding itself is near fine with just a few fragments missing from the edges of the 'medallions'. Original printed tan wrappers and spine bound in. Small square engraved bookplate of renowned collector, Gérard de Berny on front endpaper. A stunning example reflecting the love affair between Honoré de Balzac and Gérard de Berny's mother, Laure de Berny. The nineteenth century 'Medallion' oil paintings are most certainly from the collection of Gabriel de Berny. Roger Louis Gérard de Berny (1880-1957) was a French politician of the French Third Republic. He was born in Amiens, France. He was elected senator for the Somme in January 1936 and was one of those who voted to give full power to Marshal Pétain on 10 July 1940. de Berny did not return to government after the Second World War. He died in his Hôtel on Rue Victor Hugo in Amiens, now the Hôtel de Berny Museum. The Musée d'art local et d'histoire régionale or Musée de l'Hôtel de Berny is a local history museum for the region of Picardy. The Hôtel de Berny Museum includes 18th century tapestries and wood carvings, such as those from the La Fayette salon in the château de La Grange-Bléneau and those by the Huet brothers (Nicolas, François and Jean-Baptiste the Younger, the three sons of Jean-Baptiste Huet) and Adrien Choquet (a painter from Abbeville) from the Salon du Zodiaque in the Long château, as well as Art nouveau and Art déco ceramics by Montières, French Revolution-era faïence, paintings by Louis Jean François Lagrenée and Isabey, a 1612 harpsichord, pastels by Choderlos de Laclos and 16th-20th century ironwork and clocks. It also contains objects relating to figures from local and national history such as Gresset, Choderlos de Laclos, Jules Verne, Édouard Branly and Maréchal Leclerc. Gérard de Berny's father, Charles Philippe Gabriel de Berny (1825-1884) was married to Laure de Berny, née Louise Antoinette Laure Hinner (1777-1836). "In 1793, aged only fifteen, Laure married Gabriel de Berny, but their union was unhappy. He was 20 years old, quite reserved and cold, whereas his young wife was very sensitive, warm-hearted and caring. Despite their differences, they still managed to have nine children, although five died in infancy and only two survived their mother. In 1815, the family bought a house in Villeparisis, in northern France, where they spent the summers. It was here that Laure first met Honore De Balzac. Laure was 42 at the time and already a grandmother, but this didn't stop the young Balzac (he was only 22) from falling in love with her. At first she resisted him, but Balzac wouldn't give up. He courted her for months and in the end, she gave in. The two become lovers. Of course nothing could remain secret for long in a small town. When Balzac's parents learned of it they tried to break off their scandalous relationship, but to no avail. Laure wasn't just Balzac's lover. She was his confidante, his muse and his benefactress. She gave him the love, security and confidence he hadn't received from his parents as a child, she supported his literary career (she inspired the characters of Madame de Mortsauf in The Lily In The Valley, and Pauline in Louis Lambert) and helped him out financially when he needed it. She assisted him in his business ventures, which always failed, and helped him pay his debts. "La Dilecta", as Balzac called her, also told him many stories about the ancient regime and of how some of her aristocratic friends and acquaintances managed to escape
Comic Latin Grammar

Comic Latin Grammar, The [&] Comic English Grammar; The [&] Tutor’s Assistant, or Comic Figures of Arithmetic, The

LEECH, John, illustrator; CROWQUILL, Alfred, illustrator; LEIGH, Percival "Of Latin, there are three kinds: Latin Proper, or good Latin; Dog Latin; and Thieves' Latin" LEECH, John, illustrator. CROWQUILL, Alfred, illustrator. LEIGH, Percival. The Comic Latin Grammar. A New and Facetious Introduction to the Latin Tongue with numerous illustrations [&] The Comic English Grammar; A New and Facetious Introduction to the English Tongue Embellished with upwards of fifty characteristic illustrations by J. Leech [&] The Tutor's Assistant, or Comic Figures of Arithmetic, Slightly Altered and Elucidated from Walking-Game, by Alfred Crowquill. London: Charles Tilt, 1840 [&] Richard Bentley, 1840 [&] J. and F. Harwood, 1843. First editions. Three small octavo volumes (7 3/8 x 4 5/8 inches; 188 x 118 mm.). [ii], 164, [1, advertisements]; xii, 228 pp; xvi, 128 pp. The Comic Latin Grammar with eight engraved plates and numerous engravings in the text by J. Leech; The Comic English Grammar with an engraved frontispiece and "upwards of fifty characteristic illustrations by J. Leech"; The Comic Arithmetic with a woodcut frontispiece and numerous woodcut illustrations in the text. Uniformly bound in late nineteenth century full polished tan calf. Covers triple-ruled in gilt with corner fleurons, spines with five raised bands, decoratively tooled in gilt in compartments, red and green morocco labels lettered in gilt, decorative gilt board-edges, and turn-ins, gray paper liners and end-leaves top edges gilt. Original gilt decorated cloth covers and spines bound in at end of each volume. A near fine set. Although unsigned the bindings were most definately executed by one of the great London firms - possibly Francis Bedford or W.T. Morrell. Field and Osgood. John Leech on my Shelves, pp. 41 & 42.
Au Bal Masqué

Au Bal Masqué

BEAUMONT, Charles-Édouard de Charles-Édourd de Beaumont's Au Bal Masqué - At the Masked Ball BEAUMONT, Charles-Édouard de. Au Bal Masqué. [At the Masked Ball] Album par Beaumont. Paris: Au Bureau du Charivari, Maison Martinet, [1848]. [First Series]. Quarto (13 1/4 x 10 inches; 336 x 254 mm.). Pictorial lithograph title-page and thirty superb lithograph plates. Some light foxing (mainly marginal) to a few plates, otherwise fine. Later violet cloth over boards, spine lettered in gilt. Publisher's pictorial yellow wrappers bound in. This exceptionally rare album of lithographs echoes that of Gavarni who dedicated works of the same theme at the same time. Mr. Descamps-Scrive who had a colored copy of the same thirty prints prints of this album indicated that the date was "towards 1860" (catalog Descamps-Scrive, second part). OCLC locates just two complete copies in libraries and institutions worldwide, both at The Morgan Library & Museum (NY, USA), one of which appears to be partially colored. Charles-Édouard de Beaumont (1819-1888) was one of the great caricaturists and lithographers that illustrated the beautiful pages of Charivari and other fashionable image journals. He produced all the illustrations for the picturesque Revue, Le Diable Amoureux (The Devil in Love) and many of the illustrations for the 1844 edition of Victor Hugo's Notre-Dame de Paris. Often criticized for drawing too much inspiration from Paul Gavarni, he published between 1228 and 1273 lithographs in the years 1842 to 1866. He was often criticized for drawing too much inspiration from Paul Gavarni. In 1879 he co-founded the Societe d'Aquarellistes Francais in 1879, where he exhibited several watercolors Masquerades were popular imagery in France at this time, which suggests that de Beaumont might have implied that the latent qualities of the masquerade, such as anonymity, deceit, promiscuity and superficiality, equally exist in more everyday settings. Additionally, because masked balls were contexts that permitted forms of interaction and intimacy otherwise prohibited, they can be regarded as occasions where gender and sexual norms could be transgressed. De Beaumont's satirical images of gender relations are not always as progressive as this description of the series might suggest. In 1848, after Au Bal Masqué, de Beaumont stopped depicting women in acceptable female roles and instead reconnected them to the role of prostitute. He would also reverse their gender roles to support an antifeminist backlash prompted by a conservative political climate. Out of this same school of thought, de Beaumont authored a book titled The Sword and Womankind that attributes a range of historical calamities to the deeds of wayward women. For example, depictions of women castrating men and enacting other violent acts spread from the belief that women were responsible for the failure of the 1848 revolution. While the prints from Au Bal Masqué may not depict these same sentiments, it satirizes diversions from gender norms while also depicting women outside of the domestic sphere, behaving contrary to traditional social expectations.
Selection of Fac-similes of Water-Colour Drawings

Selection of Fac-similes of Water-Colour Drawings, A.

BOWYER, Robert, publisher "A Tour de Force of Engraving and Colouring" (Martin Hardie) BOWYER, Robert, publisher. A Selection of Fac-Similes of Water-Colour Drawings, from the works of the most distinguished British artists. London: Published by R. Bowyer, 1825. First edition, first issue (before the titles were added at the foot of the plates). Text watermarked "J. Whatman 1824". Large folio (19 1/2 x 14 7/8 inches; 495 x 378 mm.). Title-page, and nine leaves of descriptive text. Twelve magnificent hand colored aquatint plates. Contemporary quarter tan calf, decoratively ruled in blind over marbled boards, smooth spine decoratively bordered and lettered in gilt. Light wear to extremities, otherwise near fine. With the engraved armorial bookplate of the renowned collector of art works and a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, [Second] Baron Northwick (1770-1859) on front paste-down. A spectacular copy of a very beautiful and uncommon color plate book. The plates: 1. Fountain of the Stone Cross at Rouen, in Normandy. (S. Prout) 2. Driving Cattle to Market. (R. Hills) 3. Cattle, & c. at Williams Farm (R. Hills) 4. Robin Hood's Bay, Yorkshire. (F. Nicholson) 5. Fountain's Abbey, Yorkshire. (J. Smith) 6. Juvenile Shrimpers.--Deal. (W. Collins) 7. Shipwreck on the Black Rocks, near Scarborough, Yorkshire. (F. Nicholson) 8. Le Place de la Pucelle. Joan of Arc. (S. Prout) 9. The Dropping Well, at Knaresborough, Yorkshire. (F. Nicholson) 10. Ghent, (or Gand,) with the Cathedral, &c. (S. Prout) 11. Group of Donkies, and Rustic Children. (R. Hills) 12. South Entrance to the Cathedral of Rouen, in Normandy. (S. Prout) "A Selection of Fac-Similes of Water Colour Drawings, published by R. Bowyer in 1825, contains twelve aquatints, beautifully executed and coloured. No engraver's name is mentioned, but the plates are after S. Prout, R. Hills, F. Nicholson. W. Collins, and J. Smith. 'The dripping fountain,' [plate 9] after Nicholson will appeal to many as tour de force of engraving and colouring, and some of Prout's characteristic Normandy sketches are reproduced with sympathy and skill." (Martin Hardie, p. 145). Martin Hardie's comment regarding 'The dripping fountain,' [plate 9], could equally be applied to all of the twelve plates. The images include genre and landscape work with scenes in England, France and Flanders, and are each accompanied by informed notes about the artists, the subjects or the original history of the paintings on which the plates are based. The five artists whose work is represented were amongst the most popular of their day and their work is of very high quality, but it is evident that the works were also chosen by Bowyer as examples which would show off the mastery of his anonymous print-makers and colorists. Rare with just one copy of the first edition appearing at auction over the past fifty years (Sotheby's London, January 15, 1988, lot 176. £1,000) and OCLC locating just one copy in libraries and institutions worldwide: National Art Library Victoria & Albert Museum (London, UK). "Reissued in 1828 by R. Bowyer & M. Parkes with 10 leaves of Text and 6 additional plates." (Tooley, p. 106). However the three copies of the 1828 second edition that are listed in OCLC (Huntington Library, CA, USA; Yale University Library, CT, USA, and Cambridge University, UK), all have just twelve plates. Abbey, Life 197; Tooley, 100; Martin Hardie, p. 145; Bobins II: 618.
Les Étoiles

Les Étoiles

GRANDVILLE, J.J. (pseud. of Jean-Ignace-Isidore Gerard); MÉRY, Joseph; MEUNIER, Charles, binder Grandville's "Last Fairy-Tale" In a Superb Inlaid Binding by Charles Meunier GRANDVILLE, J.J., illustrator] MÉRY, Joseph. MEUNIER, Charles, binder. Les Étoiles. Dernière féerie par J.-J. Grandville. Texte par Méry. Astronomie des dames par le C[om]te Foelix. Paris: G. De Gonet, Éditeur, [&] Leipzig: Chez Charles Twietmeyer, [1849]. First edition. Two parts in one quarto volume (11 x 7 3/8 inches; 280 x 187 mm.). [4], xvi, 252; [4], 186, [2] pp. With added hand-colored wood-engraved vignette title in each part, hand-colored engraved portrait of Grandville by Ch. Geoffroy, and twelve hand-colored engraved plates (eleven in the first part, one in the second part) by Ch. Geoffroy after Grandville, all with original tissue-guards. Handsomely bound by Charles Meunier, stamp-signed in black on front turn-in "Ch. Meunier. 1905". Full blue morocco, covers decoratively rued in gilt with gray morocco inlaid borders enclosing an elaborate design of inlaid gray, cream and green inlaid flowers with decorative gilt stems. Spine with four raised bands, decoratively inlaid in various colored morocco's, decorated and lettered in gilt in compartments. Decorative gilt board-edges, gilt ruled turn-ins with inlaid gay morocco borders, gray-green marbled endpapers, top edge trimmed, others uncut. Original printed paper wrappers and spine bound in at end. Unidentified bookplate "Nec Tu Semper Eris" (You will not always be) on verso of front flyleaf. Housed in the original blue leather edged, patterned paper board slipcase. A wonderful copy of this lovely book, with exquisite plates after Grandville. "The compositions of this 'last fairy-tale,' brilliantly engraved on steel by Charles Geoffroy and delicately colored, form a fitting memorial to Grandville. They show that his powers remained unimpaired to the end of his short career. Grandville told his wife on the day he began these designs: 'for too long I have kept my eyes lowered to the earth; now I want to lift them to the heavens' (p. ix). The pattern which he follows is similar to that of Les fleurs animées. Nearly every plate has its beautiful lady, clad in white and adorned with stars, looming in the sky, with varied scenes of earthly life below her. These designs, Grandville's tranquil refuge from the turmoil that beset his mind, are as charming as they are mysterious. Also included in the volume are an unsigned essay, which remains the most considerable source of biographical information about Grandville, and a fine portrait of him by Geoffroy (I, xvi) with a border of his creations, animals paying him tribute as well as his flower- and star-ladies" (Ray). This posthumously published work (Grandville died on March 17, 1847) was originally issued in fifty parts, the first part appearing in September 1849. Charles Meunier (1865-1940) began his apprenticeship as a bookbinder at age eleven. Five years later, at age sixteen, he joined master binder Marius-Michel's workshop. He soon grew weary of producing traditional bindings and established his own bindery in 1885, at the tender age of twenty years old. CM was thought to be innovative and instinctive, with great reserves of energy and undeniable artistic talent. Drawing on traditional and modern techniques and forms of decoration, Meuniere mixed classical punches. with newly fashionable incised and modeled leather panels. His output was prodigious; by 1897 he had produced roughly six hundred bindings" (Art Nouveau and Art Deco Bookbinding, p. 194). Ray, The Art of the French Illustrated Book, 200. Vicaire V, col. 770. Grandville. Dessins Originaux, p. 398.
Miseries of Human Life

Miseries of Human Life

ROWLANDSON, Thomas In the Original Boards Complete with the Rare 'Pall Mall' Plate ROWLANDSON, Thomas. Miseries of Human Life: Designed and Etched by T. Rowlandson. London: R. Ackermann, 1808. Oblong quarto (8 1/8 x 10 3/16 inches; 207 x 262 mm.). Hand colored engraved title-page and forty-nine hand colored engraved plates including the rare 'Pall Mall' plate which is missing from most copies. Two of the plates watermarked 'J. Whatman 1811' and seven watermarked 'J. Whatman 1814'. Original quarter roan over drab boards. Front cover with original printed green paper label "Miseries of Human Life. / Designed and Etched by / T. Rowlandson. / 50 plates, coloured / [rule] / Price £1. 11. 6d." Spine ruled in gilt. Spine worn, corners rubbed. Housed in a full red morocco solander case with five raised bands, lettered in gilt in compartments. A wonderful untouched copy, the plates bright and fresh. "Plate 40 'Pall Mall' is rare, most copies re-placing this with 'The Chiropodist' (Abbey). According to ABPC just one copy complete with all 51 plates has appeared at auction over the past 35 years (Christie's New York, May 14th, 1985) "The Miseries of Human Life, [originally] written in 1806 by James Beresford (1764-1840) of Oxford University, was extraordinarily successful, becoming a minor classic in the satirical literature of the day. In a humorous dialogue between two old curmudgeons, the book details the "petty outrages, minor humiliations, and tiny discomforts that make up everyday human existence." The public loved it: dozens of editions were published, and printmakers rushed to illustrate their own versions of life's miseries. Thomas Rowlandson (1756/57-1827) began drawing scenes based on Beresford's book as soon as it was published, and after two years the luxury print dealer Rudolph Ackermann selected fifty of his hand-colored etchings for a new edition of Miseries. Many of the now-iconic characters and situations that the artist drew for this project - some based closely on Beresford's text and others of his own invention-reappeared in later works, with variations on the Miseries turning up until the artist's death. In the early twentieth century, Dickson Q. Brown, Class of 1895, donated two thousand Rowlandson prints and all of the artist's illustrated books to Princeton University Library. Of particular importance was a small box of Rowlandson's unpublished, undated drawings, including many specifically related to his Miseries series. Just as in Rowlandson's book, those specific to Beresford's text are shown alongside others that illustrate life's miseries more generally, including some from the Princeton University Art Museum's collection. The sections follow the chapters, or "groans," of Beresford's book." (Julie Mellby, Graphic Arts Curator, Rare Books and Special Collections, Princeton University). William Morley Pegge (1952-1927) appears to have been a sportsman and a collector. He collected lace, books and drawings, and was a client of Messrs Dowdeswell and Dowdeswell. In 1910 he was a buyer at the sale of Sir William Neville Abdy's collection at Christie's, London. His own library was sold by Sotheby's, London, on 29 March 1928. Grego, Rowlandson II, pp. 119-124; Abbey, Life in England, 317 (plates watermarked 1811 & 1814); Not in Tooley.
Le Songe D'Une Nuit D'Ete

Le Songe D’Une Nuit D’Ete

RACKHAM, Arthur, illustrator]; SHAKESPEARE, William One of Only Thirty Signed Copies Printed on Papier Imperial Du Japon [RACKHAM, Arthur, illustrator]. SHAKESPEARE, William. Le Songe D'Une Nuit D'Ete. Paris: Hachette et Cie, 1909. First edition in French of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream illustrated by Arthur Rackham. Limited to thirty numbered copies on Papier Imperial du Japon signed by Arthur Rackham, this being copy no. 19, of a total edition of 330. Quarto (11 1/2 x 9 inches; 292 x 228 mm). [6], 134 pp. Forty mounted color plates with captioned tissue guards, thirty drawings in black and white. Publisher's full vellum, gilt decorated. Top edge gilt, others untrimmed. Silk ties missing. Small rectangular bookplate on front fly-leaf. A fine copy. The black & white illustrations have far more definition here printed on 'Papier Imperial du Japon' than those in the English Limited Edition. "The most splendid illustrated work of the century, so far" (William de Morgan). "The illustrations for a Midsummer-Night's Dream. were much less controversial in theme than Alice, and their success was ungrudged. Rackham cast his spell over the play; his drawings superceded the work of all his predecessors from Gilbert to Abbey, and for fifty years have enriched the imagination; his conception of Puck and Bottom, Titiana and Oberon, Helena and Hermia, his gnarled trees and droves of fairies, have represented the visual reality of the Dream for thousands of readers. Here he excelled especially in landscape, and in reconciling dream and reality, giving himself to the luxury of rich detail with a rare generosity" (Hudson). "By March 1909, three months after publication, the entire de luxe edition.had been sold out, and of the 15,000 trade copies, 7,650 had been sold. The English edition remained in print and paid [Rackham] royalties until the end of his life" (Hamilton). Riall p. 87. Cf. Latimore and Haskell, p. 32.
Cendrillon

Cendrillon

RACKHAM, Arthur, illustrator; PERRAULT, Charles The First of Arthur Rackham's Two Great Silhouette Books The French Edition de Luxe [RACKHAM, Arthur, illustrator]. PERRAULT, Charles. Cendrillon. D'Apres Ch. Perrault avec illustrations par Arthur Rackham. Paris: Librairie Hachette, [1919]. French Edition de Luxe. Limited to 500 copies signed by the illustrator, of which this is no. 96. Large quarto (11 1/4 x 8 7/8 inches; 286 x 226 mm.). 110, [2, blank] pp. Mounted color frontispiece with color pictorial border and tissue guard. Three double-page silhouette drawings with color, one single-page silhouette drawing with color (not included in the trade edition), thirteen single-page silhouette drawings without color, and thirty-six silhouette drawings in the text. Title with color pictorial border. Title-page slightly browned from frontispiece tissue-guard. Some very light occasional offsetting from illustrations to text. Original cream parchment over boards, pictorially stamped and lettered in gilt on front cover and spine. Top edge gilt, others uncut. Pictorial end-papers in green and white. Boards very slightly 'mottled' otherwise a fine copy. "Rackham gave his talk to on Silhouettes to the Art Workers' Guild in November 1919, the month in which Cinderella, the first of his two great silhouette books, was published. Cinderella and The Sleeping Beauty differed from Rackhams' preceding books in relying almost wholly for their effect on silhouette. It is immediately clear that Rackham is a master of the medium, being able to evoke character and humour by profile and gesture alone, and allowing the two-dimensional effect of his pen work to lead the reader through the book and keep the story going. Silhouette books, even with additional colours had lower production costs than their colour plate equivalents, and so were an attractive option both for publishers and customers in the uncertain post-war market." (James Hamilton. Arthur Rackham, A Biography, p. 188). Latimore and Haskell, pp. 49-50. Riall, pp. 134-135.Hamilton, p. 189.
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

RACKHAM, Arthur, illustrator; DODGSON, Charles Lutwidge; CARROLL, Lewis; DOBSON, Austin Alice's Adventures in Wonderland Illustrated by Arthur Rackham [RACKHAM, Arthur, illustrator]. CARROLL, Lewis. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Illustrated by Arthur Rackham. With a Proem by Austin Dobson. London: William Heinemann, [n.d., 1907]. First English Edition DeLuxe. Limited to 1,130 numbered copies (this copy being # 853). Large quarto (11 1/16 x 9 inches; 281 x 229 mm.). xii, 161, [1], 1, blank] pp. Thirteen tipped-in full-page color plates mounted on heavy brown paper, with lettered tissue-guards. Fourteen black and white drawings. Publisher's white buckram over boards, front cover and spine pictorially stamped and lettered in gilt, pictorial end papers, top edge gilt, others uncut. Minimal dust soiling to spine, gilt on word "Lewis" a little rubbed, some light offsetting from paste-downs to free end-papers as usual, small neat ink inscription dated Christmas 1907 on front flyleaf. An excellent copy of one of Arthur Rackham's best loved titles. "Rackham's next undertaking after Peter Pan was the most controversial of his whole career. This was nothing less than a fresh illustration of Alice in Wonderland, a work so completely identified with the drawings by John Tenniel that it seemed to many critics almost blasphemous for anyone to attempt to prepare alternatives. As soon as it became clear, however, that a spate of new illustrated editions was being planned to follow the expiry of the original copyright (in fact, at least seven appeared in England in the first possible year, 1907), it was surely not to be regretted that an artist of Rackham's quality had taken up the challenge. Even The Times, in the course of an unfavourable review, recognized that Rackham 'feels his privilege and his responsibilities', but this critic, obsessed by Tenniel, found Rackham's humour 'forced and derivative' and discovered 'few signs of true imaginative instinct' in his work. A stranger wrote at once to sympathize: 'I felt I must express my indignation at the injustice of the "Times" criticism. However, I am certain that Time is on your side, and that nothing but prejudice prevents your superiority being recognised now. Your delightful Alice is alive and makes by contrast Tenniel's Alice look a stiff wooden puppet. This went much further than Rackham would have done, for he had no wish to set himself up against Tenniel. He would have been well content with the verdict of the Daily Telegraph, that it would be fortunate for Lewis Carroll's memory if his masterpiece encountered 'no less inspired interpreters than Mr Arthur Rackham'." (Derek Hudson, Arthur Rackham. His Life and Work. pp 70 and 72.) "The Alice. is not the heroine of Sir John Tenniel's imagination; she is older and more sophisticated; but at the same time she has a tender, flickering light of imagination in her eyes, which lifts her out of the domain of the merely pretty and childish. Mr. Rackham's inexhaustible imagination, working over and embroidering the ground-work of Tenniel's types, has added a really wonderful wealth of uncanny, dreamlike mystery to the story.[and] extraordinary feeling into the drawing of the hands" (Daily Telegraph). Latimore & Haskell, p. 29. Riall, p.77.