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MOSCOW ARCHITECTURE SOCIETY] Arkhitektura: Ezhemesiachnik. 1-2 [i.e. Architecture: Monthly Review. #1-2]

MOSCOW ARCHITECTURE SOCIETY] Arkhitektura: Ezhemesiachnik. 1-2 [i.e. Architecture: Monthly Review. #1-2]

50, [14] pp.: ills. 32,2?25 cm. In original illustrated wrappers. Very good. Small tears of the front wrapper, light restoration of the tears and spine, spots on the title page. Very rare. One of 1000 copies. Early constructivist wrapper designed by A. Vesnin (one of Vesnin brothers). This was the first Soviet architecture magazine. This first issue includes introduction «From Moscow Architecture Society» by A. Shchusev where he stated the position and purpose of the magazine. The beginning of the 1920s was a very exciting time for artists and architects - new tasks were emerging and the demand for new ideas was rising (even though there was no construction for some time after the Civil War). This is the tone of Shchusev's message - the magazine was supposed to be a chain link to building a new future. The magazine includes editorial on contemporary aesthetics of architecture which is surprisingly illustrated with grain elevators in USA. Other articles are dedicated to restoration works in the Kremlin (with photographs), contemporary construction in England, reviews on new special literature from abroad, architecture news from abroad, and the most interesting Shchusev's article on the open competition of projects for development of the first Russian agricultural exhibition in 1922. The article is illustrated with winners' design projects (first place was given to young VKUTEMAS graduate Kolli; also winners Golosov, VKHUTEMAS students Ridman, Burov and Kozhin, Norvert, Lansere and Oliu). The five winner projects were selected from 27 submitted works. The winners got awards but these projects were never realized. At the same time the Society held closed competition for famous architects like Zholtkovsky, Fomin and Shchuko (their designs also in this issue). The committee chose the Zholtkovsky's design project. The exhibition (which later transformed into famous Exhibition of Achievements of National Economy or VDNKH) was one of the first where elements of Russian architecture avant-garde were used, e.g. Melnikov's pavilion. Interesting thatiftodayVesnin's wrapper design seems flawless, when it came out it was called «vulgar playbill with awful type» by Igor Grabar'. Even though the comment had too much pathos it reflected a mismatch of constructivist book design with common criteria for evaluation. The process of becoming of polygraphic constructivism was ahead of developing of architectural constructivism. So this wrapper was more revolutionary than magazine contents.The Society went with more conventional wrapper in the next issue. WorldCat locates copy in Getty Research Institute.
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FIRST MOSCOW BIBLE] Bibliya sirech knigi vetkhogo i novogo zaveta [i.e. The Bible, or the Books of New and Old Testament] [540 leaves]. 35x23 cm. Contemporary full leather. Modern clasps. [540 leaves]. 35x23 cm. Contemporary full leather. Modern clasps. Binding is restored: pieces of leather are added. The copy is complete. Old restoration of the title page and the leaf with Moscow's plan and Russian coat of arms: corners and the margins are backed. The two last unnumbered leaves are with restoration as well of the similar nature with a bit of text missing from one of them. The rest of the block is without restoration and generally in good condition with minor damp stains. The owner's inscription goes through the first 62 leaves of the Bible. It reads: ''This book Bible from Kola Ostrog, the town man Petr Epimakhov, Pridannikov son was bought in Moscow last year in the vegetable row of Fedor Kharitonov''. The inscription dates back to 1678. Kola is an important Russian outpost in the Arctic, now located 20 kilometres from Murmansk. At the time Kola was the most northern Russian settlement and had 500 inhabitants. Seven full page woodcuts, including the title page, and the famous engraved frontispiece with Russian coat of arms and the plan of Moscow. The others are the evangelists and Luka. 97 woodcut headpieces, 25 end pieces. First edition. First translation of Bible printed in Moscow. First plan of Moscow done in a Russian book. One of the most important contributions of Pechatnyi Dvor in the 17th century Slavonic printing. The plan of the city was done by cartographer called Zosima, who was working at Pechatnyi dvor as an engraver and most likely been an icon-painter as well. The next plan of Moscow would be printed only by Michurin in 1739. The edition was commissioned by tsar Alexei Mikhailovich and based on Ostrog Bible of 1581, although the text was altered and edited. The work on the text started from 1649 and for that matter the monks of Kiev Lavra have been called to Moscow - namely Epifanii Slavinetsky, Arsenii Koretsky and Damaskin Ptitsky. However in the end the text wasn't altered drastically which met disapproval of Patriarch Nikon. The next plan of Moscow would be printed in Michurin in 1739. The next printing of the full text of the Bible in Russia will occur in 1751.
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INDEPENDENCE IN THE RUSSIAN FURNITURE CRAFT] Obmery mebeli. Vypusk 1. Obraztsy mebeli russkoi raboty kontsa XVIII – nachala XIX veka [i.e. Furniture Measurements. Issue 1 and all. The Samples of the Russian Furniture of Later 18th – Early 19th Centuries]

159 pp.: ill. 27,5x20,5 cm. In the original illustrated green cloth with decorative composition and lettering. Very good, curious contemporary pencil notes on the front flyleaf (in verse and prose). The unknown inscriber calls the book 'the album that measures human feelings' but then adds 'You could measure the forms, but you can not measure the great in the art: the feelings and the humanity'. First and only issue. One of 6000 copies. Rare. This is the book on the Russian furniture created in the period when the Russian craftsmen were the most independent from European tendencies. In connection with the French revolution, the trade relations between the Russian Empire and France became sharper. As a result, the popular French furniture was banned for mass import. The Russian masters were free to create the new canon and started to use the new types of wood: the curly birch, the black poplar and the bog oak. The book features 36 items (tables, dressers and wardrobes, armchairs and chairs, screens, sofas) from the Soviet museums' collections. They were related to the British and Roman style but were hardly interpreted by the innovative ideas of the masters. Not overembellished, these examples of furniture were chosen as able to bring the new wave to the Soviet design. The book provided their size and features, supplemented them with photographs and drawings. Worldcat shows four copies located in Library of Congress, University of Kansas, New York Public Library and The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
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MAGAZINE PUBLISHED IN GEORGIAN PRISON] Met’ekhis k’rialosani = Chetki Metekha [i.e. Metekhi Rosary]

24 pp.: ill. 26x17 cm. In original wrappers with letterpress design. Tears of the spine with small losses, soiling of the covers, water stain on the lower margin throughout the copy, otherwise very good internally. This is a unique survival of the time - the Georgian magazine published in Metekhi prison. The only issue was printed. One of 1000 copies produced. According to the National Library of Georgia, the edition was banned. Cover design and illustrations were produced by convicted artist E. Kurmakher, photographs made by G. Tokhadze who was a photographer of Georgian Goskinoprom. Metekhi has been originally built in V century AD. Throughout the centuries it has been one of the most important churches in Tbilisi. Being the prison from the early 19th century, Metekhi castle was the main 'politizoliator' in the Soviet Georgia where the political prisoners were contained, in particular, Mensheviks who led Georgia in the first years after October Revolution. It had the status of jail until the State Museum of the Arts of the Georgian SSR was established in the castle in 1934. The edition compiled the texts on day-to-day cultural life and work of prisoners as well as their prose and poetry. The materials were made public as evidence of the successfully improved conditions. The issue had different prices on the back cover stressing that it was printed for the people inside and beyond the jail. For the loyal readership, the magazine appeared with editor's note "Citizens! The edition has been prepared in a week. We did our best". Worldcat doesn't track this edition.
Katalog 2-i vystavki Moskovskogo khranilishcha proizvedenii sovremennogo iskusstva [i.e. Catalogue of the Second Exhibition of Moscow Repository of Contemporary Art]

Katalog 2-i vystavki Moskovskogo khranilishcha proizvedenii sovremennogo iskusstva [i.e. Catalogue of the Second Exhibition of Moscow Repository of Contemporary Art]

16 pp. 17x12 cm. Without covers as issued. Fine, pencil notes on the last page. Very rare. This catalogue was published for the 2nd exhibition held by the Moscow repository of contemporary art which was held in 1919 in Moscow in the former K. Lemercier Art Gallery, where 413 works were exhibited and 58 artists participated. Among the exhibitors were N.A. Andreev, V.S. Bart, L.S. Basenko, N.S. Bom-Grigorieva, S.V. Gerasimov, Goslavsky P.P., Grigoriev N., Dmitriev A., Dobrov M.A., I. Zakharov, E.A. Katsman, N.V. Krandievskaya, Kuznetsov N.E., M.V. Leblan, I.A. Mendelevich, etc. The catalogue includes list of works organized by artists' names in alphabetical order. In a short introduction is described the work of the Repository and goals of this exhibition (to help artists). In 1918-1922, the Commission for the Protection of Monuments of Mossovet organized fourteen Proletarian museums. Some of them were created on the basis of private collections in the mansions of the former owners, in others the expositions periodically changed and were composed of works concentrated in a specially organized repository in Yakovlevsky lane. The first museum was opened on November 7, 1918. It was located in the former mansion of O.I. Leuva on Bolshaya Dmitrovka, 24. The library and museum funds were also placed there, and the original storage of requisitioned treasures in Yakovlevsky Lane was taken by the new institution - the Moscow repository of contemporary art, which saved many artists and collectors of creative work, and the old wooden houses were dismantled for firewood, and mansions and apartments in tenement houses 'condensed' new tenants. There were works of artists who left Russia (part of the works of M.F. Larionov, N.S. Goncharova, and others), as well as those who were missing or died during the First World War. To help the artists in 1919, the Commission began to organize exhibitions and sales of paintings from this repository. Worldcat doesn't locate any copies.
Vos'maya vystavka kartin i skul'ptury AKhRR "Zhizn' i byt narodov SSSR": Spravochnik-katalog [i.e. The Eighth Exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture Held by AKhRR 'Life of the USSR Nations': Catalogue-Directory]

Vos’maya vystavka kartin i skul’ptury AKhRR “Zhizn’ i byt narodov SSSR”: Spravochnik-katalog [i.e. The Eighth Exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture Held by AKhRR ‘Life of the USSR Nations’: Catalogue-Directory]

121, [7] pp.: ill. 22,5x15,5 cm. In original printed wrappers. Good, small tears of the spine and extremities, Soviet bookshop's stamp on the back cover, damp stains. One of 3100 copies. Rare. Wrappers, head and end pieces by S. Pavlov. The catalogue is dedicated to the exhibition which was held in 1926 in Moscow (and reduced in Leningrad). It includes introduction, introduction by Lunacharsky, catalogue of all works organized by 15 divisions like Siberia, Caucasus, Povolzhie, North, Uzbekistan, Sculpture and others, reproductions with captions, and alphabetical index of all participants with short bio. Among them were Arkhipov, Brodsky, Kiselis, Ioganson, Katsman, Kustodiev, Lentulov, Lansere, Maliutin, Radimov, Falk, Chashnikov, Manizer, and many others (overall 766 items on the list). AKhRR (The Association of Artists of Revolutionary Russia later known as Association of Artists of the Revolution) was a group of artists in the Soviet Union in 1922-1933. Diverse members of the group gained favor as the legitimate bearers of the Communist ideas into the world of art, formulating framework for the Socialist Realism style. Despite its revolutionary title, it successfully united artists of the ''old school''. In a decade, it grew up from 80 to over 300 members. (Wikipedia) In the 1920s, exhibitions became the main direction of AHRR activity, about 70 exhibitions were organized in the capital and other cities. The Akhrovites introduced the thematic principle of exhibitions into their practice, which was a new phenomenon and had a great success with the audience. Worldcat doesn't locate any copies.
Katalog 3-i vystavki skul'ptury Obshchestva russkikh skul'pturov ORS [i.e. Catalogue of the Third Exhibition of Sculpture of the Society of Russian Sculptors ORS]

Katalog 3-i vystavki skul’ptury Obshchestva russkikh skul’pturov ORS [i.e. Catalogue of the Third Exhibition of Sculpture of the Society of Russian Sculptors ORS]

14 pp.: ill. 22,15 cm. In original wrappers. Near fine. Very rare. One of 1000 copies. The catalogue for the 3rd exhibition (of only 4 held by the Society) that was held in 1929 includes introduction "ORS in 1929" by A. Bakushinsky (short history of the society and its current state), a numbered list of 82 works organized by artists in alphabetical order (first real members and then a few participants not from society), a list of members with their current posts (chairman I.M. Chaikov). Among members were Vatagin, Sandomirskaya, Chaikov, Shadr and others. The Society (ORS) was founded in 1926 by former members of the Moscow Union of Artists and Sculptors. The impetus for the creation was the success of the sculptural department of the OBIS exhibition held in early 1925. The Society consisted of almost all famous Moscow sculptors, and their ranks was regularly replenished by the graduates of the sculpture faculty of Vkhutemas-Vkhutein. About 20 people were constantly members, 10-15 more sculptors were involved as exhibitors (candidates). Many participants were simultaneously members of other societies and unions: Korolev and Kepinov - OMH, Chaikov - ''4 iskusstva'', Shadr - AHRR; however, the ORS flourished tolerance for various trends in art (including the ''left''). The meetings were held mainly in the workshop of Ryndziunskaia. Reports were read and discussed on the problems of sculpture like Ternovets made a report «On Contemporary Sculpture in the West», architect Konstantin Melnikov with a report «On Cooperation of Sculptors and Architects in Contemporary Construction». The ORS didn't have a program but they were determined to strengthened position of sculpture as an independent art genre and paid a lot of attention to raising the level of professionalism. The Society held 4 exhibitions: in March-April 1926 (the State Historical Museum), in April 1927 (the Museum of the Revolution), in June 1929 and June 1931 (both - the Pushkin Museum), which were partly financed by Glavnauka. The exhibition committee was engaged in selection of works for the exhibitions, at different times it included Vatagin, Efimov, Zlatovratsky, Chaikov, Domogatsky, Mukhina. Since the late 1920s, the ORS was attacked by Proletkult theorists for lack of 'ideological content' and adherence to 'bourgeois' forms of 'sculpture'. In the spring of 1932, the Society was liquidated. Worldcat doesn't locate any copies.
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CHRONICLE OF THE EARLY SOVIET ART] Sovetskoe iskusstvo za 15 let: materialy i dokumentatsiia [i.e. 15 Years of Soviet Art: Materials and Documentation]

Moscow: Izogiz, 1933. 664 pp.: ill., 16 ills. 26x18 cm. In original full cloth with gilt lettering on the front cover and spine. Slightly rubbed, few ink marks, otherwise very good. First and only edition. One of 3000 copies. Very rare. This is the first fundamental work on the art of the Soviet Union from 1917 to 1932, gathering all important documents and publications. The book presents three chronological periods - the military communism, periods of recovery and reconstruction - detailing what art groups were established and how the state responded on them. The book features the manifests of futurist, abstract, productive and social realist art groups, the reports of state organizations and art institutes, publications on the exhibitions. Some black-and-white and colorful illustrations on the separate leaves accompanied the text. Period after the Revolution was one of the most interesting and intense times in the Russian art history. It would seem that everything was as before: artists united, dispersed, rumbled with manifestos, arranged exhibitions, moved from group to group. However, after the revolution, a new and very active participant appeared in the familiar space - the state. It had the power and many ways to encourage and punish. This was an unusual situation, because before the state was not very interested in artistic ideas. Looking ahead, when in 1932 the state decreed the closure of all artistic associations, it would be a perfectly logical gesture on its part - it is impossible to control what moves and changes. School unions, gathered around the central figures of the old, pre-revolutionary avant-garde, were now completely out of the mainstream. At the same time, the phrase of the critic Abram Efros about the fact that the avant-garde ''became the official art of the new Russia'', absolutely accurately captured the state of affairs in the early years of the decade. Avant-garde was really influential, but it was another avant-garde, otherwise oriented. The simplest (although not the most accurate) is to say that the main plot of the 1920s was an active confrontation between avant-garde artists and anti-avant-garde movement gaining strength very quickly. But in the early twenties, avant-garde art was experiencing a crisis itself, without any outside help. In this situation, the concept of industrial art was born. It partly reproduces the utopia of modernity - to transform the world, creating new forms of all that a person faces every day. Everything should be modern and progressive - from clothes to dishes. Art in this case justified its existence: it is applied, even useful. Suprematic and constructivist fabrics, porcelain, clothing, typography, book, poster, and photography - avant-garde artists were now doing all this. These were Lyubov Popova, Varvara Stepanova, Alexander Rodchenko, El Lissitzky, Vladimir Tatlin and many others. The ideological substantiation of industrial art took place in the society LEF (The Left Front of the Arts). On the basis of LEF, an association of contemporary architects (group OCA) arose. LEF was a kind of extreme point on the map of artistic associations of the 1920s. At the other extreme - AKhRR - the Association of Artists of Revolutionary Russia (later the name is transformed into the Association of Artists of the Revolution and lose one "r"). Between the designated poles the map of the associations of the 1920s resembled artistic nomads. People moved from group to group, there were a lot of these groups, for example, the Society of Moscow Artists, Four Arts, NOZh (New Society of Painters), Makovets, et al. By the second half of the decade, only two main forces remained on the field, opposing each other. But in the future they would have to form features of the "Soviet style" together. This refers to AKhRR and OST - the Easel Society, "the leftmost among the right-wing groups," as was said about it. All this in a short form of materials, documents, excerpts, chronology is included in this collection of a very important period of Russian avant-garde with such names as Petrov-Vodkin, Deineka, Klutsis, Pimenov, Mukhina, Lebedev, Chekhonin, Deni, Tatlin, Rodchenko, UNOVIS and Kazemir Malevich, Rozanova, Popova, Larionov, Punin, Filonov, Meyerkhold and others mentioned. Worldcat locates copies at Getty Research Institute, New York University, Iowa University, Ohio State University, University of Chicago, Princeton University, National Gallery of Art, Binghamton University Libraries, Columbia University, Thomas J. Watson Library (MET), NYPL, Yale. A few institutions have photocopies.
Soyuz-Apollon [i.e. Apollo-Soyuz]

Soyuz-Apollon [i.e. Apollo-Soyuz]

Rebrov, M., Gilberg, L.] [1], 72 pp., [12] plates. 21,5x17 cm. Near fine. Association copy: signed on the title page by four Soviet cosmonauts: Anatoly Filipchenko (from the backup crew of Apollo-Soyuz, 2 spaceflights) , Vasily Lazarev (2 spaceflights), Vitaly Sevastyanov (2 spaceflights), Alexei Gubarev (2 spaceflights). The book comes from a collection of Vladimir Korshunov, a journalist who specialized in astronautics and was close with Soviet spacemen. The copy is supplemented with his badge for access to the Apollo-Soyuz spacecrafts signed on 22 July 1975 by six cosmonauts, including Vladimir Shatalov (3 spaceflights), Alexey Eliseev (3 spaceflights ) , Georgy Shonin (1 spaceflight ). A very rare first edition describing the organization of the experimental space mission Apollo-Soyuz which was published in May of 1975, shortly before the flight itself. The very first project of collaboration between the Soviet Union and the United States which ended the Space race was conducted in July of 1975. The significance of the flight was twofold. It was incredibly important politically because the countries that were involved in the Cold War together created an international space field, and technically, the promising idea consisted of the docking of two dissimilar ships in outer space. The crews had got access to the both spacecrafts and tested the rescue program. The book contains a lot of visual materials - the details of pre-flight crew training and official events which were reflected in 30 photographs made in Houston and Baikonur. There are 3 drawings depicting the construction of ships and the design of the flight and the Apollo-Soyuz emblem as well. An original design of the book was produced by the artist V. Prokhorov, each section of the book begins with a light-blue page and marked by a little emblem. The book was written by two authors. The first one is Mikhail Rebrov (1931-1998) who was preparing for a journalist's flight into space in 1965 until that project was closed after Sergei Korolev's death in 1966. The second author is Lev Gilberg (born in 1923), the journalist worked in 'Mashinostroenie' publishing house as editor-in-chief of literature on aviation and astronautics. The book was edited by Vladimir Shatalov who took part in the organization of Apollo-Soyuz flight. They overview the space achievements of the both sides, describe the construction and the capabilities of the ships, the goals of upcoming flight. A very interesting and colorful collection of information and photographs on the Apollo-Soyuz project published right before its realization. The only copy located at the George Washington University.