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Paradisi in sole paradisus terrestris. A garden of all sorts of pleasant flowers which our English ayre will permitt to be noursed up: with a kitchen garden of all manner of herbes, rootes, & fruites, for meate or sause used with us, and an orchard of all sorte of fruitbearing trees and shrubbes fit for our land together with the right orderinge planting & preseruing of them and their uses & vertues

PARKINSON, John Xylographic illustrated title signed by A. Switzer, woodcut portrait of the author before main text, numerous botanical woodcuts, woodcut initials, head- and tailpieces. Contemporary calf, re-backed, morocco spine label and gilt decoration, red fore-edge. Front paste-down with annotations. A wonderful copy from the library of A. A. Dallman of Greenbank House in Preston with his inscription dated 1894 (see provenance below). First edition. This is the first printed book on English gardening and the first book from Parkinson. He dedicated the book to Queen Henrietta Maria, the wife of Charles I. The King was so impressed with Parkinson's work that he gave him the title of Botanicus Regius Primarius. Parkinson pays special attention to cross-breeding and selection. The book also contains over 100 detailed woodcuts of plants, many full-page, throughout its entirety. "One of the most beloved of all early English books on gardening, about which so much has been written that little need be said here . . . It was practical from the point of view of the gardener, and described nearly 1.000 plants, mostly exotics. Though it makes little appeal to the scientific botanist, it does give a very complete picture of the English garden at the beginning of the seventeenth century, and in such a delightful, homely literary style that gardeners cherish it even to the present day" (Hunt). Parkinson (1566/7-1650) was an apothecary and herbalist in London. Although he was a prominent and instrumental figure in the Society of Apothecaries established in 1617, he left his position to tend to his own garden in Longacre, which experience led to him writing this book. Provenance: Arthur Augustine Dallman (1883-1963) was a British botanist and botanical collector. He was educated at the Harris Institute in Preston. He received certificates in botany and chemistry and held a number of teaching posts. His annotations on the fly-leaf include a short biography of the author as well as a list of some other earlier botanists (such as Mathias de L'Obel, John Gerard, and William Turner), each with a brief biography.
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Voyages and travels of an Indian interpreter and trader, describing the manners and customs of the North American Indians.; (bound with) Travels through Spain and Portugal, in 1774; with a short account of the Spanish expedition against Algiers, in 1775

LONG, John; DALRYMPLE, Major William I: With 4-page subscriber's list. Fine folding engraved map, "Sketch of the Western Countries of Canada 1791." II: With frontispiece and folding map. Two works in one. 4to. Contemporary diced russia, rebacked, marbled endpapers, flyleaves and edges; interior in excellent condition. From the library at Syston Park with the bookplate on the paste-down. I: First edition of a major source on Indian life and the fur trade. Long was engaged by the Hudson's Bay Company as a fur trapper and trader between 1768 and 1787. He lived among and traded with the Indians for nineteen years, and "his relations are characterized by candor and intelligence" (Field). He details the natural history of the area, describing the lakes and rivers beyond Lake Superior. Long's account is also a valuable source on Indian vocabularies, and includes an extensive Chippewa lexicon. Little is known about the author with the exception of the material in this book. II: First edition. In the form of 16 letters, the author details his travels from Gibralter to Spain where he visited Madrid, the military academy at Avila, the University of Salamanca, and ultimately to Lisbon. He discusses the political climate and military establishment, as well as the customs and manners of the people. The work ends with an account of the invasion of Algiers by the Spanish army and navy in July 1775 in an attempt to seize the city of Algiers. The invasion, ordered by King Charles III, was led by Alexander O'Reilly, who commanded a combined military and naval expedition of nearly fifty ships and more than twenty thousand troops. The assault was a spectacular failure and the campaign proved a humiliating blow to the Spanish military revival. Dalrymple (1736-1807) was a Scottish soldier and Member of Parliament (MP) both in Britain and Ireland. He served in the campaign against the Spanish invasion of Portugal (1762), and later moved to Canada. In 1768, he was placed in command of a detachment of two regiments sent to Boston, Massachusetts, to support embattled royal officials who were having trouble enforcing the unpopular Townshend Acts. Troops in his command (although he was not directly involved) were involved in the Boston Massacre. Provenance: Syston Park Hall, built in 1775, was the seat of the Thorold baronets, who had relocated from Cranwell Manor. The 9th and 10th baronets both served as High Sheriff of Lincolnshire, in 1778 and 1822 respectively. The 10th baronet commissioned architect Lewis Vulliamy in 1822-1824 to build a new library which was then richly stocked with rare books and manuscripts, including a copy of the Gutenberg Bible. The contents of the house were dispersed in sales held in 1884 and 1923 and the house demolished soon afterwards.
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Annales veteris testamenti

USSHER, Archbishop James of Armagh I: Separate titles, both in black and red. The second title contains a vignette of a ship. Text within woodcut borders throughout. Contemporary blind-stamped vellum, binding with general soling and old orange stain on front board; some minor toning to a few leaves, otherwise an excellent copy. II: Title in red and black, with beautiful woodcut vignette, title and text within double-ruled borders, full-page portrait of Ussher, wooduct initials, head- and tailpieces. Contemporary blind-stamped vellum; interior very clean and bright. An excellent wide-margined copy from the library of Caroli Sarolea with his bookplate on the front free endpaper, another ownership inscription dated 1839 on the half-title. First edition (offered with the definitive third edition) of Ussher's famous treatise in which he calculates the time and date of creation as October 23, 4004 BC. Intended as a complete history of the world covering every major event from the time of creation, the chronology appears in the first work; the second part, which took his history through Rome's destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem in 70 AD, was first published in 1654. In making his calculations, Ussher first made the assumption that the Bible was the only reliable source document of chronological information for the time periods covered in the Bible. Biblical passages provided Ussher with clues to the number of human generations -- and hence years --since Adam and Eve. He chose the death of Nebuchadnezzar as a reliable date to anchor all the earlier biblical dates to. Working backward from that date, he ended up with his date for creation, as well as other biblical events, concluding, for example, that Adam and Eve were driven from Paradise on Monday, November 10, 4004 BC, and that the ark touched down on Mt Ararat on May 5, 2348 BC, "on a Wednesday." The Church of England adopted Ussher's dates for use in all of its official Bibles in 1701, and thus his calculations came to be regarded with almost as much unquestioning reverence as the Bible itself. Even Sir Isaac Newton defended Ussher's work in his Chronology of Ancient Kingdoms Amended: "For an educated man in the seventeenth or even eighteenth century, any suggestion that the human past extended back further than 6000 years was a vain and foolish speculation." This work is extremely rare in its first printing. It provided a key point in the high drama of the Scopes trial; when Clarence Darrow examined William Jennings Bryan, he chose to focus primarily on a chronology of Biblical events, and frequently discussed Ussher's calculations. Though Bryan stood fast with the Bible's (thus Ussher's) position on the date of creation, he broke faith with the most faithful Fundamentalists when he testified that he did not believe that the Genesis statement of six days to create the Earth meant literal 24-hour periods. This set up the current split in the Fundamentalist evangelical community between those whose literalist views compel them to accept Ussher's chronology and those who accept fossil evidence and a more metaphorical interpretation of the "days" of Genesis, but who still insist that species were intelligently designed by God, and were not the products of evolution. So the date of creation clearly does matter. If Ussher figured correctly, and every living thing has appeared in only the last six thousand hears, there would not have been sufficient time for any new species to evolve. Ussher (1581-1656) was highly regarded in his day as a churchman and as a scholar. In 1625, he was appointed Archbishop of Armagh, the highest position in the Irish Anglican Church. He was also vice-chancellor of Trinity College, Dublin, and a member of King James' Privy Council in Ireland. An expert in Semitic languages, he argued for the reliability of the Hebrew text of the Old Testament and wrote widely on Christianity in Asia. FIRST EDITION plus the definitive third edition.
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ALS to George Agar-Ellis

NASH, John Remnants of wax seal. Written in a light brown ink in a slanting, delicate cursive. The Homble | Geo: Agar Ellis | Spring Gardens My dear Sir My friend Mr. Hyde Villiers means to plead his cause in the House of Commons this evening respecting his return from Hedon. The most eminent Lawyers considering that his plea is founded on Law & justice he is anxious for a full hearing and I shall esteem it a particular favor if you would be present and if you convincd by his statement and argument (not otherwise) afford him your support. I remain ever my dear Sir Faithfully yours, J. Nash 14 Regent St. Feby 22nd, 1827 A unique example of political intrigue. While this letter is vague, the date and individuals involved point towards three possibilities. The first possibility concerns actions on February 8, 1827 according the Journals of the House of Commons, Vol. 82, Villiers responded to a petition from Robert Farrand dated December 4, 1826 that complained of "an undue Election and Return of the said Thomas Hyde Villiers." Hyde responded with his own petition that refuted Farrand's claim. The second option is petition from a group of Hedon tradesmen, artisans, and laborers issued on February 19, 1827 requesting that the Commons not interfere with the corn laws, which were tariffs and trade restrictions placed on imported food and grain (i.e. corn) in Great Britain between 1815 and 1846 (The History of Parliament). As the representative of Hedon, Hyde could have presented the petition on the group's behalf. Lastly, the letter could refer to the widely discussed topic in Parliament dealing with Catholic Emancipation. On the date in question, February 22, 1827, according to the Journals of the House of Commons, there were many petitions put forth regarding the rights of Catholics in England. Nash, Hyde, and Agar-Ellis were all liberal in their politics and leaned towards removing many of the restrictions placed on Catholics since the Reformation. There are not names attached to all the petitions oultined in the Journals, but it still stands as a possibility. John Nash (1752-1835) was the English architect responsible for the design and execution of many of London's most well-known areas including Regent Street, Regent's Park, Piccadilly Circus, and Trafalgar Square. His most prominent patron was the prince regent, George IV. It is not clear from the letter how Nash and "Mr. Hyde Villiers" became acquainted, but George IV is a potential mutual contact. Thomas Hyde Villiers (1801-1832) was the son of George Villiers, a courtier and royal favorite of the prince regent. George's mishandling of his official accounts left the family in substantial debt, however, his proximity to George IV mitigated the issue. The prince continued to assist the family, and helped Hyde to secure a position as a colonial clerk in Corfu. Hyde eventually returned to London and soon was elected to represent Hedon in Yorkshire in the general elections in June 1826. It is during this first stint in politics that he likely met the addressee of the letter, George Agar-Ellis. George Agar-Ellis (1797-1833) was a politician and well-respected art patron. He sat on the board of the National Gallery of Art and the British Museum. It is likely through his dealings in the London art culture that he formed a relationship with Nash. He had served in Parliament previously, but like Hyde, Agar-Ellis was also successful in June 1826 and was elected to represent Ludgershall.
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A compendium of the course of chemical instruction in the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania.Printed for the use of his pupils

HARE, Robert With 23 plates total and numerous text illustrations throughout. Sheepskin, leather spine label with gilt lettering, boards rubbed and some chips along the spine, but overall in good condition and well intact; interior browned and foxed, a few pages more soiled than the rest, but the plates are remarkably clean. Contemporary annotations in pencil, particularly on the end papers and paste downs. Previous owner signatures on front end paper and on the title page, and the loose bookplate of Arnold Thackray. The rare second edition of Hare's Compendium, with added material not called for in Neville and Cole (pages 363-374, which is entitled "Of Salts"). This textbook was a highly original and popular work that went through several editions. The illustrations primarily depict apparatus - most of which were thought up by Hare himself - and, though unsigned, are very finely executed. Neville, quoting from Smith's Old Chemistries, says that ". the book was unique, just as unique as Robert Hare himself, and original as few other books on descriptive chemistry have ever been." Three other works (all first editions) are bound into this volume - apparently not an uncommon practice as Neville notes six additional works (including those listed here) bound with his copy. Other than the Compendium, only the Exposition has its own separate title page. Given that Hare worked primarily with university students and intended many of his works to be used as tools of instruction, this might explain the presence of additions and variations between copies. Furthermore, according to the preface to the main work, Hare was evidently rushed to finish this greatly expanded and corrected second edition after the success of the first edition in 1828. "Hence, I have been unable to prepare the whole previously to the commencement of the present session; and am consequently obliged to issue it in numbers." It is possible that the extra materials so often bound with the Compendium were actually intended by the author to accompany and enhance the second edition, rather than being issued as separate publications entirely. Hare (1781-1858) was a Philadelphia brewer and self-taught chemist. In addition to running the family brewery, he taught natural philosophy at the University of Pennsylvania. "Few American chemists of the early nineteenth century taught more students than Hare. As a professor in the country's largest medical school for twenty-nine years, he transmitted chemistry to a proportionately large segment of the medical profession" (DSB). All of these works are very rare; OCLC locates only six copies that agree with the pagination of the Compendium, including the extra pages.
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Certaine select prayers, gathered out of S. Augustines meditations: whiche he calleth his priuate talke with God. Also his manuell, or booke of the contemplation of Christ

AUGUSTINE, St.] (Attributed) First title and following leaf from a later edition (Oiv and Ov from the 1586 edition); second part has original title. Decorated woodcut borders around each page with kneeling figures of Scripture characters. Early calf, rebacked, gilt lettering on spine, though worn; despite some small tears to a number of leaves, a very nice copy. Early edition (likely the third, with printings of 1574 and 1575) of a very rare book of devotion comprising prayers attributed to the great Christian theologian and philosopher Augustine of Hippo. Gathered out from St. Augustine's meditations in a compilatory style, these works were very popular during the Middle Ages. They were collected by anonymous thirteenth-century monks and very few copies survived because of their constant use by the faithful. These Pseudo-Augustinian books were so popular that they delayed the translated publication of Augustine of Hippo's original works during the seventeenth century and later. Long before the first English translation of Augustine's City of God (1610) and Confessions (1620), these works had not only been published in English, Italian and other European languages, but had achieved enormous popularity and even caused a "publishing war" between protestant and Roman Catholic translators and publishers.
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Les rois de la mode

FASHION PLATES With 42 full-page plates of fashion designs, chromolithographed with additional hand-coloring. Each plate signed by the designer and with a small ink-drawn outline of the back of the gown. Original front printed wrapper bound into calf-backed cloth binding. A wonderful group of colored plates of high couture French fashion at the turn of the century. This group features designs from the six leading Parisian couturiers of the time: Jeanne Paquin (1869-1936), Ernest Raudnitz (1850-1906), Madeleine Laferrière (1847-1912), Gustav Beer (b. 1875), Jacques Doucet (1853-1929) and the Maggie Rouff (1896-1971). Jeanne Paquin was a leading French fashion designer, known for her resolutely modern and innovative designs. She was the first major female couturier and one of the pioneers of the modern fashion business. Initially, Jeanne favored the pastels in fashion at the time. Eventually, she moved on to stronger colors like black and her signature red. Although black had been traditionally the color of mourning, Jeanne made it fashionable by blending it with vividly colorful linings and embroidered trim. She frequently collaborated with the illustrators and architects such as Léon Bakst, George Barbier, Robert Mallet-Stevens, and Louis Süe. Her business expanded to branches in London, Buenos Aires, Madrid and eventually Fifth Avenue in New York. In 1913, Jeanne accepted France's prestigious Legion d'Honneur in recognition of her economic contributions to the country - the first woman designer to receive that honor. Although now largely forgotten, Ernest Raudnitz was a highly regarded couture house founded in Paris at 8 rue Royale, in 1883. Ernest started out working with his sisters in the mid-1870's; their own business continued until it was taken over by Louise Chéruit in 1901. Madeleine Laferrière had a very highly regarded Parisian fashion house with quality gowns, which opened in 1869. Laferrière designed for Royalty - Queen Maud of Norway was besotted with her dresses and had a large number of the most elaborate evening styles for her wardrobe. Other clients included Princess Matilda and the Empress Eugine, as well as a number of famous actresses, as her designs were of lace lavishly embroidered with beads, sequins and diamante to stand out on the stage. Long draped skirts to the gowns flowed into trains. Completing the outfits were long evening wraps. Gustav Beer was born in Germany. After first establishing himself as a designer in Vienna. he relocated to Paris where he opened a fashion house in 1905 in the Place Vendome. He was afterwards followed there by almost all the great couturiers who set up shop in this same famous area. The Place Vendome became the Paris center for great couture salons. Beer produced feminine dresses both for day and evening wear, and was particularly popular for lingerie. Beer's approach tended to be conservative, emphasizing exquisite construction and fine materials over daring designs. In 1931 the house merged with Agnes-Drecoll although Beer dresses continued to be made till 1953. Jacques Doucet was a French fashion designer and art collector. He was known for his elegant dresses, made with flimsy translucent materials in superimposing pastel colors. His most original designs were those he created for actresses of the time. Cécile Sorel, Rejane and Sarah Bernhardt (for whom he designed her famous white costume in L'Aiglon) all often wore his outfits, both on and off the stage. For the aforementioned actresses he reserved a particular style, one which consisted of frills, sinuous curving lines and lace ruffles the colors of faded flowers. Doucet was a designer of taste and discrimination who valued dignity and luxury above novelty and practicality, Maggy Rouff was a French fashion designer of Belgian origin. She was known for her understated sportswear designs at the beginning of her career, and later for the feminine detailing in her garments such as ruffles, shirring, and the bias cut.
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Lyman’s historical chart (offered with) Questions designed for the use of those engaged in the study of Lyman’s historical chart with a key to the names mentioned in the chart

LYMAN, Azel. S. I: Original publisher's blind-stamped cloth, title in gilt on front cover; other than some browning on the blank fly-leaf, interior is in absolutely excellent condition. II: Original cloth, gilt title and embossed border; interior fine. Third edition; the first edition was published 1845. Lyman (1815-1885) sets out to present a comprehensive chronology in the form of tables and charts to "bring the eye to the aid of the mind in locating facts and events." His goal is to assist the reader to learn about history not through the overwhelming memorization of facts but through visualizing time "as a stream." He uses bright colors in the tables, signs and symbols, and the strategic organization of events, which are all additionally explained in the accompanying key. The preface includes a short explanation of the Chart as well as an interesting discussion of the causes of discrepancy among historians. Lyman lists some of the principal events in the history of various countries (the United States starts with Columbus' voyage in 1493 and ends with the 1872 re-election of President Grant) as well as a short list of important inventions and discoveries. The rare accompanying text includes questions for students of history utilizing the Chart. Lyman's historical chart is an interesting pedagogical tool and reference for the study of time and history in the nineteenth century.
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Mercurius Rusticus.; (bound with) Querela Cantabrigiensis.; (bound with) Mercurius Belgicus.

RYVES, Bruno; BARWICK, John; WHARTON, Sir George General engraved title containing 10 illustrations of events detailed in the book surrounding a figure holding a banner with the title displayed, each of the 2 parts with separate title, woodcut headpieces; Beautiful nineteenth-century full red morocco, boards ruled in gilt, a.e.g; marbled paste-downs and flyleaves, a few leaves toward the end trimmed closely at the top (without any loss). Overall a very handsome copy from the library of Fountaine Walker, who was the owner of Foyers House on Loch Ness, with his bookplate on the paste-down. First appearance of all works together, and first printings of the second and third items. Mercurius rusticus was a periodical issued in short parts between 1643 and 1644. According to the DNB, there were 21 parts published, though our copy appears to have 22. The first few parts detail the assaults upon Sir John Lucas's house, Wardour Castle, and other mansions, while the latter sections treat violations to various cathedrals. As the original issues are virtually unobtainable, this 1646 printing is the earliest one available. All of these works support the Monarchy during the English Civil War. In his preface, Ryves makes specific reference to his own plight stating that the rebels turn out "Clergiemen above exception, and placing most scandalous and insufficient wretches in their rooms, darting from their invenomed mouthes most horrid Blasphemies against our blessed Lord and Saviour." Ryves (1596-1677) served as the dean of Windsor. He was appointed chaplain to Charles I in 1640 but in July 1642 the Parliamentarian residents of Stanwell successfully petitioned for his removal. Perhaps prompted by his ousting, Ryves began to issue his pro-monarchy periodicals. Mercurius rusticus was frequently bound with Querela Cantabrigiensis leading many to assume Ryves was the author of both. John Barwick (1612-1664), the dean of St. Paul's, in fact penned this pamphlet as a response to Cromwell's Parliamentarian forces ransacking the University of Cambridge in 1642. Sir George Wharton (1617-1681) was a low ranking noble, astrologer, and Royalist. He fought in the Civil Wars in support of the monarchy while continuing his studies in astrology and mathematics at Oxford until the city's surrender in 1646. Primarily known for issuing almanacs, Wharton was a staunch supporter of Charles I who used his astrological projections as fodder against rival Parliamentarian astrologists. In a similar vein, he anonymously wrote Mercurius Belgicus as a chronicle of events of the Civil War from December 1641 to March 1646, although a portion was printed the prior year under the title Englands Iliads in a nut-shell (Wing W1544). The three works together represent a series of "real time" responses to current events, politics, religion, and war during an extremely tumultuous period in British history. FIRST EDITION OF ALL THREE PRINTED TOGETHER AND FIRST PRINTING OF SECOND AND THIRD WORKS.
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The theatre of Gods judgements: wherein is represented the admirable justice of God against all notorious sinners, great and small, specially against the most eminent persons in the world, whose exorbitant power had broke through the barres of the divine and humane law. Collected out of sacred, ecclesiasticall, and pagan histories by two most reverend doctors in divinity, Thomas Beard of Huntington, and Tho. Taylor, the famous late preacher of Mary Aldermanbury in London. . .

BEARD, Thomas Title in red and black with woodcut device, separate title for second part which lists Thomas Taylor as author and is dated 1642, woodcut initials and headpieces. Contemporary calf, worn, spine repaired; repair made in lower right corner of title, minor staining especially to first third of the text. Inscription in an early hand ("Richard") crossed out. Rare first printing of the first folio edition; fourth edition overall. A variant printed later in 1648 spelled out the names of Susan Islip and Mary Hearne. The theatre of God's judgements is essentially an anthology of anecdotes. The stories adhere to a central theme of divine vengenance against those who break the ten commandments. Similarly, the second part deals with the punishment of those who commit the seven deadly sins. Beard included tales from a wide range sources like classical authors, other clergymen, and medieval writers that were found in Chassanion's edition. Beard also added more than three-hundred narratives of his own and continued to add anecdotes from current sermons, tracts, and pamphlets in his later editions. Beard (c. 1568-1632) was a virulently anti-Catholic clergyman, teacher, and author. Once a tutor to Oliver Cromwell, he also wrote theological plas and numerous pamphlets denouncing the church of Rome in the early seventeenth century. This particular work is a loose adaptation and translation of Jean Chassanion's Histoires memorables des grans et merveilleux jugements et punitions de Dieu (1586). The first edition of Beard's interpretation of the French minister's book was printed in 1597. Two more editions appeared in 1612 and 1631 with more contemporary material added. In this present copy, printed posthumously, a second author was added (Thomas Taylor) but according to the DNB there is no evidence of the two men collaborating.
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Tracts of Mr. Thomas Hobbs of Malmsbury. . .

HOBBES, Thomas With folding engraved plate. Engraved frontispiece portrait and folding engraved plate, woodcut initials and headpieces. Contemporary blind-tooled calf, rebacked, spine label, early marbled fore-edge; interior excellent. Armorial bookplate of Sir Francis Boilean (From the library of Lord Nugent) and small book label of George Goyder (1826-1898), Surveyor General of South Australia. First edition. Although Hobbes penned the four essays in this volume decades earlier, this is the first posthumous appearance of all the tracts published together. The four essays here include Behemoth, the history of the causes of the civil wars of England; An answer to Arch-bishop Bramhall's book, called The catching of the Leviathan; An historical narration of heresie, and the punishment thereof; and Philosophical problems, dedicated to the King in 1662. Hobbes wrote Behemoth in the late 1660's and focused his account on the interplay of religion and human ambition. He composed the second essay in 1668 as a response to his long-time foe, John Bramhall an Anglican bishop who was particularly incensed at Hobbes's notion of free-will. Printed with this essay is Hobbes's history of heresy, which he was accused of on a number of occasions, which shows his advocacy of religious tolerance. The last essay concerns his attempts to solve certain philosophical problems with Euclidean geometry, and illustrated by the folding plate. According to the publisher, An answer to Arch-bishop Bramhall's book and Philosophical problems are printed here for the first time. Hobbes (1588-1679) was one of the most distinguished English philosophers of his time and is best known for his work Leviathan. His relationship with Galileo informed his adoption of the mechanistic interpretation of the universe. This in turn led to his deterministic viewpoint and belief that man is "free" to do anything he desires. Hobbes' writings on the subject made him one of the most controversial figures in the seventeenth century.
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Cusack’s patent geometrikon. A set of apparatus for simplifying the study of solid geometry, as required for Science Subject I. (offered with) Cusakc’s solid geometry in which orthographical projection is fully treated as required by the various certificates of the science and art department, for which Science Subject I is required

CUSACK; ARMSTRONG, Henry Fry Boxed set & 8vo. (text). Box: 121 x 218 x 37 mm. Complete in 2 compartments and comprising an elaborate set of didactic materials including Cusack's hinged dihedral panels in mahogany and brass with printed paper labels plus 3 geometrical solids in wood (square, rectangle and hexagon), together with 4 printed envelopes containing sets of various geometrical plain and printed two-dimensional figures (2 of the envelopes are sealed), 2 diagrams on "xylonite" (celluloid), numerous folding diagrams of projective geometry for mounting on the dihedral panels, numerous auxiliary planes made of heavy card for placing within the diagrams, and the original long glass-headed pin. One of the envelopes is chipped, some wear and damage to one or two of the folding figures. The Geometrikon kit is housed in the original pine box, with sliding lid, printed label on lid, somewhat soiled but legible, box a bit worn. Text: Copiously illustrated. Original blue publisher's cloth, upper cover and spine lettered and ruled in red, spine a bit sunned, minor bumping. A scarce survivor: a boxed set comprising both two- and three-dimensional geometrical figures in paper, card, celluloid and wood, for use in the classroom to help prepare students for examinations to obtain their school certificates. This amazing educational teaching aid is offered with the accompanying text volume by Armstrong, apparently a "trained and certified teacher, art master, and currently a demonstrator in geometry and perspective at the City of London School of Art and Day Training College, White Street, Moorfields, E.C." Divided into thirty chapters or "lessons," the work refers throughout to the Geometrikon and the contents thereof, providing a detailed explanation of its use.
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An historical narrative of a most extraordinary event which happened at the village of Bergemoletto in Italy: where three women were saved out of the ruins of a stable, in which they had been buried thirty-seven days by a heavy fall of snow. With curious remarks

SOMIS, Ignazio Woodcut headpiece and 2 folding engraved plates. Contemporary full calf, boards gilt-ruled, minor wear to spine; title with staining around edges, otherwise interior in excellent condition. Extremely rare first English edition (a second English edition was published in 1768) translated from the 1758 Italian (Ragionamento sopra il fatto avvenuto in Bergemoletto) edition printed in Turin. This is an early account of (as the title notes) an extraordinary event which resulted in a condition identified by the author and what is now deemed post-traumatic stress disorder. Somis describes in incredible detail the harrowing survival tale of three women trapped in a stable during an avalanche in the town of Bergemoletto in Piedmont which occurred on March 19, 1755. Mary Anne, Anne, and Margaret survived for thirty-seven days on a small supply of milk with a decreasing air supply and deteriorating conditions. The trauma these women suffered is encapsulated in a passage describing Mary Anne's first encounter with fresh air and sunlight after their rescue: she "was attacked by a very acute pain in the eyes . and was attended with so violent a fainting fit, that she had almost like to have lost in the first moments of her deliverance that life which she had so long and with such difficulty preserved." Somis additionally provides biological and physiological hypotheses as to how these women survived. He states that adolescent bodies have less resistance and energy reserves, and since these women were adults, their bodies were more hardy. He supports this by referencing medical works by prominent physicians such as Haller, Swammerdam, Eustachio, Harvey, and Scheuchzer. Of particular interest is his reference to the fate of Count Ugolino and his children at the end of canto 32 in Dante's Inferno. After betraying the city of Pisa, the Count and his children were locked in a tower and left to starve to death. The children died before their father thereby aligning with Somis's theory that younger individuals are less resilient than adults. One plate shows a map of the town and mountain where the avalanche occurred; the other plate illustrates equipment used by the author to simulate the bladders of the women in their captivity. Somis (1718-1793), count of Chiavrie, was a physician who taught at numerous universities and academies across Italy, and he dedicated most of his life to reconfiguring the courses at these institutions. He published his first book about the spinal cord and nervous system in 1743, and continued to write on the topics of medicine, chemistry, and biology.