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Collection of architectural and decoration prints including fortification plans, garden plans and architectural decoration].Antwerp, Venice, Rome, various publishers, [engraved] 1561-1585, [printed 1580-ca. 1600]. Large folio & small 1mo (38.5 x 27 cm). Collection of 4 separately published prints (3 large full-sheet & 1 small full-sheet), plus 67 prints from 9 series (including 3 double-page prints and a 1½-sheet plan of classical Roman ports printed from 2 copperplates). Contemporary or near contemporary limp sheepskin parchment (ca. 1600?).

VREDEMAN DE VRIES, Jan (Hans), Antonio LABACCO, Giacomo Barozzio da VIGNOLA and others. An extraordinary collection of seventy-one 16th-century architectural prints and prints showing a wide variety of ornamental engraving intended for the use of architects and others. The present states of nearly all prints in the collection date from the period 1561 to 1585 and some plates were modified after the present printings, giving latest possible dates for their printing. In some series it is difficult to identify the watermarks, but most also point to a date around the 1580s. The prints from the four series by Vredeman de Vries (1527-1609) are especially notable not only for their artistic quality and the high quality of the engraving (mostly by Joannes and Lucas van Doetecum), but also for an extraordinary and detailed print showing about 40 musical instruments and another showing about 50 tools for gardening, farming and building (in wood, brick or stone) both in 1572. Also of special note are four prints that appear to have been separately published rather than forming part of a series, showing important monuments or events in Rome. The series from Labacco, Artichitettura, probably the 1584 edition, includes all but one of its 26 prints.Including:1) MICHELANGELO. Orthographia partis exterioris templi Divi Petri in Vaticano.[Rome], (engraved by Étienne Dupérac, [Florence, 1569?]; revised by Paolo Graziani, Rome, 1582, and) Pietro de' Nobili, 1585. Double-page. 2) BÉATRIZET, Nicolas. Pantheum Romanum nunc Mariae cognomento . notum|ad . presume.[Rome, ca. 1575/85?]. Double-page. 3) [AGOSTINO VENEZIANO?]. Arco de Costatino [recté Constantino] in Roma Ant Salamanca excudebat[Italy, copied from Antonio Salamanca, ca. 1600?]. 4) VREDEMAN DE VRIES, Jan. Quicquid est huiusmodi, in quo non possunt plures excellere, . M.T.C. off. 1[Antwerp], [widow of?] Hieronymus Cock [engraved by Joannes and/or Lucas van Doetecum], [engraved 1561/70, but perhaps printed ca. 1590/1600]. Double page. 5) VREDEMAN DE VRIES, Jan. Panoplia seu armamentarium ac ornamenta cum artium ac opificiorum .,Antwerp, Gerard de Jode (engraved by Lucas or Johannes van Doetecom), [engraved] 1572 [printed 1580s?]. 5 prints from a series of 16.6) VREDEMAN DE VRIES, Jan. Caryatidum vulgus termas vocat sive athlantidum multiformium ad quemlibet architecture, .|Veelderley dieverse termen op de V ordene der edificien tot behoef alle beelt ende steenhouwers[,] scrinwerkers[,] glasscrivers .,Antwerp, Gerard de Jode [engraved by Lucas and/or Johannes van Doetecom], [engraved ca. 1565, possibly printed ca. 1590/1600]. 3 prints from a series of 16.7) VREDEMAN DE VRIES, Jan. [Waterputten],Antwerp, Philips Galle [engraved by Lucas and/or Johannes van Doetecom], [engraved ca. 1574, perhaps printed ca. 1600]. 6 prints from a series of 24.8) VREDEMAN DE VRIES, Jan. Hortorumviridariorumque elegantes & multiplicis formae, ad architectonicae artis normam af fabre .,Antwerp, Philips Galle, 1583. 5 prints from a series of 20.9) SCHILLE, Hans van. Form und Weis zu bauwen, zimmern, machen und auff zu richten, mit Blochheusern, Graben und Wallen . Vestung Schlosser Buren und Stedt . macht und braucht | Maniere, de bien bastir, edifier, fortifier, & munir chasteaux, forterelles, villes, & autres places, pour defendre & offendre .Antwerp, Gerard de Jode [engraved by Joannes and Lucas van Doetecum], 1580. Title-page plus 4 prints from a series of 14.10) COCK, Hieronymus. [Views of Roman ruins],[Antwerp], [widow of] Hieronymus Cock [engraved by Joannes and/or Lucas van Doetecum], [engraved] 1561 [printed ca. 1600?]. 4 prints from an unnumbered series of 12.11) LABACCO, Antonio. Libro . appartenente a l'architettura nel qual si figurano alcune notabili antiquita di Roma,Venice, Girolamo Porro, 1584. 25 of 26 prints.12) VIGNOLA, Giacomo Barozzi da. Regola delli cinque ordini d'architettura,Venice, Francesco Ziletti, 1582 or "1583" [= 1586?]. 11 of 37 prints.13) GROENINGEN Gerard van. Memorabilium, Novi Testamenti, . icones tredecim .,Antwerp, Gerard de Jode [engraved by Joannes & Lucas van Doetecum], [1585]. 4 prints from a series of 13.Extensive description available on request
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Album van Buitenzorg. Een souvenir aan de residentie van Insulinde. Vier en twintig onveranderlijke lichtdrukken.Buitenzorg (Bogor, Indonesia), [ca. 1888]. Folio (43 x 33.5 cm). With photolithographed title-page and 24 numbered collotype reproductions of photographic views. Loose in the original publisher’s portfolio: gold, black and blind-blocked red cloth over boards.

LANG, Carl Emanuel Friedrich. Cat. KITLV, p. 14; NCC (1 copy); WorldCat (4 copies); Haks & Maris, pp. 162-163; not in Bastin & Brommer; KVK. A rare album of 24 excellent photographic views (18 x 23.5 cm) of the palace and botanical garden of the governor-general of the Dutch East Indies, as well as architectural and topographic views in and around the city of Buitenzorg, Java (now Bogor, Indonesia). The first eleven plates cover the governor's palace and gardens, with lakes, roads, fountains, waterlilies and a great variety of trees, many with native Indonesians in the background adding to the atmosphere and giving an indication of the scale. The last thirteen plates show various buildings (including the train station), roads, mountains (including a smoking volcano), forests, rivers, villages and farms in and around the city of Buitenzorg, many with natives engaged in various activities. One shows shops and people in the Chinese quarter, and one shows a European with (apparently) his native workers. The attractive title-page, with its border and decorative initial letter, may have been executed by Lang himself. A letterpress key to the plates, in Dutch and French, identifies each view in a few words.The German-born Carl Lang (1830-1906) went to Indonesia in the 1860s, where he made his name as photographer and lithographic artist. He obtained government posts as lithographer of the Topographic Bureau in Jakarta and draughtsman of the Botanical Garden in Buitenzorg. He moved to the Netherlands shortly before his death.In very good condition, with only a couple very minor blemishes in the views. The portfolio also very good, with the spine slightly worn. A rare and fascinating set of photographic Indonesian views.
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Signa antiqua e museo Jacobi de Wilde. Veterum poeatrum carminibus illustrata et per Mariam filiam aeri inscripta.Amsterdam, Maria de Wilde, 1700. 4to. With engraved title-page, engraved author’s portrait, 1 engraved folding plate and 60 engraved plates. Contemporary mottled calf, gold-tooled spine.

WILDE, Jacob and Maria de. Grinke 61; Murray I, p. 38 & III, p. 272; Tavernier, Russia and the Low Countries 3178. First and only edition of an attractive display of the statues of the Museum Wildeanum, once housed on the Keizersgracht in Amsterdam. The Dutch tax collector Jacob de Wilde (1645-1721) began the collection, containing gems, coins, scientific instruments and statues. "This attractive account of a Dutch cabinet of the late seventeenth century is as much a eulogy of Maria de Wilde's gifts as an engraver as of her father's museum" (Grinke). The 60 plates by Maria de Wilde (1682-1729) show the ancient Egyptian, Greek and Roman statues in the museum. The 6 text leaves include a brief introduction and several laudatory poems directed at Maria de Wilde and her engravings. The collection drew some important visitors, including the Russian tsar Peter the Great in 1697, whose visit is illustrated on the engraved folding plate. After De Wilde's death, the tsar acquired part of the collection for his "Kunstkamera", the first museum in Russia, which was completed in 1727.Some minor thumbing and some occasional small spots, not affecting the illustrations, otherwise in very good condition.
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Beschryving van ‘sGraven-hage, behelzende deszelfs oorsprong, benaming, gelegentheid, uitbreidingen, onheilen en luister, mitsgaders stigtinge van het hof, der kerken, kloosters, kapellen, godshuizen, en andere voornaame gebouwen.Delft, Reinier Boitet (part 1); The Hague, Johannes de Cros (part 2), 1730-1739. 2 parts in 3 volumes. Folio. With engraved frontispiece, engraved dedication in volume 1 and 3, and a total of 57 engraved plates, mostly folding. Contemporary red half sheepskin.

RIEMER, Jacob de. Nijhoff & V. Hattum 267. First and only edition of an extensive, thorough and lavishly illustrated work on the history and topography of the city of The Hague. The beautiful frontispiece is explained in an allegorical poem by Hendrik Schim on the verso of the half-title. More laudatory poems on The Hague and the author Jacob de Riemer (1676-1762) follow in the preliminaries of the first part by Caspar Barlaeus, Joannes Van Dam, Constantijn Huygens and Hendrik Schim. The main text starts with the foundation of the city, followed by descriptions of different buildings, including several churches and monasteries, the orphanage, schools and much more, most of them are shown in the engraved folding plates as well. The second part (volume 3) of 1739 contains the description of the government of The Hague and its organization.Binding worn, corners bumped and lacking the paper on the front side of volume three, but the bindings are structually sound. Text and plates with some occasional spots and a few wormholes, and some of the folding plates are reinforced with tape at the back; a good copy, wholly untrimmed.
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Itinéraire du Royaume des Pays-Bas. Ouvrage indispensable pour les voyageurs et orné de cartes. Première partie. Contenant les provinces septentrionales. | Seconde partie. Contenant les provinces méridionales.Amsterdam, Evert Maaskamp, 1829. 2 parts in 1 volume. 12mo. With 5 folding engraved maps. Contemporary paper boards.

MAASKAMP, Evert. KVK & WorldCat (1 copy, apparently this ed.); not in Saalmink; Tiele; this edition not in NCC. Extremely rare edition of an extensive travel guide to the United Kingdom of the Netherlands (1815-1830), encompassing both the Netherlands and Belgium. The first part covers the Netherlands and opens with an engraved folding map showing routes between Paris, London and Amsterdam; an engraved folding table displaying the hours of travel between cities within the Netherlands and an engraved folding map of the Netherlands. The text starts with an introduction to the Netherlands, covering its history, religion, government, customs, commerce, etc., followed by a section on travelling to and arriving in the Netherlands. The rest of first part gives descriptions of many cities and villages worth visiting and popular travel routes. The second part, covering Belgium and part of Germany, includes a folding engraved map of Belgium and a folding engraved map of the area between Maastricht and Cologne depicting the postal routes. Again, the text describes popular routes and provinces, cities and villages.Some pages slightly browned and stained. Binding rubbed, spine discoloured and slightly damaged. Overall in good condition.
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Nuovo metodo, che facilita la lingua Toscana disteso con regole grammaticali, .Rome, Paolo Moneta, 1683. Small 12mo (14 x 8 cm). Contemporary marbled wrappers.

SEBASTIANI, Pietro de’. Not in Gamba, Serie dei testi di lingua . Italiana; ICCU; KVK; Parenti, Prime edizioni Italiane; WorldCat; for Sebastiani's 1677 grammar: Fabio Aprea, "Il 'Nuovo metodo per acquistare . la lingua Toscana Romana' di Pietro de Sabastiani (Roma, 1677)", in: Soc. Int. di Linguistica e filologia Italiana, XIV congresso (2016); BLC Italian (17th cen.), p. 838; Dennis Rhodes, "An anonymous guidebook to Rome, 1677", in: British Library journal IX (1983), pp. 193-194; for other works by Sebastiani: Schudt, Le guide di Roma 411-413. Unrecorded first and only edition of a concise grammar of and guide to the Italian language (in its Tuscan variant, which had already spread to Rome by this date), dedicated to Massimiliano di Bethune, Prince of Henrichemont. Pietro de' Sebastiani, professor of the Tuscan language in Rome, follows his dedication with a brief account of the origins of the language, followed by an introduction to the pronunciation and grammar. Little is known about the author. Moneta published his first three works in a single edition in 1677, similar to the present book in dimensions and layout: a brief introduction to the Tuscan language for foreigners ("per commodità delle nationi oltramontane"), followed by two tourist guides: to the churches in Rome and their artwork, and to Rome's principal gardens, palaces, libraries, museums and galleries. Sebastiani went on to publish at least eight more small books in the years 1679 to 1686, mostly about the history and antiquities of Rome. He returned to his professional field, the Tuscan language, only in the present book. Its structure and content differ considerably from his 1677 Nuovo metodo per acquistare brievemente la lingua Toscana Romana. Dennis Rhodes first drew attention to the 1677 publication in 1983 and Aprea called its introduction to the Tuscan language "a source of considerable interest for the study of pre-unification Roman regional Italian". From the Fürstlich-Fürstenbergische Hofbibliothek, Donaueschingen. On the title-page, the author, place of publication, publisher and date are underlined in red pencil. With a faint stain in the lower outside corner throughout, not reaching the text and darkened only at the tip, and a couple tiny chips, but otherwise in very good condition. The wrapper is somewhat rubbed.
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Vas nestes a pontamende de mistura as cauzas originaes que tem lancado a perder este Reino, e a India posta no stado que se ve e juntamende vão os meyos, que pode haver para se tirar dinheiro para o soccorro d[‘]ella.[Lisbon?, 1628?]. Folio. Manuscript document in Portuguese. Disbound.

BRAZIL - DUTCH INCURSIONS]. A detailed report, apparently advising the Portuguese government on the dangers of Dutch incursions in Portuguese colonies, especially in Brazil. The report contains 30 numbered articles. Articles 1, 2 and 26 explicitly name Brazil, but many others name "India", which can refer to the Indies (Brazil was regarded as part of the West Indies). During the 12 Years' Truce (1609-1621), the Dutch agreed not to attack Portuguese ships or territories, but in 1621 the Dutch set up the West India Company to attempt to capture a great deal of the lucrative trade in the New World. The capture of Bahia in 1624 proved short-lived, the Portuguese retaking it in 1625, but in 1630 the Dutch captured Pernambuco and much of the surrounding territory, forming a Dutch colony in Brazil that they were to keep until 1654. The present document is undated, but its references to the Dutch "robberies" in Brazil and to the restoration show it dates after the capture and recapture of Bahia in 1624 and 1625, and apparently before the capture of Pernambuco in 1630. Another (shorter) version of the same report (some articles match nearly word for word), published by Da Silva Tullio, is apparently dated 1628, which seems to suit the present version as well.The ink or quill used damaged some of the paper resulting in the loss of several letters and words, mostly affecting the second and third leaf.
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De vyerighe colom klaer vertoonende in vyftich onderscheydene curieuse caarten de XVII Nederlantsche provincien.Amsterdam, Jacob Aertsz. Colom, [ca. 1660]. Oblong 4to (23 x 28 cm). With engraved allegorical title-page by Experiens Sillemans, incorporating the arms of the 17 provinces of the Low Countries, and 50 engraved plates (47 maps, and 3 plates containing 117 portraits of the Counts of Brabant, Flanders and Holland). Contemporary vellum; recased, with the endpapers restored.

COLOM, Jacob Aertsz. Koeman, Col 5; V.d. Krogt, Koeman's Atlantes Neerlandici IIIB, 365:02 (pp. 635-637); Shirley, British Library T.COLM-1a; STCN 853365954; Tiele, Bibl. 262. Second Dutch edition of a charming atlas of the Seventeen Provinces (more or less the modern Netherlands and Belgium), composed and published by the ambitious Amsterdam map- and globe maker, printer and publisher Jacob Aertsz. Colom (1600-1673). Like Willem Jansz. Blaeu, Colom first began publishing pilot guides and maritime atlases (no one else dared compete with Blaeu in that field), but both branched out into terrestrial atlases. The maps and portraits are printed from the plates of the rare first Dutch edition (1635), but the text is updated.Apart from the general maps of the Netherlands (in Roman times as well as in the 17th century) and the Seventeen provinces, there are many detailed maps of regions and cities with the surrounding areas, including the Meyery van 's-Hertogenbosch, Bergen op Zoom, Breda, Valckenburgh and Dalem, Malines, diocese of Liège, Namur, Veluwe, Zutphen, island of Dordrecht, Delfland, 6 maps of the new polders (Bylmermeer, Purmer, Wormer, Heer Huygen-waert, Diemermeer, Zype), Walcheren, Ooster- and Westergoe, and Seven wolde.Restored tears in the head and foot margins of the title-page, map 31 on paper with smaller margins, map 45 with a water stain in the corner, but otherwise in very good condition.
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Codex Argenteus Bibliothecae R. Univ. Upsaliensis.[Uppsala, Uppsala University Library, 1960] (colophon: Uppsala, printed by Almqvist & Wiksells, 1959). With the title in Latin and the text in Swedish, English, French and German. The book (3.4 x 2.9 x 0.7 cm) is kept, as published, in a silver box in the shape of a book, made by the goldsmiths K.G. Markströms Guldsmeds AB in Uppsala, jewellers to the Swedish court. It is a facsimile of the chased silver binding made in Stockholm in 1669 for the Codex Argenteus.

UGGLA, Arvid Hj. Bondy, p. 181; Welsh 1972; for the codex and its binding: Simon McKeown, Recovering the Codex Argenteus (2005) First and only edition of a miniature book celebrating an extraordinary manuscript, the ca. 520 Codex Argenteus (Silver Codex), the earliest surviving manuscript of the four gospels in the ancient Germanic Gothic language, kept in a silver box that is a miniature facsimile (about 1/7 original size) of the chased silver binding made for the codex in Stockholm in 1669. In fact the Codex is the earliest sizable surviving manuscript of any kind in any Germanic language, so it forms an essential source for the history of languages in general far beyond its great importance as a record of the extinct Gothic language. In 2011 UNESCO added it to the Memory of the World register.Bishop Ulfilas or Wulfila (ca. 311-383), a Goth from Anatolia, but of Greek ancestry, and others working under him made the translation. Tradition credits Ulfias with inventing the script for his translation, though it certainly had antecedents. It was discovered in the 16th century in the Abbey of Werden in the Ruhr valley in western Germany and acquired by the Holy Roman Emperor Rudolph II in Prague. When Sweden occupied Prague in 1648 they brought it to the scholarly and devout Queen Christina in Stockholm. She secretly converted to Catholicism in 1652 and abdicated in 1654, when the codex was acquired by her Dutch librarian, Isaac Vossius, and his uncle Franciscus Junius began a scholarly study of it. In 1662 the Swedish chancellor Count Magnus Gabriel De la Gardie bought it from Vossius and in 1669, as chancellor to the Uppsala University as well, he donated it to the University, where it remains today. He had the silver binding made for the donation, designed David Klöcker and executed by the Stockholm goldsmith Hans Bengtsson Sellingh, jeweller to the Swedish court.The corners of the book are slightly curled, but the book and box remain in very good condition.
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Les observations de plusieurs singularitez et choses memorables, trouvees en Grece, Asie, Indée, Egypte, Arabie & autres pays estranges.Antwerp, Christoffel Plantin, 1555. 8vo. With Plantin’s early woodcut device on title-page, a double-page woodcut map (31.5 x 35 cm) showing Mount Sinai, and 45 woodcut illustrations in text (including a portrait of the author). 18th-century gold-tooled calf, richly gold-tooled spine.

BELON, Pierre. Nissen, ZBI 304; USTC 15402; Voet 637A; cf. Atabey 93 (2nd edition); for the author: Dictionnaire des orientalistes, pp. 75-76. First Plantin edition of Belon's Observations, the fruit of his extensive travels in Greece, Turkey, Egypt, Palestine, Lebanon and Syria from 1546 to 1549. It is one of the earliest works printed by Christoffel Plantin, published in the year he opened his printing office. Piere Belon (ca. 1518-1564), famous for his works on ornithology, was attached as naturalist to the French embassy to the Ottoman Empire, aimed at convincing Suleiman the Magnificent to join forces against Charles V and led by Gabriel de Luetz (Luez, Luels) d'Aramont. The envoy sailed for Venice in December 1546 and proceeded to Croatia. Here Luetz continued overland to Adrianople (Edirne), while Belon sailed for Istanbul by way of Greece, visiting Lemnos, Macedonia, Crete and Kavala en route. He reached Istanbul in August 1547, explored the city and continued to Alexandria, while Luetz accompanied Suleiman to Persia. Belon's journey continued to Cairo, Mount Sinai, Jerusalem, Damascus, Baalbek, Aleppo, and to Turkey again.Unlike many contemporary travel writers, Belon does not elaborate on extraordinary travel adventures, but rather limits himself to detailed observations on mammals, fish, snakes, birds, plants, trees and the manners and customs of the peoples he encountered, only commenting on what he had witnessed himself. The narrative includes valuable observations about Mount Athos, the pyramids and mummies of Egypt, Mount Sinai, Damascus and the Ottoman culture (with an account of the consumption of opium).With the bookplate of the German collector Kurt Lindner (1906-1987) and with his library stamp below the last leaf of text. A water stain in the first 20 leaves, leaving some wrinkles in the following leaves, but otherwise in very good condition.
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Reyse van hare doorluchtige majesteyt Christina, Koninginne van Sweden; gedaen door de Nederlanden, Duytslant, Vranckrijck, Italien, en andere gewesten des werelts, van . 1654. tot . 1660. Den tweeden druck vermeerdert, en van veel fouten gesuyvert.Amsterdam, Johannes van den Bergh, 1660. 12mo. With 4 etched and engraved plates (a full-page portrait of Christina and 3 folding scenes from her journey, the folding plates 10.5 x 13.5 cm). Modern flexible beige paper binding.

CHRISTINA, former Queen of Sweden (subject). STCN (2 copies); KVK & WorldCat (4 copies including the 2 in STCN); not in Buisman; Scheepers. First issue of the second edition of a rare Dutch account of Christina's six years of travels through Europe after her 1654 abdication as Queen of Sweden, with an etched and engraved portrait of Christina (1626-1689), apparently unique to the present edition, after a ca. 1653 painting by Sébastien Bourdon (1616-1671). The first two editions are both very rare. The three folding plates, showing Christina in Stockholm (her 1654 abdication), Rome (1655) and Paris (1656), are copied from the first edition. After the main text follow four pages explaining the four engravings. The preliminaries of the present edition include two poems by the great Dutch Catholic poet Vondel in praise of Christina.Christina's father, King Gustav Adolf of Sweden, died when she was five years old, leaving her heir to the throne. She was therefore educated as a prince and demonstrated both a brilliant mind and a passion for scholarship, theology, philosophy, literature, politics, music and the arts. She attended council meetings from age 14 and gave patronage to René Descartes (who lived at the Stockholm court and tutored her), the composers Scarlatti and Corelli, who directed her court quire and orchestra, and the sculptor and architect Bernini, who became her friend. She also established the Accademia dell'Arcadia in Rome. She secretly converted to Catholicism in 1652 and abdicated in 1654, in part because she knew the powerful Lutherans in Sweden would not accept a Catholic queen and in part hoping to escape the pressures to marry (though she is thought to have had a male lover).With a small stain in the foot margin of the last page and an occasional minor spot or smudge, but still in very good condition.
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Excursions dans les isles de Madère et de Porto-Santo, faites dans l’automne de 1827, pendant son troisième voyage en Afrique, . Ouvrage traduite de l’Anglais et accompagné de notes de M. le Baron Cuvier et de M. le Baron de Humboldt.Paris, F.G. Levrault, 1826. 2 volumes. 8vo (text) and 4to (plates). With 22 lithographed plates (3 double-page and 4 hand-coloured), most of them drawn and lithographed by Sarah Bowdich. Modern half morocco; the text volume with the original publisher’s wrappers bound in.

BOWDICH, Thomas Edward, Sarah BOWDICH LEE (editor), George CUVIER and Alexander VON HUMBOLDT (annotators). Bradley I, p. 497; Nissen, ZBI, 520. Rare first and only edition in French of an account of a journey to Madeira and Porto Santo, by the British traveller and naturalist Thomas Edward Bowdich (1791-1824), edited and with appendices by his wife Sarah (1791-1856), an outstanding naturalist and traveller in her own right. In 1816-1818, Bowdich had travelled to the West-African Ashanti Kingdom as part of an expedition of the Royal African Company. The resulting publication met with little success in the United Kingdom but more so in France, where Bowdich and his wife befriended Georges Cuvier (1769-1832) and worked on several publications about West Africa and natural history, illustrated by Sarah. The success of these publications enabled the couple to embark upon a second African expedition in 1822. After a stay of several months in Madeira, where they gathered all sorts of botanical, geographical and geological material, they travelled to Gambia. After taking astronomical observations at night, Bowdich caught a cold, developed a fever and died.Penniless and with the botanical specimens collected during the voyage lost in a storm, Sarah Bowdich took it upon herself to edit and publish the gathered material. With the help of several friends, including Cuvier and Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), she prepared Bowdich's notes on Madeira, added illustrations drawn by herself (the 7 plates of fishes foreshadowing her famous book Fresh-water fishes of Great Britain) and prepared additional sections describing the African part of the journey and presenting translations of Arabic writing. "Most significantly, however, her original descriptions of new species and genera of fish, birds, and plants, evaluated by Cuvier, established her as the first woman known to have discovered whole new genera of plants" (Beaver). The French translation also contained additional notes by her friends Cuvier and Von Humboldt.Binding worn at the extremities. Somewhat foxed throughout; in very good condition.
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Justitie over enige Arminiaensche verraders, geschiet in s’Gravenhaech.[Amsterdam, Claes Jansz. Visscher, 1623]. Engraved print (26.5 x 32 cm) mounted on a large sheet of 18th-century(?) laid paper (50.5 x 33 cm), with manuscript text in three columns with the title: Cort verhaal ende waerachtige afbeeldinge der justitie geschiet in s’Gravenhage, over seeker, conspirateurs, diens conspiratie deur Gods voorsienigheid ontdekt is den 6e. February 1623.

VISSCHER, Claes Jansz. Atlas van Stolk 1574; Hollstein XXXVIII, p. 31, no. 46 state III (6 copies); Knuttel 3457; Muller, Historieplaten 1494b. Third state of a rare print of the execution of the conspirators in the failed attempt to assassinate the Dutch stadholder Maurits of Nassau, Prince of Orange, in 1623, skilfully engraved by the publisher and engraver Claes Jansz. Visscher. The plate is divided into nine panels, the main one showing a view of the beheading at the square in front of Het Binnenhof in The Hague, watched by a large crowd. The other panels show portraits of Reinier van Oldenbarnevelt, David Koornwinder, Adriaen Adriaensz. van Dijck and Cornelis Gerrits and five smaller scenes of the dismembering of the bodies.A heated theological and political conflict had raged in the Low Countries between the Arminians (from 1610 also called Remonstrants) and Gomarists for more than a decade when it came to a head with the Synod of Dort (1618/19), which decided in favour of the Gomarists. The Synod led to the 1619 execution of the Republic’s greatest statesman Johan van Oldenbarnevelt, who had supported the Arminian cause. In revenge his sons Reinier and Willem conspired to assassinate the (Gomarist) Dutch stadholder Maurits of Nassau, Prince of Orange. Other prominent members of Dutch society who had political, religious or personal grudges against the Prince lent their support. The plot was betrayed in February 1623, and the conspirators arrested and executed from March to May.The print was also issued as a broadsheet with a letterpress description below, here added in manuscript in an 18th-century(?) hand. A small restored tear at the foot of the engraving and a faint stain at the foot of the manuscript text, but otherwise in very good condition.
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Abraham’s sacrifice].[Amsterdam], Rembrandt, 1655. 4to leaf (16.5 x 14 cm). Etching and drypoint on European laid paper (plate size 15.7 x 13.2 cm). Mounted with 2 hinges on a piece of thick cardboard.

REMBRANDT van Rijn. Hind 283; Laurentius, Rembrandt’s etchings 19; New Hollstein, Rembrandt 287; Perlove & Silver, Rembrandt’s faith, pp. 86-92; White & Boon, B35. A fine impression of one of Rembrandt's most famous prints, "Abraham's sacrifice", illustrating Genesis 22: 10-12, where Abraham, after god ordered him to sacrifice his only son Isaac, raises his knife to do so but is stayed by an angel who reveals that it was only a test of his obedience to god. In the Bible, the angel merely speaks to Abraham, but Rembrandt made the scene much more intimate, with the angel reaching around Abraham from behind almost in an embrace, holding his left arm (with the knife), just above the elbow and his right arm (holding Isaac's head) near the wrist. The Dutch States Bible of 1637 does place the angel behind Abraham, but still only speaking to him. Rembrandt made the etching in 1655 and no variant states are known. It differs greatly from his 1635 painting of the same subject, where the figures are not so closely united and neither Abraham nor the angel expresses such tenderness. The present example of the etching retains the finest lines very clearly (for example, in the background along the edge of the angel's left wing, between the highest point of the wing and the top of Abraham's head) and shows considerable burr, giving the scene a powerful richness and contrast.The etching has two collectors' stamps on the back: those of Count Johann Nepomuk Ernst Harrach (1756-1829) and Senator Johann Karl Brönner (1738-1812). The etching came into the hands of the Dutch Dreesmann family (art collectors and founders in 1887 of the Vroom & Dreesmann department stores) who gave it to the Van Ravesteijn family before 1982 for services rendered. With minor foxing, but otherwise in fine condition. A fine example of one of Rembrandt's most famous etchings.
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Al-Coranus s. lex Islamitica Muhammedis.Hamburg, “officina Schultzio-Schilleriana” [= the widow of Gottfried Schultz & Benjamin Schiller], 1694. 4to. With woodcut Arabic half-title. Set in roman, italic and Arabic types with incidental fraktur, Greek and Hebrew. Contemporary vellum.

QURAN - ARABIC]. HINCKELMANN, Abraham, ed. Hamilton, Europe and the Arab world 33; Philologia orientalis 360; Schnurrer 376. First and only edition of Hinckelmann's Arabic text of the Qur'an, the second edition of the Arabic Qur'an, the first actually available to readers and the only convenient edition before 1834, with a 36-page Latin introduction by the editor making extensive reference to the earlier literature. The first complete Arabic edition of the Qur'an was printed at Venice ca. 1537/38, intended for distribution in the Middle East, but the entire edition was thought to have been destroyed until one copy turned up in the 1980s. Hinckelmann's edition was therefore the first edition available to European scholars, missionaries or Islamic readers. It was followed by Ludovico Marracci's Arabic and Latin edition published at Padua in 1698, whose two folio volumes and extensive (anti-Islamic) commentary made it both expensive and inconvenient to use. The editions published at St Petersburg (from 1789) and Kazan (from 1803) for the use of Islamic groups in the Russian Empire were almost unknown in Europe, so the present edition remained the primary source for European knowledge of the Qur'an for 140 years, until Flügel's 1834 Leipzig edition. VD17 has four different entries for this work, with different fingerprints, but they are all the same edition.With bookplate on paste-down, covered behind the first endleaf, which is partially mounted to the paste-down, and an inscription on flyleaf. First quire partly detached, two small tears in the foot margins of pp. 185-186 and 375-376, first leaf slightly soiled and some minor thumbing to the first and last few leaves, otherwise in very good condition.
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Tableau du royaume de Caboul, et de ses dépendances, dans la Perse, la Tartarie et l’Inde, offrant les moeurs, usages et costumes de cet empire, traduit et abrégé de l’anglais, par M. Breton.Paris, Nepveu, 1817. 3 volumes. 18mo. With 14 engraved plates depicting various costumes, lords on horseback, etc., all beautifully coloured by hand. Original publisher’s printed wrappers, each volume with wood engraved illustrations on front, back and spine. Preserved in a modern gold-tooled green morocco box.

ELPHINSTONE, Mountstuart. Chadenat 822; Colas 961; Lipperheide 1483. First edition of the French translation of one of the first exhaustive works on the kingdom of Kabul, now known as Afghanistan, and its dependencies in Persia, Tartary and India. First published in English in 1815, it was written by a British official, Mountstuart Elphinstone (1779-1859). Elphinstone was sent to the kingdom of Kabul by the rulers of British India in 1808, to discuss with the Shah the possibilities of a mutual defence against Napoleonic France. Elphinstone, as a consequence, was the first Englishman to visit Peshawar, the traditional winter residence of the rulers of Kabul, which was also the terminus of all trade routes from east to west. The meeting was concluded by a treaty of friendship (7 June 1809), the Shah promising to oppose the passage of foreign troops through his country. Before this could be ratified, however, the Shah was driven off the throne by his brother.The book opens with a short history of Afghanistan that ends with the coming of the English in 1809. It gives a good impression of Afghan society at the beginning of the 19th century, when Afghanistan was still virtually unknown in Western Europe.Some foxing in text, otherwise in good condition and wholly untrimmed. Wrappers have only some minor wear to the ends of the spines and some very slight soiling, but are still very good.
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Capital und Versal Buech, allerhanndt grosser und kleiner Alphabeth, zue den Hauptschrifften und Büechern, dessgleichen in Canntzleyen unnd gemein, zuegebrauchen ganntz zierlich geordiniert. Augsburg, Johann Jacob Schönig, [1680/94, printed from the woodblocks of 1568]. Oblong folio (21 x 34 cm). With a richly calligraphic woodcut title-page (18 x 28 cm), with text in white fraktur lettering on black, with a white panel at the foot with the letterpress imprint in a fraktur type; and 9 (of 10) full-page woodcuts (about 17 x 25.5 cm) showing alphabets in white on black, one dated 1568: 8 with decorated gothic capitals (versals: 22-150 mm) and 1 with textura capitals, textura lowercase and roman capitals, all versos blank. With a small and perhaps fragmentary manuscript on parchment (2 ll., 11.5 x 13.5 cm, written on both sides): a Protestant copybook written (soon?) after 1557, probably in Basle or vicinity, with 7 writing samples, including alphabets of capitals and minuscules, the firs

ROGEL, Hans the elder. Berlin Kat. 4799; Bonacini 1548 (Berlin copy); Doede 21 note; Hollstein, German, 34, KVK & WorldCat (4 copies: 2 lacking 1 leaf); Van Stockum, Cat. bibl. J.W. Six de Vromade, part 1 (16-21 November 1925), lot 407 (the present copy?); cf. Paul von Stetten, Kunstgewerbe und Handwerksgeschichte . Augsburg (1779), vol. 1, p. 23 (1655/68 ed.). Sixth known copy of Johann Jacob Schönig's edition of a stunningly decorative Augsburg writing master's woodcut copybook, devoted primarily to decorated gothic capitals (versals), printed in the period 1680-1694 from the original woodblocks of the first edition of 1568. Hans Rogel the elder (1532-1592), writing master, school teacher, poet, wood-block cutter, engraver, printer and publisher at Augsburg cut the woodblocks and probably executed the lettering himself. All the lettering examples and the title-page are printed from large, richly calligraphic woodcuts with their lettering in white on black. Nine of the ten examples display versals (the missing leaf supplied in reproduction), including complete alphabets in three sizes. The final leaf displays alphabets of textura capitals, textura minuscules and roman capitals. As early as 1779 Paul von Stetten described Rogel's Capital und Versal Buech as "besonders fein geschnitten" and said that if Rogel executed the lettering himself he "ist er billig den zierlichsten Schreibmeistern beyzuzählen". He thought it good enough to be the work of Caspar Brinner (1565-1610), the greatest Augsburg writing master of the second half of the century, apparently not knowing Brinner was only about three years old in 1568.All editions should apparently contain 11 leaves, but many contain only 10 and some fewer. Some have also been bound with additional leaves that do not belong to the edition. There appear to be only 3 complete copies of the present edition.An early owner skilfully wrote out alphabets in the fore-edge margins of 2 leaves and phrases at the foot of one. It seems likely to be the copy owned by Jan Willem Six van Vromade (1872-1936). Lacking leaf "2" as noted, professionally and unobtrusively restored in 1984 and probably rebound soon after: the tattered fore-edge margins of several leaves were restored and a couple gaps in the right border of the title-page filled in with black ink. A small brown smudge in the unnumbered first page of versals (22 mm) slightly affects small bits of 4 letters, but in general the woodcuts remain in good condition.
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The practice of perspective: or, an easy method of representing natural objects according to the rules of art. . The third edition.London, Thomas and John Bowles, 1749. 4to. With 2 folding engraved plates and 150 numbered full-page engravings on integral leaves. Half calf (ca. 1985), gold-tooled spine.

DUBREUIL, Jean]. BAL 925; ESTC T117737; Fowler, p. 92 note; cf. Berlin Kat. 4714 (1642 French ed.); Millard French 63-64 (1651 & 1679 French eds.). "Third" [recté fourth] edition of the second English translation (by the encyclopaedist Ephraim Chambers) of one of the most influential handbooks of perspective ever published: Le perspective practique (Paris, 1642) by the Jesuit mathematician Jean Dubreuil (1602-1670). "Probably the most influential [work on perspective] ever published expressly for the use of a lay audience" (Millard), it is clearly and thoroughly illustrated with 150 full-page engravings printed from the original plates of the 1672 English edition, which were copied in mirror image from the original 1642 edition, plus 2 folding plates illustrating Hodgson's essay. It was especially important in England, where Robert Pricke published a translation already in 1672 and Chambers published the present improved translation in 1726. The title-page describes it as "highly necessary for painters, engravers, architects, embroiderers, statuaries, jewellers, tapestry-workers, and others concerned in designing." The 1739 edition introduced the present 16-page essay on the theory of perspective by James Hodgson, a fellow of the Royal Society and one of England's leading mathematicians, as well as the two folding plates that accompany it. With 19th-century owners' inscriptions at the head of the title-page: "J.G. Poole Southampton 1841" (struck through) and ". Bartlett Worthing" (initial unclear). Very slightly browned, with a transparent stain in the upper right corner of the title-page, an occasional very small marginal stain, and a black spot in the text of 1 page, but still in good condition. The sewing of the first quire is somewhat loose, but the binding is otherwise very good.