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The Journals of Alfred Doten, 1849-1903

Doten, Alfred First edition. Edited by Walter Van Tilburg Clark. Preface by Robert Morse Clark. 3 volumes. 2,381pp. Illustrated with nearly 80 photographs, facsimiles, portraits, maps, etc. Extensive index. Original gray-green cloth, gilt. Previous owner's signature on front endpaper (hard to see over printed paper) else, a very fine set with slipcase (printed paper label on slipcase). Doten is considered Nevada's premier diarist. No less than 55 of his years are recorded in 79 leather bound journals. The author sailed around the Horn at the age of 19 from Plymouth, Massachusetts in March of 1849. His life ended in Carson City in 1903. Starting as a carpenter, Doten became a rancher and miner in California's Sierra. He mined for gold in and around Rich Gulch, Lower Bar, and Spanish Gulch in the region of the Calaveras and Mokelumne rivers and provides "amazingly detailed descriptions of life in the Mother Lode" (Kurutz). In 1865 he began a 39 year journalistic career, first for Virginia City's Daily Union, and then after 1867 at the Gold Hill Daily News where he became editor-owner in 1872. The News became Nevada's leading political and mining journal. Along the way, Doten was also a horse breaker, a surgeon's assistant, a musical entertainer, a politician, mining expert, lime-burner, hunter, fisherman, insurance salesman and vigilante. Of unusual historic interest is Doten's coverage of the Comstock after 1878. "A monumental tribute to a pioneer-adventurer who experienced everything from lynching and murders to confrontations with Indians" (Paher). [Kurutz: 201; Paher: 491].
The Bloody Assizes: Or

The Bloody Assizes: Or, A Compleat History of the Life of George Lord Jefferies, from His Birth to this Present Time. Wherein, Among other things, is given a true Account of his unheard of Cruelties, and Barbarous Proceedings, in his whole Western Circuit

First edition. Very scarce. Octavo. 19x15 cm. Pp. 70, [1, advert.]. Collated complete. Early 20th century full calf, black leather spine label, marbled endpapers. Later engraved bookplate. Contemporary owner's name at head of title page. Later owner's embossed stamp to blank flyleaf. Title page toned, minor rubbing to spine ends and corners, slight wear to front joint at head of spine, label a bit chipped. A fine copy. Attributed to James Bent (most likely a pseudonym of John Dunton). Titus Oates was also considered a contributor to this work. Pp. 5-8 contain A Poem to the Memory of George Lord Jefferies by John Carter. George Jeffreys, 1st Baron Jeffreys of Wem (1645-1689) was known as the "Hanging Judge." He became notable during the reign of King James II, rising to the position of Lord Chancellor after the Monmouth Rebellion. His conduct as a judge was to enforce royal policy, resulting in an historical reputation for severity and bias. Earlier, during the "Popish Plot," he was frequently on the bench which condemned numerous innocent men on the perjured evidence of Titus Oates. These condemnations were remembered against him in 1685 when he secured the conviction of Oates for his perjury at the same trials. This trial was Jeffreys' first major trial under the reign of James II. Jeffreys' historical notoriety comes from his actions in 1685, after Monmouth's Rebellion. Jeffreys was sent to the West Country in the autumn of 1685 to conduct the trials of captured rebels. Hundreds were executed. Jeffreys remained a Protestant, despite his loyalty to James II, the last Roman Catholic to reign over the British kingdom. During the Glorious Revolution (1688) when James II fled the country, under siege by his son-in-law William of Orange, Jeffreys stayed in London until the last moment, the only legal authority in James' abandoned kingdom to perform political duties. Jeffreys was eventually captured by William's troops and was dragged to prison "for his own safety" as he was terrified of the public who intended "to show him that same mercy he had ever shown to others." He died of kidney disease while in custody in the Tower of London on April 18, 1689, the year this book was published. Full title: The Bloody Assizes: Or, A Compleat History of the Life of George Lord Jefferies, from His Birth to this Present Time. Wherein, Among other things, is given a true Account of his unheard of Cruelties, and Barbarous Proceedings, in his whole Western Circuit. Comprehending The whole Proceedings; Arraignment, Tryals, and Condemnation of all those who Suffer'd in the West of England, in the Year 1685. To Which is added. the Dying Speeches and Prayers of many other Eminent Protestants.
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The Interest Of these United Provinces. Being a Defence of the Zeelanders Choice. Wherein is shewne, I. That we ought unanimously to defend our selves. II. That if we cannot, it is better to be under England than France, in regard of Religion, Liberty.

Hill, Joseph (1625-1707) First edition of the English translation, preceded by a Dutch edition printed at Amsterdam the same year. Octavo. 20.5x15 cm. Pp. [ff. 60]. A few woodcut initials, printer's woodcut device on title. Later plain gray wrappers. Circular stain to front wrapper. Leaves lightly toned, lower corner of first 15 leaves curled. A very good copy. The Third Anglo-Dutch War was a military conflict between England and the Dutch Republic, that lasted between April 1672 and early 1674. It was part of the larger Franco-Dutch War. Finally, the Parliament of England, fearful that the alliance wth France was part of a plot to make England Roman Catholic, forced the king to abandon the costly and fruitless war. Hill was at the time pastor of the Scottish church at Middleburg, Zeeland, and was paid a stipend by the Provincial States. On publication of the present work, in which he advocates the English alliance, and vindicates Charles II from suspicion of popery, he was ordered to leave Zeeland, with permission to return at the close of the war. Charles rewarded him for his pamphlet with a sinecure of eighty pounds a year and the offer of a bishopric, which Hill declined. He returned to Holland in 1678 and became minister of the English Presbyterian church at Haringvliet, Rotterdam. [Wing: H-2000]. Full title: The Interest Of these United Provinces. Being a Defence of the Zeelanders Choice. Wherein is shewne, I. That we ought unanimously to defend our selves. II. That if we cannot, it is better to be under England than France, in regard of Religion, Liberty, Estates, and Trade. III. That we are not yet come to that extremity, but we may remaine a Republick. And that our Compliance with England is the onely meanes for this. Together with Severall Remarkes upon the present, and Conjectujres on the future state of Affaires in Europe, especially as relating to this Republick.